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... My wife has an Amazon credit card that is metal. I've always been told that when a card expires, you should cut it up. Destroying my wife's old Amazon card was a giant pain. Am I just old fashioned, and is tossing the old card into the recycle bin good enough?
 


The EU (European Union) is bringing in new laws/regulations on 14th September 2019 regarding security of contactless payments, and, also, online payments will mostly require a verification code to be sent to your mobile phone (i.e. Strong Customer Authentication - SCA), but they are allowing for systems whereby card owners will be able to whitelist certain sites.
I hope they will take into account a major issue with visitors. I leave my iPhone in airplane mode when I travel outside the USA, and I use Wi-Fi. I can send and receive iMessages but not SMS. With this law, I could not receive the verification code to make an online purchase.

There is a similar "Catch 22" at the Singapore airport. They offer free Wi-Fi, but you have to enter an SMS sent to your phone, which, of course, will not be received if it is in airplane mode.
 


I hope they will take into account a major issue with visitors. I leave my iPhone in airplane mode when I travel outside the USA, and I use Wi-Fi. I can send and receive iMessages but not SMS. With this law, I could not receive the verification code to make an online purchase.
There is a similar "Catch 22" at the Singapore airport. They offer free Wi-Fi, but you have to enter an SMS sent to your phone, which, of course, will not be received if it is in airplane mode.
One option: sign up for a Google Voice account. You will get a phone number that accepts SMS messages that can be relayed to the Google Voice app, not to the mobile phone number associated with your carrier. Further, you can minimize privacy and data harvesting concerns by opening a Gmail account that you use only for Google Voice.

Another benefit is that using Google Voice for forced-SMS situations, such as on websites that do not support authenticator apps or physical tokens for 2-factor authentication, reduces the risk of somebody gaining control of your online accounts through SIM-swapping scams.

The reader comments to this article can help you decide if this is a good solution for you:
 


(Apple said:) Your early access invitation is waiting, but we need your Apple ID to send it. The email address you provided does not match an Apple ID signed in to iCloud. Just complete a few simple steps
Apparently these confirmation requests go to people requesting cards using email addresses other than their Apple ID, but some also go out even when addresses match. This is a glitch at Apple (and not a phishing scam) according to coverage at Reddit and 9to5mac, which say Apple’s advice is to revisit the Apple Card site and again request it to ‘Notify Me’ using a (the same?) Apple ID email address.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's a tip about a different issue:
Ars Techica said:
Apple’s new credit card comes with forced arbitration—here’s how to opt out
... The card's primary draw isn't in its benefits, which are perfectly fine but not outstanding by any metric. Instead, the card's strength is in its tight vertical integration with the Apple technology ecosystem and the (hopefully) increased security one gains by moving to using tokenized payments for (most of) your point-of-sale transactions. The card otherwise has a lot in common with other traditional credit cards—and, unfortunately, one of those things is the Apple Card's forced arbitration provision.

Briefly, this means that there is language in the Apple Card/Goldman Sachs' customer agreement that requires customers to give up their right to file lawsuits against Goldman or Apple, either individually or as members of a class, and instead forces customers into accepting binding arbitration to resolve disputes. Although binding arbitration is frequently defended by proponents as being faster and less expensive than lawsuits, arbitration heavily favors companies over consumers in disputes. The arbitrator or arbitrators are typically chosen by the company engaging in arbitration and tend to favor the company's interests; studies show that in the vast majority of cases, the odds of winning are heavily on the company's side. The bias in arbitration outcomes has been taken advantage of by numerous companies—including companies we regularly cover—to engage in some truly shady dealings.
 


... My wife has an Amazon credit card that is metal. I've always been told that when a card expires, you should cut it up. Destroying my wife's old Amazon card was a giant pain. Am I just old fashioned, and is tossing the old card into the recycle bin good enough?
After I spent some time figuring out how to cut up an expired metal Amex card, I discovered that these new metal cards are generally accepted by the issuer for recycling. The issuer should send you an envelope for the purpose upon request. I don't know about Apple, however...
 


After a few days with an Apple Card, we decided that a showstopper for our family was not being able to download transactions into Quicken. Cancelling the account was quick and easy using text chat from my iPhone. But destroying a card made of titanium...
That’s an issue for me also and would limit my use if not added.
 


After a few days with an Apple Card, we decided that a showstopper for our family was not being able to download transactions into Quicken. Cancelling the account was quick and easy using text chat from my iPhone. But destroying a card made of titanium...
Hammer, nail, and punch a hole through the chip? No real reason the titanium card itself needs to be destroyed. Is there even a mag stripe on the back? If so, scramble it with a magnet.
 



I think destroying unwanted or expired credit cards is always a good idea. But with the current trend for cards that are not easily cut up or damaged, I would first lock one of these cards (most issuers let you do this easily on their website or in their app, while it looks like Apple Card puts the function in Wallet) then simply toss the card in a junk drawer. Since my junk drawers only get cleaned out every couple of years, by the time I see the card again, it will be completely useless... especially if the account has been closed.
 


Hmmm, now I'm thinking of some things Apple should have done with Apple Card. Just think, if Apple had put cardOS on every chip, anybody who wanted to cripple their card would only have to wait for a Security Update to brick it.

And it's too bad Sir Jony didn't design the physical card. Then it would be thinner-thinner-thinner glass, and simply shattering or snapping an unwanted card would be easy.
 


For some time I have been writing "see photo ID" in my credit card signature field. Never saw the point in showing a valid signature to anyone who might steal my card.
I agree, and did the same for a while, but it was pointed out by a store manager that the card usually says something like "Not Valid Unless Signed", at which point, we went round and round over how many times a clerk actually checks it against a signed receipt. Luckily, my drivers license has my signature on it, and she relented.
 


Well, here is a new one on me: went to my Wallet on my iPhone X to see about applying for the new card, and after I hit "Add" and then Continue, I was hit with a screen asking for the security code for a credit card that has been cancelled for a few months. Seemed odd but more frustrating, since there were no other options to skip this screen. The card was no longer in my wallet on my iPhone, so off I went to call Apple.

After 30 minutes of hold, a very nice lady walked me through a few screens, and we found that the card was still in the wallet on my iPad. OK, so I deleted it. She then said it could take days for it to disappear on my iPhone and that, until then, there's nothing I could do.

Huh? Days? Tried reseting my iPhone. No change. Tried logging out of iCloud on my iPad and logging back in. No change. Am somewhat loathe to log out of iCloud on my iPhone for fear of lost/unmerged data, but I guess that is my next thing to try (other than waiting "days" for the system to catch up to the deleted credit card).

Other ideas, folks?
 


For some time I have been writing "see photo ID" in my credit card signature field. Never saw the point in showing a valid signature to anyone who might steal my card.
FYI:
creditcards.com said:
Sign your credit card, don’t write ‘See ID’ Anti-fraud strategy is outdated, ineffective

“If you don’t sign your card and it gets stolen or lost, it just makes it easier for the thief to sign it,” says Steven Weisman, author of “Identity Theft Alert: 10 Rules You Must Follow to Protect Yourself from America’s No. 1 Crime.”

... According to Visa’s 2014 Card Acceptance Guidelines for Visa merchants, an unsigned credit card is not considered valid and merchants are instructed not to take it. MasterCard has similar rules.
 


After a few days with an Apple Card, we decided that a showstopper for our family was not being able to download transactions into Quicken. Cancelling the account was quick and easy using text chat from my iPhone. But destroying a card made of titanium...
American Express, the granddaddy of metal cards, sends out a postage-paid envelope with new cards so that the old card can be destroyed/recycled. Apple should be doing the same. If not, perhaps you can return it to an Apple Store. Or frame it as a collector's item.
 



I see that already implemented with my Revolut.com card. Works like a charm. Reassuring. :-)
Yes, the basic technology is called 3-D Secure. However, it's not currently a requirement to use it, and some implementations of 3-D Secure don't use verification codes to mobiles - they use passwords instead.

The new (postponed) EU law is to set (3DSecure) verification codes to mobiles as the default legal requirement (SCA). The current implementation is different in different countries – e.g. all my UK-issued cards rarely use 3-D Secure (strangely, even on transactions when I most expect it), whereas all my Czechia-issued cards require 3-D Secure every time with a verification code to a mobile.

Incidentally, as a supplier processing 3DSecure payments you are not actually protected against fraud. In fact, 3-D Secure is just security theatre for the public/suppliers and completely stiffs those suppliers that actually process card payments. But, that, is a whole 'nother story…
 


A good way to destroy a titanium card would be to use an ordinary grinding wheel. But that's also a good test for titanium. If the sparks from grinding it are brilliant white, it's titanium. If they're an orangey-yellow, it's really a ferrous metal.
 


A good way to destroy a titanium card would be to use an ordinary grinding wheel. But that's also a good test for titanium. If the sparks from grinding it are brilliant white, it's titanium. If they're an orangey-yellow, it's really a ferrous metal.
Why wouldn’t you just heat over flame until it’s toasty?
 





Red heat begins at about 1000°F, so that's how you can eyeball when your card is adequately toasted. Mine hasn't been delivered yet, so I'll pass for now.
 


Hammer, nail, and punch a hole through the chip? No real reason the titanium card itself needs to be destroyed. Is there even a mag stripe on the back? If so, scramble it with a magnet.
I must be overlooking something. Why is destroying the card of any importance? It can't be used, since the account number is no longer valid, and there is no identification information (except your name) on it.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Official release:
Apple P.R. said:
Apple Card launches today for all US customers
Apple Card, a new kind of credit card created by Apple and designed to help customers lead a healthier financial life, is available1 in the US starting today. Customers can apply for Apple Card through the Wallet app on iPhone in minutes and start using it right away2 with Apple Pay in stores, in apps and on websites. Built on simplicity, transparency and privacy, Apple Card has no fees,3 encourages customers to pay less interest, offers an easy-to-understand view of spending and provides a new level of privacy and security. This launch follows the Apple Card preview earlier this month, during which a limited number of customers were invited to apply early.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Updated report from Macworld:
Alaina Yee said:
Apple Card vs Citi, Chase, and Capital One
Apple might not be turning into a bank, but it wants to handle your money. At its March announcement of Apple Card, we heard a lot about financial health, low interest rates, cash-back percentages, and zero fees. Details were fairly light then, as Apple emphasized the card's simplicity, security, and ease of use while taking broad digs at the competition.

Now that the card has launched, we finally have all the hard numbers, too. Those final details let us stage a proper showdown between Apple and its most popular cash-back rivals, because formidable opponents do exist—as our dive into into the nitty-gritty details of cash-back percentages, interest rates, and fees shows.
 


One note: Goldman Sachs told me that the card rules state that only your legal first and last name can be on it. You can contact Goldman Sachs via the "contact us" tab by tapping the Apple Card in your Wallet app.
They may have that rule, but they don't seem to enforce it. My card was issued in the name of Middlename Lastname without a hitch. Perhaps I'd have had trouble if it had been issued differently and I was trying to change it.

I applied for Apple Card out of sheer curiousity. So far, the experience, from applying to activating the physical card to making a payment to Goldman Sachs to opting out of the arbitration clause, has been better than any card I've ever had. It's been a pure delight. And the physical card itself is striking.
After a few days with an Apple Card, we decided that a showstopper for our family was not being able to download transactions into Quicken. Cancelling the account was quick and easy using text chat from my iPhone. But destroying a card made of titanium...
I suspect you've run into a "that's a feature" bug. Because your transaction history is private and only accessible to you on your iPhone/iPad, there's no way for Apple or Goldman Sachs to generate a data feed to Quicken. They just don't have that data. (Which begs the question of how to challenge a transaction if it was legit but the merchant never delivered the product or service promised…)

As for destroying the card… sharpen the edge, put it in your knife drawer in the kitchen. Next to your MacBook Air kitchen knife, of course. :-)
 



I have the original Apple Watch with watchOS 4.3.2 (the last supported) on it. When I try to add the card, which did not automatically appear on my watch, I get an error that an OS upgrade is required.

I use the watch to make most Apple Pay payments (leaving the phone in my pocket or elsewhere), so I will likely be using the Apple Card less than I might have.
 


In Nosillcast #745, podcaster Allision Sheridan chats with her friend Denise, whose Apple Card was (apparently) one of the first delivered. There are no "show notes" for the conversation, so you'd need to listen to the podcast for follow-up.

Denise didn't have to fill out a credit application. She only had to provide her "total income" and last four digits of her Social Security number. She and Allison seemed a bit spooked about that. I surmise everything from buying the iPhone to activating cell servie to what's in Apple wallet may be accessible to Apple in one way or another.

Denise's other card(s) provide warranty extension, and she was disappointed the Apple Card doesn't.

The highest 3% Apple Card cash back is for Apple and Uber. The base $1,099 MacBook Air 2019 would generate $32.97. (That's considerably less than its $249 cost for Apple Care....)

By the way, am I correct in recalling AppleCare used to be listed as an option, much like keyboards, software, and RAM, on the "Buy" page for a system? When I wanted to find the AppleCare price for the MacBook Air, the only page I found that offered to let me check required an Apple ID log-in or entry of the System's serial number. Thanks to the Google, I found an iMore article with AppleCare prices for different laptops.
 



I suspect you've run into a "that's a feature" bug. Because your transaction history is private and only accessible to you on your iPhone/iPad, there's no way for Apple or Goldman Sachs to generate a data feed to Quicken. They just don't have that data.
If that were true then the Wallet wouldn't be able to show transactions made with the physical card.

Per Apple Card - Privacy and Security, Apple doesn't have transaction details but "Goldman Sachs will use your data to operate Apple Card".
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch







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