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Ric Ford

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Adobe presented an Apple-style "MAX" show today (more than 2.5 hours long), and announcements that include Premiere Rush, an "all-new app for creating and sharing online videos", voice prototyping for its XD (eXperience Designer) app, Project Aero, "an integrated platform for AR", Photoshop for iPad, planned for next year (while competitors, such as Affinity Photo, are already in the market), Project Gemini, a future "painting and drawing app for pen and touch devices", and more.
 


Downloaded the latest versions of my Creative Cloud apps today - the 2019 versions. It left the 2018 versions. I only have it on two machines, as per the rules, but the new one kept insisting that I had exceeded my activations. On the new MacBook Pro, it worked fine. On the Mac Pro, nothing I did would convince it that I wasn't running it on an extra machine.

I did chat support with a useless person. Then did phone support. This time, I refused to let them screen share. Their knowledge of tech issues was abysmal. Long story short, I'll never get that three hours of my life back and the problem was not resolved. I'll keep using the 2018 versions and suck it up. Maybe I'll go back and try to fix it at some point, but I just got tired of it all.

My lost hours to the Adobe activation teams over the years, and previously with the team that coded the installers, before CC, cannot be added up. Days of my life gone to a company that doesn't care enough to get it right. I own and have tried to get Affinity Photo to work for me, but it's not there yet for the kind of work that I do. Sorry to rant here, but it's so frustrating.
 


Adobe presented an Apple-style "MAX" show today (more than 2.5 hours long), and announcements that include Premiere Rush, an "all-new app for creating and sharing online videos", voice prototyping for its XD (eXperience Designer) app, Project Aero, "an integrated platform for AR", Photoshop for iPad, planned for next year (while competitors, such as Affinity Photo, are already in the market), Project Gemini, a future "painting and drawing app for pen and touch devices", and more.
In other words "Please don't jump ship for apps that are leaner, more efficient, and don't spew prefs files all over your Library folder! Here, look—we've got some great new online tools that could almost replace the ones you're already happy with! Subscription fees 4evah!"
 


Downloaded the latest versions of my Creative Cloud apps today - the 2019 versions. It left the 2018 versions. I only have it on two machines, as per the rules, but the new one kept insisting that I had exceeded my activations. On the new MacBook Pro, it worked fine. On the Mac Pro, nothing I did would convince it that I wasn't running it on an extra machine.

I did chat support with a useless person. Then did phone support. This time, I refused to let them screen share. Their knowledge of tech issues was abysmal. Long story short, I'll never get that three hours of my life back and the problem was not resolved. I'll keep using the 2018 versions and suck it up. Maybe I'll go back and try to fix it at some point, but I just got tired of it all.

My lost hours to the Adobe activation teams over the years, and previously with the team that coded the installers, before CC, cannot be added up. Days of my life gone to a company that doesn't care enough to get it right. I own and have tried to get Affinity Photo to work for me, but it's not there yet for the kind of work that I do. Sorry to rant here, but it's so frustrating.
Episode 2 today. Got someone with a little more brains on the phone. We deleted the 2018 apps, even though the 2019 and 2018 versions all ran on my laptop. Briefly, the 2019 versions ran on my Mac Pro which, by the way, they do with no problem when I use my other Adobe ID, so it's not technical on my end. He closed the case and hung up.

I then went to open Bridge, and the same thing happened: "You have exceeded activations." Another 90 minutes of my life. At this point, I'm inclined to live with the 2018 versions on my Mac Pro and the 2019 ones on the MacBook Pro.

They are just so useless at even trying to comprehend what I'm telling them, let alone finding a way to fix it. I may call them again, as I'm p*ssed at paying for something and not being able to use it, but I don't have much hope. He wanted to screen-share, so I let him, but he didn't do anything I hadn't already done. He kept trying to tell me how the activations are all done "dynamically from the server now," but he sounded like he was making it up as he went along. I rarely need to call tech support with Adobe, and it's always with activation issues. It's draining, I have to say. Maybe I'll try again tomorrow.
 


Episode 2 today. Got someone with a little more brains on the phone. We deleted the 2018 apps, even though the 2019 and 2018 versions all ran on my laptop. Briefly, the 2019 versions ran on my Mac Pro which, by the way, they do with no problem when I use my other Adobe ID, so it's not technical on my end. He closed the case and hung up.

I then went to open Bridge, and the same thing happened: "You have exceeded activations." Another 90 minutes of my life. At this point, I'm inclined to live with the 2018 versions on my Mac Pro and the 2019 ones on the MacBook Pro.

They are just so useless at even trying to comprehend what I'm telling them, let alone finding a way to fix it. I may call them again, as I'm p*ssed at paying for something and not being able to use it, but I don't have much hope. He wanted to screen-share, so I let him, but he didn't do anything I hadn't already done. He kept trying to tell me how the activations are all done "dynamically from the server now," but he sounded like he was making it up as he went along. I rarely need to call tech support with Adobe, and it's always with activation issues. It's draining, I have to say. Maybe I'll try again tomorrow.

Episode 3: Today it worked. I did nothing, which is always a bit upsetting, when it "fixes itself." I always like to know what changed. I called and spoke with a tech from Adobe, who was patient while we walked through it. When I was done, he said "between us, we have had a lot of problems with this sort of thing - activations - since the latest update. Trust me, it will all be fixed soon." For what it's worth, as they say.

Figured I should report back that it seems to be working for the moment.
 


Episode 3: Today it worked. I did nothing…
Glad to hear it is working again for you. I am curious, did Adobe support ever suggest you sign in through their website and check what was listed under "Activated Devices" in "Manage Plan"? That gives you a list of the computers they think CC is activated on. You can also deactivate the installations there as well.
 


I had an issue yesterday with the Adobe CC app being unable to connect, even though every other Internet-enabled app on my Mac successfully connected with whatever "cloud" port they needed.

On a hunch, I double-checked Little Snitch's rules and found a couple of "deny" settings that I don't recall setting; perhaps there was an attempt, I wasn't at my Mac to approve it, and it defaulted to "deny". I deleted those rules, ran the CC uninstaller, and asked it to repair things. It re-downloaded a new copy of the CC app, made whatever connections it desired (and I made sure I hung around to "allow" those new connections - all the rest had already been approved), and everything was resolved.

Prior to the above, I did check for any Adobe connection issues with a Google search. I found quite a number mentioned at the Adobe page that lists such items. Interestingly, when I ran the repair, the webpage (sitting in the background) displayed a green (if I recall correctly) checkmark and notification that my Mac, apparently, had a good connection to them (Adobe). Go figure; user error, I guess.
 


Glad to hear it is working again for you. I am curious, did Adobe support ever suggest you sign in through their website and check what was listed under "Activated Devices" in "Manage Plan"? That gives you a list of the computers they think CC is activated on. You can also deactivate the installations there as well.
Oh yeah, we did that early on. Everything was seemingly on the up and up. I even signed out of my laptop. Nothing made a difference.
 


I had an issue yesterday with the Adobe CC app being unable to connect, even though every other Internet-enabled app on my Mac successfully connected with whatever "cloud" port they needed.

On a hunch, I double-checked Little Snitch's rules and found a couple of "deny" settings that I don't recall setting; perhaps there was an attempt, I wasn't at my Mac to approve it, and it defaulted to "deny". I deleted those rules, ran the CC uninstaller, and asked it to repair things. It re-downloaded a new copy of the CC app, made whatever connections it desired (and I made sure I hung around to "allow" those new connections - all the rest had already been approved), and everything was resolved.

Prior to the above, I did check for any Adobe connection issues with a Google search. I found quite a number mentioned at the Adobe page that lists such items. Interestingly, when I ran the repair, the webpage (sitting in the background) displayed a green (if I recall correctly) checkmark and notification that my Mac, apparently, had a good connection to them (Adobe). Go figure; user error, I guess.
I'd still like to know what the AIGPUSniffer app is that Adobe seemingly installed.
 


I'd still like to know what the AIGPUSniffer app is that Adobe seemingly installed.
From the web:
It's an auxiliary process probing your GPU capabilities and intercepting misdirected driver calls to prevent GPU-related crashes. At least that is the original intention. Naturally, when it doesn't work that well it becomes a pain in the rear parts. In any case, it's nothing malicious.
 


Working in the field of freelance broadcast engineering, I keep my eye out on programs commonly used by my radio colleagues, with Adobe Audition being one of them. I'm a hold-out, using version 1.5 on the Windows platform, as Adobe's SoundBooth, which they once touted as "... Audition for the Mac" left such a bad taste in my mouth that I never looked back, thanks to that abomination.

Recently, Adobe announced their 2019 Creative Cloud apps, and Audition was one of the updated programs. I proceeded to install the program on a test Mac to give it a whirl. After it loaded and I played with it for a short time, I proceeded to disconnect the computer from its wireless connection, as it's often used in locations where there's no internet access. Launching the app resulted in a message indicating a required internet connection, though I installed the software in the presumed demo mode, like previous versions of their Creative Cloud apps.

Well, I can't imagine that everybody is going to have guaranteed internet access 100% of the time to be able to use any of the CC 2019 apps, let alone Audition. The few radio stations I'm involved with don't have hotspots for their reporters, so there's no way they're going to launch the app, assuming the same behavior occurs with an active subscription installation.

Sorry, Adobe, but as far as I'm concerned, you just screwed yet another market in your user base. Radio stations have stuck with Audition 1.5 after you made a mess of the software, and now you've given them another reason to never upgrade. It looks like I now need to find an alternative DAW to recommend to the stations I provide support to, as I find it even more difficult to recommend this Adobe product now.
 


In terms of state-of-the-alternatives, I recently ran afoul of how Corel handles authentication of CorelDraw installs.

Background: I purchased a used copy of a slightly older version of CorelDraw for a client. Yes, used software is a crapshoot, but at minimum this was a boxed copy of the software with legit serial number. One of the reasons for selecting CorelDraw over an Adobe product is their perpetual licensing model and ability to get older versions (a previous version was necessary for a particular use case).

The software installed fine, and the serial number was authentic and worked. Except it turns out that while you can download bug fix updates for your version of CorelDraw, in order to actually install them you must create an account with Corel, log in using the installed software, and register your serial number with them. That alone would be sufficiently annoying, but it turns out that (unless you are in the E.U., where I believe law requires transferability of software) once a serial number has been associated with a Corel account, it cannot be transferred to another one.

So, basically, while you can technically give or sell a copy of CorelDraw to someone else. it will be impossible for them to install any bug fix updates for it, and Corel's licensing system will not recognize them as the legitimate owner.

This may not technically be worse than Adobe's old licensing system disaster, and depending on your use case may be a significant improvement over their SAAS model, but it's certainly not what I'd call good, and pretty much crossed Corel off my list of workable Adobe alternatives for my own use.
 


Episode 3: Today it worked. I did nothing ... I called and spoke with a tech from Adobe ... Figured I should report back that it seems to be working for the moment.
Thank you. When you have a ticket opened and the problem resolves itself, it is important to report this back.

This is important because if/when the company does a post-problem analysis, they will have a timeline of problems leading up to resolution. If they haven't figured out the cause of the problem, the time when it fixed itself (derived from the time when people started reporting "problem solved") can be correlated with various log files to narrow down the event that actually fixed it, hopefully leading to an understanding of what the problem was.

They won't keep you informed of this, of course, but it will greatly help their IT people understand the problem and (hopefully) prevent it from happening again.
 


Working in the field of freelance broadcast engineering, I keep my eye out on programs commonly used by my radio colleagues, with Adobe Audition being one of them. I'm a hold-out, using version 1.5 on the Windows platform, as Adobe's SoundBooth, which they once touted as "... Audition for the Mac" left such a bad taste in my mouth that I never looked back, thanks to that abomination.

Recently, Adobe announced their 2019 Creative Cloud apps, and Audition was one of the updated programs. I proceeded to install the program on a test Mac to give it a whirl. After it loaded and I played with it for a short time, I proceeded to disconnect the computer from its wireless connection, as it's often used in locations where there's no internet access. Launching the app resulted in a message indicating a required internet connection, though I installed the software in the presumed demo mode, like previous versions of their Creative Cloud apps.

Well, I can't imagine that everybody is going to have guaranteed internet access 100% of the time to be able to use any of the CC 2019 apps, let alone Audition. The few radio stations I'm involved with don't have hotspots for their reporters, so there's no way they're going to launch the app, assuming the same behavior occurs with an active subscription installation.

Sorry, Adobe, but as far as I'm concerned, you just screwed yet another market in your user base. Radio stations have stuck with Audition 1.5 after you made a mess of the software, and now you've given them another reason to never upgrade. It looks like I now need to find an alternative DAW to recommend to the stations I provide support to, as I find it even more difficult to recommend this Adobe product now.
I concur with this, Adobe has no clue these days. At one of my clients (enterprise), when I installed the new updates of CC 2019, install went fine, but when opened, they came up as 7 day trials. When Adobe Support was called, we were informed that they did not have the authentication servers set up to authorize installs. So, why offer up the install if their servers were not ready? Typical Adobe now.
 


Today was the first time the Adobe Audition 2019 demo launched and allowed itself to finish loading while not demanding a mandatory connection to the internet. Adobe Audition team member Durin joined my broadcasters' forum to field questions, but he hadn't returned as of this writing to address my questions or those of other broadcasters.

I wonder if MacInTouch poster Brieger is onto something, as perhaps the activation servers finally caught up with recognizing demo versions.

This is yet another reason why I despise cloud-based subscription software. I'd rather buy a perpetual license version that installs and keeps working without missing a beat instead of enduring this nonsense. I understand that software vendors are looking to the cash cow of subscription sales, but users who don't want to pay a monthly fee for software they might not use often will just find an alternative to Adobe apps they need.

I'm still milking Audition 1.5 on a Windows box, and there's other Mac software I've purchased for audio editing and Photoshop-like duties. I can use newer versions of Audition with my freelance clients and/or employers who have active subscriptions, but I don't feel compelled at all to subscribe for the limited personal use of a handful of days per month. I wonder how much revenue Adobe misses out on by not providing perpetual licensed software.
 


Annnd... today I received InDesign v14.0 files from a client. Turns out my OS X 10.11.4 El Capitan can't download the new version. Adobe now requires macOS 10.13 for the current Creative Cloud.

Anybody else notice this?

We just re-upped the subscription for another year. Any opportunity to dump their products will be a relief from this nightmare of forced hardware and software upgrades.
 




One of my designers and I do that all the time. I'm on ID 2018, while he's on an older version for various reasons that work for him. As an interchange format, IDML is pretty good.
Agreed. But one thing I neglected to mention to Chris earlier should also be mentioned: keep up with your clients if you don't want to lose them. I've learned this lesson the hard way.
 


Annnd... today I received InDesign v14.0 files from a client. Turns out my OS X 10.11.4 El Capitan can't download the new version. Adobe now requires macOS 10.13 for the current Creative Cloud. Anybody else notice this?
We just re-upped the subscription for another year. Any opportunity to dump their products will be a relief from this nightmare of forced hardware and software upgrades.
I agree on the nightmare, but macOS 10.12.6 still works (just upgraded). The help page also states 10.12.6 is OK.
 


Richard, depending on the value of your work, you might consider obtaining Snow Leopard Server and building a virtual machine duplicate of your current configuration.

The use of a virtual machine can isolate the preserved machine and capabilities, as Apple continues shifting the sand beneath our feet with OS upgrades combined with removal of almost anything.

And note that having no internet connection for the virtual machine acts as a pretty effective firewall for most purposes, including unwanted changes from Apple, Adobe, etc.
James… Thanks for the tip. Question: Assuming I can find and download Snow Leopard Server, where can I find directions / instructions for creating the virtual machine dupe of my current config? Can this be accomplished on the same machine through the use of partitioning, or should I anticipate acquiring another, separate, machine for this purpose? Thanks again.
 


Yep, CS5.5 is all 32-bit.
Nope. CS5.5 is not all 32-bit.

From my macOS 32-Bit Applications To Be Unsupported In The Future MacStrategy article, the last Adobe 32-bit app versions are:

Adobe After Effects CS4​
Adobe Bridge CS5.1 (aka 5.5)​
Adobe Dreamweaver CS6​
Adobe Extension Manager CS6​
Adobe Illustrator CS5.1 (aka 5.5)​
Adobe InDesign CS6​
Adobe Photoshop CS4​
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4​

so CS5.5 apps that are 64-bit:

Adobe After Effects​
Adobe Photoshop​
Adobe Premiere Pro​

I just need InDesign and Photoshop to work for those 2 weeks.
You're good to go with Photoshop, but, as we've mentioned here on MacInTouch before, the real deal killer is no 64-bit version of InDesign - not even with CS6. Adobe Cloud subscription is required for a 64-bit version of InDesign. Grrrrr!
 


Nope. CS5.5 is not all 32-bit.
... You're good to go with Photoshop, but, as we've mentioned here on MacInTouch before, the real deal killer is no 64-bit version of InDesign - not even with CS6. Adobe Cloud subscription is required for a 64-bit version of InDesign. Grrrrr!
Oh, cool. Thanks for the detailed info. I'm sure I checked it out a couple years ago and have since forgotten, but what stuck in my mind is that I use at least one of the 32-bit apps, and that's all that mattered.
 


Another concern about CS5.5 is whether your can install Photoshop CS5.5, even if the app will run fine. Are the installers 32-bit or 64-bit?

I remember having problems running Illustrator CS6 on some iMacs. I had to install Apple's Java 6 on the machines. Illustrator did a check the first time it ran. I have been unaware of it needing Java 6 in its operation. I suspect it had to to with the help system.

Anyway, just wanted to point out some potential problems. If you have a chance to install PhotoShop 5.5 on a Mac running Mojave I think it would be a worthwhile test before you commit yourself.
 


Another concern about CS5.5 is whether your can install Photoshop CS5.5, even if the app will run fine. Are the installers 32-bit or 64-bit? I remember having problems running Illustrator CS6 on some iMacs. I had to install Apple's Java 6 on the machines. Illustrator did a check the first time it ran. I have been unaware of it needing Java 6 in its operation. I suspect it had to to with the help system.
Anyway, just wanted to point out some potential problems. If you have a chance to install PhotoShop 5.5 on a Mac running Mojave I think it would be a worthwhile test before you commit yourself.
The installers require Java, and the apps do not, but the CS3 apps, at least, require certain empty folders to be in place. This is discussed on MacInTouch and elsewhere... you can install and remove Java 6 if needed.
 


While the main Photoshop CS6 application is a 64-bit program, there are pieces of it which are not. Since these pieces are called during launch or are running in the background they will probably fail in the next version of MacOS preventing the program from being useable as is. It may be possible to disable those pieces leaving the editing package useable.

Here is what Howard Oakley’s free 32-bit Checker apps reports on my system:
Listing of all bundles which are 32-bit only in the folder /Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6:

/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Frameworks/AdobeUpdater.framework
/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Frameworks/ahclient.framework/Versions/A/Resources/arh
/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Required/Droplet Template.app
/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Required/Droplet Template.app/Contents/MacOS/Droplet
/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Required/logtransportlaunch.app
/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Required/logtransportlaunch.app/Contents/frameworks/LogTransport.framework
/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Required/logtransportlaunch.app/Contents/frameworks/LogTransport.framework/Versions/A
/Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6/Adobe Photoshop CS6.app/Contents/Required/logtransportlaunch.app/Contents/frameworks/LogTransport.framework/Versions/A/support/LogTransport.app


Found 8 bundles which are 32-bit only, out of 323 scanned in /Applications/Adobe Photoshop CS6 (including Mach-O files)
Checked at Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 12:05:54 PM Mountain Standard Time
 


Whoa! The whole Adobe Creative Suite / 32-bit apps / Java threads blew up. Here's a quick, simple breakdown correcting some inaccuracies recently posted here.

32-bit apps
All 32-bit apps will stop working in macOS 10.15 "Thingymajig" from ~September 2019. See macOS 32-Bit Applications To Be Unsupported In The Future on my MacStrategy website. If you want to run 32-bit apps in macOS 10.15 or later you will need to virtualise an older version of macOS - see recommendations below.

Adobe Creative Suite
  • CS3 - all primary CS3 apps are 32-bit.
  • CS4 - Photoshop, Premiere Pro and After Effects are 64-bit*, all other primary apps including InDesign are 32-bit
  • CS5 - Photoshop, Premiere Pro and After Effects are 64-bit*, all other primary apps including InDesign are 32-bit
  • CS5.5 - Bridge, Illustrator, Photoshop, Premiere Pro and After Effects are 64-bit*, all other primary apps including InDesign are 32-bit
  • CS6.0 - Bridge, Illustrator, Photoshop, Premiere Pro and After Effects are 64-bit*, all other primary apps including InDesign are 32-bit
*As Brian Lawson points out, even if the primary app is 64-bit, some of its resources may still be 32-bit. There's no way, until the 10.15 beta comes out (~June 2019), to know which apps will/won't work. The recommendation, at this point, is that if you still want to run any form of Adobe Creative Suite/InDesign CS with macOS 10.15 or later is to virtualise an older version of macOS - see recommendations below.

Java
Java (not to be confused with JavaScript), to keep it simple for people to understand, can be considered as a virtual operating system environment running on top of macOS - this is also known as the Java Runtime Environment, which is why you see the term Java RE (JRE). There are different versions, such as the Standard Edition (SE) and the developer edition (Java Development Kit - JDK). Java was included with macOS up until Mac OS X 10.6, then it became a separate installation - either Java RE 6 (which Apple produced) and/or Java RE 7 and later (which Oracle produces).
  • Apple's Java RE 6 can be downloaded from here.
  • Oracle's Java RE 7 and later can be downloaded from here.
I have more information about Java at MacStrategy. As Java is essentially a virtual operating system environment running on top of macOS, it's a potentially major security weakness - if you install Java, keep it up-to-date.

Adobe Creative Suite and Java
David Zatz incorrectly states that the Creative Suite installers require Java. This is not true. Installing CS3-CS6 does not require Java. I know this, because I extensively tested all the CS versions on many OSes during 2015-2017. However, once installed, running/launching certain CS apps ask for Java, but they don't, in fact, require Java - it's nothing to do with the Help system as Paul Chernoff speculated. You can read all about my testing and which CS apps request/require Java in my Adobe Creative Suite CS and Java RE v6 article at MacStrategy.

David Zatz linked back to the CS installer problems on later macOS versions. The reason for this is not Java but because Adobe are a$$h***s and created a proprietary installer that spews crap all over your hard drive. This older installer has not been updated to work properly with later versions of macOS because, hey, Adobe could update it if they wanted to, but they'd rather you succumb to the Adobe Creative Cloud subscription instead.

Java browser/applet plug-in
George incorrectly states that "The problem with Java was that most web browsers included / offered a Java plugin." This is not true. Browsers on macOS don't come with the Java plug-in. Either the macOS itself includes the Java plug-in or you manually install Java and with it comes the plug-in.

Apple included the Java plug-in in the OS up until OS X 10.8 (I know this because I just checked it right now on my "All Mac OSes Clean Installations" partitioned test hard drive). OS X 10.9 and later require a separate installation of Java (see above) to get the plug-in.

George then correctly states that the Java plug-in is NPAPI-based, and support for NPAPI plug-ins has been removed in most browsers except Safari v11 and earlier, so going forward it's pretty safe, even if it's installed, because it simply won't work. However, Apple's Safari supported NPAPI plug-ins right up to v11. But, for reference, Apple automatically disabled the Java plug-in by default from around 2014 onwards (if I remember correctly) even if it was installed - you had to specifically turn it on to get it to work.

Information on/instructions for removing/disabling the Java plug-in can be found in my Java Security article on MacStrategy.

Watch out, though - there are two locations where internet plug-ins can be found. Those are:
  • /Library/Internet Plug-Ins
  • /Users/username/Library/Internet Plug-Ins (this folder will exist for each user on the Mac)

Recommendations
  1. If you don't need Java don't install it.
  2. If you have Java installed but don't need it, remove it or disable it.
  3. If you need Java RE6 for Adobe Creative Suite don't install it, use the fake Java 6 trick outlined in my Adobe Creative Suite CS and Java RE v6 article on MacStrategy.
  4. If you need Java for any other purpose, make sure you keep it up-to-date (Oracle issues security updates every 3 months).
  5. If you want to run Adobe Creative Suite (or any other 32-bit apps) with macOS 10.15 or later. virtualise an older version of macOS. I personally recommend Mac OS X 10.6, OS X 10.8, OS X 10.11 or macOS 10.12 for this purpose. I have an article with step-by-step instructions for virtualising Mac OS X 10.6. (The reasons for these OSes are in my macOS 32-Bit Applications To Be Unsupported In The Future article on MacStrategy.)
I'm planning on doing step-by-step instructions for virtualising OS X 10.8, OS X 10.11 and macOS 10.12 on MacStrategy. (I know I've promised this before here, but FYI, I do MacStrategy for free, in my own time, and simply ask for donations and utilise Amazon and Apple affiliate links - there's very little other tracking/advertising/revenue generation on MacStrategy. For the whole of 2018 I got a grand total of £35.75 in donations! So, I'll get around to doing those other virtualisation articles when paid work doesn't get in the way. ;-)

All of the above has been a useful exercise anyway, and I plan to also turn it into a personal blog post. :-)
 


... From my macOS 32-Bit Applications To Be Unsupported In The Future MacStrategy article, the last Adobe 32-bit app versions are... the real deal killer is no 64-bit version of InDesign - not even with CS6.
That is consistent with what I've seen. So, of course, InDesign is the one that currently seems hardest to replace and the one I still use the most professionally (well, for a retired person... ;-) Furthermore, it has become somewhat erratic in a hard-to-pin-down way in Mojave....
And the latest Mojave update just blew away my CS6/Illustrator Java hack... again. Sigh...
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's more:
Bleeping Computer said:
Adobe Says Upgrade Creative Cloud Apps or Risk 3rd Party Claims
On May 8th, 2019, Creative Cloud users have started receiving emails from Adobe stating that older versions of the products they are using have been discontinued and that users are no longer licensed to use them. For many of these developers, this [is] not a reasonable request as they need to utilize older versions for certain projects.

... According to a support page created by Adobe on May 8th, the following programs have versions that have been discontinued:
https://www.macintouch.com/community/javascript:void(0)
Photoshop, InDesign, Premiere Pro, Media Encoder, After Effects, Animate, Audition, Lightroom Classic, Bridge, Prelude, SpeedGrade, and Captivate

... In March 2018, Dolby sued Adobe for unpaid license fees related to the use of their technology in various Adobe software. Many of the discontinued programs mentioned above include Dolby intellectual property.
 


Maybe someone has already pointed this out, but the "no longer authorized" versions that users are expected to remove manually include components of Creative Suite 6. Specifically mentioned are Photoshop version 13.x, InDesign version 8.x, and Media Encoder 6.x (see Remove unauthorized versions).

Creative Suite 6 was, of course, software-for-purchase, not software-as-subscription. Owners such as myself possess the boxed installation DVD-ROM media with license codes that we bought at considerable expense ($1200, in my case).

I don't use CS6 all that frequently, so I don't know if it will "phone-home" or how an Adobe server will respond, but suffice to say I am not at all pleased with Adobe's "solution" to its license-fee dispute with Dolby. End-users of legally purchased software ought not be forced into upgrades to software-as-subscription. We're not the criminal bootleggers, as Adobe is alleged to be.
 


I immediately bought a copy of Lightroom 6 on disc when Adobe announced that they would be going all-in with Creative Cloud for the next major version. I have yet to install it, however.

Can anyone tell me whether it is 64-bit (once fully updated, of course... I don't believe the version on the disc is 64-bit.) Does it work well under Mojave?

If the answer is no, does it work better under earlier versions in virtualization?

If the answer to that question is no as well, I can always install it in Windows...
 


Maybe someone has already pointed this out, but the "no longer authorized" versions that users are expected to remove manually include components of Creative Suite 6. Specifically mentioned are Photoshop version 13.x, InDesign version 8.x, and Media Encoder 6.x (see Remove unauthorized versions).
Creative Suite 6 was, of course, software-for-purchase, not software-as-subscription. Owners such as myself possess the boxed installation DVD-ROM media with license codes that we bought at considerable expense ($1200, in my case).
I don't use CS6 all that frequently, so I don't know if it will "phone-home" or how an Adobe server will respond, but suffice to say I am not at all pleased with Adobe's "solution" to its license-fee dispute with Dolby. End-users of legally purchased software ought not be forced into upgrades to software-as-subscription. We're not the criminal bootleggers, as Adobe is alleged to be.
As usual, what we need here is some clarity, preferably from Adobe themselves. The link you posted above for removing software is for enterprise users (i.e. Adobe CC for Teams and Enterprise). The email I got as an "Adobe Partner" last week about the continued use of unauthorised software (even though I'm no longer registered as an Adobe Partner) stated the notification was specifically for Adobe CC for Teams and Enterprise users.

It is not clear if these warnings/emails/requirements are going out to normal/regular Adobe CC subscribers - my wife, who is an InDesign CC (single app) subscriber and who has all versions of InDesign going back to CS3 installed, including the unauthorised CC 9, 8 CS, has not received such an email.

In addition, AppleInsider's report on this specifically states "Adobe licensed certain technologies from Dolby with an agreement based on how many discs of certain apps were sold. Now that the software is distributed online, the companies reportedly renegotiated their agreement to be based on how many users are actually running the software." This might indicate that purchasers of the CS6 suite perpetual licence on disc are okay, but subscribers are not. It might also be okay for normal subscribers. Who knows?

Of course, Adobe not being clear benefits them. If they scare people still using CS6 suite perpetual licences into upgrading to the subscription CC, they make more money.

Unfortunately, a CS6 suite perpetual licence requires login and registration with an Adobe ID - it will be trivial for them, if necessary for them legally, to block all installations of this software in the future and all those already installed, as CS6 phones home and they can just switch off the activation - bang goes your software that you paid for. Expect a huge uproar if they do that though.

In the meantime, I'm going to continue using my personal CS6 suite perpetual licence (and f*** Adobe), until they literally switch it off….
 


I don't use CS6 all that frequently, so I don't know if it will "phone-home" or how an Adobe server will respond, but suffice to say I am not at all pleased with Adobe's "solution" to its license-fee dispute with Dolby. End-users of legally purchased software ought not be forced into upgrades to software-as-subscription. We're not the criminal bootleggers, as Adobe is alleged to be.
Oh, and one more thing, Adobe snuck out an announcement behind all the other stuff, the fact that they now only support the last two versions of CC (only one version of Acrobat) and going forward,
Adobe said:
Changes to Creative Cloud Download Availability
Creative Cloud customers will only have direct download access... to the two most recent major versions of Creative Cloud desktop applications
So, subscribers won't even be able to download older versions e.g. for compatibility reasons, which is especially important for InDesign users!
 


Maybe someone has already pointed this out, but the "no longer authorized" versions that users are expected to remove manually include components of Creative Suite 6. Specifically mentioned are Photoshop version 13.x, InDesign version 8.x, and Media Encoder 6.x (see Remove unauthorized versions).
Creative Suite 6 was, of course, software-for-purchase, not software-as-subscription. Owners such as myself possess the boxed installation DVD-ROM media with license codes that we bought at considerable expense ($1200, in my case).
I don't use CS6 all that frequently, so I don't know if it will "phone-home" or how an Adobe server will respond, but suffice to say I am not at all pleased with Adobe's "solution" to its license-fee dispute with Dolby. End-users of legally purchased software ought not be forced into upgrades to software-as-subscription. We're not the criminal bootleggers, as Adobe is alleged to be.
As anyone who has tried to re-activate Microsoft Office 2011 after upgrading a drive or getting a new computer can tell you, indefinite use of software-for-purchase is not taken very seriously or respectfully by its vendors, including Apple (see Aperture) and its subsidiary FileMaker. Further, unlike in the past, modern security needs and browser support dictates that operating systems be kept up to date, which inevitably means incompatibilities with perpetual-license software. In other words, because I cannot opt for a static operating environment, and because many software vendors don't really respect the notion of perpetual use, I don't really have an expectation that paid-for software remain operational beyond a few years. It sucks, but it's what it is.
 


Maybe someone has already pointed this out, but the "no longer authorized" versions that users are expected to remove manually include components of Creative Suite 6. Specifically mentioned are Photoshop version 13.x, InDesign version 8.x, and Media Encoder 6.x (see Remove unauthorized versions).
Creative Suite 6 was, of course, software-for-purchase, not software-as-subscription. Owners such as myself possess the boxed installation DVD-ROM media with license codes that we bought at considerable expense ($1200, in my case).
I don't use CS6 all that frequently, so I don't know if it will "phone-home" or how an Adobe server will respond, but suffice to say I am not at all pleased with Adobe's "solution" to its license-fee dispute with Dolby. End-users of legally purchased software ought not be forced into upgrades to software-as-subscription. We're not the criminal bootleggers, as Adobe is alleged to be.
CS6 still fetches a pretty penny on eBay. I read a description in one such auction wherein the seller guaranteed the buyer would be able to authorize the software after purchase...
 


If Adobe is really going through with this, I would expect them to pull all the relevant product updaters down from their update sites.
 


Can anyone tell me whether it is 64-bit (once fully updated, of course... I don't believe the version on the disc is 64-bit.) Does it work well under Mojave?
While the actual Photoshop CS6 program is fully 64-bit, some of the background pieces, i.e., the parts that call home and manage updates kinds of things, are not, and you will get the warnings about it not working in the next OS release. (It runs fine on my system.)
 


While the actual Photoshop CS6 program is fully 64-bit, some of the background pieces, i.e., the parts that call home and manage updates kinds of things, are not, and you will get the warnings about it not working in the next OS release. (It runs fine on my system.)
Thanks, Brian, but I was actually inquiring about Lightroom 6 rather than CS6. (Though, with all the other replies in this thread relating to CS6, I can see where the mistake would be very easy to make!)
 


...I don't use CS6 all that frequently, so I don't know if it will "phone-home" or how an Adobe server will respond, but suffice to say I am not at all pleased with Adobe's "solution" to its license-fee dispute with Dolby. End-users of legally purchased software ought not be forced into upgrades to software-as-subscription...
I have every Adobe app and process (including CS6) set to "deny any outgoing connection" via Little Snitch. It all works. I did have to allow it for a reinstall (that probably was unnecessary) a few years ago.
 


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