MacInTouch Amazon link...

Apple designers

Channels
Apple, Other



... and the Magsafe, battery charge indicator lights, start-up 'gong', SD slot, etc., etc., etc.—all the things that made a laptop so functional, productive and easy to use without large numbers of dongles and other accessories! One of the many reasons I'm still using my mid-2012 MacBook Pro and will not upgrade.
Of all these (and the list will grow), the loss of Magsafe was the most unbelievable sacrifice on the alter of "thin, thin, thin" that Ive dictated - and the one feature that differentiated Macs from any other laptop and which has saved countless users not just money but their livelihoods, to avoid when machines would fly across the room, with crashed hard drives and smashed screens. You could even see the sheepish looks on the faces of the presenters when they rolled this out to stunned silence (as the boys upstairs in marketing rubbed their hands thinking of the fortune they'd make for the company in a forest of required dongle sales, repairs and destroyed laptops).
 



You shouldn't have to make some unknown keypress to make Save As accessible. It should be the default. And the menu is not a limited list. Both could be on that menu.
I agree. But, just for the heck of it, I created a new keyboard shortcut (⌘S) for Save As… in Keynote using the Keyboard Preference Pane. So now that key combination invokes Save As… and the Save command has no shortcut. Of course, any attempt to do this to an existing file will bring up a confirmation dialog, but some people may actually prefer that as a safeguard against mistakenly overwriting a file. I've become so accustomed to hitting ⌘S every so often to avoid losing my work (a holdover from days when storage was less reliable, I suspect) that I've done it unintentionally a few times.
 


You shouldn't have to make some unknown keypress to make Save As accessible. It should be the default. And the menu is not a limited list. Both could be on that menu.
I agree, but at this point I'm content with holding down Option to get Save As…

It may not be remembered, but at the time Save As… went away (and it did go away, completely), there was a tremendous hue and cry on the Apple message boards about its disappearance. I participated heavily in this outpouring of anger. There is no doubt whatsoever that Duplicate was/is a poor and baffling substitute.

For one of the few times in memory, Apple actually listened to its customers, and they soon brought Save As… back.

I've been so glad to have it, ever since, that I haven't wanted to rock the boat, even though I agree that it would be easy to retain Save As… as its own discrete menu selection.
 


Indeed you shouldn't, which is why Apple eventually offered an obscure but completely workable method for getting "Save As...." back into the File menu.
And this needs to be repeated for all languages you use. Some examples:

Dutch: Bewaar als...
German: Sichern unter ...
French: Enregistrer sous...

Important:
The text must be exactly as is used by default in the File menu with option key pressed.
"..." are three dots, not an ellipsis (and note, for instance, the space in German before the three dots).
 


I don’t think the “trash can” Mac Pro belongs in this group...
I agree. I understand that, for most pro, it didn't satisfy their needs, but for mine, it has worked out brilliantly. A Sonnet Echo 15 solved all my expansion needs, and with the Mac Pro on top of the Echo 15, it makes a small footprint. It is amazingly quiet. I have spiked all six CPUs (and hyper-threads) for over two hours with barely a perceptible increase in fan noise. I finally swapped a quieter fan into the Echo 15, it was so annoying by comparison, and even so, it still completely drowns out the Mac Pro.
 




Of all these (and the list will grow), the loss of Magsafe was the most unbelievable sacrifice on the alter of "thin, thin, thin" that Ive dictated
Apple's original super-thin laptop, the MacBook Air, still had a Magsafe connector, and there's no obvious impediment to designing an even more compact version of it should that have been called for.

No, the Magsafe was abandoned in favor of the new USB-C connector, because that offered a one-port-does-it-all solution. One can argue with the decision that Apple took, but there's a demonstrable rationale for it.

Having lived with my own new MacBook Pro since they came out at the end of 2016, and taking care of a bunch more of them at the office, I can see why Apple decided as they did. All of ours use external dock/monitor/power/ethernet setups, and being able to hook them up with a single connector is a thing of beauty.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Having lived with my own new MacBook Pro since they came out at the end of 2016, and taking care of a bunch more of them at the office, I can see why Apple decided as they did. All of ours use external dock/monitor/power/ethernet setups, and being able to hook them up with a single connector is a thing of beauty.
Too bad Apple never produced a portable dock for them, or any dock, for that matter. (Of course, for mobile laptops on the go, a typical Thunderbolt powered dock is even dumber than dongles.)
 


Meanwhile, I've been looking for a good adjustable desk that goes low enough to accomodate the stupidly unadjustable (non-VESA) iMac. 1) Adjustable desks get expensive, fast 2) Most aren't low enough, and 3) It's really hard to find one of good quality.

I guess what's needed is a desk with a hole in the middle and an adjustable platform underneath capable of holding the iMac on its stand....
With my setup, I went the other way. I've got a standing-height desk that never moves, with a drafting chair when I want to sit. I found it was much easier to find a good taller chair than to make my desk setup move.
 


Indeed you shouldn't, which is why Apple eventually offered an obscure but completely workable method for getting "Save As...." back into the File menu.
I had forgotten about that modification, since I had made that change many years ago (oh, to be able to remember such things). When I looked at my various application menus, I found the "Save As" listed. Your comment reminds me why that still happens. Thanks
 



... Magsafe was abandoned in favor of the new USB-C connector, because that offered a one-port-does-it-all solution.
And this has been a holy grail for Apple since I can remember.

Think about ADB (replacing separate keyboard, mouse and other related peripheral ports). SCSI (hard drive, CD, scanner, others). The HDI45 connector (video in/out, audio in/out and ADB). ADC (analog video, digital video, USB and display power). USB (most kinds of peripherals). FireWire (hard drives, cameras, scanners, other stuff). iPod Dock (USB, power, analog audio/video, FireWire). Lightning (USB, audio and just about anything else Apple can think of). And Thunderbolt (video, USB, PCIe).

Ideally, Apple would like one cable that carries absolutely everything. And if it can't be all done on one cable, it should be over a small number of identical interchangeable cables. Apple has been working toward this goal since the Mac Plus, with varying degrees of success. USB-C is coming pretty close to finally achieving the goal.

Whether or not this is a good thing, of course, is a matter of opinion.
 


1) Bring back Save As. Has anyone mastered duplicate, move, expand window, browse to, save; without losing their mind?​
2) Bring back color labels to folders and the Finder. Ive color dots have little value compared to entire folders and Finder using color.​
3) Banish all hover-to-view options and hidden edge scrolling surprises. We can handle an arrow or gear to show advanced options.​
Ive's passion is aluminimum-machining simple shapes, not designing user interfaces.
These changes in Lion kept me on Snow Leopard until August 2017. The release of Lion told me that Apple's Human Interface Guidelines had been relegated to nostalgia.

So the decision to purchase my previous MacBook Pro in June 2012 was based on whether it could run Snow Leopard (late 2011 could, mid 2012 could not). The decision to purchase my current 2015 Retina MacBook Pro in August 2017 was based on avoiding 2016+ models due to functionality and reliability subordinated by Ive's vanity design language.

OK, the new Mac Pro seems to be a reactionary release; I'm really hoping the MacBook Pro line also experiences a similar refresh.
 


Ultra-thin laptops with wonky keyboards and no charging indicators, silly mouse designs, “sealed unit” devices that can’t be expanded or easily serviced, all have one thing in common: their sacrifices are all on the altar of design. The sole reason for these design decisions was to make the device prettier.
To be fair, I don't think these decisions were solely Ive/design. There is probably equal blame with Tim Cook. Tim is a master logistics man.

Thinner, lighter, less volume means shipping 100's of million products around the world becomes much cheaper = more profit.

Sealed devices that can't be repaired = forced new purchase = more profit (plus, don't forget, forced obsolescence, which means that when you buy that new purchase you have to upgrade everything else to work with it - new cables, dongles, adaptors, software, services, Apple ecosystem products = more profit).

Sealed devices that can't be upgraded = less support problems/calls to/contact with Apple = more profit.

The biggest problem is that between the two of them endlessly going around the "make it more beautiful vs profitable" wheel, they lost all sense of what the customer actually wants. In my opinion, this is the big difference between the two of them and Steve Jobs.
 




while these brilliant Apple designs feature a total of two ports, one of which is needed for charging
And the T2 chip. Doesn't it preclude any chance of replacing SSD? And ensure when these little Macs no longer receive macOS security updates, they can't be repurposed to Linux?
 



MagSafe was inspired functionality. (Couldn't have been Ive.) I just snagged my power cord the other day. It would have been a particularly long fall from my standing desk (I'm 6'5"). My (aging) MacBook Pro said, "What, me worry?"
This looks interesting:
Kickstarter said:
It is a MagSafe adapter project for Thunderbolt 3/USB-C, so it [supposedly] works for both power cords and anything else that plugs into the USB-C port.
 


This looks interesting:
Kickstarter said:
It is a MagSafe adapter project for Thunderbolt 3/USB-C, so it [supposedly] works for both power cords and anything else that plugs into the USB-C port.
The Tug was like several I watched, and like them, it remained announcmentware for a long time before finally becoming available.
Ilovehandles said:
Tug
As cool as USB-C is, many of us were sad when Apple killed off MagSafe, which has undoubtedly saved the lives of countless laptops over the years. That disappointment led us to a key insight: Why not place the magnetic break-away connection at the outlet?
Given at least OWC seems to have identified issues with USB-C / Thunderbolt disconnections, breaking the connection at the outlet as the Tug does makes some sense. OWC's ClingOn seems the opposite of MagSafe:
OWC said:
OWC ClingOn
Dropping a cable during file transfers or a work session can be devastating. ClingOn is designed to hedge that risk by reducing – if not completely eliminating – the slight and ongoing cable strain of external devices with USB-C and Thunderbolt™ 3 connection ports.
I'm not sure about the Tug claim that pulling he connection apart as a "switch" is a good idea. I've observed that pulling the plug while a piece of gear is running may generate possibly destructive sparking. Perhaps the Tug breaks away cleanly enough to prevent that?
 


2) Bring back color labels to folders and the Finder. Ive color dots have little value compared to entire folders and Finder using color.​
Erica Sadun's brilliant, free little app called "Folderol" does exactly this. I love, love, love it. It works for colorizing both folder and file icons, even though it only claims to colorize folder icons. Note #1: I'm using it in Sierra. I don't know if it still works in later OSes. Note #2: It 'touches' the file or folder, so "Date Modified" will change to when you colorized the icon. That's worth remembering if you often sort by modified date, which I do. Sometimes it's confusing, and sometimes it's a handy trick to quickly update the modified date. (If Folderol works for you with newer OSes, can you please let us know? I might have to upgrade someday.)
 


"Save As" is [accessible if you] hold down the Option key to reveal it in the Edit menu.
True but, if we're talking about how many users (most?) prefer to actually have Save as... as the default, should it not be a simple checkbox in a System Preference?

"Duplicate" (and, therefore, "Revert") was always a Rube Goldbergian process to manage, while Save as... is simple to understand and manage. If I recall correctly, there is a way of modifying the menu in the Keyboard System Preference for certain apps; I did this to bring back Save as... (in place of Duplicate), but why must I be an alpha-geek in order to restore some sense of sanity to my system? What about those who are not? Oh, yeah; that's why Time Machine was created; so they can find the original, un-munged version. Really simple, eh?
 


Erica Sadun's brilliant, free little app called "Folderol" does exactly this. I love, love, love it. It works for colorizing both folder and file icons, even though it only claims to colorize folder icons. Note #1: I'm using it in Sierra. I don't know if it still works in later OSes. Note #2: It 'touches' the file or folder, so "Date Modified" will change to when you colorized the icon. That's worth remembering if you often sort by modified date, which I do. Sometimes it's confusing, and sometimes it's a handy trick to quickly update the modified date. (If Folderol works for you with newer OSes, can you please let us know? I might have to upgrade someday.)
A better choice, in my opinion, is ColoFolXS from Trollin. It does not modify date/time attributes. It colorizes, and optionally adds Finder labels to both folders and files. I've used it for years, and it's wonderful.
 


Of all these (and the list will grow), the loss of Magsafe was the most unbelievable sacrifice on the alter of "thin, thin, thin" that Ive dictated - and the one feature that differentiated Macs from any other laptop and which has saved countless users not just money but their livelihoods, to avoid when machines would fly across the room, with crashed hard drives and smashed screens. You could even see the sheepish looks on the faces of the presenters when they rolled this out to stunned silence (as the boys upstairs in marketing rubbed their hands thinking of the fortune they'd make for the company in a forest of required dongle sales, repairs and destroyed laptops).
... I have been using MacBooks, MacBooks Air, and MacBooks Pro for well over fifteen years, including 15 months using MacBooks Pro with USB-C power.

In comparing the disconnect force for Magsafe power connectors vs USB-C connectors, I have found:
  • The straight-out-cable Magsafe wins in a right-angle pull.
  • The cable-to-the-side Magsafe loses to a right angle pull, just like USB-C.
  • The straight-out-cable Magsafe loses to a straight pull, requiring much more force to disconnect than either cable-to-the-side Magsafe or USB-C.
This means each is better than the other. The economic analysis, driven by the requirement for having USB-C connectors, was what doomed the Magsafe connector. It was Tim, not Jony.

I really liked both the charge indicator and the sleep indicator, as well as the startup tones. It is difficult to believe that the savings to Apple (read increased profit margin) can in any way compare to our loss of so much useful function, especially the startup tones.
 


"Duplicate" (and, therefore, "Revert") was always a Rube Goldbergian process to manage, while Save as...
Barry, you named it! Apple versioning is Rube-Save. Complicated, confusing, versioning, revert to what, and all files with same name is disaster. Then add Time Machine, and iCloud, and who knows where anything is? Rube-save.

Our workflow relies on Save As for every change request, "R1", "R2" added to file names. Thankfully, Adobe stuck with Save As in Creative Suite. But we use other OSX apps and get frustrated daily at Apple's forced hubris of Rube-Save.
 


As annoying as the hockey puck was, I'd take it over some of the huge "ergonomic" shaped mice with red taillights from the 2000's, and those trackball contraptions. For someone with small hands like mine, those were very uncomfortable and would have for sure overstressed my hand tendons if used for any length of time.
The only real use I ever had for the round hockey puck mouse was when I dug it out of the abandoned device drawer and for a while used it as a foot mouse. I found it psychologically satisfying to stomp on it. Used this for drop & drag for a while until I tired of it not working on a carpeted floor.
 


That’s the difference between an artist and an industrial designer, who aims for high functionality that is also beautiful. “Form follows function,” in other words. Or, “Design is how it works,” as some guy once said.
Precisely! Which is why Industrial Design should be in the Engineering school, not under the Art department, where it's usually found.
 


True but, if we're talking about how many users (most?) prefer to actually have Save as... as the default, should it not be a simple checkbox in a System Preference?
For these reasons, many stated by Dave Dahl, and several others (like traditional scroll arrows and Rosetta), I regard 10.6 Snow Leopard as the last great version of Mac OS X – and I use that name here to refer to all versions through today regardless whether the official name is OS X or macOS.

If I could have a theoretical Snow Leopard 10.6.50, with FileVault 2 and modern 64-bit support with no hoops to jump through, I'd be running it. For the record, I also prefer the system font, Aqua UI, etc., of 10.9 and earlier.
 


Precisely! Which is why Industrial Design should be in the Engineering school, not under the Art department, where it's usually found.
The Industrial Design program was part of the College of Architecture at Georgia Tech, where I earned my BSID in the 1980s. We had numerous courses in manufacturing, materials and processes, as well as human factors.
 




And the T2 chip. Doesn't it preclude any chance of replacing SSD? And ensure when these little Macs no longer receive macOS security updates, they can't be repurposed to Linux?
It's not the T2 chip preventing one from replacing the SSD. It's the fact that the SSD chips are soldered to the motherboard. Replacing a failed SSD on one of the MacBooks Pro requires changing out the entire motherboard.

As for repurposing to Linux after they no longer receive security updates, the T2 has three levels of boot security. 1) Boot only the most recent operating system version cryptographically signed by Apple. 2) Boot any operating system version cryptographically signed by Apple. 3) Boot anything, whether signed or not. So you should just be able to set it to the least secure setting and should be good to go.
 




It's not the T2 chip preventing one from replacing the SSD. It's the fact that the SSD chips are soldered to the motherboard. Replacing a failed SSD on one of the MacBooks Pro requires changing out the entire motherboard.
Unless you know a tech with access to a rework station who can remove and replace surface-mount chips, as seen on YouTube:
Strange Parts said:
The T2 chip (controller) along with the raw flash devices makes up the SSD. With this architecture, there is no chance of ever having a removable SSD as the main storage device.
Not with Apple's current implementation, but there's no technical reason why they couldn't give you this ability. In order to perform its function, the T2 is cryptographically bonded to its flash memory modules, so they can't be (meaningfully) read on another computer.

But Apple could choose to release the software they use to create this bond (maybe as part of the recovery partition). With it, you could replace the flash modules with new ones. You could probably also use it to erase modules such that they could be bonded to another Mac - assuming the module is replaceable, of course, as it is on an iMac Pro, but not a MacBook Pro.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I don't know what your price range or requirements are, but where I work, we're using sit/stand desks from Ikea...
You might find some use in one of the simpler Ikea desks...
For others considering this option, I'll just note that I tried ordering from Ikea, and the delivery experience has been a nightmare of failures and support/contact problems, unintelligible messages, outsourcing, etc. I'm currently trying to cancel the order and am being burned for $99 in shipping charges. I just got blown off multiple times by the automated phone system trying to contact the company for help and had to "hack" around the problem to reach a human. I very seriously doubt that I will ever again attempt to order anything from Ikea or deal with them again in any way.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts