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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I had the same issue. Trying to reinstall macOS in an old Mac whose hard drive died and replaced with SSD. Could not find the original CDs, nor a bootable copy of macOS to download. If I tried downloading with Mojave, I would get the error that the OS was not supported.
It might be worth trying to reinstall via Recovery mode:
Apple Support said:
Reinstall from macOS Recovery
...
Shift-Option-⌘-R
Install the macOS that came with your Mac, or the closest version still available.

... If macOS Sierra 10.12.4 or later was never installed on your Mac, macOS Recovery works differently...
  • Option-Command-R installs the macOS that came with your Mac, or the closest version still available.
  • Shift-Option-Command-R isn't available.
 


Do you perhaps have differing DNS's assigned to the two options (Ethernet and WIFI)? It is possible that the wired DNS is unable to resolve the address. I have had this situation arise when I have had a DNS set in my network preferences. Some things can be accessed but others can not. By changing to a "non-denominational" DNS (let the system decide), I have then been able to connect to the previously unreachable web sites. It might be worth checking.
I can't remember now exactly what my previous configuration was. The iMac is configured using DHCP, and I had to configure IPv6 to Link Local Only, due to a broken IPv6 prefix configuration in my network. Nonetheless, there isn't any IPv6 DNS configuration in the DHCP parameters, so it shouldn't affect network connectivity.

I don't think I set an alternate DNS (though I have configured my home machines for Google DNS running on a different AppleID; I don't know if network settings are shared from one device to another, but it should not affect the iMac, which is using a different AppleID).

The weird thing is that it persists after a reboot, so the "App Store is Unreachable" status seems to be cached somewhere and was not fixed by rebooting.
 


It might be worth trying to reinstall via Recovery mode...
This is a bit off topic, but I was upgrading a bunch of Late-2012 iMacs to Mojave, with reFind to enable multi-OS selection on booting. To install reFind, I need to boot into recovery mode (hence disabling System Integrity Protection) to run the installer.

The problem is that the recovery mode partition is removed by the Mojave installer (it would be useless in any case, since it doesn't understand APFS), but the Internet Recovery Image is also unable to recognize APFS partitions!

I ended up needing to boot from a bootable USB Mojave installer to access Recovery Tools that can mount APFS.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... The problem is that the recovery mode partition is removed by the Mojave installer (it would be useless in any case, since it doesn't understand APFS), but the Internet Recovery Image is also unable to recognize APFS partitions! ...
I wonder if you could do this?
  1. Add a (small) unencrypted HFS partition to the drive.
  2. Select that small partition in Carbon Copy Cloner.
  3. Click the Recovery HD... button.
  4. Clone Recovery HD
This might only work on a pre-Mojave system, though. I haven't tried it on Mojave, but I do it frequently in macOS Sierra, and it adds a Recovery HD partition, which you can see if you type the diskutil list command in Terminal.
 



I installed Security Update 2018-003 10.13.6 (1.8GB download) a few weeks ago. Today it showed up again in App Store Updates. Maybe it's different without a version number change? I installed it again. After the requisite reboot, it shows up in App Store Updates again.
 


I installed Security Update 2018-003 10.13.6 (1.8GB download) a few weeks ago. Today it showed up again in App Store Updates. Maybe it's different without a version number change? I installed it again. After the requisite reboot, it shows up in App Store Updates again.
I did several updates yesterday for apps and Security -- and they show up again today.
 


I had a problem with two third-party applications: clicking the Update button for either resulted in an endlessly spinning gear at the upper left of the App Store window. But, in consult with Apple Support, this worked for them: close App Store; open System Preferences > Spotlight. In the Search Results tab, assure that Applications is checked. In the Privacy tab, make sure that {...mumble...} is not listed.

For both, I made no changes; just opening and closing the Spotlight prefs evidently causes it to reindex. Give it "a while" for the reindex, then try App Store again. This allowed the two applications to update normally.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I have a second production system for a specific task, a 2011 MacBook Pro running macOS Sierra. I was using it for another job yesterday, and it wanted to do a security update and a Safari update. OK, probably a good idea.

Now, when I try to login to the main production account (non-admin account), all I get is a blank screen. (The admin account still works.) I tried a bunch of tricks and workarounds (e.g. Safe Boot, user account settings changes, etc.), but none worked.

I'm now restoring from an old backup. Great.
 


When the downloaded combo updater said I couldn't install the macOS 10.14.3 update on my 27" iMac 2015, I should have walked away and waited, but, no, I just had to do it through System Update in the System Preferences pane. Well...

I just updated to macOS 10.14.3, and my Bluetooth vanished - not working (no mouse, no keyboard). I hooked up a USB mouse and keyboard, and found that the Bluetooth icon was gone from System Preferences, could not be found with Spotlight, and nothing was listed in the About This Mac > System Report > Bluetooth! Gone!!

This maneuver saved me:
Apple Discussions said:
Just in case anyone needs this!
 


I have a MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013, 2.8 GHz Core I7, 16 GB running 10.14.2.)

I've downloaded the 10.14.3 combo updater twice and it tells me that I cannot install the update as my computer does not meet the minimum requirements for installation. (or words to that affect).

Pretty weird! First time that this has ever happened!
 


Can anyone explain why I currently have Version 3 of the App Store application (which is the version associated with Mojave) installed, even though I am currently running High Sierra, which requires version 2.4 of the App Store application?

Accordingly I am unable to download and install the latest updates for High Sierra released today. Yes, I have found the direct download for the "Security Update 2019-001" but am not sure how I would get the Safari update.

Thanks
 



I have a MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013, 2.8 GHz Core I7, 16 GB running 10.14.2.)
I've downloaded the 10.14.3 combo updater twice and it tells me that I cannot install the update as my computer does not meet the minimum requirements for installation. (or words to that affect).
Pretty weird! First time that this has ever happened!
That happened to me too. I waited a few hours, then downloaded the "macOSUpdCombo10.14.3.dmg" file again. This time it presented the disks available for updating correctly.

I have no way to prove this, but I'm guessing Apple messed up the earlier Combo updater, received reports of their error, then silently replaced the original file with a corrected version. (It's not like that part of the scenario has never happened.)
 


That happened to me too. I waited a few hours, then downloaded the "macOSUpdCombo10.14.3.dmg" file again. This time it presented the disks available for updating correctly.
Unfortunately after downloading a new copy of the Combo updater I still get the same message. Now it is a bit annoying. I've never had this problem with Apple before. Oh well!
 



And now, 24 hours later, Apple still has not replaced/fixed this problem.

I am a long-time, since the Apple II days, user of Apple products, and this inability to release a usable system update is very sad. Welcome to modern American business practices!
 


And now, 24 hours later, Apple still has not replaced/fixed this problem.
I went to the local Apple Store here in Tucson to ask about this situation. They were unaware of any difficulties. They recommended that I call Apple Customer Support, which I did.

The Apple tech was unaware of the problem that I was describing with the combo updater. So asked if she could do a screen share with me. As she watched, she had me go to the App Store, select Updates and then search for Mojave. She had me download the Mojave installer, which asked if I wanted to install 10.14.3. I said yes, of course!

After 40+ minutes, my retina MacBook Pro restarted and macOS 10.14.3 was installed.

I did the same with my wife’s 13" retina MacBook Pro. The combo updater also did not work on her computer. Doing the above worked for her, too.

macOS 10.14.3 is working as expected on both machines.

A long and winding road to finally achieve success!
 


Like many of you, I had the same problem with the macOS 10.14.3 combo updater on two machines (2015 MacBook Air 11", 2015 Retina MacBook Pro 15"). Two downloads on two different days. Get Info reported the exact same number of bytes in the files, and neither one would install.

So I downloaded the delta update from Apple Downloads, and it installed just fine on both. (Haven't tried either yet on the cheese grater.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
When the downloaded combo updater said I couldn't install the macOS 10.14.3 update on my 27" iMac 2015, I should have walked away and waited, but, no, I just had to do it through System Update in the System Preferences pane. Well...
I just updated to macOS 10.14.3, and my Bluetooth vanished - not working (no mouse, no keyboard). I hooked up a USB mouse and keyboard, and found that the Bluetooth icon was gone from System Preferences, could not be found with Spotlight, and nothing was listed in the About This Mac > System Report > Bluetooth! Gone!!
This maneuver saved me:
Just in case anyone needs this!
That is resetting the SMC (System Management Controller). The procedure is different for different Mac models:
How to reset the System Management Controller (SMC) on your Mac
Thanks for the heads-up on that. It turns out that Mac laptops with T2 chips have a bizarre new, two-step SMC Reset contortion:
Apple Support said:
How to reset the System Management Controller (SMC) on your Mac

Mac notebook computers with the T2 chip
...
If that doesn't resolve the issue, follow these steps:
  1. Choose Apple menu > Shut Down.
  2. After your Mac shuts down, press and hold the right Shift key, the left Option key, and the left Control key for 7 seconds. Then keep holding those keys while you press and hold the power button for another 7 seconds.
  3. Release all three keys and the power button, then wait a few seconds.
  4. Press the power button again to turn on your Mac.
 



Like many of you, I had the same problem with the macOS 10.14.3 combo updater on two machines (2015 MacBook Air 11", 2015 Retina MacBook Pro 15"). Two downloads on two different days. Get Info reported the exact same number of bytes in the files, and neither one would install.

So I downloaded the delta update from Apple Downloads, and it installed just fine on both. (Haven't tried either yet on the cheese grater.)
I had the same problem with the 10.14.3 Combo Update. After my first try failed I waited a day, downloaded the Combo update and tried again, still with no success. I then installed the delta update, which worked. After that I downloaded the Combo update for a third time and ran it. This time it worked.
 


I'm not running Mojave on any of my machines, but have been archiving the associated installers and updates for possible future use.

After reading here about the problems people were having with the 10.14.3 Combo Update that I'd just downloaded on January 24, I tried downloading it again on the 25th. The second file was about 30MB larger than the first. As I said, I don't use Mojave, so can't comment on the functionality of either version.
 


David, I think it was in one of your posts where you mentioned getting the Mojave 10.14.3 installer through the App Store. I tried that on my 15" Retina MacBook Pro 11,3 (late 2013 also) and it worked. The file size was over 6 gigabytes. I made a copy of the installer before doing the installation, which went perfectly well.
However, when I transferred the installer file to my 2018 Mac Mini, the installation gave me a verification error and could not proceed. So I tried a fresh download from the App Store onto the Mac Mini, and this time it work without a hitch. Apparently, the download from the App Store links the installer file to the particular Mac acquiring it.
The 10.14.3 update apparently performed a firmware update on the Mini between the 10.14.3 combo update and the update from the full installer. Previously, the Boot ROM version was 220.240.2.0.0 (iBridge: 16.16.3132.5.1,0). Now it’s 220.240.2.0.0 (iBridge: 16.16.3133.0.0,0). Same boot ROM but different iBridge.
We keep installers for the past 7 or so macOS versions on our utility portable drives. They never ask for Apple ID and install with no problem on machines with no Apple ID or with different Apple IDs in use. I've never seen this be an issue.

Keep in mind, the OS updates download and install without ever setting up an Apple ID in the store. If it does insert some ID info into the package, I don't think it works in any limiting way. We do get a verification error sometimes and have to re-download a new one. I guess this is due to it being a defunct or problematic version or getting corrupt.
 


I also downloaded the Combo Update only to have it not work. I did go ahead and used the Delta update. Subsequently, the same Combo Update that had not worked now worked just fine. Of course, I was already at 10.14.3, but this way I get the 'advantage' of the Combo Update
 


We keep installers for the past 7 or so macOS versions on our utility portable drives. They never ask for Apple ID and install with no problem on machines with no Apple ID or with different Apple IDs in use. I've never seen this be an issue.
Keep in mind, the OS updates download and install without ever setting up an Apple ID in the store. If it does insert some ID info into the package, I don't think it works in any limiting way. We do get a verification error sometimes and have to re-download a new one. I guess this is due to it being a defunct or problematic version or getting corrupt.
Looking at the contents of the full installers it seems that they had a Mac App Store receipt up through Sierra. After that, no receipt is present.
 


I think the issue with the Combo Update (10.14.3) is that the version is off (18C54 vs 18D42) in that my 10.14.2 was C54, and 10.14.3 Combo’s list parameter was not recognizing this.

An Apple forum user recommended editing the package list, something I am not comfortable with. I did get the delta update to show up (it was not initially until 30 hours later for some reason) and after that, the combo worked (extra work but cleaner in my opinion)....
 


I'm not running Mojave on any of my machines, but have been archiving the associated installers and updates for possible future use.

After reading here about the problems people were having with the 10.14.3 Combo Update that I'd just downloaded on January 24, I tried downloading it again on the 25th. The second file was about 30MB larger than the first. As I said, I don't use Mojave, so can't comment on the functionality of either version.
I downloaded 10.14.3 Combo Update at 12:15 pm EST today. They are different sizes and diff says they are different. Since I've already updated all my Mojave disks, I can't check to see if the new one works. Here is some information about both:

Kind: Installer package
Size: 2,485,124,277 bytes (2.49 GB on disk)
Created: January 15, 2019 at 8:50 PM
Modified: January 16, 2019 at 12:30 AM

Kind: Installer package
Size: 2,505,751,715 bytes (2.51 GB on disk)
Created: January 24, 2019 at 7:36 AM
Modified: January 24, 2019 at 4:21 PM
 


So considering all these issues surrounding the last Mojave update, I had problems with the most recent High Sierra security update, as well, on an iMac Pro. Maybe it's the security component that's shared between both that's the culprit?

In my case, I ran the update from the App Store, it rebooted and ran the update, then I went along happily using the computer. However, once I shutdown or restarted (could be hours or even days later), it would stall and then go to the "failed to complete" screen.

Disk Utility was no help, and the only recourse was to reinstall High Sierra from recovery - 20-30 minutes later, and I was back to the state before the update.

I tried again the next day, and the same thing happened. Based on the error log, it was looking for a file or files that didn't exist, as if it was trying to clean up something that was already gone.

Anyway, after reinstalling once again, I instead downloaded the combo updater and ran that after unplugging all peripherals. This finally worked, but, geeze Apple, this is such a train wreck of an OS and it looks like Mojave is no better.

I've been holding off on upgrading to Mojave while waiting for some mission-critical apps to get support, but as has been the case since Lion, is there anything compelling in this new OS that I want? I haven't seen anything.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Howard Oakley writes about the confusing, silent operations involved in Apple firmware updates:
The Eclectic Light Co. said:
Setting up a new (or repurposed) Mac: 8 The problem of updating firmware
For some years now, Apple has only distributed EFI and other firmware updates bundled within macOS system installers and updaters. This is one of the reasons why macOS updates are so large: each (even the recent 10.14.3 Supplemental Update) now contains a full set of EFI, SMC and other firmware updates, even though the firmware may not have changed for some months.

If you want to set up a new or repurposed Mac which is identical (the same model) to another, and both are running the same firmware versions throughout – and those include EFI, SMC, and SSD controller – then you should still get away with using imaging, so long as the Mac doesn’t have a T2 chip.

If any of that firmware needs to be updated during installation, for example if the new Mac is still running High Sierra, then imaging won’t accomplish the necessary firmware updates; only an Apple system installer with the correct firmware installer within it will achieve that. At best, you’ll be left with a new Mac which is running outdated firmware, which is a good reason for instability. At worst, you may end up with an unbootable mess.

The T2 chip, with its Secure Boot, makes this even worse....
 


Apple's Downloads "support" page remains confoundingly out of date, showing macOS 10.14.3 and Security Update 2019-001 as the latest releases a day after Apple released macOS 10.14.4 and Security Update 2019-002. What in the world is Apple's problem with simple, essential documentation?
In case it helps, here's the result of an automated scan for latest stuff:

DLDateVersionDescription/Link
1994​
2019-03-25
v10.14.4​
Download macOS Mojave 10.14.4 Update
1995​
2019-03-25
v2019-002​
Download Security Update 2019-002 (Sierra)
1996​
2019-03-25
v10.14.4​
Download macOS Mojave 10.14.4 Combo Update
1997​
2018-12-05
v2019-002​
Download Security Update 2019-002 (High Sierra)
1998​
2019-03-25
Download Swift 5 Runtime Support for Command Line Tools
1999​
iTunes - Upgrade to Get iTunes Now - Apple (301 Moved Permanently)
 


Yesterday I updated to macOS 10.14.4 on three systems, security updates 2019-002 on both Sierra (VM) and High Sierra (hardware), and iOS 12.2 on an iPhone 7. So far, zero observed problems.

Thanks to Zaphod Beeblebrox, I'm really excited about the giraffe.

I'm watching a three-screen setup on a Mac Mini 8,1 which previously had shown problems.
 


I was also offered the second Security Update after installing the first a few days ago. I'm on an iMac running High Sierra.

Another oddity surrounding the second update is that as of the writing of this post, there hasn't been any announcement on Apple's security listserv. It seems to me that Apple made a bad QA mistake on the initial release and is trying to avoid drawing attention to the fixed (?) version.
 


I tried to download Mojave 10.14.4 today in a VM, but it just downloaded the small stub file. When I previously downloaded 10.14.1 in the same environment, it downloaded the full installer via the App Store.

I've read to use DOS Dude's Mojave Patcher to get the full installer, which is probably fine, but I'd rather not have the installer modified and get it more directly.

I discovered this terminal script, which seems more direct, but it gives two different builds with the same date for downloading Mojave. I've read that one of them might be for Macs with a T2 chip. Does anyone know which is correct for a Mac without the T2?

# ProductID Version Build Post Date Title
1 041-47723 10.14.4 18E2034 2019-03-25 macOS Mojave
2 091-95155 10.13.6 17G66 2019-01-08 macOS High Sierra
3 091-94326 10.13.6 17G65 2018-07-11 macOS High Sierra
4 041-49229 10.14.4 18E226 2019-03-25 macOS Mojave
5 091-95774 10.13.6 17G2208 2018-07-30 macOS High Sierra


Is there a trick to get the App Store to download the full installer? It's been talked about before, but I can't find the reference.
 


I discovered this terminal script, which seems more direct, but it gives two different builds with the same date for downloading Mojave. I've read that one of them might be for Macs with a T2 chip. Does anyone know which is correct for a Mac without the T2?
I have macOS 10.14.4 on my 2017 iMac that has no T2 chip. This is the System Software Report description for macOS:
macOS 10.14.4 (18E226)

So that would be #4 in the list you got with the terminal script.
 


I tried to download Mojave 10.14.4 today in a VM, but it just downloaded the small stub file. When I previously downloaded 10.14.1 in the same environment, it downloaded the full installer via the App Store.
I've read to use DOS Dude's Mojave Patcher to get the full installer, which is probably fine, but I'd rather not have the installer modified and get it more directly.
I discovered this terminal script, which seems more direct, but it gives two different builds with the same date for downloading Mojave. I've read that one of them might be for Macs with a T2 chip. Does anyone know which is correct for a Mac without the T2?

# ProductID Version Build Post Date Title
1 041-47723 10.14.4 18E2034 2019-03-25 macOS Mojave
2 091-95155 10.13.6 17G66 2019-01-08 macOS High Sierra
3 091-94326 10.13.6 17G65 2018-07-11 macOS High Sierra
4 041-49229 10.14.4 18E226 2019-03-25 macOS Mojave
5 091-95774 10.13.6 17G2208 2018-07-30 macOS High Sierra


Is there a trick to get the App Store to download the full installer? It's been talked about before, but I can't find the reference.
I didn't have a problem downloading the full installer, so I didn't read any of the threads, but there are several on tonymacx86 forums about how to do so:

 


I tried to download Mojave 10.14.4 today in a VM, but it just downloaded the small stub file. When I previously downloaded 10.14.1 in the same environment, it downloaded the full installer via the App Store. I've read to use DOS Dude's Mojave Patcher to get the full installer, which is probably fine, but I'd rather not have the installer modified and get it more directly. I discovered this terminal script, which seems more direct, but it gives two different builds with the same date for downloading Mojave. I've read that one of them might be for Macs with a T2 chip. Does anyone know which is correct for a Mac without the T2?

# ProductID Version Build Post Date Title
1 041-47723 10.14.4 18E2034 2019-03-25 macOS Mojave
2 091-95155 10.13.6 17G66 2019-01-08 macOS High Sierra
3 091-94326 10.13.6 17G65 2018-07-11 macOS High Sierra
4 041-49229 10.14.4 18E226 2019-03-25 macOS Mojave
5 091-95774 10.13.6 17G2208 2018-07-30 macOS High Sierra


Is there a trick to get the App Store to download the full installer? It's been talked about before, but I can't find the reference.
As a general rule, the build number of combined release will be 2 or 3 digits after the letter. If you see 4 numbers, that is typically a special build. What happens at every point update is that Apple rolls in all drivers and kexts for all current shipping Macs. Any Macs released in between point updates are given a special build until the next point release.

In this case, the 18E226 build is the correct build for every device except the 2019 iMac released in March. 18E2034 is a special build just for the new iMacs.
 


Something that surprised me a little regarding Software Update (Mojave)...
Like many people, I leave my Mac Mini on 24/7, and on one space (desktop) I keep System Preferences running. If you click on Software Update, it always says No Update, even when there is one. You have to quit System Preferences and restart it, and then Software Update really runs the check and finds it.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
In contrast to the title, this is some seriously useful information, including a list of every Mac OS X/OS X/macOS version with notes and links describing the changes it brought.
Rob Griffiths said:
A useless analysis of macOS (OS X) release dates

Some random notes, updated from the original post:
  • Starting with the Public Beta and up through macOS 10.14.4, there have been 121 macOS releases, both major and minor. This figure includes every macOS release. There have been two updates—10.0.2, which as far as I can tell, was never released, and 10.2.7, which I believe was the update with the one-day lifespan—that are somewhat odd, but they have been publicly discussed, so I’ve counted them. If I’m wrong about either of these, please correct me.
  • As of March 25, 2019 (macOS 10.14.4’s release date), it’s been 6,767 days since the Public Beta was released. So on average, we’ve seen some sort of update every 56.3 days.
  • The shortest time period between any two releases is 8 days, which is how quickly the 10.10.3 Supplemental Update came out after the 10.10.3 release. (And also the 10.14.1 Supplemental Update.)
  • The longest time period between any two minor releases is 165 days, which was how long we waited for the 10.4.8 » 10.4.9 update.
  • The smallest update was 10.3.1, at only 1.5MB. The largest (non-combo, non-main OS release) update was 10.14.1 at 3.3GB.
 



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