MacInTouch Amazon link...
Channels
Products
If Adobe intends to shut off CS6 suite standalone copies, due to their flaws, they should prepare for a class action lawsuit of monumental proportions. We were not sold that possibility. My suggestion is that Adobe exchange every CS6 suite standalone for a perpetual, no-cost license for CS Cloud Suite.

If they need an example of legal handling, use a tangible product, like recall of a Dewalt saw - there is always full compensation or replacement. Not Adobe, they just make the rules up as they go along. Not cool. Or legal?
 


If Adobe is really going through with this, I would expect them to pull all the relevant product updaters down from their update sites.
Which is why I download updaters and keep them "in perpetuity" on external hard drives. Barring bit-rot or more extreme forms of hard drive failure, I am self-sufficient in this regard.

(Same for Microsoft Office and Apple macOS updaters, as well.)
 


Thanks, Brian, but I was actually inquiring about Lightroom 6 rather than CS6...
Although it wasn't Will M's question, it does seem to be a recurring question here, so I thought I would post this from System Information (note: I do not have all components of CS6 installed). Besides InDesign, there are some potentially significant, lower-profile components that are still 32-bit:

Adobe Acrobat Pro: Version: 10.1.16 64-Bit (Intel): Yes​
Adobe Application Manager: Version: 9.0.0.141 64-Bit (Intel): No
Adobe Bridge CS6: Version: 5.0.2.4 64-Bit (Intel): Yes​
Adobe DNG Converter: Version: 9.8 (692) 64-Bit (Intel): Yes​
Adobe Extension Manager CS6: Version: 6.0.8.28 64-Bit (Intel): No
Adobe Illustrator CS6: Version: 691 64-Bit (Intel): Yes​
Adobe InDesign CS6: Version: 8.1.0.419 64-Bit (Intel): No
Adobe Lens Profile Creator: Version: 1.0 64-Bit (Intel): No
Adobe Media Encoder CS6: Version: 6.0.2 64-Bit (Intel): Yes​
Adobe Photoshop CS6: Version: 13.0.6 64-Bit (Intel): Yes​
adobe_licutil: Version: Adobe License Utility 2.0.0.10 64-Bit (Intel): Yes​
AdobeIPCBroker: Version: 5.2.0.29 64-Bit (Intel): No
 


As anyone who has tried to re-activate Microsoft Office 2011 after upgrading a drive or getting a new computer can tell you, indefinite use of software-for-purchase is not taken very seriously or respectfully by its vendors, including Apple (see Aperture) and its subsidiary FileMaker.
Some years ago I had an interesting and pleasant experience with FileMaker on this very subject.

I lost a MacBook Pro 5,5 due to the third-party battery catching fire back in October 2015.

I bought a replacement computer and restored from a reasonably current Carbon Copy Cloner backup. Some applications, however, needed to be reinstalled from scratch using the installation media and license codes. One of these was FileMaker Pro version 9.x. Unfortunately it wouldn't validate due to the license servers having been shut down.

So I got in touch with FileMaker customer service and explained the situation. Much to my delight, they gave me a download link to a FMP 9.x installer that was freed of the need to phone home. It still runs, of course.

your milage may vary, of course.
 


I have every Adobe app and process (including CS6) set to "deny any outgoing connection" via Little Snitch. It all works. I did have to allow it for a reinstall (that probably was unnecessary) a few years ago.
Assuming you have installed CS6 and all subsequent releases of every Adobe app, including the current CC 2019 offerings, I'm curious as to just exactly how many outgoing connections you had to block. Please share the number or perhaps even the detailed list (which I suspect to be quite large). Thanks!
 


I have done the same thing with Little Snitch. To install one of those apps, though, I think phoning home is the only way to get the activation done. Might be a problem for de-authorizing, also.
 


Assuming you have installed CS6 and all subsequent releases of every Adobe app, including the current CC 2019 offerings, I'm curious as to just exactly how many outgoing connections you had to block. Please share the number or perhaps even the detailed list (which I suspect to be quite large). Thanks!
Well, just speaking for myself, not including the CC offerings was kind of the point (hmm, maybe I could have phrased the first message better), but, currently eight rules for apps and processes. (Now that you have me looking at them, I could probably consolidate them into about four rules... but not tonight.)
 


Thanks, Brian, but I was actually inquiring about Lightroom 6 rather than CS6. (Though, with all the other replies in this thread relating to CS6, I can see where the mistake would be very easy to make!)
Sorry, Will. I’ve removed Lightroom since switching to ON1 Photo RAW 2019. However, I would expect the same thing [with Lightroom 6], as those are shared pieces of code for the same reason.

Howard Oakley has a free app, 32-bitCheck, which will look at all the pieces of a program and tell you which are and which are not 64-bit. That should give you a definitive answer.
 


If Adobe intends to shut off CS6 suite standalone copies, due to their flaws, they should prepare for a class action lawsuit of monumental proportions. We were not sold that possibility. My suggestion is that Adobe exchange every CS6 suite standalone for a perpetual, no-cost license for CS Cloud Suite.
What about those of us who stopped with CS3, CS4, and CS5? (I still use Dreamweaver CS3 every day, though I own CS4 and CS5 versions of it.)
 


What about those of us who stopped with CS3, CS4, and CS5? (I still use Dreamweaver CS3 every day, though I own CS4 and CS5 versions of it.)
The online activation/licensing servers for CS3 have already been switched off. You can download a new, non-internet-required installer via the Adobe web site, but you need an Adobe ID, and you need to register your original serial number with Adobe - see my article, Virtualising Adobe Creative Suite with Mac OS X / OS X / macOS.

They haven't switched off CS4, CS5 or CS5.5 (yet), but as these don't appear to be affected by the lawsuit, hopefully, when Adobe eventually do, they will offer a new, non-internet-required installer. The main issue here, currently, is that they can switch off the activation servers for CS6 (for legal compliance reasons) and they don't have to offer a new installer (for legal reasons), but they'll need to offer something, and a 1-year subscription to Creative Cloud just isn't going to cut it!
 


MacStories has an interesting interview with Khoi Vinh, Principal Designer at Adobe. He talks about their product, Adobe XD, how they approach cross-platform apps, what he sees as the advantages of subscription software, Marzipan, and how they are using AI in their products.
 


Serif finally did something I've been advocating (along with others) since the release of their Photo and Designer products: they added the pica/point measuring system to their measurement engine.

Previously, you could display or enter measurements in pixels or points, along with inches, centimeters, Didots, and a number of other gradations. But picas were conspicuously absent, despite some serious user demand for them.

I have much higher confidence in the upcoming launch of their Affinity Publisher, which is scheduled to ship June 19. If Serif paid attention to its users on an issue that the developers hadn't baked into the engine, I think the three-tool suite will truly be a challenge to Adobe's hegemony.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Perhaps, but a lot of professionals require automation via scripting, specifically AppleScript. They have announced no scripting at all yet, to the best of my knowledge.
Affinity Photo has macros:
Serif said:
Affinity Photo
Automation with Macros and Batch Processing
  • Record and save actions as macros (for desktop only)
  • Edit individual recorded steps and their parameters (for desktop only)
  • Customize macro settings post recording (for desktop only)
  • Import, export, and maintain a macro library
  • Run batch jobs for bulk processing & conversion of images
  • Apply macros in batch jobs for a seamless custom workflow (for desktop only)
  • Batch processing supports scaling expressions (w, h and dpi)
Scripting seems to be missing so far from Affinity Publisher, though (and I didn't find mention of any for Affinity Designer).
 



Serif finally did something I've been advocating (along with others) since the release of their Photo and Designer products: they added the pica/point measuring system to their measurement engine....
I’m one of the people who asked for picas. This is a really good sign.

Working without that pica ruler is a major irritant that I just can’t get beyond, after thinking in picas since 1986.
 


I’m one of the people who asked for picas. This is a really good sign. Working without that pica ruler is a major irritant that I just can’t get beyond, after thinking in picas since 1986.
Since before 1980 for me. Base 12 (12 pts = 1 pica; 6 picas = 1 inch/72 pts to the uninitiated) is a lot easier to divide into even numbers in your head than any of the other document units.
 


What I haven't seen in any of the Photoshop-replacement applications is something equivalent to the "Auto-align Layers" function. I often have to scan images that are larger than my scanner, which involves multiple scans, occasionally even 4, of different parts of the document. I can put each scan on it's own layer in the same psd document, choose all the layers, and then select "Auto Align Layers" from the Edit menu, and Photoshop will make a large document of the overlapping layers. It is incredibly good at this.

I don't remember what version of Photoshop introduced this, but since I discovered it, it has saved me days of editing time over the course of using it. It's the one thing that I absolutely rely on Photoshop (CS6) to do.
 


What I haven't seen in any of the Photoshop-replacement applications is something equivalent to the "Auto-align Layers" function. I often have to scan images that are larger than my scanner, which involves multiple scans, occasionally even 4, of different parts of the document. I can put each scan on it's own layer in the same psd document, choose all the layers, and then select "Auto Align Layers" from the Edit menu, and Photoshop will make a large document of the overlapping layers. It is incredibly good at this. I don't remember what version of Photoshop introduced this, but since I discovered it, it has saved me days of editing time over the course of using it. It's the one thing that I absolutely rely on Photoshop (CS6) to do.
I haven't tried it myself but there is the open source Hugin. They recently released a big new 2019 update. The site states (and shows) that it has "Photometric alignment and vignetting correction." You wouldn't even need to create layers - it looks like it will just take your scans and stitch them together.
 


For those who, like myself, await the fast-approaching release of Affinity Publisher, I was curious to find out whether they plan to produce a hardcover workbook, as they have done for Photo and Designer. They responded this morning that such a workbook is indeed planned.
 


Simply because I cut my teeth on PageMaker 4.2 (which turned me into a page layout junkie) and never got a chance to try InDesign when it came out, it has always piqued my curiosity, and I jumped at the chance for a discounted subscription to Creative Cloud but haven't actually gotten around to installing any of it yet. Does anyone have any advice for removing Adobe cruft when (not if) I decide to remove and discontinue it? I think fear of a littered system is the main reason I have waited as long as I have.
 


Simply because I cut my teeth on PageMaker 4.2 (which turned me into a page layout junkie) and never got a chance to try InDesign when it came out, it has always piqued my curiosity, and I jumped at the chance for a discounted subscription to Creative Cloud but haven't actually gotten around to installing any of it yet. Does anyone have any advice for removing Adobe cruft when (not if) I decide to remove and discontinue it? I think fear of a littered system is the main reason I have waited as long as I have.
I remember the uninstaller in CS was pretty thorough the last time I used it, but I've no experience with CC. However, Adobe's penchant for prefacing the name of everything with "Adobe" does help in hunting things down.
 


Simply because I cut my teeth on PageMaker 4.2 (which turned me into a page layout junkie) and never got a chance to try InDesign when it came out, it has always piqued my curiosity, and I jumped at the chance for a discounted subscription to Creative Cloud but haven't actually gotten around to installing any of it yet. Does anyone have any advice for removing Adobe cruft when (not if) I decide to remove and discontinue it? I think fear of a littered system is the main reason I have waited as long as I have.
Adobe have a Creative Cloud Cleaner tool - the direct download link is:
https://download.adobe.com/pub/adobe/SupportTools/Cleaner/mac/AdobeCreativeCloudCleanerTool.dmg

This is a deeper, cleaner than the standard "uninstaller" utility that comes with the normal installation. I believe this cleaner cleans Creative Suite, too i.e. current + all previous versions. If not, you might be able to find older cleaners e.g. I easily found one for Creative Suite 5. I also, personally, have an archive of them somewhere.
 



Affinity Publisher arrived in final form today. (For those who are interested, there's also an Affinity Live 2019 keynote.)
I almost dropped off at the start of the keynote [but] I was impressed with StudioLink - it looks great, but I'm sure there'll be functional restrictions to the way things change between personas. It also looks very deep and complex - you [may be] learning three apps with significant enough interface differences to Adobe to make it a considerable task. That aside, the missing 'link' for us is scripting....
 


Affinity Publisher arrived in final form today. (For those who are interested, there's also an Affinity Live 2019 keynote.)
Wow.... Everyone should watch the Affinity keynote. They've added stunning capabilities, bringing excitement back to the design world. I had no idea they were this far. It brings feelings back from Adobe's release of InDesign 1, freeing us from Quark's dominance.

Affinity engineering has leapfrogged Adobe by making a better product and adding true innovation (isometric drawing, speed, non-destructive layers, and tons more). They did what Adobe should have done. Meanwhile, Adobe's efforts over the last few years were to add app-bloatware, minor product tweaks with forced file format changes to trap us into upgrades while trying to justify their pay-forever scheme, a scheme still as disgusting as they day they forced us to it.

Thanks, Ric, for your site. The Affinity keynote got my blood pumping again. Can anyone recall the last time we were excited for any recent Adobe announcement? Affinity brought back exciting. Adding the fact that Affinity is not blackmail-ware brings back that sense of calm that what we create stays ours to enjoy. It's a very good day for designers.
 


Wow.... Everyone should watch the Affinity Keynote....
Oh boy, is Dave right! I started doing graphic design before I was 20. (I'm in my 70's now.) I'm still doing some variation of it: photography; webdesign; video editing. I also started working with/for Apple in 1978. Suffice it to say, I've "been down that road."

As an integrated suite of tools, Affinity products really knocked the workflow issues out of the park. What was revealed in that video would have exceeded my wildest dreams of my 20's. I own all their products, and am pretty much delighted with each of them.

Recommended.
 



Affinity Publisher arrived in final form today. (For those who are interested, there's also an Affinity Live 2019 keynote.)
It's been said, but I'll say it again: go watch the full keynote and see how they've accomplished core functionality that Adobe can never achieve.

That leads me to the point about Adobe that's beyond the subscription model or any other issues. Adobe is stuck with a modality that goes back now almost 3 decades, with separate software culture in each its programs. Observe the different behavior of such a simple task as drawing a bezier curve in Illustrator, Photoshop, or InDesign. They've struggled with common keyboard commands. And they're stuck, because not only is their code immense and bloated, each program has a user base that is central to that program, and they'll scream if so much as a tool is changed.

Affinity had the advantage of being able to start anew, with an approach not only to each program's function that's unburdened by past expectations, but linking them together in a way no one has ever done. The keynote tells the story.

And the price is affordable by everyone, with no subscription model to shackle its users. Especially for those who are just learning these tools, getting familiar with the Affinity approach has the advantage of not trying to think in terms of how Adobe has done it. This company is going places. Stay tuned.
 


I can only envy anyone who doesn't need to maintain compatibility with Adobe CC-based clients. I'll be looking forward to hearing from pre-press folks how this new suite shakes out in actual design and production work. It certainly looks lean and functional.
 


I've been betting on Affinity since they arrived on the scene. Can't use Affinity Photo, because I'm a hostage of learned keystrokes and too many hours to change. Affinity Designer is great. I'm still blundering my way through it but have turned out some credible work.

I did the beta for Affinity Publisher and shelled out up-front for the product. Have just started daubbing at it, but it is worlds better than the endless InDesign. (I've never forgiven Adobe for butchering PageMaker and FreeHand, for that matter.)
 


Affinity had the advantage of being able to start anew, with an approach not only to each program's function that's unburdened by past expectations, but linking them together in a way no one has ever done. The keynote tells the story.
Affinity demoed editing one document, while switching seamlessly between using Word Processing, Drawing and Painting tools on the document elements. Where have we seen that before?

ClarisWorks, in 1991.
 


I can only envy anyone who doesn't need to maintain compatibility with Adobe CC-based clients. I'll be looking forward to hearing from pre-press folks how this new suite shakes out in actual design and production work. It certainly looks lean and functional.
Prepress manager here. We will keep one copy of CC for compatibility - just as we did for Quark until we only had one customer left.

We have switched in the front office to Affinity to replace Quark and are looking to see how soon we can go beyond to the production side.

One thing to note is Affinity's marketing comments about the print industry. They support us 100%, and - can you believe this? - you are supposed to be able to lock the color space of your document to CMYK (or whatever)! Woo hoo!
 


I almost dropped off at the start of the keynote [but] I was impressed with StudioLink - it looks great, but I'm sure there'll be functional restrictions to the way things change between personas. It also looks very deep and complex - you [may be] learning three apps with significant enough interface differences to Adobe to make it a considerable task. That aside, the missing 'link' for us is scripting....
FUD. No restrictions between personas. And as for "learning three apps", the control key combos are all editable across the suite. When was the last time you pressed Command-D in Illustrator to "place" art? If you know what I'm talking about, you'll be thrilled with Affinity. And as for scripting, what do you think might happen next? And it will be across all the apps.
 


FUD. No restrictions between personas. And as for "learning three apps", the control key combos are all editable across the suite. When was the last time you pressed Command-D in Illustrator to "place" art? If you know what I'm talking about, you'll be thrilled with Affinity. And as for scripting, what do you think might happen next? And it will be across all the apps.
[For us] just reality. I showed StudioLink to my staff yesterday (I'm the production manager of a publishing company), and they all had the same thoughts - learning the new interface would seriously impact productivity. Most of them have used InDesign since version 2, so they have deeply engrained muscle memory. I'm sure they can do it, but we'll pay a penalty at the start.

The next issue raised was ability to open InDesign files, given we have tens of thousands of existing documents. Affinity have said it will eventually come - just the same as they've said scripting will eventually come. However, until I see it in action, they are both just vapourware. I'm sure they have every intention of addressing them, but our production environment relies on scripting, and Affinity are yet to even announce which language they'll support. It's impossible for us to make a commitment to change without these essential requirements.

I was in the beta program from day one, but there were enough bugs that I was wasting too much time. I trust the release version will be better, but I'm on holidays right now, so it will have to wait a few weeks. Not that it matters - we can't change any time soon, regardless of how much we'd like to.
 


Where have we seen that before?
ClarisWorks, in 1991.
That may be true, but what's amazing is that it took so long for anyone to bring it back. Bravo to Affinity for doing it! I'm sure they will take it far beyond what Claris did; some might say they already have (and I say that as a person who loved ClarisWorks!)
 


Thanks, Graham! Do you happen to know whether it would still work in the event that I had already done a partial manual removal? (I haven't yet; I'm merely trying to ascertain whether, by necessity, it should be the first line of defense, or whether it can still clean up anything that may be left over.)
Yes, it should still work in the event that you have already done a partial manual removal. I believe it basically works upon a script of where every possible Adobe file may reside, including those hidden, invisible activation files deep in the system, and it just goes in and cleans them out. It doesn't matter if you have a license, subscription or whatever. Adobe often use it as a troubleshooting tool when activation fails to work after a CS/CC reinstall, system upgrade/update or when the activation files corrupt and you get various mystifying error XXX activation messages. I haven't used it for a while, but back when I did, it did the job.
 


I count my blessings that I have nothing in the "pre-press" realm to limit my choices. I had been using Adobe Lightroom since v1. With the subscription model providing that ongoing nagging insult, and the feeling that relying upon such an enormous vendor for my critical needs was no longer wise, I searched for a replacement. After some months of testing, I finally pulled the plug on Lightroom Classic and banished it (and the CC infrastructure) from my Mac.

Over the last month+ of testing, I am comfortable with Alien Skin's Exposure X4. The user interface is similar to Lightroom, so I was able to make the jump without too many issues popping up. I was never a keyboard-shortcut kind of guy, but Exposure does rely upon them more than Lightroom (it seems), so I've had to print the cheat-sheet and get used to using the keyboard more than I did with Lightroom.

The migration process (which Alien Skin details quite well) went well, although it did take about four hours for 70,000 files. I did have the Migration Tool generate TIFF files for any RAW file I edited in LR, so I'd have a copy of what I had ended up with, in case I wanted to recreate the altered RAW file in Exposure rather than pick up with the TIFF. This process seems like what takes most of the time.

I'll need to do more editing to become really proficient again, but, as this is a hobby (and not something I need to do to make a living), I have the time. Thankfully, the NIK plugins may be called in the same manner as they were used in Lightroom. I'm not sorry I've made the break from Adobe. I'll sleep better.
 


I remember reading here years ago about a major Adobe CC bug that, if my memory serves me correctly, resulted in the deletion of the contents of a given Mac's Desktop folder. Because I never used CC, and didn't see myself ever using it, I didn't follow it too closely, beyond being super grateful that I didn't use CC.

For those who dealt with that fiasco (or helped others deal with it), is there any advice – besides, of course, a current backup – to avoid problems of this nature? By this, I am asking whether the problem was caused by some optional piece of software that can be avoided, particularly since I only intend to try a single app (InDesign)?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I remember reading here years ago about a major Adobe CC bug that, if my memory serves me correctly, resulted in the deletion of the contents of a given Mac's Desktop folder. Because I never used CC, and didn't see myself ever using it, I didn't follow it too closely, beyond being super grateful that I didn't use CC. For those who dealt with that fiasco (or helped others deal with it), is there any advice – besides, of course, a current backup – to avoid problems of this nature? By this, I am asking whether the problem was caused by some optional piece of software that can be avoided, particularly since I only intend to try a single app (InDesign)?
Here's one Adobe file-deletion bug:
Gizmodo said:
Nasty Adobe Bug Deleted $250,000-Worth of Man's Files, Lawsuit Claims
... The lawsuit was filed in a California district court last week by Dave Cooper. He alleges that an update to Premiere Pro came with a flaw in the way it handles file management that resulted in the deletion of 500 hours of video clips that he claims were worth around $250,000. Adobe has acknowledged the bug and issued an update, so you might want to make sure that you’re on the latest version of Premiere.
But you're probably thinking of this one:
BBC News said:
Fury after Adobe Creative Cloud deletes files
Adobe has patched its Creative Cloud apps after people noticed the software was deleting Mac users' files without warning. After customers updated Creative Cloud, it accessed their hard drive and deleted the first folder that appeared in alphabetical order.
For testing, I'd suggest a procedure like this:
  1. Clone your system to a separate, external drive (e.g. Samsung T5).
  2. Password-protect your main drive (i.e. enable FileVault encryption).
  3. Boot from your external clone drive, making sure not to mount your main drive.
  4. Install the software you want to test (on this external clone drive), and proceed with testing.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts