MacInTouch Amazon link...

Apple March 2019 announcements

Channels
Apple, News

Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Don't let Apple tell you it isn't in the advertising business and that you're not a product being profiled, packaged and sold for profit as part of its "services" business.
Apple said:
Apple Search Ads
Choose keywords and audiences for your ads.​
Set your own bids and budgets.​
Pay only when a user taps on your ad.​
View detailed reports of all key metrics.​
Measure value and manage at scale with APIs.​
Apple said:
Advertising & Privacy
... Ads that are delivered by Apple’s advertising platform may appear in the App Store on iOS, Apple News, and Stocks.

The following contextual information may be used to serve ads to you:
  • Device Information: Your keyboard language settings, device type, OS version, mobile carrier, and connection type.
  • Device Location: If the Location-Based Apple Ads system service is enabled, then your location may be used to serve you geographically relevant ads. Your device location is not stored by Apple’s advertising platform and profiles are not constructed from this information.
  • Searches in the App Store on iOS: When you search in the App Store on iOS, your query may be used to serve you a relevant Search Ad.
  • Apple News and Stocks: The type of article you read is used to select appropriate ads.
Additionally, to ensure ads are relevant, Apple’s advertising platform creates groups of people, called segments, who share similar characteristics and uses these groups for delivering targeted ads. Information about you is used to determine which segments you are assigned to, and thus, which ads you receive. To protect your privacy, your information is used to place you into segments of at least 5,000 people.

In Apple News and Stocks, the topics and publications associated with your News identifier, and the publications you allow to send you notifications are used to assign you to segments. No segments are created from search terms in the App Store.

In the App Store on iOS, Apple News, and Stocks, the following information may also be used to assign you to segments:
  • Account Information: Your name, address, age, and devices registered to your account. Information such as your first name in your Apple ID registration page, or salutation in your iTunes Account may be used to derive your gender.
  • Downloads: The music, movies, books, TV shows, and apps you download.
  • Activities in Other Apps: App developers, subject to their own privacy policies and applicable laws, may provide information regarding your in-app purchases and activities such as game level completion.
  • Advertising: Your interaction with advertising delivered by Apple’s advertising platform.
  • Other Segments: For specific advertising campaigns, advertisers may match information they have about users with Apple’s information to create segments, which must contain at least 5,000 people. Advertisers can use an Advertising Identifier, or other information they have about users, such as a phone number or email to match users to segments on Apple’s advertising platform. During the match process, these identifiers are obscured to limit personally identifiable information being disclosed. To choose which segments they match users to, Advertisers may use information they have from interactions with users. This information is acquired and used subject to the Advertisers’ own privacy policies....
Haymarket Media Group said:
Apple signals greater role for ad revenue as iPhone sales drop 15%
... Revenue from the iPhone – the company’s main revenue stream – declined 15% year on year to $51.98bn (£39.66bn) for the quarter ending 29 December 2018 (Apple's fiscal 2019 first quarter).

However, total quarterly revenue from all other Apple services grew 19% to $10.88bn. This includes subscriptions to Apple Music and Apple Pay, but also search ads on the App Store. Apple is planning on doubling its services revenue to more than $100bn by 2020 (up from $41bn for 2018).

In a call with investors, the company’s chief financial officer, Luca Maestri, pointed to a growing percentage of Apple users paying for more than one service, as well as "an advertising business in our App Store".

Mentioning advertising in a dialogue with investors is significant for Apple, which has prided itself in selling hardware rather than relying on ads like Google and Facebook.

Apple does not break down revenue for search ads, but it is reportedly worth $500m and set to grow to $2bn by next year.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I just cancelled my Apple News+ subscription a day after signing up, as it just highlighted everything I dislike about the new Apple, from confusing user interface design to bugginess to style over substance to manipulation to mediocrity, Ugh. Done. :-(

(On the plus side, it was simpler to find the cancellation option in the macOS News app than it was in the iPhone News app.)

Are others finding Apple News+ more appealing than I did?

Ultimately, it just seems cluelessly stupid to me, distributing mostly fixed-size paper page images in an app that's supposed to work across screens from small iPhones to large TVs. There's no sense that this Apple app is in any way an appropriate medium for distributing that content to these types of devices, let alone something innovative or compelling in the tradition of great Apple products of the past.
 


Apple's marketing show yesterday felt incomplete for such a major strategic shift.
I, too, felt Apple missed the mark with these announcements, for such a major strategic shift.

To me, the credit card was the "big" headliner innovation in the "Showtime" announcements. I feel that might become quickly popular, especially in large metro areas where Apple Pay is already accepted. (My sense is that a lot of people older than 20-something really don't understand Apple Pay, or even the Wallet app. I think the new Apple Card might help break through for that older group. And it might help promote Apple Pay by merchants in areas other than big cities.

In the TV segment, I agree it felt like Apple failed to land some big deal it had hoped for. The Apple TV software innovation for me was the single-sign-on (Apple ID) giving access to multiple services/accounts. That seems like a really useful idea, if it works. Better than what Amazon has done (because we still have to log on to individual subscriptions through Amazon). But, at least initially, Apple will have to produce some pretty blockbuster content to successfully steal business from Netflix. (I wonder if Apple tried - but failed - to just buy Netflix, or to buy "into" it for its own Apple service?)

The News Plus announcement was really what Apple News should have been at the start a couple years ago. Seems strange to me that, despite Apple's successful snare of the NYTimes for its iPad apps early on, News Plus does not (apparently) include subscriptions to the NYTimes. At the moment, News Plus just looks like a desperate move by magazines to stay afloat by selling digital subscriptions through Apple's news service. Somehow, I doubt that will succeed. But the magazine world has nowhere to go but up.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
In addition to the other issues with Apple News+, there's this problem:
The Verge said:
Apple’s news subscription service doesn’t have a lot of news
,,, if Apple News is supposed to be the digital equivalent of a newsstand, there’s still a big piece missing: newspapers. Apple News Plus includes access to more than 300 magazines, from highbrow journalism like The New Yorker to mass-market celebrity fare like People. But the service was only able to enlist three major newspapers — The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and the Toronto Star. It’s a strange weak point in the service, and one that could seriously jeopardize Cook’s goal of building an all-in-one location for reading news.

If you look at the project’s origins, it’s no surprise the service skews so heavily toward periodicals. Apple News Plus inherits the majority of its content from the app Texture, known as the “Netflix of magazines,” which Apple acquired this time last year.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
To me, the credit card was the "big" headliner innovation in the "Showtime" announcements.
I had the same feeling, although I'm not sure yet how the interest charges and cash back and detailed terms will shake out - haven't got the details - but it looked good, and better security features seem like something we could use.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The Verge digs into Apple's App Store game issues and how they play into the Apple Arcade project:
Chaim Gartenberg said:
Apple Arcade wants to slay the free-to-play monster iOS helped create
Apple has created a monster. Free-to-play games have taken over the iOS App Store almost entirely, creating a marketplace that is dominated by scammy timers and cheap monetization schemes, one that no amount of quality game design, curation, and promotion have been able to fix. But now (after years of profiting off this system), Apple is here with the alleged cure: Apple Arcade.

... While developers are cautiously optimistic that Apple Arcade could turn the tide toward premium gaming, there are still a lot of unanswered questions about how it’ll work, how much it’ll cost, what Apple’s cut will be, and what revenue splits will look like. There are also concerns that the service could cannibalize paid game sales in the future, or create a higher barrier of entry for less established developers at the expense of elevating established, known brands. None of this is particularly a problem for Apple — it takes a 30 percent cut of all purchases on the App Store, whether they be extra lives in Candy Crush or full game downloads of Alto’s Odyssey.
 


On Apple News+ I see that FourFourTwo is a good example of bad iPhone layout - it's just large, fixed pages you have to scroll around to see. A bunch of other magazines have similar awkward page presentations.
On daringfireball.net there is a mention of this web story that iterates through all the magazines in News+:
Federico Viticci said:
A Complete List of All the Magazines Available for Apple News+ in the U.S. (So Far)
... To create this list, I manually opened each magazine and annotated whether its latest issue was using Apple News Format or the standard, PDF-like format. Magazines that support Apple News Format are labeled with "(ANF)" in the list. The split between Apple News Format magazines and standard magazines is fairly even: 125 magazines are using the richer Apple News Format in their latest issue, while 126 of them are relying on traditional PDFs (likely the format the old Texture service was using).
How much fundamental sense does Apple's model actually make, when it seems to be built on putting paper pages into an Apple app, instead of just using standard web formats that are designed for flexibility across mobile, laptop, desktop and TV screens.
The publishers probably have at least a role here as much as Apple does. Standard e-book format is EPUB (not really generic HTML). Apple Books (iBook) uses EPUB as a baseline. Apple News format uses JSON as a baseline.

A major factor here is probably how easy it is to do a 'save as' into something JSON-like from the favorite editor that each publisher uses, versus 'save as PDF'. In the second case, that is the lowest common denominator across all editor applications. It probably will never completely disappear, since it is the most cost-effective option for a magazine that isn't making much money (export once and put it into all the distribution options). In the JSON case, just because it is flexible doesn't mean a particular layout is going to scale well across all possible viewers. (As with sending stuff to a high-end printer, some tweaks are probably necessary that have to do with the quirks/features of the specific printer.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I'll just post this without comment while biting my tongue...
Sean Hollister/The Verge said:
Once again, Apple isn’t following its own advertising rules
The Apple News Plus subscription screen is the latest example of a double standard

Why won’t Apple follow its own rules? That’s the question running through my mind right now, as I write a post for The Verge about how — for the fourth time in four months — Apple is promoting its own content in ways that are forbidden to Apple’s own developers.
 



I don't know what's going on inside magazine publishers today, but I used to work in the magazine world, so I know that advertising plays an important role in their profits. Many magazines I receive in electronic format today use PDF, which has the advantage of maintaining the format used for print advertising. One example on the list is Sky & Telescope. I suspect many publications that are going with Apple News are doing so to build circulation so they can boost advertising revenue, which is based on subscription numbers. Subscription revenues may be secondary to increasing ad revenue.
 


In the mid-90s, Apple and CitiBank teamed up on a card. My recollection of the details is very fuzzy, but I remember that you could accumulate a percentage of purchases toward the purchase of Apple products. I took advantage of it with my own purchases, and my employers also let me buy stuff for work using the card, for which they reimbursed me. After a couple of years, I had accumulated enough to get a hefty chunk off the cost of my Power Mac 7600 and 20” MultipleScan monitor. I was disappointed when they phased out that card.
I had an Apple credit account way back when; not sure if that's the same thing as the old credit card. I opened the account to finance a computer, which I then paid down. It had an Apple logo on the account, but it was GE finance if I recall correctly. I don't think it came with an actual credit card. The terms were nothing to write home about.
 


How much fundamental sense does Apple's model actually make, when it seems to be built on putting paper pages into an Apple app, instead of just using standard web formats that are designed for flexibility across mobile, laptop, desktop and TV screens.
Ultimately, it just seems cluelessly stupid to me, distributing mostly fixed-size paper page images in an app that's supposed to work across screens from small iPhones to large TVs. There's no sense that this Apple app is in any way an appropriate medium for distributing that content to these types of devices, let alone something innovative or compelling in the tradition of great Apple products of the past.
This is a matter of personal preference, but back in the day when the iPad 1 seemed magical, I tried and was very disappointed by magazines as apps, or magazines in apps.

I was so frustrated with the limitations of "magazine apps" that I scanned several issues of BusinessWeek through my ScanSnap to read on the iPad in PDF format with pinch to zoom. The experience would have been ideal had I been able to easily create "bookmarks" from the table of contents.

I'm pretty sure publishers don't offer PDF subscriptions outside DRM-protected apps to keep users from breaking encryption and sharing content.
 


Beware if you download News+ magazines for offline reading. Apparently there is no way to delete them. They will automatically delete after 30 days, supposedly.
 


This is a matter of personal preference, but back in the day when the iPad 1 seemed magical, I tried and was very disappointed by magazines as apps, or magazines in apps.
I was so frustrated with the limitations of "magazine apps" that I scanned several issues of BusinessWeek through my ScanSnap to read on the iPad in PDF format with pinch to zoom. The experience would have been ideal had I been able to easily create "bookmarks" from the table of contents. I'm pretty sure publishers don't offer PDF subscriptions outside DRM-protected apps to keep users from breaking encryption and sharing content.
George, you are, indeed, correct regarding PDF as the DRM-enabled delivery format of choice. Ric's complaint about fixed-size paper page images is also spot-on. There is, if I recall correctly, a solution, but it's certainly not one we'd ever embrace: Adobe Flash. The main reason for it still hanging around is its ability to be presented in a web browser while the content remains protected. This is why many colleges and universities still use it for educational training and testing purposes. Maybe HTML5 will have an answer.
 


According to MacObserver, the 2019 iMacs use a variety of CPUs with a variety of maximum RAM capacities. ... The 27" model uses one of four CPUs: i5-8500, i5-8600, i5-9600KF, or i9-9900KF, all four of which have a maximum of 128 GB.
OWC has now tested and demonstrated that the 2019 27" iMac models support 128 GB of RAM. A set of four 32GB SO-DIMMs is not cheap ($1100 from OWC), but they are available and user-installable.

No word about the 21.5" model, but given the extreme difficulty of replacing memory in that model, I don't think very many people (other than professional service techs) will be willing to try.

Also in today's news, Apple quietly added a 256GB RAM BTO option to the iMac Pro. This option consists of four 64GB DIMMs, is insanely expensive ($5200, plus the cost of the rest of the iMac) and there is currently no mechanism to upgrade an iMac Pro with less memory to 256 GB.
 


I just cancelled my Apple News+ subscription a day after signing up, as it just highlighted everything I dislike about the new Apple, from confusing user interface design to bugginess to style over substance to manipulation to mediocrity, Ugh. Done. :-(

(On the plus side, it was simpler to find the cancellation option in the macOS News app than it was in the iPhone News app.)

Are others finding Apple News+ more appealing than I did?

Ultimately, it just seems cluelessly stupid to me, distributing mostly fixed-size paper page images in an app that's supposed to work across screens from small iPhones to large TVs. There's no sense that this Apple app is in any way an appropriate medium for distributing that content to these types of devices, let alone something innovative or compelling in the tradition of great Apple products of the past.
That is one botched UI. It's not as if they didn't have alternate services to look at for comparison. The whole service is a rush job with inconsistent access to back issues for various magazines.

I've been using Zinio and RBdigital for years, and accumulated a lot of back issues. So switching will be difficult with only 12 months of access to back issues. It's the main reason I prefer purchasing instead of subscribing.

Why wouldn't Apple realize the licensing issue they were about to tackle?

Apple's starting to smell a lot like 1995 again.
 
  • appreciate
Reactions: BKN


In the mid-90s, Apple and CitiBank teamed up on a card. My recollection of the details is very fuzzy, but I remember that you could accumulate a percentage of purchases toward the purchase of Apple products. I took advantage of it with my own purchases, and my employers also let me buy stuff for work using the card, for which they reimbursed me. After a couple of years, I had accumulated enough to get a hefty chunk off the cost of my Power Mac 7600 and 20” MultipleScan monitor. I was disappointed when they phased out that card.
I found some details about it. Apparently introduced in 1993 and discontinued in 1996.
 


I was in Hong Kong and Shanghai last week with a local friend of mine. She has an iPhone 7, I have an iPhone X, and we were both running iOS 12.1. When either of us tapped the WiFi icon in Control Center, it disabled the WiFi radio. When I returned to USA, tapping the WiFi icon in Control Center merely disconnected it but left the radio on. Can anyone else outside the USA, and especially in Asia, confirm the behavior when tapping the WiFi icon in Control Center?
 


Just for grins, I asked the sales department at ibuypower to work up a proposal for an expandable "Lightroom/Photoshop" machine.

They came up with a fairly nice arrangement, but I modified the proposal to include a Samsung 970 NVME M.2 500GB and a 1TB Samsung 860 EVO SSD. The video card is an Nvidia (so no hackintoshing with Mojave) but seems to be close to the "best" video card that Apple can provide CTO with the top of the line iMac (not Pro).

When I built an iMac to be similar to the ibuypower unit (but with only the 512GB SSD option, as a second drive isn't available), the price was pushing $3900. The ibuypower unit (along with a professional Viewsonic 27" of the same res as the iMac) came to about $2500. Only two of the four RAM slots are full. There's also this "Optane" memory thing for which I have not done any research, but it appears to be something along the lines of super-fast RAM cache; I'll let those more alpha-geek than I opine.

I'll mention that buying a PC (unless from HP or Dell, etc.) entails making a lot of choices and that's scary.

Here are the specs from ibuypower:
CaseiBUYPOWER Trace 2 Tempered Glass RGB Gaming Case-
iBUYPOWER Elite Build PackageNone-
Case FansDefault Case Fan-
Case LightingNone-
iBUYPOWER Labs - Noise ReductionNone-
iBUYPOWER Labs - Internal ExpansionNone-
ProcessorIntel® Core™ i9-9900K Processor (8x 3.60GHz/16MB L3 Cache)-
iBUYPOWER PowerDriveNone-
Processor CoolingiBUYPOWER 120mm Addressable RGB Liquid Cooling System - Black-
Memory32 GB [16 GB x2] DDR4-3000 Memory Module-Certified Major Brand Gaming Memory
Video CardNVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 - 6GB (GDDR6) (VR-Ready)-
SLI BridgeNone-
MotherboardASRock Z390 PHANTOM GAMING 4-IB -- 802.11ac WiFi, USB 3.1 (1 Type-C, 3 Rear, 4 Front), ASRock Super Alloy-
Power Supply650 Watt - CORSAIR TX650M 80 PLUS Gold, Semi Modular-
Advance Cabling OptionsStandard Default Cables-
M.2/PCI-E SSD Card500 GB Samsung 970 EVO PLUS M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD -- Read: 3500MB/s; Write: 3200MB/s-
Intel Optane Memory Accelerator16GB Intel Optane Memory-Free Upgrade to 32GB Intel Optane Memory; Boost Primary Drive - Up to 18x Faster for hard disk drive
Primary Hard Drive1 TB Samsung 860 EVO SSD -- Read: 550MB/s, Write: 520MB/s-Single Drive
Data Hard DriveNone-
Optical DriveNone-
Media Card Reader / WriterNone-
Meter DisplayNone-
Sound Card3D Premium Surround Sound Onboard-
Network CardOnboard LAN Network (Gb or 10/100)-
USB Expansion CardNone-
Operating SystemWindows 10 Home + Office 365 Trial [FREE 30 Day Trial]-(64-bit)
MonitorNone-
KeyboardiBUYPOWER Standard Gaming Keyboard-
MouseiBUYPOWER Gaming Optical Mouse-Multi-Color LED Lighting
Speaker SystemNone-
Advanced Build Options - Thermal PasteNone-
Case Engraving ServiceNone-
Warranty3 Year Standard Warranty Service-
Rush ServiceStandard Service-Estimated Ship in 5-10 Business Days
Subtotal* 2084.00
(plus tax & shipping)
*Prices are subject to change at any time.
ibuypower config with M2 NVME Samsung 970 500GB 1TB Samsung 860 EVO data drive
 


But, at least initially, Apple will have to produce some pretty blockbuster content to successfully steal business from Netflix. (I wonder if Apple tried - but failed - to just buy Netflix, or to buy "into" it for its own Apple service?)
Well, I can only hope they are successful. I just finished up a recording session for a song for a new PBS-Apple-produced kids' show. Song writers and session guys can always use more work. This show will teach kids coding basics. Here's an article about it at TechCrunch:

 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Just to be clear, I'm not arguing that iMacs should be all-SSD, like the Mac Mini and Apple laptops with their exhorbitant storage pricing; I'm just saying that a hard drive only iMac in 2019 with not even a miniscule 24 GB of flash for a fusion setup seems like it would be perversely bad for performance, given the optimization/anti-optimizations in macOS 10.14. (In fact, I recommended that a client on a very tight budget bump up to the fusion configuration on a low-end refurb for that reason, when their old iMac died completely.)
No one should buy a Mac with a spinning hard drive, and no one should buy a Mac with the 1TB Fusion (the one with the the 32GB flash portion, as opposed to the 128GB version on the original Fusion drives or the 2 and 3TB current model Fusion drives). If one has purchased with the spinner-only or 1TB Fusion option, one should return the computer. Make Apple get the message.
At this point in time there is zero reason why Apple should be selling a computer with a spinning hard drive in it, especially since their more recent OSes and APFS introduce performance penalties when installed on a spinning drive. I can buy a name-brand 512GB SSD at retail for $70, so Apple's price would be what, $45? How much more is that than what they pay for a spinning hard drive? I just upgraded two of the more recent 21.5" iMacs with spinning drives to macOS 10.13, and the performance hit, even with the drives formatted in HFS+, is atrocious. If they made the darn things such that I could actually swap out the drive for an SSD, I would have done so in a heartbeat.
The great Mac repairman, Louis Rossman, agrees with us...
YouTube said:
Is new iMac trash?
... Now there are many people that say that the average person is not going to notice the difference between a hard drive and an SSD. And that's where I call BS....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
A brief question: for the newly-refreshed iMac models that were released last week, will they only run with Mojave and newer versions of macOS? Or can one run them with Sierra or High Sierra? I'm sure they come with Mojave installed, but I wondered if there was a chance I could run an older macOS version on them (natively, i.e., not in a virtual machine.)
I've checked the Tech Specs, but they don't state this explicitly. Thanks in advance!
As they use newer-generation CPUs and hardware, I don't believe they will be able to run pre-Mojave versions of macOS or OS X (and they may even need a newer version of Mojave than the current one).
FYI:
EveryMac.com said:
Apple iMac "Core i5" 3.0 27-Inch (5K, Early 2019) Specs
Pre-Installed MacOS: 10.14.4 (18E2034)

What's new
24 March 2019
This update of EveryMac.com features preliminary specs, identifiers, and global prices on the new iPad mini, iPad Air, and iMac lines as well as complete details on the configuration changes to the MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and iMac Pro. Because the new models are scheduled to arrive in stores later this week, complete info can be added when it becomes available.
 


This is a matter of personal preference, but back in the day when the iPad 1 seemed magical, I tried and was very disappointed by magazines as apps, or magazines in apps. I was so frustrated with the limitations of "magazine apps" that I scanned several issues of BusinessWeek through my ScanSnap to read on the iPad in PDF format with pinch to zoom. The experience would have been ideal had I been able to easily create "bookmarks" from the table of contents. I'm pretty sure publishers don't offer PDF subscriptions outside DRM-protected apps to keep users from breaking encryption and sharing content.
That seems to be a solved problem these days. In addition to the NY Times, I have long had several magazine subscriptions on my iPad. Most have evolved through different software platforms, including one that was on some kind of proprietary platform, changed to PDF (awful, nearly unusable), then then back again. All of them work well now.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
That seems to be a solved problem these days.
Maybe not at Apple, though...
The Verge said:
One week with Apple News Plus: a messy but good-enough Netflix for magazines

When it comes to the reading experience, the lack of standardization across publications makes it difficult to know what you’re getting into when you download an issue of a magazine you’re not familiar with. The density of the interface makes reading and maneuvering from an issue’s table of contents to an article page and to the publication hub a total pain. Regardless of whether a magazine is using ANF or PDF-style file formats, I find myself too often encountering badly translated articles that were never designed to be read on a phone screen, with plain, clunky page designs.

The closest thing to a thoughtfully designed layout is the text-heavy magazines, like The New Yorker and The Atlantic, that simply rely on drop caps, the occasional photo, and a pull quote or two to spruce up the page. That these no-frills layouts are preferable speaks to how much work Apple still has to do on the design side, both with the tools it provides publishers and with the ways it organizes information on the main News Plus tab, to make this a product worthy of being part of the company’s new slate of premium services.

As you start to scroll down, you’ll begin to notice the first of many annoying design quirks....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple News is now freezing on me repeatedly on an up-to-date iPhone 7 when I try to open/send a link via Sharing. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, but the problem is recurring. (I'm not using News+ after cancelling my subscription to it, just plain Apple News.) Is anyone else seeing this?
 


I decided to subscribe to the NY Times after a number of excellent articles from their reporters were the basis of some TV stories. Rachel Maddow said something like, "Here's a good reason to subscribe to the NY Times; their people do the work that helps keep democracy alive." So, after I glance through the articles in Google News (on my Mac or my Android phone), I head over to the NY Times for some in-depth coverage.

Until Apple has their own reporters covering things (Hah!), why would I want YANA (yet another news aggregator)? Been there, done that.
 


OWC has now tested and demonstrated that the 2019 27" iMac models support 128 GB of RAM. A set of four 32GB SO-DIMMs is not cheap ($1100 from OWC), but they are available and user-installable.
No word about the 21.5" model, but given the extreme difficulty of replacing memory in that model, I don't think very many people (other than professional service techs) will be willing to try.
Also in today's news, Apple quietly added a 256GB RAM BTO option to the iMac Pro. This option consists of four 64GB DIMMs, is insanely expensive ($5200, plus the cost of the rest of the iMac) and there is currently no mechanism to upgrade an iMac Pro with less memory to 256 GB.
According to an article on Apple's support web site, the RAM in the 2019 21.5" iMac cannot be upgraded after purchase. You either increase the RAM at the time of purchase, or you're stuck with what you bought.

Additionally the 2019 21.5" iMacs come standard with 5400-rpm hard disks. In 2019.
 


According to an article on Apple's support web site, the RAM in the 2019 21.5" iMac cannot be upgraded after purchase. You either increase the RAM at the time of purchase, or you're stuck with what you bought.
Additionally the 2019 21.5" iMacs come standard with 5400-rpm hard disks. In 2019.
Louis Rossman's YouTube video is spot-on. The question I keep asking is whether I continue warning clients (through my website) and El Paso Apple User Group members that they'll have to add a USB 3 SSD and clone their system over to it (for at least some improved performance, and, at under $300 for a 1TB SSD, that's not unreasonable) or just let buyers of the 21.5" models get really P.O.'d at Apple and lose them as future customers when they realize that they could buy a Windows box with much better performance for less; certainly, if one can accept a separate display, then many more low-price options open up, and the display may be moved to the next system (lowering its cost further).

But, if you drink the iPhone Kool-Aid and buy into iCloud, you invite the insidious Apple ecosystem into your life; then you have no choice but to either make excuses for Apple or keep spending more $$ in order to "fix" deficiencies. I feel that buying another Mac just encourages Ive and Cook; I'm not willing to do so.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts