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I recently installed a new beta version of a security update for Mojave. This is likely the third or more version, as I do not really keep track. As far as I know, I have never seen multiple beta versions of a security update.
 


I figured this out, at least for my case. It's nothing to do with PHP, but with postfix. In Console, every 10 seconds I saw this logged:

default 13:05:16.042569 -0500 master fatal: unable to determine open file limit

After lots of debugging, ultimately my solution was to raise the max open file limit, using this technique: ulimit osx el capitan
Thanks for the tip. However, in my case, there is no line like that in my Console logs or the Server logs :-(
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... Another steaming pile from Apple...
Next I tried copying the new Install macOS Sierra.app over the old one on the bootable flash installer. I then booted from that, but the Mac went into recovery mode after long delays. ...
... It's all a really weird mystery to me, as I can't quite figure out what's going on to cause this kind of problem.
I just repeated this test using DropDMG, which failed in the same way with Apple's new macOS Sierra installer app...
Here's a very helpful email from a longtime MacInTouch supporter:

While I had seen several folks noting that createinstall media fails for new certificate posted OS X Sierra Installer, I hadn’t seen a solution posted there (aside from resetting a Mac’s internal clock).​
One fix that I’ve used successfully without resetting the clock (that I think has been noted elsewhere) requires that you have an old version of the Install MacOS Sierra.app (dated October, 2017) and that you use that first to create a bootable USB stick with the old version of the installer (with the expired certificate).​
Then put that bootable USB in your Mac, and update it with the new version of the Sierra installer, as follows:​
1. Download the new software for the Sierra macOS installer, which is named InstallerOS.dmg​
2. Mount the dmg and run the package - this will put Install MacOS Sierra.app in the /Applications directory, per usual; this is dated​
3. Open the USB stick and delete the old version of the Install MacOS Sierra.app that is there (erase and empty trash, e.g.)​
4. Copy the new version of the Install MacOS Sierra.app to the USB stick​
This seems to work - will boot up and install Sierra in all the minis, laptops that I’ve tried, up to 2015 at least, without any complaints that the installer is damaged, etc.​
If you don’t have a bootable USB with the older version of Sierra, you can still create one: using createinstall media with Apple’s instructions works fine here; I have tried it. (Of course, the installer won’t work due to the expired certificate). Then you can do the replace bit as per 3-4 above.​

#applequality
 


FYI: ... Ubuntu Linux Gets Intel Microcode Update to Fix CPU Hangs ...
Apple’s not too far behind with microcode updates, it seems, though I’m not sure if they are applied at the firmware level or at boot time. At least on my 2015 iMac (with a Skylake processor), microcode from June is installed.
Bash:
  sysctl -x machdep.cpu.signature
  machdep.cpu.signature: 0x000506e3

  sysctl -x machdep.cpu.microcode_version
  machdep.cpu.microcode_version: 0x000000cc
For those who didn’t read the article, the “update” referenced is actually a change to back out the buggy version of the microcode until Intel gets it right. Sometimes being on the bleeding edge isn’t ideal. :-)
 



Apple has released macOS 10.15.2. However, there appears to be no "combo" update - I can't even find one trying different download numbers in the usual way on their (dysfunctional) Support page. Has Apple now abandoned these without warning?
 



iOS 13 has been the worst iOS I can remember. Even on the latest version, I've had random app
I'm running Mojave, IOS 12, and my watch is Version 5 something. I doubt I will ever install another update unless someone holds a gun to my head. Everything works now, and that is all I care about. I even regret upgrading to Mojave, but there's no turning back on that, mostly getting some Apache server stuff to run again.
 


That particular download is only a delta update, and requires that you already have macOS 10.15.1 installed.
Apple has released macOS 10.15.2. However, there appears to be no "combo" update - I can't even find one trying different download numbers in the usual way on their (dysfunctional) Support page. Has Apple now abandoned these without warning?
Apple has finally released the combo update.
 



Thank you. I literally updated last night and searched Apple's site without results. And it's not like "10.15.2 combo update" as a search is cryptic, right? Apple's site... well, it's designed to sell, not support.
After seeing Simon's post and noticing it was for the delta update, I did a crawl through adjacent kb values in the URL looking to see what was available. Did not see the combo updater. The next day I did the same thing, but this time there was a record. Much like yourself, I could not find an entry otherwise at Apple Support. Today, it is there in plain view for all to find.

Past history indicates that it is usually a day after Apple releases a new macOS version before it appears in any form on the Apple web site, and two days before everything has been created and the web site updated. Perhaps a warning to us all that we do not necessarily need to rush out and install these as soon as they are made available. Only make a note that they will soon be available, and while you are waiting for them to post, you can take the time to perform your backups.
 


Here's a very helpful email from a longtime MacInTouch supporter:
While I had seen several folks noting that createinstall media fails for new certificate posted OS X Sierra Installer, I hadn’t seen a solution posted there (aside from resetting a Mac’s internal clock).​
One fix that I’ve used successfully without resetting the clock (that I think has been noted elsewhere) requires that you have an old version of the Install MacOS Sierra.app (dated October, 2017) and that you use that first to create a bootable USB stick with the old version of the installer (with the expired certificate).​
Then put that bootable USB in your Mac, and update it with the new version of the Sierra installer, as follows:​
1. Download the new software for the Sierra macOS installer, which is named InstallerOS.dmg​
2. Mount the dmg and run the package - this will put Install MacOS Sierra.app in the /Applications directory, per usual; this is dated​
3. Open the USB stick and delete the old version of the Install MacOS Sierra.app that is there (erase and empty trash, e.g.)​
4. Copy the new version of the Install MacOS Sierra.app to the USB stick​
This seems to work - will boot up and install Sierra in all the minis, laptops that I’ve tried, up to 2015 at least, without any complaints that the installer is damaged, etc.​
If you don’t have a bootable USB with the older version of Sierra, you can still create one: using createinstall media with Apple’s instructions works fine here; I have tried it. (Of course, the installer won’t work due to the expired certificate). Then you can do the replace bit as per 3-4 above.​
Thanks very much to the person who reported this, and to Ric for posting it. Your solution saved me a lot of work and head-scratching.

I downloaded the macOS Sierra installer (.dmg) yesterday and can report the problem still exists. Happily, the solution Ric posted still works!

#applequality #bugs #tips
 


I noticed today that if you purchased the Better Blocker Safari extension from its two-person developer team, you'll need to purchase it again to get continued updates, thanks to a change in the developer's legal structure and Apple's apparent unwillingness to engage with them.
Ind.ie said:
About Better’s migration from Ind.ie to Small Technology Foundation
We reached out to Apple to ask if they would simply move our developer account to Small Technology Foundation. Computer said “no.” We also asked if we could migrate the apps to our new account. Computer said “no.” (You cannot move apps between accounts if they use iCloud features. Better uses iCloud to sync your ‘Do Not Block’ list between devices.)

We even wrote a blog post and appealed to anyone at Apple who might be able to help. But no one got in touch. So we really did try everything we could to avoid this. We’d rather not do this either: it means we’re going to lose over three years of history and our placement on the App Store and probably upset a bunch of people in the process.
P.S. It is astonishing that it is impossible to perform such an elementary task as copying the text, i.e. the "what's new" text, from the "more" link of an App Store update notice using the Mojave version of the App Store app. An elementary, defining feature of the Apple computing experience since at least the Lisa... gone, because hey, it's 2020, and Apple doesn't need to follow no stinkin' UI conventions.
 


I noticed today that if you purchased the Better Blocker Safari extension from its two-person developer team, you'll need to purchase it again to get continued updates, thanks to a change in the developer's legal structure and Apple's apparent unwillingness to engage with them.
Yup. A [trillion]-dollar company that spent $6B+ on a spaceship campus, doesn't have the resources to deal with a simple request that would make the life of third-party developers (and by extension, Apple's own customers) that little bit easier.

This is, indeed, the Apple of 2020.
 



And the most important point from that post in my opinion:
"That said, this is just how life is when you’re dealing with trillion-dollar faceless corporations. It’s just one reason why it’s so important that we fund and develop human-scale small tech as an alternative to the strangehold of big tech on our lives."
 


That said, this is just how life is when you’re dealing with trillion-dollar faceless corporations. It’s just one reason why it’s so important that we fund and develop human-scale small tech as an alternative to the strangehold of big tech on our lives.
Big companies like Apple ration their touch costs because it is very easy for any touch cost to balloon. The issue sort of answers itself, in that Better Blocker doesn't really mean anything to Apple, and whatever process is needed likely involves actions outside of the scope of the developer plan. The little thing for Better Blocker then doesn't fit with Apple management of touch costs.

Let me put out there that there are things that make me unhappy in selling through Apple, but we are all remora tagging along under the shark. We are not dependent in any way on Apple for most of our revenue, and that keeps us healthy. If you put all your eggs into the basket of a brokerage or publishing system, then you accept they will make decisions that benefit the brokerage system and not you. A part of that is Apple ensuring it isn't dependent on any third party. This was clear from the very beginning for selling iOS and Mac apps through Apple. Indeed, if you are exclusively developing for an Apple platform, then you have faced this for quite some time. It just has been less noticeable an issue - but it has always been there.
 


For a while, now, I have been wondering, perhaps an odd consideration: If Apple offered a security update plan for older systems Mac OS, Safari, and such... for a fee,
would folks sign up?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For a while, now, I have been wondering, perhaps an odd consideration: If Apple offered a security update plan for older systems Mac OS, Safari, and such... for a fee,
would folks sign up?
Yes, of course. (People already paid to buy copies of Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard without even getting security updates and despite Apple's best efforts to hide it.)
 


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