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2019 Mac Pro and alternatives

Re. Mac Pro:
Apple said:
Mac Pro 2019: Nothing extraneous, everything intentional. … a high-performance system based on absolute flexibility and uncompromising utility…
Onboard spinning hard disks or more than 4TB onboard storage are definitely extraneous, inflexible and useless. Thanks, Apple.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Onboard spinning hard disks or more than 4TB onboard storage are definitely extraneous, inflexible and useless.
Ding! I just now see how they got eight PCIe slots and a 1.4-kilowatt power supply into a space the size of the original Mac Pro. What is the 2019 Mac Pro storage setup, anyway? More flash RAM soldered to the motherboard? What's the chance of being able to boot from a PCIe card with M.2 SSDs on it?
 


Ding! I just now see how they got eight PCIe slots and a 1.4-kilowatt power supply into a space the size of the original Mac Pro. What is the 2019 Mac Pro storage setup, anyway? More flash RAM soldered to the motherboard? What's the chance of being able to boot from a PCIe card with M.2 SSDs on it?
Check the Mac Pro Tech Specs page at Apple. The simple answer is 'you can only get 4 terabytes of flash into the box. :-) That's quite a lot. Maybe you can use some PCIe slots. Beyond that, I'd want some RAID arrays, whose capacity should be very much larger. But I'm not a pro. I can imagine a Thunderbolt 3-connected RAID box clicked onto the top deck, though, as an aftermarket (OWC?) add on.
 


I saw the news: A new Mac Pro! Woohooh... woo... hoo... $6000 for a base model without a GPU?

Did we just transport back to the 80's when a Mac IIfx was $6000, and LaserWriter II was $5000?

Am I the only one whose jaw dropped at the price? First it was the iMac Pro (no one I know wants one). And now this... this... I can't like it. It looks like a 50's HiFi with those Ikea feet!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Check the Mac Pro Tech Specs page at Apple.
I did more research after my original post and found more about 2019 Mac Pro storage. It looks like there are two T2-based SSD "modules" on the opposite side of the motherboard from the PCIe slots. The base model apparently holds a single, 256GB module, while 1, 2 and 4-TB modules are optional (and undoubtably overpriced). Performance wasn't particularly impressive - similar to current T2-based Macs. Two critical questions:
  • Can you boot off SSDs on standard PCIe cards in this computer?
  • Will third-party storage modules be available (this seems unlikely with the T2)?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I saw the news: A new Mac Pro! Woohooh... woo... hoo... $6000 for a base model w/o a GPU? Did we just transport back to the 80's when a Mac IIfx was $6000, and LaserWriter II was $5000? Am I the only one whose jaw dropped at the price?
The BLS Inflation Calculator says that the 1984 Mac 128K price is equivalent to $6270 in today's dollars. The Mac IIfx's base price equivalent today is $17,990.

Yes, the 2019 Mac Pro is expensive, but I don't think it's out of line (although Apple upgrades and add-ons likely will be).

Of course, the price is a barrier for any of us on a tight budget with no business justification for the computer, but I like what I see with this 2019 Mac Pro and its design - it's much nicer than I expected it to be, and I never expected Apple to return so completely to the traditional Mac Pro concept.

Apart from budget, the one thing that would hold me back from purchasing is concern about engineering or manufacturing problems in early production runs of a new product, something we've seen all too often with Macs and other products (e.g. automobiles). When you're spending this much money on a computer, you probably don't want to be a beta tester (like Apple butterfly keyboard buyers...).
 


I saw the news: A new Mac Pro! Woohooh... woo... hoo... $6000 for a base model w/o a GPU? Did we just transport back to the 80's when a Mac IIfx was $6000, and LaserWriter II was $5000? Am I the only one whose jaw dropped at the price? First it was the iMac Pro (no one I know wants one). And now this... this... I can't like it. It looks like a 50's HiFi with those Ikea feet!
One of the big problems with building a highly-expandable machine is that the base model is going to be unreasonably expensive, since it includes the infrastructure for the high-end machines - in materials and in power supply. It doesn't look any worse than the classic old cheese grater to me, and looks extremely accessible and expandable - just like the pros said they needed.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
At the bottom of the specs page, under Accessories,
  • Promise Pegasus R4i 32TB RAID MPX Module Kit
  • Promise Pegasus J2i
Well, that's certainly interesting (although I was actually talking about replacements for Apple's SSD modules, not PCIe cards). Here's more from Apple's favored partner:
Promise Technology Inc. said:
Promise Pegasus Storage
Custom-Designed for New Mac Pro
The power of Promise Pegasus Storage, now inside eNews20190318 Pro
Co-designed by Promise & Apple
 


Yes, the 2019 Mac Pro is expensive, but I don't think it's out of line (although Apple upgrades and add-ons likely will be).
I agree, especially in the context of the inflation adjustments, though I had been guessing the starting price would've been $4,999, rather than $5,999.

At first glance, the new Mac Pro is a much more reasonable design than what I was expecting. In other words, it feels like an evolution of the traditional 2006-2012 Mac Pro line, rather than a new excursion into the trashcan world of pretentious, impractical design-for-the-sake-of-designers.

I did chuckle when I saw that the new Mac Pro includes a couple of type A USB ports. I can only imagine the wailing and gnashing of teeth from the folks at Apple who prefer machines with only a single USB C port.

I also laughed out loud when I saw the $1,000 price tag on the "Pro Stand" for the Pro Display.
#agrandforastand
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Am I the only one whose jaw dropped at the price?
How about a well outfitted model?
The Verge said:
Apple’s top spec Mac Pro will likely cost at least $35,000
Apple announced today that its new Mac Pro starts at an already pricey $6,000, but the company neglected to mention how much the top-of-the-line model will cost. So we shopped around for equivalent parts to the top-end spec that Apple’s promising. As it turns out: $33,720.88 is likely the bare minimum — and that’s before factoring in the four GPUs, which could easily jack that price up to around $45,000.

For all that dough, big-budget video editors and other creative types get a lot of firepower: a 28-core Intel Xeon W processor, an almost-impossible-to-comprehend 1.5TB of RAM, 4TB of SSD storage, and four AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo GPUs — assuming you can afford one.

Add in a Pro Display XDR monitor (and a Pro Stand to go with it), and you’re looking at a workstation that could clear $50,000. Keep in mind too that these estimates are based on market prices for these (or similar) parts: Apple historically has charged far more for its pre-built configurations than for a computer you’d build on your own.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Onboard spinning hard disks or more than 4TB onboard storage are definitely extraneous, inflexible and useless. Thanks, Apple.
At the bottom of the specs page, under Accessories...
Here's more from Apple's favored partner:
Scroll down Apple's Mac Pro page to see the internals with the cover lifted, and there is a space at the top that appears to have room for something like a hard drive module - there seem to be two SATA ports and what looks like a power connector. Something could attach to the frame above... maybe that Pegasus J2i?
 


How about a well outfitted model?
FWIW, the idea of a $35k+ Unix technical workstation is not that far-fetched. In the 90s and well into the 2000s, it was very common for drug companies, energy companies, auto manufacturers, government agencies, and even local tv stations to drop $25k-100k on desktop Unix workstations from Sun, Silicon Graphics, and others for everything from R&D analyses and simulations to generating the fancy graphics on tv weather reports. In many cases, the software was even more expensive than the hardware.
 



I was actually pleasantly surprised by the 2019 Mac Pro. It seems Apple really has reverted to the original scheme: a big-enough, powerful-enough box to house as many drives and memory cards and slots and ports as a pro could imagine needing, while leaving those specific choices pretty much up to the buyer. From what I've read, that's the recipe the pros have been clamoring for - without the chichi trappings of exterior design Apple wrongly thought would attract the pros. This strikes me as a workhorse machine, not a "statement" to be made on a desktop.

Even the price surprised me. I was expecting a $10K base price. At $6K, this machine seems capable enough for "lower-end pros," lone entrepreneurs, etc., while capable of being decked out to a much higher price point with third-party facilities Apple doesn't necessarily have to produce (some pros seem to prefer choosing their own brands for those extras).
Personally, I'd love to have one, because the flexibility seems dreamy... but my solo work doesn't justify the price. At least not right now. Maybe if I win a lottery...
 


Granted, I'm not even sure the Earth will continue to rotate after Catalina comes out, but, the new Mac Pro looks like an extreme swing in the opposite direction of the "Trash Can", with the exception of internal storage. Once again, Apple has skillfully avoided the less profitable middle ground and gone for broke. I'm still hoping for that Mini+ sized desktop.
 



[A] critical question: Can you boot off SSDs on standard PCIe cards in this computer?
My guess is this will work with the same constraints as booting from an "external" drive has on current T2 machines. But I'm also not too sure how important it is for the users this machine is aimed at.

I think most use cases for a machine like this require some nominal amount of storage to hold the OS and related software, and then a great big place to put 'data' - video or scientific computation data or whatever. Depending on the use case and environment, that great big place could either be local, using something like the Promise arrays, or on a networked storage system or some sort. Either approach is nicely accommodated by this machine. I think they've anticipated both without bias towards one or the other, which I like.

In fact, I think this is the explanation for why the base internal SSD is so small. If it's just my system drive, and all my data is elsewhere, I only need 256 GB, so why pay (Apple prices) for more? I think a surprising number of these things will be sold and used with the base SSD, counterintuitive as it may be for a high-end machine.
 



I did more research after my original post and found more about 2019 Mac Pro storage. It looks like there are two T2-based SSD "modules" on the opposite side of the motherboard from the PCIe slots. The base model apparently holds a single, 256GB module, while 1, 2 and 4-TB modules are optional (and undoubtably overpriced). Performance wasn't particularly impressive - similar to current T2-based Macs. Two critical questions:
  • Can you boot off SSDs on standard PCIe cards in this computer?
  • Will third-party storage modules be available (this seems unlikely with the T2)?
Well, that's the question, isn't it? Ignoring the m.2 standard for PCIe flash used by, well, everyone else, Apple is sticking with their electrically-compatible but physically different connector, as used in late model MacBooks, the 2013 Mac Pro, and the iMac Pro. Several companies make m.2 <-> Apple adapters (I use one to support a Samsung 970 EVO in my 2013 Mac Pro), but I don't know if this will fly with the T2 chip.

Despite the surfeit of PCIe slots, Apple's only demonstrated their own proprietary video and coprocessor cards. With no PCIe power cables evident, it's not clear at all if you could even use a standard Radeon video card in this computer. Perhaps some enterprising third party will make a Mac Pro power slot -> PCIe power cable adapter card...

And need I mention how conspicuous Nvidia support was by its absence? All you folks doing work that depends on CUDA, Apple doesn't care about you.

Still, I could be surprised: maybe the Pro machine will allow you to bypass T2, use m.2 drives with adapters, use standard video cards, and support Nvidia.

I'm not holding my breath, though.
 



My take on the Mac Pro is that it turned out far more functional than it could have. Yes, built-in, on-board storage is somewhat limited; there is only room for one CPU; and some aspects of a complete workstation package (a grand for a stand?) are somewhat baffling. No support for optical drives, etc. is to be expected - this is a "courageous" system, after all.

But, at first glance, there are lots of PCIe slots available... finally allowing a modern Mac Pro to take advantage of the large field of PCIe-based offerings, a huge step up from the trash can. The eight PCIe slots certainly give a lot of room to grow, particularly since four of them are double-wide (though MPX module use will cut into that free PCIe slot count quickly).

Also consider that the topmost PCI slot is only x4 and is filled by default with a Thunderbolt / USB Type-A I/O card. So, if you want to use both MPX modules, that leaves you with one x16 and two x8 PCIe slots to use for expansion - likely enough for most users... though one of those remaining three slots may get eaten by the Afterburner ProRes card, as well, leaving you with two x8 slots.

Folks who need multiple industrial-strength GPUs and storage will thus continue to go with external solutions. Otherwise, consider getting a bifurcated NVME PCIe adapter card that will allow multiple NVME storage modules to run at PCIe 3 x4 in parallel. Happily, also a significant amount of thought seems to have gone into air flow management, which is a huge step up from many desktop systems.

I'm not a huge fan of single-CPU systems, as high-core count systems typically feature slower core clocks and extreme value-pricing by Intel. On the other hand, as Mac Pro Cheesegraters have shown, being able to upgrade a CPU years later, once a reseller market for used CPUs has opened up, is a really cost-effective way to keep a system competitive.

As elegant as the MPX approach is to solving common cooling problems, I worry that the MPX system approach may lead us all down the same rabbit hole as the trash can GPUs: a limited selection of compatible cards and a huge Apple tax. Between the non-standard PCIe connector arrangement, etc., Apple is asking graphics card OEMs to spend a lot of time and treasure to support a likely limited set of customers. That might get very expensive for the end consumer.

Given how effectively Apple management has given the pro community the middle finger for the better part of six years, the main question in my mind is how many users will be left to buy these systems. Those who currently chug along with a Cheesegrater might be tempted to finally upgrade - both because of faster hardware as well as system software limitations imposed by Apple. Trash Can users, on the other hand, may not - past purchasing behavior suggests that they may be better served with an iMac Pro.

It will be interesting to see how well this rig sells. It is a tremendous improvement over the trash can, but it might also be too late to save the Pro Mac market.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Despite the surfeit of PCIe slots, Apple's only demonstrated their own proprietary video and coprocessor cards. With no PCIe power cables evident, it's not clear at all if you could even use a standard Radeon video card in this computer.
FWIW:
Apple said:
Mac Pro - Technical Specifications
Alternatively, each MPX bay can support:
One full-length, double-wide x16 gen 3 slot and one full-length, double-wide x8 gen 3 slot (MPX bay 1)
Or two full-length, double-wide x16 gen 3 slots (MPX bay 2)
Up to 300W auxiliary power via two 8-pin connectors
 


The new Mac Pro is truly "pro", and a bargain compared to current prices on workstations today. Fully tricked-out, it will come out north of $50,000 (CPU: $20,000; 1.5 TB RAM: $15,000; machine and monitor $11,000; graphic cards: (probably) $4000; plus your Thunderbolt 3 RAID drives).

On price lists available before WWDC, I'd bet the same capabilites for a workstation would be in the $100,000 range (although I'm guessing).

These will likely be corporate purchases, not individual... unless you have money to burn.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Has anyone spec'd a Windows PC to compare directly with the 2019 Mac Pro? (I started to do this last night, but I found Dell's website to be a massive headache, in stark contrast to Apple's far superior website, and temporarily abandoned the exercise.)
 



Looking at the specs on Apple Mac Pro webpage, the high-end Xeon requires faster RAM so, assuming the faster RAM is compatible with the low-end Xeon, one would be well-advised to custom-order the faster RAM during the initial purchase, should upgrading the CPU be on one's radar down the road.
 


Has anyone spec'd a Windows PC to compare directly with the 2019 Mac Pro? (I started to do this last night, but I found Dell's website to be a massive headache, in stark contrast to Apple's far superior website, and temporarily abandoned the exercise.)
The HP Z8 Workstation site may provide an easier comparison than Dell's. I think Kafka must be Dell's website designer.

The configurable model begins at $3395 with one Xeon 6-core Bronze 3104 Processor, 8 GB RAM, a 500GB hard disk drive, and AMD FirePro™ W2100 Graphics. The most expensive Xeon is the 28 Core Platinum 8280, $19,851, dual processors available, though the second costs more than the first, I presume due to "credit", when upgrading the "first" replaces "stock."

1450 Watt / 20-Amp Chassis, $30​
1.5 TB 2933 ECC RAM, $45,380. (Available only in the two-processor model.)​
480 GB Intel Optane PCIe SSD for OS $1,379​
2 TB HP Turbo M.2 $1,379​
2 x 2 TB SATA SSD $1,727x2​
2 x Nvidia Quadro GP100 with 16GB HBM2, 2x$7,659​

Total at this point, $46,280.80 - and I got tired of clicking options, more available than I chose.
 


Considering the price of the stand for the new display I'm guessing these will be high-spec Pro wheels and cost something in the neighborhood of $500.
In keeping with the theme of automotive design and tail fins, the new Mac Pro will ship with Generation 3 PCIe and will likely ship after other manufacturers have begun selling computers with PCIe Generation 4:
Tom's Hardware said:
What We Know About PCIe 4.0 So Far
The PCIe 4.0 standard supports a 16 GT/s bit rate, (roughly 2GB/s per single lane, or 64GB/s in total) as opposed to 8GT/s bit rate for PCIe 3.0 (1GB/s).
 


At the bottom of the specs page, under Accessories,
  • Promise Pegasus R4i 32TB RAID MPX Module Kit
  • Promise Pegasus J2i
I find it a bit odd that the Pegasus R4i is limited to four 8TB hard disk drive when 14TB enterprise hard disk drive are readily available. Is this a space limitation inside the new Mac Pro case, due to the increased thickness of the larger drives? (Many, many, small details to work out on what is possible with this new hardware.)
 


...the main question in my mind is how many users will be left to buy these systems. Those who currently chug along with a Cheesegrater might be tempted to finally upgrade - both because of faster hardware as well as system software limitations imposed by Apple...
I've been holding off on any hardware purchases to see if the new Mac Pro would be useful. Well, it certainly is useful, but at that price, I won't be buying it.

I bought my Mac Pro 5,1 Quad-Core for $2328 ($2633 in 2019 dollars). And, in 2006, I paid $2091 for a dual-core PowerPC G5 (the original cheesegrater; $2535 in 2019 dollars). This new Mac Pro isn't just priced a bit higher; it's 2.3–2.4x higher.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The HP Z8 Workstation site may provide an easier comparison than Dell's....
Thanks, that was actually going to be my next stop. I was looking for something to compare with the entry-level, $6000 Mac Pro, not high-end versions, so 8-core Xeon, 32GB ECC memory, Radeon Pro 580X, and 256GB SSD. Here's my shot at a 2019 Mac Pro equivalent, and... hey, the price is almost identical!

Windows 10 Pro 64​
Intel Xeon Silver 4215 Processor (2.5 GHz, up to 3.5 GHz w/Boost; 11 MB cache, 2400MHz, 8 core, 85W)​
HP Z8 G4 90 1125W Chassis 100V/15A​
32 GB (2x16 GB) DDR4-2933 ECC Registered Memory​
256 GB HP Z Turbo Drive M.2 SSD​
500 GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.5" hard disk drive​
AMD Radeon™ Pro WX 7100 (8 GB GDDR5, 4x DisplayPort)​
4 x USB 3.0 Type A​
9.5mm DVD-Writer​
USB Business Slim Wired Keyboard​
HP Wired Optical USB Mouse​
HP Dual-port Thunderbolt™ 3 PCIe Add-in Card​
3/3/3 year (material/labor/onsite) Warranty​

Mac Pro benefits:
runs macOS​
various design features (e.g. MPX modules, 1.4-kilowatt power supply, cooling)​
HP benefits:
optical drive​
hard drive​
M.2​
3-year warranty​

The HP Z6 Workstation is similarly configurable and may be a more appealing (lower cost) option, although it also uses the expensive Intel Xeon SP processors, which allows the addition of a second CPU (unlike the 2019 Mac Pro).
 






I haven't seen the keynote yet, but I decided to price an equivalent PC workstation and it seems that Apple's Mac Pro pricing is not overly expensive. I decided to try and create a matching configuration of Dell's Precision 7920 tower workstation. This is available with a blinding array of options, and not all match Apple's features, but I think I was able to pick configurations that come close.

For the base (Apple) model, the nearest equivalent Dell workstation came to $7,513.44 ($10,705, less a $3,191.56 discount). My configuration includes:
  • CPU: Intel Xeon Gold 6144. 3.5GHz. 4.2GHz Turbo. 8 core, 24.75MB cache. Close, I think. Apple doesn't say which chip, but the base model has 8 cores, 24.5M cache and a Turbo speed of 4.0 GHz.
  • Video: AMD Radeon Pro WX 9100. 16GB. 6 mini DisplayPort. There were only two AMD cards, neither of which matched Apple's, but this one offers 6 ports, which is what the base video card on Apple's configuration offers (4 internal via Thunderbolt, 2 on the card). But it has 16GB of RAM instead of the 8GB on Apple's base card.
  • 32GB ECC memory configured as 4 DIMMs of 8GB each - matching Apple's base config
  • 256 GB M.2 PCIe NVMe class 40 SSD (and corresponding controller card)
  • Dual-port 10G Ethernet (copper) NIC
  • Wi-Fi (802.11ac) and Bluetooth
  • Thunderbolt 3 card (2 port, supports one DisplayPort from the GPU)
  • Wireless keyboard and mouse
  • OS: Windows 10 Pro for Workstations (>4 cores). I could have saved $263.20 by ordering it with Ubuntu Linux instead
  • No additional software, no optical drive
  • Expansion room for up to 10 storage devices (hard drives or SSDs) (!)
I couldn't configure a model equivalent to a maxed-out Mac Pro. I could come close or exceed it in some specs, but not in others. My nearest equivalent came to $51,985.59 ($74,068.00, less a $22,082.41 discount), but it doesn't offer as much as the Apple offering:
  • CPU: Dual Xeon Gold 6146. Each at 3.2 GHz. 4.2 GHz Turbo. 12 core, 24.75M cache. Apple is offering a single 28 core CPU with turbo speed at 4.4 GHz and 66.5MB cache. I can't get that CPU from Dell. I went with dual 12-core instead of a single 28 core CPU because the single-socket motherboard has fewer PCIe slots, which I need for the rest of the configuration. Note, however, that this is far from the maximum CPU configuration for this workstation - that would be a dual Xeon Platinum 8280L (28 core each, 2.7 GHz, 4.0 GHz Turbo, 38.5M cache, up to 4.5TB RAM). I would have preferred an 8th-gen Xeon (their "Platinum" series), but Dell isn't offering any with 12 cores and I wanted to come as close as possible to Apple's total of 28 cores.
  • Video: Dual NVLink NVIDIA Quadro GV100 (32GB, 4 DisplayPort each). Apple's top offering is four AMD Vega II GPUs with 32GB each and 5 ports (4 DP, 1 HDMI) per dual-GPU card. I chose the Quadro GV100 primarily because they offer 32GB of memory and 4 ports. I can't equip the computer with three or four GPUs without giving up PCI slots I need for other features, so this is probably going to be less powerful than Apple's maxed-out offering
  • 1TB ECC memory (16 DIMMs of 64GB each). Windows doesn't support more than 1TB of RAM. The motherboard will go up to 3TB of RAM (and add another $29,500 to move from 1TB to 1.5TB, BTW), but in order to actually use that much, I need to switch from Windows to Linux and Linux doesn't support my video card configuration.
  • Two 2TB PCIe NVMe Class 40 SSDs
  • Dual-port 10G Ethernet (copper) NIC
  • Wi-Fi (802.11ac) and Bluetooth
  • Thunderbolt 3 card (2 port, supports one DisplayPort from the GPU)
  • Wireless keyboard and mouse
  • OS: Windows 10 Pro for Workstations (>4 cores)
That's a really nice (and expensive) system, but Apple's maxed-out system has a better CPU, better set of GPUs and more memory. So I think we can assume that such a system will easily cost over $50,000 and may go significantly higher. My gut feeling is around $75,000 for that maxed-out system, and it will be worth it for those few people who actually need that much power.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Thanks, that was actually going to be my next stop. I was looking for something to compare with the entry-level, $6000 Mac Pro, not high-end versions, so 8-core Xeon, 32GB ECC memory, Radeon Pro 580X, and 256GB SSD. Here's my shot at a 2019 Mac Pro equivalent, and... hey, the price is almost identical!
Intel Xeon Silver 4215 Processor​
...​
OK, I found a similar Dell system while searching for information on the Intel Xeon W that Apple is using in the 2019 Mac Pro:

$2,913.17
Processor​
Intel Xeon W-2123 (3.6GHz, 3.9GHz Turbo, 4C, 8.25MB Cache, HT, (120W) ) DDR4-2666​
Operating System​
Windows 10 Pro for Workstation (up to 4 Cores)​
Chassis Options​
Precision 5820 Tower 950W​
Graphics Card​
Radeon Pro WX 7100, 8GB, 4DP (5820T)​
Memory​
32GB 2x16GB DDR4 2666MHz RDIMM ECC​
Wireless​
Intel Dual Band Wireless AC 8265 (802.11ac) 2x2 + Bluetooth module​
Operating System (Boot) Drive​
Intel NVMe PCIe SSD (Front PCIe FlexBay)​
Hard Drive Controllers​
Intel Integrated controller (RST-e) with 1-2 Front FlexBay NVMe PCIe Drives,v2​
Hard Drive​
M.2 256GB PCIe NVMe Class 40 Solid State Drive​
Network Cards​
Intel® X550-T2 10GbE NIC, Dual Port, Copper​
PCIe I/O Cards​
Thunderbolt 3 PCIe card - 2 Type C Ports, 1 DP in​
Warranty​
3 Years Hardware Warranty with Onsite/In-Home Service after Remote Diagnosis​
 



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