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I'll install the higher speed processor, test it in machine #1 and then attempt to install Mojave on a clean hard drive in the second machine with hopes that the latest Mojave installer will flash the firmware and replacement processor tray with the 144.0.0.0 firmware.
Just so you know, you don't actually [have to] install Mojave to run the firmware updater, so you don't need a blank drive. The firmware updater runs before any of the OS software is installed.
 


Just so you know, you don't actually [have to] install Mojave to run the firmware updater, so you don't need a blank drive. The firmware updater runs before any of the OS software is installed.
Thanks for the reminder, Jeff. I still have machine #1 on High Sierra. The other machine is also on macOS 10.13, but if the higher-speed processors work, I'd likely make that my Mojave machine, assuming I can flash the firmware to the final 1444.x.x.x version and the tray also supports my 1333MHz memory, which for some reason doesn't bump up in speed on the other tray.
 


Has anyone with a Mac Pro 4,1 flashed to 5,1 running Mojave been able to restore the startup chime that Apple took away a while back?

I've tried both the terminal strings I've found on the 'net, but neither has restored my startup chime.

sudo nvram BootAudio=%01
sudo nvram StartupMute=%00

My Mac: dual six-core 3.33Ghz processors (X5860), 26 GB 1066MHz RAM, running the latest version of Mojave.
 


I looked up the processor string via Terminal, and it reported back as X5560 - a processor that supports 1333MHz speed, according to the online spec sheet. That's making me believe that the CPU tray must get flashed along with the main backplane board when a firmware update is applied.
This doesn't sound right to me. As far as I know, there's nothing on the tray to flash - the only thing on the tray is the tray's part of the SMC, and if there was any easy way to flash those, then we could all learn to mix and match 4,1 and 5,1 trays and boxes without the fans going nuts.

On the other hand, X5560's are still Nehalems, not Westmeres. It could be that the firmware runs Nehalem CPUs at 1066MHz independent of whether they're capable of 1333 or not - someone else who has a set might know for sure. I'd get a pair of X56xx's if I were you, though - the X55xx's have other limitations, as well, with current OS's..
 


... I'm still stumped by the dual X5560's not running at 1333MHz memory speed though. No amount of PRAM resets, main board resets via the push button and battery removal cured it like the previous CPU tray.
MacRumors has a list of processsors and specs that work in the Mac Pros:
The x5560's are listed as Nehalem and are 1333MHz compatible. From the page:
For the 4,1 to use Westmere CPUs and run RAM at 1333, it will need the firmware upgrade to 5,1...
Any chance one of your memory DIMMs is only 1066MHz? Are they in the correct slots?
 


As mentioned above, it certainly appears that the tray itself is independent of needing to be flashed. I received my second tray yesterday and, while I'm still struggling with trying to get both CPU error LEDs to extinguish, the memory I have did jump to the 1333MHz bus speed when I installed the 3.33GHz processors. I'm still somewhat stymied why the 2.92GHz processors, which Intel's own specs state should also run at 1333 MHz, don't

I was able to find Apple documentation about how to tighten up the heat sinks, and it appears they can be quite fussy. In finessing the heat sinks, I was able to get both error lights out until it started to read the boot drive, and then CPU A's LED would pulse to the thrashing of the drive. I think this was the point last time when I got frustrated and accidentally tanked the socket on the previous board.
 


I have been using a late 2012 Mac Pro under macOS 10.14 and tried to install the latest Security Update 2020-002 today. The updater ran, the Mac Pro rebooted, and up comes the dreaded circle/slash and no hard disk. Luckily I had a fast backup and ran Carbon Copy Cloner to restore, and all was well after 11 minutes.

Has anyone else run into a problem with this update?

Thanks for your help.
I have found that if I have more than one bootable drive in my flashed 4,1 Mac Pro, then I get the circle/slash after applying a Mojave update. The solution is to remove all of the drives from the Mac Pro, other than the drive being updated, before running the Mojave update.
 


I have found that if I have more than one bootable drive in my flashed 4,1 Mac Pro, then I get the circle/slash after applying a Mojave update. The solution is to remove all of the drives from the Mac Pro, other than the drive being updated, before running the Mojave update.
Can you just "unmount" the disks with Disk Utility instead of removing them? I've found that 1Password doesn't like multiple disks with 1Password when updating, but just unmounting them makes it happy.
 


I have been using a late 2012 Mac Pro under macOS 10.14 and tried to install the latest Security Update 2020-002 today. The updater ran, the Mac Pro rebooted, and up comes the dreaded circle/slash and no hard disk. Luckily I had a fast backup and ran Carbon Copy Cloner to restore, and all was well after 11 minutes.
Has anyone else run into a problem with this update?
Thanks for your help.
I've had that problem twice with my 2009 Mac Pro flashed to 5,1 I'm running High Sierra 10.13.6 with the 144.0.0.0.0 boot ROM version. SMC version is 1.39f5.

Sometime last year I applied a Security Update and probably got the same thing. I say probably because I have an AMD Radeon R9 280X video card, so I don't see the boot screen. I just get a black screen until macOS boots far enough for the video drivers to kick in.

A week ago I tried the latest Security Update - forgetting my earlier problems - and went through the whole thing again. Fortunately, I have a backup clone of my boot drive refreshed every 4 hours by Carbon Copy Cloner, so a little fiddling and I (blindly) got the backup drive set as startup and got back to almost normal. I've got an Apple EFI video card ordered from MacVideoCards, so I shouldn't have to do the blind search if I forget again.
 


At what internal temperature range should I be keeping my Mac Pro 2009?

I use Macs Fan Control to control fan speeds and aim for keeping the Northbridge Diode at 60° C. Looking to see if I can lower the fan speeds to reduce fan noise.

I have a 2009 Mac Pro, 4,1 firmware updated to 5,1, with 26 GB of RAM. I've replaced the processors with two 3.33GHz 6-Core Intel Xeons, have all four drive bays filled with 4- and 8-GB drives, boot off of an SSD on a card in one of the four PCI slots, have a Radeon RX 580 8GB driving three large monitors in slot 1 and a USB3 card in the third slot.

I know that "lower temperature is better" but would like to learn more about what range of temps is considered "normal" for this Mac.
 


At what internal temperature range should I be keeping my Mac Pro 2009? I use Macs Fan Control to control fan speeds and aim for keeping the Northbridge Diode at 60° C. Looking to see if I can lower the fan speeds to reduce fan noise.
Looking at a stock Mac Pro Mid 2010 2.8GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon that's been running for about 1:13 (one hour plus 13 minutes), and CPU currently active due to Time Machine backup, I see the Northbridge Die at 64.4°C, which is an increase over the temperatures prior to the backup. I tend to see low to mid 60s when warmed up.

Web search found Intel Mac Temperature Database but I can't vouch for it.
 


At what internal temperature range should I be keeping my Mac Pro 2009?
I use Macs Fan Control to control fan speeds and aim for keeping the Northbridge Diode at 60° C. Looking to see if I can lower the fan speeds to reduce fan noise.
I have a 2009 Mac Pro, 4,1 firmware updated to 5,1, with 26 GB of RAM. I've replaced the processors with two 3.33GHz 6-Core Intel Xeons, have all four drive bays filled with 4- and 8-GB drives, boot off of an SSD on a card in one of the four PCI slots, have a Radeon RX 580 8GB driving three large monitors in slot 1 and a USB3 card in the third slot.
I know that "lower temperature is better" but would like to learn more about what range of temps is considered "normal" for this Mac.
Both of my Mac Pros have 3.46GHz six-core Xeons. Both have hot Northbridge chips. I've re-applied heat sink compound to both. Right now my dual-CPU's Northbridge is running at 165F/74C. The CPUs are mostly idle - one is at 118F/48C, the other at 104F/40C. My three SSDS are all at 88F/31C. Power consumption is 150-160W.

When I ran distributed computing on them, everything ran much hotter. The dual-CPU consumed about 430W. While many chips ran significantly hotter, the Northbridges were only slightly hotter. This led me to suspect the Northbridge's temperature is more of a function of CPU clock speed than load.

I used Macs Fan Control to blow more air through the CPU and drive/PCI areas. I don't recall the actual temperatures I aimed for - my goal was to minimize fan noise while keeping things cool.
 


Looking at a stock Mac Pro Mid 2010 2.8GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon that's been running for about 1:13 (one hour plus 13 minutes), and CPU currently active due to Time Machine backup, I see the Northbridge Die at 64.4°C, which is an increase over the temperatures prior to the backup. I tend to see low to mid 60s when warmed up.
Thanks for the reply.

I just tested my Mac Pro's temperature with Macs Fan Control off for 20 minutes: Northbridge die = 76.5°C, with three large monitors on but nothing happening on the computer other than checking every five minutes for mail.

This is why I'm using Macs Fan Control to lower temps. But if mid 60's is a "fine" temp, I could give that a try. More data points would be good though ...
 


I run a Mac Pro 4,1 -> 5,1 with an upgraded 6-core Xeon. When idle, the CPU is at 43°C and Northbridge at 65°C. When the CPU is running at 100%, its temperature rises and the fans start cranking but the Northbridge temperature falls to about 32°C. The latter is presumably a side-effect of the Boost A fan increasing the airflow over both of them.

I'm not using Macs Fan Control, so this is the behavior of the standard temperature control firmware. I would assume that if a Northbridge temperature in the mid 60's were a problem then the Boost A fan would speed up to keep both CPU and Northbridge within limits.
 


I've got a 2009 cheesegrater uprated to 5,1 firmware with twin Xeon x5690 3.4GHz 6-core Westmeres, Radeon RX 580 8GB video and 64GB RAM. Temps are generally around 46'ish ˚C with the Northbridge diode ~59° and heatsink ˜46° — this whilst running SETI @Home (8 instances of Asteriods@home approx 16 hours a day).

I use Macs Fan Control set at Auto (based on ambient) — fans run around 2556 RPM for Boost A and B with hardly any noise. My small desk fan for cooling internet modem and firewall makes considerably more noise than any of the Mac fans.
 


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