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For others considering this option, I'll just note that I tried ordering from Ikea, and the delivery experience has been a nightmare of failures
I didn't even know you could have items delivered. I've always driven (with the family minivan) over to one of their stores. The last time I asked, they said they don't deliver - you have to figure out how to get the parts home on your own. I guess that rule only applies to items purchased in-store, not from their web site.
 



Re: Sit Stand Desks
We have one at work, Hon "Coordinate." Ours was custom-ordered from a "real" office furniture store with a custom color, dual articulated, swing-arm VESA mounts, and a 72" top. It has a motorized control with memory positions. It's been very satisfactory.

Staples offers the basic model of the same model for $870. Not cheap, but if you believe in the sit-stand premise?
 



Apart from the issue of spending hours getting there and back, the closest store didn't even have the product, so online ordering was the only option (which I greatly regret).
I've had luck buying used via Craigslist. Search for 'Ikea desk'. Don't be afraid to counter-offer low, especially for listings over a week old.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There are some USB hubs that are designed to give front-side ports to an iMac, like this one from Sabrent: Sabrent 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub for iMac Slim Unibody (HB-IMCU)
I'm really leery of hanging a hub like this off an iMac USB port for fear of damaging the port or the bottom of the computer, and I've also had nothing but problems with USB hubs in general.

A friend suggested this similar USB-C hub:

But my response was that I didn't want to give up one of the two Thunderbolt 3 ports on the iMac 5K and raised the same concerns about mechanical issues. Though less "aesthetic", I think the best answer is a good Thunderbolt 3 dock, such as the CalDigit TS3 Plus.

Another big help is a Rain Design i360 Turntable, which at least lets you swing the iMac around for better access, if you have enough space around it. I did actually buy one of these, and it's neat in its place (but not very helpful when you're carrying the iMac around). I think it raises the iMac by about 1/2".
 


It's not the T2 chip preventing one from replacing the SSD.
The T2 is actually part of what is the SSD. Without the SSD controller, you don't really have a complete SSD.
Unless you know a tech with access to a rework station who can remove and replace surface-mount chips, as seen on YouTube:
However, the replacement NAND chips would need to be exactly what Apple used. The SSD controller is highly likely set to work with just an extremely narrow implementation type. (Also, is the T2 really going to cough up a specific NAND chip as root-cause failure?)

RAM doesn't wear differently across implementations — NAND is far more finicky. For the T2 chip itself, that probably has issues — and that doesn't have any impact on the data integrity? It is one thing to move empty RAM chips — it is another to move this without impacting the storage internal state. If the keys in the secure enclave are perturbed, then the data is gone.
Not with Apple's current implementation, but there's no technical reason why they couldn't give you this ability. In order to perform its function, the T2 is cryptographically bonded to its flash memory modules, so they can't be (meaningfully) read on another computer. But Apple could choose to release the software they use to create this bond (maybe as part of the recovery partition).
Security is a "technical reason." The T2 bonding to the logic board is to prevent a man-in-the-middle attack. Keeping the actual cryptographic key in the secure enclave is also to protect against attacks. The software (crypto algorithm) isn't the core issue; the keys are. The T2 does key management so that no one can actually get to the key but can only access by proxy (a secret some users know).

If talking about just the NAND chips (e.g., worn out NAND), then Apple has already done a "replace NAND" and start over solution in the iMac Pro and next Mac Pro. It takes more vertical space, so they aren't likely to map to the laptops (or Mac Mini).

(The small corner case of T2 itself failing should be in same range as the power management chip (PMIC) failing.)
With it, you could replace the flash modules with new ones. You could probably also use it to erase modules such that they could be bonded to another Mac - assuming the module is replaceable, of course, as it is on an iMac Pro, but not a MacBook Pro.
If you have perturbed any NAND chip(s) of an SSD, then the only move is to erase/reset the whole SSD anyway. The metadata consisting of the persistent map of which logical blocks are stored where is in the NAND — not a specific, one either, nor just one. The whole thing is screwed if you replace a NAND and need to make the SSD controller completely start over from scratch.

Additionally, pragmatically, it would be a good idea to only 'pop in' brand-new modules, because the metadata housing the wear count is also toast. Moving partially worn modules to an SSD controller that doesn't know what the wear count is will probably cause more unexpectant errors later on.
 


For others considering this option, I'll just note that I tried ordering from Ikea, and the delivery experience has been a nightmare of failures and support/contact problems, unintelligible messages, outsourcing, etc. I'm currently trying to cancel the order and am being burned for $99 in shipping charges. I just got blown off multiple times by the automated phone system trying to contact the company for help and had to "hack" around the problem to reach a human. I very seriously doubt that I will ever again attempt to order anything from Ikea or deal with them again in any way.
We had a similar experience with Ikea delivery - tried a whole kitchen, and their shipping company was just the worst. We'd get calls that it was on the truck and they’d schedule delivery and the day would go by, they would say they never received it from the warehouse.

But if you go into the store (if possible) and deal directly with the staff there, you should be able to get the delivery fee cleared - our associate knew what I was going to say before I even said it. Those front-line people know exactly how bad XPO is and have been very helpful in resolving issues (generally by canceling the order).
 


Sorry to learn about Ric's Ikea nightmare. My experience with them has been mostly favorable. Deliveries from the Seattle-area store arrived on time, without hassles. But I warn people to be careful about buying their cheapest furniture items, some of which are made from very low quality particle board. The stuff is prone to disintegrating, especially in a humid environment. Some of their more expensive items are actually quite nice, with better materials.

One more comment about desks. Whether you get a fixed or adjustable one, make sure that the working surface is at a comfortable height for typing while seated. I'm of medium height (66" tall), and I find that, on most desks, a keyboard will be placed too high. Ideally, when typing, your arms should be nearly horizontal, with no bend at the wrists. This is why I decided to have a desk built to my own specs (described in my earlier post in this thread).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
One more comment about desks. Whether you get a fixed or adjustable one, make sure that the working surface is at a comfortable height for typing while seated.
That's exactly the issue. Using Apple's wedge mouse on a standard conference room table years ago created physical problems that lasted for years and prevented me from mousing with my normal hand. I won't do either of those things again.
 



That's exactly the issue. Using Apple's wedge mouse and a too-high table years ago created physical problems that lasted for years and prevented me from mousing with my normal hand. I won't do either of those things again.
I keep a Wacom pen/tablet handy for the times I feel wrist strain. I keep the active area very small so I don't need to move my wrist very much. I don't draw with it much. When the wrist strain goes away, I can switch back as desired.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I keep a Wacom pen/tablet handy for the times I feel wrist strain. I keep the active area very small so I don't need to move my wrist very much.
With my favorite (before the security and Bluetooth problems) Logitech Triathlon mouse and careful preference settings, I can efficiently operate the Mac with just millimeter fingertip movements, really minimizing RSI/wrist strain while working for long hours.
 


Found this article regarding Ive's departure on Mashable (linked on XLR8YourMac.com), and it gave me a bit of a reality check about the almost impossible task Apple faces, because, in reading the author's wishlist of changes, I found it barely crossed my wishlist, even though his premise is that there are certainly Ives obsessions that he would like to see relented on, and I would agree. But the desired outcome still varies greatly. Apple truly does have to decide who it wants be when it grows up.
Raymond Wong said:
 


Security is a "technical reason." The T2 bonding to the logic board is to prevent a man-in-the-middle attack. Keeping the actual cryptographic key in the secure enclave is also to protect against attacks. The software (crypto algorithm) isn't the core issue; the keys are. The T2 does key management so that no one can actually get to the key but can only access by proxy (a secret some users know).
I think you misunderstood what I wrote. I'm not talking about moving modules, with data intact, to a new computer. That would definitely be a bad thing, but there's no security problem if you move the modules to a new computer and erase them (by generating and installing a new random key) as a part of the bonding process.
 


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