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Ric Ford

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Anyone know how long Apple supports its latest generation of iPads?
Wikipedia has a page that tracks that:
Wikipedia said:
iOS version history
iOS is a mobile operating system, developed by Apple Inc. for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. Updates for iOS are released through the iTunes software and, since iOS 5, via over-the-air software updates. With the announcement of iOS 5 on June 6, 2011, a USB connection to iTunes was no longer needed to activate iOS devices; data synchronization can happen automatically and wirelessly through Apple's iCloud service. Major new iOS releases are announced yearly during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC), and are usually released in September of the same year, usually coinciding with the release of new iPhone models.
 


Anyone know how long Apple supports its latest generation of iPads? I got burned with the 1st Gen iPad when Apple stopped supporting it after two years. It was (and is) a great little tablet, but I use it mostly as an ebook reader now, because the version of Safari on the device doesn't work well with most new websites that use the latest gewgaws and gimcracks in place of sensible interface design principals - just one of the reasons I don't own an iPhone or a newer iPad, which Apple seems to turn into landfill fodder relatively quickly. I won't touch one with a bargepole unless I can get at least four generations of iOS on it and six years of serviceable life.
The iPad Air, released in 2013, can run iOS 12 and run it well. I still have an iPad 2 from 2011 that struggles with iOS 9, but, since its Music app is able to access iCloud music, works as a lightweight music server.
 


Anyone know how long Apple supports its latest generation of iPads?
I have iPads that are 4 years old that use the current iOS. Unfortunately, the 1st-gen iPad had a shortish life. (I also have an iPhone 6, and it runs great with the latest iOS.)

The biggest hurdle for older iOS devices was the move from 32-bit to 64-bit only software. Apple has done a great job of supporting their devices vs. the Android world, where the cheap phones might come with old versions of Android and you can't count on OS upgrades after 2 years. (I hope the Google-made phones do better.)
 


With my (very) preliminary investigation into this, it appears VMWare Fusion can do it. I've set aside some time tomorrow to investigate/test it properly.
Bad news, everyone - I couldn't get this to work. There are many old references on the Internet to converting a .dmg to .vmdk using VMWare Fusion's rawdiskCreator and vdiskmanager utilities (e.g. this one). There are also many references to "p2v" (physical-to-virtual), all of which are great for Windows but ultimately no good for macOS.

I created my .dmg's from working OS X 10.8 and macOS 10.12 hard disk partitions then tried to use the above instructions (or the myriad of similar ones on the internet). None of them would work. The second, vdiskmanager, command would generally fail with a "Received signal 11" error message. Googling this turned up this bug in Fusion 11. I can only assume the bug is still there in v12.

After what many viewed as, Apple's deliberate requirement of crippling VM software to not be able to use the client version of Mac OS X 10.6, I wouldn't put it past Apple that this bug has been deliberately required/introduced to stop users converting a .dmg to .vmdk.

In our use case, this feature would be really useful, but, of course, its primary use would end up being for Windows/Linux users to easily take a pre-installed .dmg of an OS X/macOS installation and convert and run it on non-Apple hardware, which would totally bypass the need for Apple hardware and the requirement to download and use the OS X/macOS installer to set up a virtual environment in the first place. Apple will no doubt take all action necessary to cripple a "feature" that allowed this to happen… (YDVOAMV - Your Dystopian View Of Apple May Vary).

On the good news side, what I could get to work is to create a clean OS X/macOS virtual environment (but not in VirtualBox) and then use Apple's Migration Assistant on first boot to access and use a .dmg clone to copy across the original setup/installation, users, applications and files. Of course, this requires setting up the basic/clean VM in the first place, on Apple hardware with Apple's official OS X/macOS installer, but at least this is possible.
 


My iPad is also pretty much an ebook reader, but I'm surprised to see Apple introduce a "new" iPad Air that, even when brand new, doesn't support the latest generation of Apple pencil!

I remember when Steve Jobs was spending his "40 years wandering in the (East Bay Pixar) wilderness, Apple fell into the "too many different models" swamp. I wonder if they're descending there again.
 


I won't touch one with a bargepole unless I can get at least four generations of iOS on it and six years of serviceable life.
Well, given that the iPad 2 started out with iOS 4.3 and ended OS updates with 9.3.5 five years later...

Given that the iPhone 6 started out with iOS 8 in 2014 and is still supported by the current iOS in 2019...

Given that the iPad Air started out with iOS 7.0.3 in November of 2013 and is still going strong with the current iOS now, nearly six years later...

I suspect you're safe on both scores. The only reason those older devices lost support (original iPad not included, it was just woefully underpowered and more of a proof-of-concept, honestly) was the lack of a 64 bit CPU.

You'll be fine with any iPad made in the last 2-3 years, except the iPad Mini 4.
 


My iPad is also pretty much an ebook reader, but I'm surprised to see Apple introduce a "new" iPad Air that, even when brand new, doesn't support the latest generation of Apple pencil!
The only iPads that do support the second-gen Pencil are the 2018 iPad Pros.

It makes sense that Apple would keep the [new iPad Air and Mini] with the original Pencils, since their design still includes a Lightning port and all. The transition to USB-C with the Pros is the whole reason they went with the inductive charging Pencils in the first place.

Maybe the Neo iPad Air 2: Electric Boogaloo will have USB-C and Pencil 2 support...
 


My iPad is also pretty much an ebook reader, but I'm surprised to see Apple introduce a "new" iPad Air that, even when brand new, doesn't support the latest generation of Apple pencil!
I've relegated my iPad 1 to do something I wish modern iPads could do: enter picture frame mode from the lock screen. It now spends its retirement sitting comfortably in its 30-pin dock in my parents' family room.

I think Apple does a reasonable job of supporting older electronic hardware. I expect that new product categories will be obsoleted fairly quickly, because they have a lot of rough edges, which often can only be seen once in wide use, and I can understand why they don't want to hobble newer OS versions to provide a less than great experience on hardware that is one step beyond prototype.

I had the original iPhone and original iPad; both had very rough edges, but I was glad to have had the use of them, because they were so revolutionary when they were introduced. I was also happy to move on to newer generations of the product when I could afford to.

My obsolescence problem with Apple is with how long it provides accessories for older products. My perfectly functional iPad Pro 9.7" (2016) now has a worn out Apple keyboard cover that apparently Apple no longer sells. When it first came out, they were readily available; now that they are wearing out and ready to be replaced, they are nowhere to be found. The same holds for iPhone cases, although this has been mitigated by the same case design of models from the iPhone 6(+) to the 8(+) and the X models. But it was impossible to find an Apple case or bumper for an iPhone SE, even while it was still being sold by Apple.

I have heard conflicting reports that the 10.5" iPad Pro keyboard may fit the 9.7", although Apple reps have told me that it's not true. I see the new 10.5" iPad Air has an available keyboard. It would be great if it would work with my Pro, but I'm not betting on it.
 



Anyone know how long Apple supports its latest generation of iPads? I got burned with the 1st Gen iPad when Apple stopped supporting it after two years....
General rule of thumb is that Apple uses the latest iPhone for 3 iterations. Current, last year's phone (to fill next price tier down), two years old phone (to fill next price tier down), then the phone would fall "off" of the sold-as-new line up. Another two years after, fall off the end, and that is about 5 years.

However, there is a variation with the current iPad line up where Apple uses a 'old' iPhone chip in a 'new' iPad. The current entry iPad has an A10 chip. That's a relatively higher volume mover, so they probably won't dump those quickly, but also are not going to extend that 5 years from when they stop selling them (e.g., iPad Mini 4 has a very good chance of dying off support pretty quickly now). Those years in a comatose design state count as 'clock running' time on iOS updates.

Going from 32 to 64 bits shorted some devices on the 32-bit side. The augmented reality and/or AI stuff may be a future inflection point, depending upon how the baseline "smarts" are set for iOS devices in about two iterations or so of iOS (e.g., moving handling of Siri speech recognition to the iOS device and perhaps almost completely off of Apple servers the vast majority of the time).
 


How does it perform? A 2010 Mac Mini is probably slower than the minimum supported hardware configuration.
There's been some discussion of the Mojave patch on the 2010 Mac Mini and on older MacBook Pros over at the LowEndMac Facebook Group. It looks like most people are saying that Mojave runs surprisingly well on those older systems, i.e. in the same general range as Sierra and High Sierra, at least if they have adequate RAM and an SSD. I have a 2009 Mini running very nicely with the High Sierra patcher, an SSD, and 8 GB RAM, and I'm thinking of trying Mojave on it, just for curiosity. (It's the oldest Mini that will work with the patcher.) I wouldn't try it at all on a spinning drive or with less than 4 GB of RAM, though.

As an aside, the folks behind the High Sierra and Mojave patchers have figured out how to get the Broadcom BCM4321 WiFi modules included in some of the older machines to work. If you have one of those machines, the WiFi fix will be included in the next version of the patchers, expected when macOS 10.14.4 comes out. If anyone already has High Sierra or Mojave installed on an affected machine, they can get the new Broadcom support by running the current patcher's "Patch Update" process.
 


My obsolescence problem with Apple is with how long it provides accessories for older products. My perfectly functional iPad Pro 9.7" (2016) now has a worn out Apple keyboard cover that apparently Apple no longer sells.
Not as elegant, but you could get a bluetooth keyboard. I'm not sure if they make any that integrate into the cover though.
 


... My obsolescence problem with Apple is with how long it provides accessories for older products. My perfectly functional iPad Pro 9.7" (2016) now has a worn out Apple keyboard cover that apparently Apple no longer sells. When it first came out, they were readily available; now that they are wearing out and ready to be replaced, they are nowhere to be found.
If you're seeking an Apple Smart Keyboard for 9.7" iPad Pro, consider Adorama or other retailers besides Apple. Another option to consider is third-party smart keyboards such as one by Logitech.
 



Today's iMovie and Final Cut Pro X updates mention conversion of formats that "may be incompatible with future versions of macOS after Mojave". Does anyone know which formats these might be? I don't have time to hunt down every project and open it in the new version to see if it converts to some new format.
 



DFG

Speaking of upcoming announcements, rumors are swirling that macOS 10.15 will not run apps not signed with an Apple Developer ID, contradicting a ten-year-old promise by the late Steve Jobs.

This would lead to the paradoxical situation where somebody won't be able to run a program they wrote on their own computer...
 


Speaking of upcoming announcements, rumors are swirling that macOS 10.15 will not run apps not signed with an Apple Developer ID, contradicting a ten-year-old promise by the late Steve Jobs.

This would lead to the paradoxical situation where somebody won't be able to run a program they wrote on their own computer...
Any other sources for this rumor? The two links you posted come from the same site, where they admit that they started such a rumor several years ago in order to get a response out of Steve Jobs (who categorically denied it).

It's also worth noting that even Apple's locked-down systems (iOS, tvOS, watchOS), allow developers to install their own code without a paid-up account. Xcode generates self-signed certificates for people using free developer accounts, and they are sufficient to side-load apps that you compile yourself.

In the absolute worst case, macOS might go the way of the locked-down OS's, requiring you to side-load your apps via Xcode. But I would be highly skeptical of even that.

I'm going to need more evidence than a rumor. Let's see it in actual code (e.g. a developer release) first.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This Apple support page discusses the reasoning and details for today's updates for Compressor, Final Cut Pro, iMovie, and Motion:
Thanks for posting that link, Richard! I subsequently found this helpful post from Howard Oakley on the topic, and his 32-bitCheck app may be helpful.
Eclectic Light Co. said:
Apple is killing QuickTime 7 in macOS 10.15: convert old media now
Apple has now confirmed that macOS 10.15 won’t support 32-bit software, which includes QuickTime 7 and all media formats and codecs relying on it. Mojave currently includes legacy support for QuickTime 7, so if you have old media files which rely on that and its codecs, now is the time to convert those to formats which will be supported in macOS 10.15....

Among those video formats which will still be supported in 10.15 are Apple Intermediate codec, Apple ProRes, Apple ProRes RAW, AVCHD, DV, H.264, and XDCAM. Most popular still image and audio formats will also continue to be supported.

Among those which won’t be supported under macOS 10.15 are several Avid formats, Cinepak, DivX, Flash Video, FlashPix, GlueTools codecs, JPEG 2000, Motion JPEG A and B, Perian codecs (MPEG-4, DivX, and more), RealVideo, several Sorensons, and Windows Media Video (WMV) 7, 8, 9.
 


Speaking of upcoming announcements, rumors are swirling that macOS 10.15 will not run apps not signed with an Apple Developer ID, contradicting a ten-year-old promise by the late Steve Jobs.

This would lead to the paradoxical situation where somebody won't be able to run a program they wrote on their own computer...
On the other hand, getting a developer signature is trivial, and free. Open source projects could be an issue though.
 


Thanks for posting that link, Richard! I subsequently found this helpful post from Howard Oakley on the topic, and his 32-bitCheck app may be helpful.
Great article there, Ric. I like the comments left by the first and second persons in the comments section. Just hope Apple would give editing features to QuickTime version 10.x. Thank God that I have a Mac Pro 5,1 on which I can run multiple macOS versions. Even these days, QuickTime 7 is still being used on my end.
 


This Apple support page discusses the reasoning and details for today's updates for Compressor, Final Cut Pro, iMovie, and Motion:
I would hope some enterprising developer might release an app to examine all the media files on one's hard drive and notify which are among the "bad" formats that should be converted. This would be useful to those (most) of us who do not use Final Cut Pro X.
 


I would hope some enterprising developer might release an app to examine all the media files on one's hard drive and notify which are among the "bad" formats that should be converted. This would be useful to those (most) of us who do not use Final Cut Pro X.
If you're not using Final Cut Pro X, then I assume you're probably not interested in editing the "bad" formats, and are more interested in simply continuing to be able to play them back. In that case, there are several options that will allow you to continue to play pretty much all formats without conversion, including the QuickTime Player-like IINA, and the well-known VLC.
 



If you're not using Final Cut Pro X, then I assume you're probably not interested in editing the "bad" formats, and are more interested in simply continuing to be able to play them back.
Not at all. I need to quickly assemble short video and audio clips taken from various longer sources from previous years. Final Cut Pro X is complete overkill for such a simple (hobbyist) task.
 


Not at all. I need to quickly assemble short video and audio clips taken from various longer sources from previous years. Final Cut Pro X is complete overkill for such a simple (hobbyist) task.
This is why I mourn the passing of QuickTime Pro, the simplest tool for doing what I called 'video carpentry' - cut a scrap off the end, or spike two bits together, grab a tiny chunk of security footage to share, etc...
 




This is why I mourn the passing of QuickTime Pro, the simplest tool for doing what I called 'video carpentry' - cut a scrap off the end, or spike two bits together, grab a tiny chunk of security footage to share, etc...
It was (still is) my go-to tool for all manner of carpentry, joinery, welding, smelting... the list could go on and on. Apple just feels like a big fat meanie for yanking it away from us... and even though it wasn't free, it was certainly worth the $30 Apple charged for it. (I assume they had to pass on some of the format-/codec-licensing fees.)

A toolkit that more or less conformed to the Macintosh way (with apologies to Mr. Kawasaki) of doing quite a number of things so simply and directly will be hard to replace. I know it can't continue as it (32-bit-ly) is, but it's hard to shake the resentment of Apple prying it (very much alive) from my/our very-much-alive fingers.
 


This is why I mourn the passing of QuickTime Pro, the simplest tool for doing what I called 'video carpentry' - cut a scrap off the end, or spike two bits together, grab a tiny chunk of security footage to share, etc...
That's a good point. What do people here recommend as the closest replacement?
 




That's a good point. What do people here recommend as the closest replacement?
I would love a replacement that is scriptable via AppleScript. For example: chop a long video with sound into three 3-minute duration pieces taken from the beginning, middle, and end; insert two 30-second existing clips between the pieces; recombine them all into one 10-minute video; delete soundtracks; apply an existing 10-minute soundtrack to the whole video; do that to a folder of videos.

QuickTime 7 does this kind of thing pretty well, and I haven't yet found anything else that will. Aren't computers supposed to get more useful as technology progresses? :|
 


VidCutter, an open source application, recently drew some favorable blog/podcast comment. There's a Mac "native installer" available as a .DMG here:
ozmartian/vidcutter
Adding to my post about VidCutter, it works on original media types, no transcoding required. Since it skips transcoding, it is supposed to be really fast (presuming it can open the media you want to cut/clip).
 


Yesterday I updated to macOS 10.14.4 on three systems, security updates 2019-002 on both Sierra (VM) and High Sierra (hardware), and iOS 12.2 on an iPhone 7. So far, zero observed problems.
Sad to say, when I attempted to apply the Sierra security update to my DosDude patched 3,1 Mac Pro, I got the dread ‘this software is not compatible’ message.

Is there a workaround known? Previous updates had applied seamlessly.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Howard Oakley continues his series dealing with macOS 10.15 abandonment of "legacy" media:
Eclectic Light Co. said:
Finding and converting legacy media 3: Movies and more

So far, I have looked at two problems resulting from the loss of QuickTime 7 codecs in macOS 10.15: converting JPEG 2000 images, and movies embedded in KeyNote presentations. It’s time to tackle the elephant in the room, all those other movies and video clips which rely on codecs which won’t be available in the future.
 


Howard Oakley continues his series dealing with macOS 10.15 abandonment of "legacy" media:
This link is hugely valuable! Thank you, Ric, for finding and posting, and thanks to Eclectic Light Co. for posting. I have probably hundreds of video clips embedded in Keynote presentations, plus all their original (unembedded) source clips. So this will be an important "rainy-day" task sometime before the next major macOS "upgrade."

It would be nice if someone (Apple?) created a utility to perform these multi-step "search-and-convert" functions for no-longer-supported video... as a batch.

After all, this is not merely deprecation of apps or of a system function, but a wholesale, instant, and largely unannounced, deprecation of user files which will no longer run in the next macOS.
 


While the Dosdude1 Sierra patch tool is a fine way to run Sierra on an older machine, I found to my surprise that on my patched Mac Pro 3,1 SIP had been turned off. Whether this was the result of using the Sierra patcher or not I don’t know - I certainly don’t remember turning SIP off.

So I thought I’d just boot in recovery mode and use Terminal to re-enable SIP but found that, although the computer is running Sierra and has updated and did install the latest security patch, it won’t boot the recovery disk, saying that Sierra is not compatible with my Mac.

So my question is… is there a way to re-enable SIP? I’d sure feel better using the machine with than without.
 


While the Dosdude1 Sierra patch tool is a fine way to run Sierra on an older machine, I found to my surprise that on my patched Mac Pro 3,1 SIP had been turned off. Whether this was the result of using the Sierra patcher or not I don’t know - I certainly don’t remember turning SIP off....
Hello, Louis. There was a discussion long time ago about SIP and Dosdude1’s patcher. Dosdude1’s patcher disables SIP in order for the macOS to work. If one enables SIP on such a patched Mac, the Mac won’t work. One can read the threads for Sierra, High Sierra, and Mojave for unsupported Macs in MacRumors. Hope this helps explain why SIP is disabled for you.
 


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