MacInTouch Amazon link...

Apple compatibility issues

Channels
Apple


That's a good point. What do people here recommend as the closest replacement?
I would love a replacement that is scriptable via AppleScript. For example: chop a long video with sound into three 3-minute duration pieces taken from the beginning, middle, and end; insert two 30-second existing clips between the pieces; recombine them all into one 10-minute video; delete soundtracks; apply an existing 10-minute soundtrack to the whole video; do that to a folder of videos.

QuickTime 7 does this kind of thing pretty well, and I haven't yet found anything else that will. Aren't computers supposed to get more useful as technology progresses? :|
 


VidCutter, an open source application, recently drew some favorable blog/podcast comment. There's a Mac "native installer" available as a .DMG here:
ozmartian/vidcutter
Adding to my post about VidCutter, it works on original media types, no transcoding required. Since it skips transcoding, it is supposed to be really fast (presuming it can open the media you want to cut/clip).
 


Yesterday I updated to macOS 10.14.4 on three systems, security updates 2019-002 on both Sierra (VM) and High Sierra (hardware), and iOS 12.2 on an iPhone 7. So far, zero observed problems.
Sad to say, when I attempted to apply the Sierra security update to my DosDude patched 3,1 Mac Pro, I got the dread ‘this software is not compatible’ message.

Is there a workaround known? Previous updates had applied seamlessly.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Howard Oakley continues his series dealing with macOS 10.15 abandonment of "legacy" media:
Eclectic Light Co. said:
Finding and converting legacy media 3: Movies and more

So far, I have looked at two problems resulting from the loss of QuickTime 7 codecs in macOS 10.15: converting JPEG 2000 images, and movies embedded in KeyNote presentations. It’s time to tackle the elephant in the room, all those other movies and video clips which rely on codecs which won’t be available in the future.
 


Howard Oakley continues his series dealing with macOS 10.15 abandonment of "legacy" media:
This link is hugely valuable! Thank you, Ric, for finding and posting, and thanks to Eclectic Light Co. for posting. I have probably hundreds of video clips embedded in Keynote presentations, plus all their original (unembedded) source clips. So this will be an important "rainy-day" task sometime before the next major macOS "upgrade."

It would be nice if someone (Apple?) created a utility to perform these multi-step "search-and-convert" functions for no-longer-supported video... as a batch.

After all, this is not merely deprecation of apps or of a system function, but a wholesale, instant, and largely unannounced, deprecation of user files which will no longer run in the next macOS.
 


While the Dosdude1 Sierra patch tool is a fine way to run Sierra on an older machine, I found to my surprise that on my patched Mac Pro 3,1 SIP had been turned off. Whether this was the result of using the Sierra patcher or not I don’t know - I certainly don’t remember turning SIP off.

So I thought I’d just boot in recovery mode and use Terminal to re-enable SIP but found that, although the computer is running Sierra and has updated and did install the latest security patch, it won’t boot the recovery disk, saying that Sierra is not compatible with my Mac.

So my question is… is there a way to re-enable SIP? I’d sure feel better using the machine with than without.
 


While the Dosdude1 Sierra patch tool is a fine way to run Sierra on an older machine, I found to my surprise that on my patched Mac Pro 3,1 SIP had been turned off. Whether this was the result of using the Sierra patcher or not I don’t know - I certainly don’t remember turning SIP off....
Hello, Louis. There was a discussion long time ago about SIP and Dosdude1’s patcher. Dosdude1’s patcher disables SIP in order for the macOS to work. If one enables SIP on such a patched Mac, the Mac won’t work. One can read the threads for Sierra, High Sierra, and Mojave for unsupported Macs in MacRumors. Hope this helps explain why SIP is disabled for you.
 


Hello, Louis. There was a discussion long time ago about SIP and Dosdude1’s patcher. Dosdude1’s patcher disables SIP in order for the macOS to work. If one enables SIP on such a patched Mac, the Mac won’t work. One can read the threads for Sierra, High Sierra, and Mojave for unsupported Macs in MacRumors. Hope this helps explain why SIP is disabled for you.
Thank you, Richard, I'm sad to say, searching MacRumors' site using the term "Sierra, High Sierra, and Mojave for unsupported Macs" yields nothing. However, thank you, I see that I'm at a dead end so must pursue some other solution. Sad to abandon a dogonne good functional Mac Pro for lack of security support.
 


Thank you, Richard, I'm sad to say, searching MacRumors' site using the term "Sierra, High Sierra, and Mojave for unsupported Macs" yields nothing. However, thank you, I see that I'm at a dead end so must pursue some other solution. Sad to abandon a dogonne good functional Mac Pro for lack of security support.
Simon says, “I love an internet search challenge!”
 


So my question is… is there a way to re-enable SIP [on a dosdude1-Sierra-patched Mac]? I’d sure feel better using the machine with than without.
The answer appears to be no, as this page mentions specifically:
dosdude1 said:
macOS Sierra Patcher Tool for Unsupported Macs
Please also note that SIP MUST remain disabled for as long as you run Sierra. You will be warned and prompted to re-disable it if it does somehow become enabled.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch


Thank you, Richard, I'm sad to say, searching MacRumors' site using the term "Sierra, High Sierra, and Mojave for unsupported Macs" yields nothing. However, thank you, I see that I'm at a dead end so must pursue some other solution. Sad to abandon a dogonne good functional Mac Pro for lack of security support.
Forget SIP - consider yourself lucky to actually have macOS running on your old beastie. Other security methods are working. Craft an "emergency booter" external drive (or a second internal drive). Or abandon macOS and run Linux or Windows; the former is quite secure, as long as you get your software through the official repositories; the latter is... well... not as secure but not bad.
 


... It would be nice if someone (Apple?) created a utility to perform these multi-step "search-and-convert" functions for no-longer-supported video... as a batch.

After all, this is not merely deprecation of apps or of a system function, but a wholesale, instant, and largely unannounced, deprecation of user files which will no longer run in the next macOS.
I can imagine that there are plenty of people with large libraries who would even pay something non-exorbitant for it. I know I would.
 


I think we also need to remember to verify / update backups with those archived file types. May be a good time to revisit what we really need to keep and cull the rest.
 


After all, this is not merely deprecation of apps or of a system function, but a wholesale, instant, and largely unannounced, deprecation of user files which will no longer run in the next macOS.
Oh, you mean like the wholesale, instant, and largely unannounced removal of Rosetta in Mac OS X 10.7 that deprecated user-installed applications?
 



Norbert Doerner advises that the next version of Neofinder, due in late April / early May, will have a file codec search. This, along with that list of deprecated Quicktime 7 file types from the
page and, of course, knowing the name of the codec(!), should help you search your system for any of this deprecated media.

Do this before the macOS 10.15 nagging begins in the Fall so you have conversion options. There are many apps that can do the conversion (the free MPEG Streamclip comes to mind) so put this on your calendar well before it hits the fan.
 


Norbert Doerner advises that the next version of Neofinder, due in late April / early May, will have a file codec search. This, along with that list of deprecated Quicktime 7 file types from the
page and, of course, knowing the name of the codec(!), should help you search your system for any of this deprecated media.

Do this before the macOS 10.15 nagging begins in the Fall so you have conversion options. There are many apps that can do the conversion (the free MPEG Streamclip comes to mind) so put this on your calendar well before it hits the fan.
Question: Does Handbrake perform the same functions? Or am I mixing apples and oranges? Could Handbrake be used to convert Quicktime 7 file types to more modern formats?
 



Question: Does Handbrake perform the same functions? Or am I mixing apples and oranges? Could Handbrake be used to convert Quicktime 7 file types to more modern formats?
Handbrake uses ffmpeg. The question is, will ffmpeg decode the list of formats abandoned by moving away from the 32-bit QT7 libraries.

I exported an H264 movie to AVI (Cinepak) using QT7. I then used Handbrake to convert it back to H264. It worked, but that's no guarantee it will work for every soon to be abandoned codec.

In addition, I'm not positive Handbrake only uses ffmpeg. It may be using the QT7 libraries, as well, which are scheduled to go away.
 


I'm not positive Handbrake only uses ffmpeg. It may be using the QT7 libraries, as well, which are scheduled to go away.
I'm not positive either, but as a cross-platform open source product (Mac, Windows and Linux), I doubt it could rely on proprietary Apple libraries. QT7 might still be available for Windows, but it was never available for Linux.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I'm not positive either, but as a cross-platform open source product (Mac, Windows and Linux), I doubt it could rely on proprietary Apple libraries. QT7 might still be available for Windows, but it was never available for Linux.
I think it's more of a front-end to other tools, using Libav and FFmpeg for decoding, for example.
 


Norbert Doerner advises that the next version of Neofinder, due in late April / early May, will have a file codec search. This, along with that list of deprecated Quicktime 7 file types from the
Part of the reason that several of those are on the list is because they are either abandoned or pragmatically abandoned codecs (often proprietary ones).

For example, Sorenson went Chapter 11 last year. Apple's royalty check wasn't keeping them awash with money, and open source isn't particularly going to solve that problem (the folks who bought the assets probably are out to milk the cow on the intellectual property).

Perian open source group shut down.

RealVideo (RealPlayer) is on very thin ice. (A 'better than H.264' codec had some leverage before built-in hardware support for H.265/HEVC. Now... it is proprietary encoding with less leverage.)

Avid isn't going bankrupt, but also probably not giving away their codec either. There's a pretty decent chance Apple was paying them a licensing fee, which may not make sense (for Apple) anymore as a 'free' bundle for high-volume Mac users.

Where these encodings are stored into files with different extensions (xxxxyyy ccc codec in .xyz), any of the decent filename searchers with wildcard matching should work - '*.xyz' or '.xyz'. That could be wrapped up in a GUI menu-driven system, but there's not a big gap to access the metadata now.
 


Oh, you mean like the wholesale, instant, and largely unannounced removal of Rosetta in Mac OS X 10.7 that deprecated user-installed applications?
Well, Rosetta removal was, indeed, a pain, though somehow I remember it being announced (but maybe I'm wrong).

In today's case, however, it's not apps that are being deprecated; it's user-created/modified files. More akin (I think) to Apple's decision to deprecate old-version ClarisWorks / AppleWorks files when Apple abandoned those apps and switched to Pages. Thankfully, LibreOffice still (!) handles those old formats. I'm wondering how I'll handle all those embedded videos when QT7 formats are no longer readable by Apple's video software.
 




Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts