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Two notes:
  1. From a support document:
    1. "Exporting data from Apple Card to a financial app like Mint is not currently supported."
    2. "Statements are PDFs of statements from previous months."
  2. The credit card agreement contains a mandatory arbitration provision. However, you have 90 days from the time you get the card to reject the provision. The provision and procedure for filing a rejection are clearly stated in the last section of the agreement.
 


I am not, by any means, a fan (or fanboi) of Goldman Sachs or the investment banking industry. Even so, I disagree that Taibbi's article is worth reading [and I think] any credit card issuer capable of working at the scale required by the Apple Card is going to face the same concerns....

If the operational details of the Apple Card are a factor you wish to consider before applying, I recommend looking at Goldman's most recent annual filing with the SEC and sources like The Economist or Bloomberg Businessweek.
 


With no intention of defending Goldman Sachs, I must add that the application process for an Apple Card, completely implemented within one's iPhone Wallet, is impressive.

Apple has taken full advantage of your iCloud account and only requires two pieces of information to approve and issue the new Apple Card. It is available in your Apple Wallet in less than a minute.

When Apple does something so well, you can easily envision how they will be able to apply this simplicity to other complex tasks. I see many possibilities for Apple in finance.
 


Excellent and comprehensive list! And finally we find out how to make a payment to an Apple Card account.

However... most credit cards in the US are chip-and-signature cards, while in the rest of the world most are chip-and-PIN. The physical Titanium Apple Card has no signature panel, so presumably it doesn't work as a chip-and-sig. That's a good thing, since chip-and-sig is laughably insecure. But is there a PIN associated with the Ti Apple Card for those occasions when the physical card needs to be presented, because there's not an NFC reader?
 






Chip and PIN is very common in areas outside the US. We seem to be behind the times here.
In Australia it's often hard to use a chip card, because contactless is so pervasive that the chip has become de facto obsolete. More than once I've heard, "Hey, do we still have a chip card reader?"

In the mid 90's I was a heavy texter from my mobile phone and was used to paying with a chip+PIN card. It was a shock to see how primitive the phone and banking infrastructure was in the US, at least until Apple reset the phone world. I wonder if this is a small step in them doing the same to banking.
 


Chip and PIN is very common in areas outside the US. We seem to be behind the times here.
I have encountered a PIN requirement in the USA twice in my life; the only one I remember in detail was a US Post Office kiosk. In that case it was password app to the rescue. In the other case it was omg wtf – let's try another card – lucky I have more than one – whew.
 


... However... most credit cards in the US are chip-and-signature cards, while in the rest of the world most are chip-and-PIN. The physical Titanium Apple Card has no signature panel, so presumably it doesn't work as a chip-and-sig. That's a good thing, since chip-and-sig is laughably insecure. But is there a PIN associated with the Ti Apple Card for those occasions when the physical card needs to be presented, because there's not an NFC reader?
Except, signatures are no longer required by the credit card companies in the U.S.

Merchants can still require them, but I suspect a lot of that is habit.
 


I don't think I've ever needed a PIN to use a credit card.
As I had pointed out, chip-and-PIN cards are the norm in the rest of the world. One of the Apple Card's features is no charges for foreign currency conversion, so how the card works in other countries is of interest.

When I insert my US-based Visa card in a card reader in Europe, it is identified as a chip-and-sig card, and a charge slip will be printed for signing. When my mother's local card is used in the same reader, it'll be identified as chip-and-PIN, and she has to key in her PIN to complete payment.

There are two reasons this is important. The first is, of course, security, since signatures are essentially meaningless. The other is that unattended card readers overseas, such as those used in parking, road toll or other automated POS [Point-of-Sale] machines, require the PIN (unless using NFC). Many vendors set an amount limit for NFC transactions, in order to contain fraud.
Except, signatures are no longer required by the credit card companies in the U.S.
Merchants can still require them, but I suspect a lot of that is habit.
That the credit card companies no longer require signatures is a distinction without a difference, since, as the article you linked points out, most merchants do still require them. The merchant also sets the amount threshold below which they don't call for a signature. At my local supermarket, that's $50, meaning I almost always have to sign. I've always, without exception, had to sign at restaurants (unless you count fast food as a restaurant).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
As I had pointed out, chip-and-PIN cards are the norm in the rest of the world...
I actually had gone back to your post and reread it then looked for details about how to enter a PIN for an Apple Card, but I came up empty in my searches.

I also wondered, is zip code commonly used as a defacto/default PIN for credit cards?
 


I also wondered, is zip code commonly used as a defacto/default PIN for credit cards?
No. They're different. But I frequently see point of sale terminals (especially gas pumps) asking for your billing zip code as a part of the authentication process.

Most banks in the US will support a PIN, but you usually have to call their customer service phone number to set it up. If you plan on traveling to Europe, it's probably a good idea to set it up. If not, don't bother - it may force you to start needing it in the US.

On the other hand, contactless payment (including ApplePay) is becoming very popular in Europe, so you may not need the physical Apple Card very much anyway. (When I was on a trip to Italy a few years ago, I got a lot of "wow" reactions when I used Apple Pay, because none of the local banks had yet to support it, but I had to convince a few waiters to let me try it - they didn't understand that I wanted to pay using the phone instead of a card!)
 



A few thoughts:

1. It looks like the Apple Card does not offer cash advances at this time. That could explain why there isn't a way to add a PIN. Also, if contactless transactions are offered by a merchant, Apple wants you to use Apple Pay from your phone or watch.

2. I've had a PIN assigned to a US-issued chip-and-signature credit card for several years. I haven't ever been required to enter a PIN in the USA when making a purchase. I don't think the PIN is stored on the card, though, because it is possible to change the PIN on the issuer's website.

3. I use my card frequently both inside and outside of North America. Transactions outside of the USA virtually never use chip-and-PIN mode. I either have to sign (if a card reader has always-on network connectivity) or the transaction is rejected (if a card reader is offline most of the time and relies on a card-stored PIN).

4. I did some research on US-issued chip-and-PIN cards recently. It is rare for a bank or credit union to offer true chip-and-PIN cards, with card-stored PINs, to customers. A name that does come up often as a source is PenFed Credit Union. I don't have any experience with PenFed or any of its services, however.
 


First Tech Federal Credit Union Platinum (or Choice) is the only US card I found when I researched a few years ago that offers true primary chip+PIN, no foreign transaction fees, and no annual fee. I carry it as a backup card while travelling, in the event that another card fails me. (Several other cards, such as those issued by Barclays, support chip+PIN secondarily, but that won't help you if a reader tries to support chip+signature and fails, as happened to me in Finland.)
 


On the other hand, contactless payment (including ApplePay) is becoming very popular in Europe...
I would say "On the other hand, contactless payment (including ApplePay) is very popular in Europe..."

It is almost the norm here in the UK to use contactless for amounts under £30. Amounts over that will normally require a PIN.

I have a market stall selling my images, and I accept all contactless payments via an iZettle device. Most of the other traders in the market do the same. I also see them used by street traders selling food. Cash use in this country is dwindling, according to reports.

It is now not required to have a ticket to travel on the London Underground or on London buses. If you have a contactless card or a phone with a payment system, all you have to do is tap in and tap out. Nothing else required.

One of our biggest supermarkets has introduced a payment system attached to their loyalty card. It now carries a QR code. If you have activated the payment system with it (linked it to a card account or your phone, etc), then the cashier scanning the card automatically takes the payment, as well as adding in your divi points.

I'm off out shopping now, and I doubt that I will see anyone paying cash.
 


I would say "On the other hand, contactless payment (including ApplePay) is very popular in Europe..." It is almost the norm here in the UK to use contactless for amounts under £30. Amounts over that will normally require a PIN....
Even in Eastern Europe, contactless payment has grown rapidly. In the Czech Republic, for instance, just 5 years ago even some major restaurants didn't take card payments at all; they were cash only. Now, the vast majority of places have at least Chip & PIN, of which many are contactless. Apple Pay was launched here on the 19th of February, along with many other European countries this year.

Obviously, it helps that, when you didn't take any card payments at all, moving to that system now means you get the latest, modern tech and, thus, can take contactless/Apple Pay. In addition, the Czech Republic has introduced (albeit controversial) laws around Electronic records of sales (EET) that require electronic payment/receipt systems, and, so, card payments are a low/nil cost add-on to these systems. Prague public transport recently launched contactless payment and travel tickets/cards available to buy on all trams/buses.

The EU (European Union) is bringing in new laws/regulations on 14th September 2019 regarding security of contactless payments, and, also, online payments will mostly require a verification code to be sent to your mobile phone (i.e. Strong Customer Authentication - SCA), but they are allowing for systems whereby card owners will be able to whitelist certain sites.

When I'm in stores/supermarkets here in Prague, I see most people paying contactless. Personally, I find it amazing to pay for stuff here contactless via my Apple Watch - on technology Apple absolutely nailed - even my local kebab and pizza take-away stores take contactless card payments!
 


Works well if someone steals your card, not so well if they steal your wallet!
Not really. They steal your card, look up your name in the several online places that mine your data, and find your zip code. We have had our credit card number stolen several times, not the card, and it is still the number is fraudulently used in gas stations that require a zip code. Not very secure!
 


First Tech Federal Credit Union Platinum (or Choice) is the only US card I found when I researched a few years ago that offers true primary chip+PIN, no foreign transaction fees, and no annual fee.
My credit union sent me a chip-and-PIN credit card after my original card was compromised (why do these fraudulent transactions always take place on Saturday mornings or Friday afternoons?).

As far as I can tell, it's a true chip-and-PIN, because I always get a PIN request for purchases, and I can't see any mechanism for changing the PIN, other than to contact customer service and maybe they'll send a new card.

My Barclaycard (the white Apple version) occasionally required PIN entry on purchases, but I don't see any pattern.
 


It is now not required to have a ticket to travel on the London Underground or on London buses. If you have a contactless card or a phone with a payment system, all you have to do is tap in and tap out. Nothing else required.
I don't know about London, but for other transit systems with similar abilities, you are charged the single-ride rate every time you use Apple Pay or something similar. If you are in a place more than a day or two, it is generally cheaper to use their multi-ride/multi-day pass, especially if you are eligible for a discount, such as a senior citizen rate. Many places sell a card for a few dollars that you can reload at will using your preferred payment system.
I'm off out shopping now, and I doubt that I will see anyone paying cash.
I've seen a couple of no-cash businesses here in California, also some when I visited Stockholm earlier this year.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I've seen a couple of no-cash businesses here in California, also some when I visited Stockholm earlier this year.
FYI:
Food&Wine said:
New Jersey Bans Cashless Restaurants and Stores
Less than two weeks ago, Philadelphia became the first U.S. city to ban cashless stores, and now, New Jersey is following suit. On Monday, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed legislation outlawing cash-free restaurants and stores in the Garden State, NBC reports—making it the second state to do since since Massachusetts banned them in 1978.

The debate surrounding cashless businesses—those that require payment by debit or credit card—has been escalating steadily, thanks to their recent proliferation and the accompanying media attention they've received. (Amazon Go, Dig Inn and Sweetgreen, who have all adopted a cashless model, are often mentioned.)
 


Does any one know which credit reporting agency they need unlocked? They say to unlock all of them if you apply for a card, and then if/when you get the card, you can lock them up again, but if they just need one, i'd rather minimize this exposure, since i've had some credit fraud recently.
 



I don't know about London, but for other transit systems with similar abilities, you are charged the single-ride rate every time you use Apple Pay or something similar.
Transport for London will cap fares on a daily and weekly (Monday-Sunday) basis, so there is no penalty for using Apple Pay or a contactless card for fares - with two provisos:

1) All fares must go to the same device. Since the system cannot link Apple Pay and a credit card for the same account, fares charged to one won't count for the other.​
2) Weekly capping only applies to a Monday-Sunday week. If you are traveling, will be a moderate to heavy user of transit, and starting your trip mid-week, you may do better with a weekly pass on an Oyster Card. However, if you staying for a shorter period, daily capping will be at least as advantageous as anything else.​

Note that the caps are generally lower than the charge for a pass for the equivalent period.
 


Except, signatures are no longer required by the credit card companies in the U.S.
Merchants can still require them, but I suspect a lot of that is habit.
For the last four years, I "sign" with an X. No one ever questions it, although occasionally merchants look at it and laugh. On the other hand, almost every in-person physical card transaction I do requests a signature, on paper or on the card machine. I suspect many would object if I refused to place my X.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
A new kind of problem:
BuzzFeed said:
If You Lose Your iPhone, You Can’t Pay Your Apple Card Bill On The Web
There are no paper statements with the digital-first Apple Card. Unlike a traditional credit card, everything is accessed through the Wallet app on the iPhone, including transaction histories, total balances, previous statements, and payments. There’s no website to view the latest transactions made on the card or make a payment if you lose access to that Wallet app.

So, how do you pay your Apple Card bill if your iPhone is misplaced or stolen? You could always wait until you buy a new phone, or recover your old one, but a late payment would result in interest charges which, obviously, would not be ideal. Because Apple’s support website doesn’t say, BuzzFeed News posed the question to a customer service representative through Apple’s phone and text message support system (Apple Card is currently available to a limited number of people and members of the press).
 


For the last four years, I "sign" with an X. No one ever questions it, although occasionally merchants look at it and laugh. On the other hand, almost every in-person physical card transaction I do requests a signature, on paper or on the card machine. I suspect many would object if I refused to place my X.
I usually draw either a smiley face or a dog. Security theater?
 



My physical card arrived via FedEx overnite from EWA in Compton, CA. It was in a white card-stock holder with just an embossed Apple logo on the outside and was inserted in a plain cardboard sleeve.

When the inner sleeve is opened, the card is in a slot against a multi-colored background. Below the card is the text, "Activate your card. Wake iPhone and hold here." When you follow the instructions (don't hold your iPhone over the card but over the bottom of the sleeve), your card is activated without any actions on your part.

One note: Goldman Sachs told me that the card rules state that only your legal first and last name can be on it. You can contact Goldman Sachs via the "contact us" tab by tapping the Apple Card in your Wallet app.
 



... Security theater?
Always has been. No bank or credit card company has ever compared your signature against anything on file. I've heard of banks refusing to process checks for signature mismatches but never for a credit card.

The only protection a signature gets you is so you can look at, and verify, it in the event of a dispute. For example, you don't recognize a charge on your statement, so you call the merchant, the merchant locates the receipt and shows it to you, at which point you either recognize the signature as your own or you don't.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Got an Apple Card invitation today after entering my Apple ID email address on an Apple form a number of days ago to get more details.
Apple Card <applecard@insideapple.apple.com> said:
Here’s your chance to get early access to Apple Card.

You wanted to be one of the first to get Apple Card — a new kind of credit card created by Apple, not a bank. Good news: Here’s your chance to experience Apple Card before everybody else, so you can help us get ready for the public launch. Your early access invitation is waiting, but we need your Apple ID to send it. The email address you provided does not match an Apple ID signed in to iCloud. Just complete a few simple steps so we can send your invitation.

How to get your invitation:
  • Make sure your iPhone is running iOS 12.4. To update, go to Settings > General > Software Update.
  • Take note of the Apple ID used to sign in to iCloud on your iPhone. To see your Apple ID, go to Settings, then tap your name.
  • Set a passcode for your iPhone, if you don’t have one already. To set a passcode, go to Settings, tap Face ID & Passcode or Touch ID & Passcode, then tap Turn Passcode On.
  • Go to apple.com/apple-card [clickable complex URL link apparently containing a code] and tap Notify Me to enter your Apple ID.
Invitations may take up to 48 hours to arrive.
I didn't know that signing into iCloud was a pre-requisite (in addition to being signed into Find My iPhone, iMessage, FaceTime, etc.?). Apple requires two-factor authentication (2FA) for the Apple ID account used for your Apple Card.
 


Another way signatures are used is when charges are disputed through a card issuer. When a dispute is initiated by a card holder, the issuer contacts the merchant to request documentation of the transaction. If a merchant cannot provide sufficient evidence that the charge was legitimate (back in paper-based days, this could involve quite a bit of work going through archived charge slips!), the card holder usually will not have to pay.
 


The EU (European Union) is bringing in new laws/regulations on 14th September 2019 regarding security of contactless payments, and, also, online payments will mostly require a verification code to be sent to your mobile phone (i.e. Strong Customer Authentication - SCA), but they are allowing for systems whereby card owners will be able to whitelist certain sites.
One day after posting, and the new Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) rules are now being delayed by 18 months:
 


Always has been. No bank or credit card company has ever compared your signature against anything on file. I've heard of banks refusing to process checks for signature mismatches but never for a credit card.
On a barely related note...

For some time I have been writing "see photo ID" in my credit card signature field. Never saw the point in showing a valid signature to anyone who might steal my card.

A few years back I went to purchase an Amtrack ticket at the BWI station. Handed them my credit card and was told they would not accept it. They would accept a card with a signature on the back.

I was stuck, as I really needed to get on the next train. That's where is gets odd. I borrowed a pencil from the clerk. In front of them, I used the eraser to remove "see Photo ID" and signed my name in the space. They then accepted the card for payment. As they were printing my ticket, I used the eraser to take off my signature and again wrote "see Photo ID."

Bureaucracy at its finest, helping to show how pointless the signature is.
 



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