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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Experimenting more with Capture One import, I found that the "managed" catalog option (import "inside catalog") stores files inside the "package" in a folder structure by import time (not photo capture time)...
There's an additional option during import with this approach: Location Sub Folder Tokens. Using the same kinds of metadata, you can automatically create folders for the files you're "importing" (copying) into a new location while the catalog is being built....
I just stumbled on a neat trick within Capture One that lets you create a self-contained ("managed") catalog that organizes the files inside the catalog "package" within folders and subfolders by date or whatever other metadata tokens you wish to use.
  1. Create a new catalog in Capture One.
  2. Import images...
    1. Pick a temporary Destination folder - but we won't actually use this...
    2. Configure Sub Folder tokens, e.g. Image year \ Image Month \ Image Day of Month
    3. Go back to Destination and switch it to Inside Catalog.
    4. Configure Naming format as you like for the names of files you're storing in the catalog.
  3. Review Erase Images After Copying to make sure it's as you wish (e.g. uncheck the box).
  4. Select images to import.
  5. Click the Import button.
Now, switch to the Finder, select the catalog file icon and right-click to Show Package Contents. You should see the photo files neatly organized into folders and subfolders as you specified. (Even though the Sub Folder choices are hidden with the Inside Catalog import option, they still work!)

What this means is that you can import a collection of images into a self-contained catalog yet still have them organized into logical hierarchical folders that you can access/retrieve as necessary, and this also should be better at handling very large collections of files than a simpler, flatter folder structure inside the catalog.
 


I just stumbled on a neat trick within Capture One that lets you create a self-contained ("managed") catalog that organizes the files inside the catalog "package" within folders and subfolders by date or whatever other metadata tokens you wish to use.
  1. Create a new catalog in Capture One.
  2. Import images...
    1. Pick a temporary Destination folder - but we won't actually use this...
    2. Configure Sub Folder tokens, e.g. Image year \ Image Month \ Image Day of Month
    3. Go back to Destination and switch it to Inside Catalog.
  3. Review Erase Images After Copying to make sure it's as you wish (e.g. uncheck the box).
  4. Select images to import.
  5. Click the Import button.
...
Your example stores photos by shoot date. Are the files renamed? How might name collisions be handled?

I frequently import from many sources: my SLR, my phone, email, message photos from all members of my family, sometimes images downloaded from the web. It is not uncommon to have multiple photos with the same name but from different sources shot on the same day. Although more difficult to navigate in Finder, there is a logic in Apple’s Photos organizing by import batch, where names almost never collide!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Your example stores photos by shoot date. Are the files renamed? How might name collisions be handled? I frequently import from many sources: my SLR, my phone, email, message photos from all members of my family, sometimes images downloaded from the web. It is not uncommon to have multiple photos with the same name but from different sources shot on the same day.
I skipped over that detail in my post (now added), but, yes, I actually do rename the files for just that reason, and it's very easy to do. Just specify what you want in the Naming section of the import dialog — you have a wealth of metadata tokens you can use. For example, you can rename the files as you import them into the catalog to incorporate date/time, camera model, format, location, ISO, etc. You could also create subfolders for each camera/source.
Although more difficult to navigate in Finder, there is a logic in Apple’s Photos organizing by import batch, where names almost never collide!
You can do that, instead, if you like — Capture One import is flexible enough to handle it. (That may even be the default behavior.)
 


I'll just throw this out there; it may fit someone's use-case. Caveat; my #1 priority with photos is the date they were taken; chronology is job #1 for me.

I wrote an AppleScript droplet years ago that I use to rename all my digital photos/videos (and MP3's) first thing after copying them to my main storage drive (because what sane person wants 10 files named "_MG_1234.CR2"?, I always thought that was so ridiculous).

My first digital camera was an Olympus, and they use a file-naming scheme that I thought made a lot of sense to my order of priorities. Since Olympus makes other digital media products (such as voice recorders which use "A" for audio as the first character, if I recall correctly), their photo files begin with a "P" for Photo, then the month, using 1-9, A, B, C, then a 2-digit day segment and 4-digit counter segment, a period, and the file extension. Think about it... why not name the file with some useful information rather than something that's totally disposable and almost demands that you replace it?

My script attempts to read the EXIF info, so that it can potentially avoid anomalies that may occur with how exactly the file got to me (email etc.). It renames the file to YY_MDD####.ttt. This tells you the entire date of the file and also facilitates chronologically-correct sorting of the files when collected into a single location for various re-purposing.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I noticed a huge improvement in speed when the original Affinity Photo app got some updates a while ago (confirmed by another customer recently), and I heard an Apple representative talking about future performance improvements coming from Adobe and others. I wonder if this is one of those:
Adobe said:
Improvements to Lightroom Classic & ACR
Updates are available today for Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw, our two desktop-centric photography applications. These updates focus on performance and improving your workflow.

GPU Accelerated Editing
Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw take advantage of the more powerful graphics cards (GPUs) while editing, providing a smoother and more responsive experience. GPU acceleration is more pronounced with larger resolution monitors (4k and above) as well as with more powerful GPUs.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I noticed a huge improvement in speed when the original Affinity Photo app got some updates a while ago (confirmed by another customer recently)...
Probably not as dramatic, but Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer just got new updates, with more performance improvements listed for Affinity Photo.

Meanwhile, Affinity Photo has some features not included in Capture One (as far as I know) for those who need them: HDR Merge, Focus Merge, Stack, and Panorama.
Affinity Photo Help said:
Merging to 32-bit HDR
Multiple exposures of the same subject can be merged to produce an unbounded 32-bit document, which contains a significant amount of tonal range—more, in fact, than most displays outside of specialized equipment can reproduce. The resulting 32-bit image can then be edited with Photo's extensive set of tools, adjustments and filters, or it can be tone mapped in order to map the extensive 32-bit tonal range to a result that looks suitable for most displays.
...
Stitching panoramas
... Multiple images can be stitched together to create a wider and taller scene, referred to as a panorama. The benefits of creating a panorama are:
  • Capturing a much wider view of a scene.
  • Producing higher resolution images than can be achieved with just one exposure; useful for printing large images and other large size applications.
...
Image stacks
Non-destructive image stacks blend together a series of images based on the same scene or almost identical subject matter. Visual differences between images in the series can then be removed, composited together, or used for creative effects.

Use image stacks for:
  • Exposure merging: Merging images of varying exposures.
  • Object Removal: Use a series of images to blend out unwanted subject matter from a specific image in an image set.
  • Noise reduction: Blend together multiple shots of the same subject and average out the noise.
  • Creative effects: Simulate long exposure imagery and combine bright subjects (e.g., fireworks) for a composite effect.
On the flip side, I haven't found Affinity Photo as handy for lens corrections (including chromatic aberration) as Capture One (though I haven't explored it thoroughly).
 


Probably not as dramatic, but Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer just got new updates, with more performance improvements listed for Affinity Photo.
Meanwhile, Affinity Photo has some features not included in Capture One (as far as I know) for those who need them: HDR Merge, Focus Merge, Stack, and Panorama.
On the flip side, I haven't found Affinity Photo as handy for lens corrections (including chromatic aberration) as Capture One (though I haven't explored it thoroughly).
Affinity Photo and the rest of the Affinity suite are a formidable and elegantly integrated solution that I do recommend for those who aren't locked into Adobe's subscription model by their client or work requirements.

But there are limits. Capture One's Raw conversion just kicks butt over all others. This is where Affinity Photo does come up a bit short, though it's adequate for many uses. Capture One has a completely non-destructive workflow that accesses original Raw data for every adjustment, with important quality benefits.

Affinity doesn't have anything for workflow management, and Capture One continues to mature in this area that was once its weak point. Fortunately, it's easy to round-trip from Capture One to another editor for those tasks that have been the province of Photoshop but which now Affinity can mostly handle. And Affinity is nimble and fast, without the legacy of code bloat that slows down the Adobe suite.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For what it's worth, Serif/Affinity has a 30%-off sale at the moment on its hard-cover guides to Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer, dropping them to $34.99 each (with a free t-shirt included).
 





Kudos to Thorsten Lemke of GraphicConverter. I found a minor bug which I reported it to him. Within 12 hours he squashed the bug and sent me a link to a beta version. It's refreshing to experience such good customer support...
Indeed, just had a similar experience with my wholly unimportant Classic Solitaire from Dogmelon. Graphics failed to size correctly in Catalina, so I emailed Dogmelon, and they replied that they were traveling for the weekend, but they would update the app on Monday. And they apologized for it not working. Something that Apple might want to consider.
 


There is a very detailed article explaining the discovery, development, and implementation of a complex hack that allows Aperture and iPhoto to run with most functionality intact on Catalina systems. The most notable things that don't work are QuickTime-related video operations.

It's an excellent bit of sleuthing, but be aware that executing the hack involves things like disabling SIP, copying a Mojave library onto a Catalina system, and some sorcery with Xcode and the command line. Future macOS updates almost certainly will break the hack, so at least some steps would need to be repeated after updating a system.

While I can't recommend that anyone install the hack unless they really know what they're doing, the article itself may be very interesting to some readers:
Tyshawn Cormier said:
P.S.: I haven't tried the hack myself, so all caveats apply.
 


There is a very detailed article explaining the discovery, development, and implementation of a complex hack that allows Aperture and iPhoto to run with most functionality intact on Catalina systems.
I followed most of that down to where it involved Xcode. What I thought most interesting was that both Aperture and iPhoto were 64-bit, "but with some internal components that are still 32-bit."

As "hack" author Tyshawn Gormier says, this is fun, but not for a production system. It also looks so simple, Apple could have fixed Aperture for those of you still clinging on. (Same fixes possible for iPhoto, but not an application users want as much.)

Gormier mentions that, in 2011, Mike Potter enabled Snow Leopard's versions of Preview and Text Edit to work on Lion. I kept those two old versions running using Mike's workaround as long as I could, but Apple eventually made it impossible.
 


What I thought most interesting was that both Aperture and iPhoto were 64-bit, "but with some internal components that are still 32-bit."
The Aperture 3.6 binary itself is a 64-bit app, but the app bundle includes 32-bit binaries. A similar situation holds for iPhoto. For example, here is the output of the file command on the Aperture-related binaries in question:

/Applications/Aperture.app/Contents/MacOS/Aperture: Mach-O 64-bit executable x86_64

/Applications/Aperture.app/Contents/Frameworks/iLifeSlideshow.framework/Versions/A/XPCServices/com.apple.iLifeSlideshow.MRXPCMovieServer.xpc/Contents/MacOS/com.apple.iLifeSlideshow.MRXPCMovieServer: Mach-O executable i386

/Applications/Aperture.app/Contents/Frameworks/iLifeSlideshow.framework/Versions/A/XPCServices/com.apple.iLifeSlideshow.MEXPC32ExporterHelper.xpc/Contents/MacOS/com.apple.iLifeSlideshow.MEXPC32ExporterHelper: Mach-O executable i386

/Applications/Aperture.app/Contents/XPCServices/com.apple.PhotoApps.AVCHDConverter.xpc/Contents/MacOS/com.apple.PhotoApps.AVCHDConverter: Mach-O executable i386
 


I know there are lots of good options out there for image editing - On1, Luminar, etc. My question really pertains more specifically to DAM [Digital Asset Management] usage. I have all my digital images/video in a managed Aperture library, but macOS 10.15 will officially break it, so I have got to either a) not upgrade or b) find a good DAM alternative.

I have the Nik suite of plugins and generally don't do any major heavy lifting with image editing. My wishlist is topped with finding another app that could either use or import my existing Aperture library. I don't mind exporting it first into a referenced file structure, if needed, but was curious if there was anything that could just use it "as is" (other than Apple's Photos app - haven't been overwhelmed with it).

So, that's pretty much it, I need a good DAM to replace Aperture. Thoughts? The idea of the transition makes me a bit queasy... but I suppose this is a good time to cull/keyword my library... sigh....
One option would be to use my NeoFinder software, which has been 64-bit since 2013, and handles a very wide range of file formats.
 


There is a very detailed article explaining the discovery, development, and implementation of a complex hack that allows Aperture and iPhoto to run with most functionality intact on Catalina systems. The most notable things that don't work are QuickTime-related video operations....
Blimey. I wish I'd seen this earlier. I'm 70% of the way through importing over 1 TB of Aperture libraries (I organised them per year) into Lightroom Classic on my 2018 Mac Mini (running Mojave) so I'll be ready to upgrade it to Catalina at some point. (All the images/metadata are stored on an external Thunderbolt 3 LaCie array, so an upgrade wouldn't pose any risk to them.)

I have a sacrificial 2012 MacBook Pro running Catalina, so I might give this hack a try.
 


I followed most of that down to where it involved Xcode. What I thought most interesting was that both Aperture and iPhoto were 64-bit, "but with some internal components that are still 32-bit."
As "hack" author Tyshawn Gormier says, this is fun, but not for a production system. It also looks so simple, Apple could have fixed Aperture for those of you still clinging on. (Same fixes possible for iPhoto, but not an application users want as much.)
Gormier mentions that, in 2011, Mike Potter enabled Snow Leopard's versions of Preview and Text Edit to work on Lion. I kept those two old versions running using Mike's workaround as long as I could, but Apple eventually made it impossible.
I have been using Aperture for almost 10 years (and 500 GB of photos) and was going to stay on Mojave for as long as I could to postpone the inevitably painful migration to Something Else. This development is very exciting! I personally would pay $100 for a utility that was released and kept up to date with system releases which could perform all of these steps. Aperture and my 2010 Mac Pro will soldier onward to Catalina!
 


One option would be to use my NeoFinder software, which has been 64-bit since 2013, and handles a very wide range of file formats.
Norbert, once one exports from Aperture with all the user metadata, how does NeoFinder allow a user to search and navigate based on that? I'm happy to look at a video if you have one.
 


Just an FYI: Skylum's Luminar 4 is scheduled for a November 18 release, with those who pre-ordered due to get notification a few days beforehand.
 


There is a very detailed article explaining the discovery, development, and implementation of a complex hack that allows Aperture and iPhoto to run with most functionality intact on Catalina systems. The most notable things that don't work are QuickTime-related video operations.
It's an excellent bit of sleuthing, but be aware that executing the hack involves things like disabling SIP, copying a Mojave library onto a Catalina system, and some sorcery with Xcode and the command line. Future macOS updates almost certainly will break the hack, so at least some steps would need to be repeated after updating a system.
While I can't recommend that anyone install the hack unless they really know what they're doing, the article itself may be very interesting to some readers:
P.S.: I haven't tried the hack myself, so all caveats apply.
What we need is someone with these sleuthing and hacking skills to figure out how to get Aperture to run in a virtual environment. Getting it to run in Catalina is a temporary solution that may only last until the next dot release of macOS. Getting it to run in a virtual environment would allow me to totally control (ie, never update) the OS it's running in while allowing the rest of my system to move forward, for better or worse, with Apple's parade of system updates.

Has anyone determined if this is feasible, or is the dependency too intertwined with the GPU access within virtual environments, which is the issue per my very limited understanding?
 


What we need is someone with these sleuthing and hacking skills to figure out how to get Aperture to run in a virtual environment. Getting it to run in Catalina is a temporary solution that may only last until the next dot release of macOS. Getting it to run in a virtual environment would allow me to totally control (ie, never update) the OS it's running in while allowing the rest of my system to move forward, for better or worse, with Apple's parade of system updates. Has anyone determined if this is feasible, or is the dependency too intertwined with the GPU access within virtual environments, which is the issue per my very limited understanding?
Joe, FYI... I've installed Mojave and Aperture in a VMWare Fusion virtual HD for the sole purpose of running Aperture after I upgrade to Catalina. I moved my Aperture photos library to the macOS/VMware shared folder, but I've been unable to open it in Aperture in VMWare Fusion. I receive the following Aperture error message when I attempt to open the Aperture photos library: "Unable to write to library 'Aperture Library 2".

Aperture itself opens without a problem in the Mojave virtual machine. It just can't seem to access the Aperture photos library. I'd appreciate anybody's thoughts on how to solve this problem.
 



Joe, FYI... I've installed Mojave and Aperture in a VMWare Fusion virtual HD for the sole purpose of running Aperture after I upgrade to Catalina. ... I receive the following Aperture error message when I attempt to open the Aperture photos library: "Unable to write to library 'Aperture Library 2"....
Les, can you create an Aperture Library in your VM?
 


Joe, FYI... I've installed Mojave and Aperture in a VMWare Fusion virtual HD for the sole purpose of running Aperture after I upgrade to Catalina. I moved my Aperture photos library to the macOS/VMware shared folder, but I've been unable to open it in Aperture in VMWare Fusion. I receive the following Aperture error message when I attempt to open the Aperture photos library: "Unable to write to library 'Aperture Library 2".
Aperture itself opens without a problem in the Mojave virtual machine. It just can't seem to access the Aperture photos library. I'd appreciate anybody's thoughts on how to solve this problem.
This seems different from the issues I've seen before - perhaps related to your library being in a shared folder. Maybe a permissions issue?

The issue I normally see reported is that Aperture will launch just fine and will open the library and display thumbnails of your photos, but you can't open/view the full-size images. The error reported is that the [virtual] computer you are trying to run Aperture on does not support the minimum graphics requirements.
 


There is a very detailed article explaining the discovery, development, and implementation of a complex hack that allows Aperture and iPhoto to run with most functionality intact on Catalina systems. The most notable things that don't work are QuickTime-related video operations. It's an excellent bit of sleuthing, but be aware that executing the hack involves things like disabling SIP, copying a Mojave library onto a Catalina system, and some sorcery with Xcode and the command line. Future macOS updates almost certainly will break the hack, so at least some steps would need to be repeated after updating a system.
While I can't recommend that anyone install the hack unless they really know what they're doing, the article itself may be very interesting to some readers:
P.S.: I haven't tried the hack myself, so all caveats apply.
For those interested in getting Aperture to run on Catalina, Nik Bhatt has written up some simplified instructions. Nik is the author of RawPower which accesses the underlying Apple RAW engine functionality and is available for macOS and iOS. He worked for Apple for many years and led the RAW Camera and Core Image teams. RawPower is a very nice editing app.
Gentlemen Coders said:
Aperture For Catalina
Using the excellent investigation and instructions from Tyshawn Cormier (article here), I have replicated his work and gotten Aperture to open on Catalina.

You can follow his steps where you build everything from scratch, or you can use my approach which provides most of what you need. Note: this is untested software. No promises.
 


Okay, I walked into Apple Photos no longer seeing my iPhone. Since I needed a photo for something really important, I called Apple Support. I eventually got to John. Together we actually have a workaround:
  1. Open up Photos on iPhone and find the Photo you need to send
  2. Select the photo
  3. Then tap share in the lower corner
  4. Airdrop should be on, if not, turn it on
  5. Tap on your Computer icon
  6. Your Download folder on your Mac will auto-open
  7. Reset your open to date, and look for today
This is the workaround when your updated iPhone is no loner seen in Photos.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Okay, I walked into Apple Photos no longer seeing my iPhone. Since I needed a photo for something really important, I called Apple Support. I eventually got to John. Together we actually have a workaround:
  1. Open up Photos on iPhone and find the Photo you need to send
  2. Select the photo
  3. Then tap share in the lower corner
  4. Airdrop should be on, if not, turn it on
  5. Tap on your Computer icon
  6. Your Download folder on your Mac will auto-open
  7. Reset your open to date, and look for today
This is the workaround when your updated iPhone is no loner seen in Photos.
Alternatively:
  1. Open up Photos on iPhone and find the Photo you need to send
  2. Select the photo
  3. Then tap share in the lower corner
  4. Choose Mail
  5. Email the photo to yourself
  6. Open the email on your Mac to get the photo.
Email could potentially have issues with large files, which are not a problem for AirDrop, but if you keep AirDrop disabled (e.g. for stronger security), it may be more of a hassle to enable it than to send the photo by email when the file size isn't a problem (and it usually isn't for JPEGs, like almost all iPhone photos).

Another option that's often better for collections of photos: Use the Image Capture on your Mac, connecting the iPhone via USB. (Make sure to disable the "delete after import" option if you want to retain the photos on your iPhone.)
 


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