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... It is still frustrating to have to do this. Windows users, ironically, have a simple app to just bulk-download an iCloud Photo Library, but Mac users have to go through Photos or iPhoto, it seems.
There is a simple app: iCloud.com.

If she logs into iCloud with the Apple ID associated with her phone and goes to the iCloud Photos section, she will see all her photos. There are tools to download any she wants to the computer she is on.
 


Actually, you should do your homework. They are not the same. Yes, the suite is identical, but there is one big difference: with High Sierra, now, they work the way they are supposed to work and the way they originally worked....
PaulV - thanks for this information and that such important functionality has been restored. Not an item that I missed using, but I can easily see why it is so important to some. Odd that they wouldn't update version numbers to reflect it, but either way, no harm, no foul.
 


Just to follow-up, I misunderstood my daughter's problem and therefore had to start over from scratch.

She doesn't want to remove images from the cloud, but wants to have a local backup because she (probably reasonably) is afraid that Apple is going to do something to trash them.

So I went back and deleted both Photos libraries (fortunately, I had just migrated from iPhoto the day before) and re-migrated it to re-create the original library. Then I created a second library, made that one the "system" library and configured it to sync with iCloud. And I'm leaving it that way. My normal backup process (Time Machine and periodic clones) will preserve the images in that library should something happen to iCloud.

You shouldn't need to delete any photos from the phone to save space. iOS can do that for you automatically. In iOS 11, go to Settings->Photos and select Optimize iPhone Storage.
What about when space runs way down (e.g. not enough room to store thumbnails of everything)? Will it purge images from the phone (and presumably re-fetch them later when necessary)? Or will it start misbehaving?
 


There is a simple app: iCloud.com.
If she logs into iCloud with the Apple ID associated with her phone and goes to the iCloud Photos section, she will see all her photos. There are tools to download any she wants to the computer she is on.
We tried that. You can only download individual images. If you want to download the entire collection (over 5000 images right now) you need to select and download them one at a time. There is no "select all" or "download all" command on the web interface.
 


Seems like the right place for a little heads up. DxO, having purchased Nik from Google, has issued the entire Nik suite for under US$50. They say it's "new" but actually as I discovered to my chagrin, all of the apps/plugins have the same version as numbers as the free Google versions. If you have the free Google versions, you do not need the DxO ones. Also, DxO Labs is in bankruptcy administration. Unlike me in this instance, do your homework.
Here's the info that I got from DxO - sounds like much more than just a re-packaging:
'Nik Collection by DxO' 2018 introduces the following new features:

- Full compatibility with current operating systems and with the latest versions of Photoshop and Lightroom,
- An enhanced user interface: the Selective Brush tool is now fully operational, and you can modify filters and dynamic objects freely
- Free access to future minor updates (bug fixes ...) and a special reserved price for new major updates, which will include new tools.
- And of course complete customer support.

The original version, purchased from other companies, will continue to work as long as it is used with a compatible OS, or with compatible third-party programs, but it will not be updated any longer, and we will not be able to offer support for this version.

Then, you'll understand then that DxO decided to work on to continue the development of Nik Collection, something that Google did not do in the past. So, yes, this is a misunderstanding.
 


Actually, you should do your homework. They are not the same. Yes, the suite is identical, but there is one big difference: with High Sierra, now, they work the way they are supposed to work and the way they originally worked. ... I hope DxO doesn't cease operations but, for the moment, the NIK plugins again work the way they originally did.
I've been using the Nik plugins since Nik first made them available for free, shortly before they went out of business, through the last Google-owned update on a mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra and Aperture. I'll be darned if I can figue out how they run any differently now than when I first installed them on whatever system I was running at the time Nik first started giving them away. And I use all of them pretty much all the time. That said, I really, really like DxO Viewpoint.
 


I hope no one got a bad impression of DxO from some of the comments here. Their PhotoLab software is a remarkable product. It does an amazing job of rescuing tonal values in the darkest areas of a photo and of cleaning up noise with the Prime noise reduction option. And PhotoLab is so intelligent in balancing tonal values that it can look like you've already started processing a photo when it opens. It is well worth trying. (I also like Alien Skin’s Exposure, which has different strengths.)
 


We tried that. You can only download individual images. If you want to download the entire collection (over 5000 images right now) you need to select and download them one at a time. There is no "select all" or "download all" command on the web interface.
Sorry, you are correct. I was confusing it with the way Flickr works, where one can download whole albums.
 


Seems like the right place for a little heads up. DxO, having purchased Nik from Google, has issued the entire Nik suite for under US$50. They say it's "new" but actually as I discovered to my chagrin, all of the apps/plugins have the same version as numbers as the free Google versions. If you have the free Google versions, you do not need the DxO ones. Also, DxO Labs is in bankruptcy administration. Unlike me in this instance, do your homework.
I use Lightroom, but am sorry to hear that DxO is in bankruptcy. I bought, or rather, re-bought the Nik suite from DxO after first having bought it before it was sold to Google. I knew that the plugins were the same as the old version, tweaked a bit to work better in newer Mac OS's. I hope that supporting DxO will get it back to where it can work its way out of bankruptcy and be healthy again. Adobe needs healthy competitors.
 


Seems like the right place for a little heads up. DxO, having purchased Nik from Google, has issued the entire Nik suite for under US$50. They say it's "new" but actually as I discovered to my chagrin, all of the apps/plugins have the same version as numbers as the free Google versions. If you have the free Google versions, you do not need the DxO ones. Also, DxO Labs is in bankruptcy administration. Unlike me in this instance, do your homework.
Actually, they have done work on the product. Nik crashed in Photoshop when using layers and/or smart objects. That in itself was worth the $50 for those of us who use those features frequently.
 



The "they are in bankruptcy" comments may leave some with the wrong impression. They are not "in receivership", and the company has not closed. The are re-organizing to get out of financial trouble - essentially the same thing as Chapter 11. They have already dropped the DxO One camera, which was likely a foolish financial mistake at the time they decided to do it, clever though it was. (I have one until it breaks, and that will be that.)

I was one of the first customers for Nik plugins*, and have literally spent thousands over the course of the product's life. I had no hesitation to buy DxO PhotoLab, and the DxO Nik Collection.

As to the software itself, I have nothing but praise. In fact, before my last museum show, I ran 90% of my images through PhotoLab before printing.

*It was called something else before Nik, but I don't recall it now...
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
*It was called something else before Nik, but I don't recall it now...
According to Wikipedia...
Nik Software
In 1995 Nik Software (originally Nik Multimedia) was founded by Nils Kokemohr in Hamburg. Nik Software focused on digital photography and graphic design. The Nik Software team developed Nils Efex! and Nils Type Efex!, these were a combination of Photoshop actions and textures.
 


I've been using the Nik plugins since Nik first made them available for free, shortly before they went out of business, through the last Google-owned update on a mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra and Aperture. I'll be darned if I can figue out how they run any differently now than when I first installed them on whatever system I was running at the time Nik first started giving them away....
They run the same way. The difference is that they now work on High Sierra. High Sierra caused them to crash for me - and most other people I read about - if you didn't do their odd workaround, which was to create a smart object or to not apply the effect to a separate layer. That was unacceptable for my workflow. I also use them every day and paid a lot of money for them when they first came out, have used them since Day 1, etc. Anyway, they fixed that one thing, but it was enough to make it worth it for me. Your mileage may vary.
 




I thought I had Photos set up just as I wanted. I had iCloud Photos turned on on my iMac and off everywhere else. That way all my photos end up on the Mac and in the cloud.

I had My Photo Stream turned on, on both my iPhone (6s) and iPad. That way, I had instant access (no waiting for download) to my one thousand most recent photos on both devices.

It worked well for me.

Yesterday I got a notice on my iPhone that the device was running low on storage. I anticipated this, as I had downloaded a large number of songs and videos in preparation for what I thought would be a lot of down time after cataract surgery. (There was no down time at all.)

The iPhone offered a list of suggested solutions. Top of the list was to enable iCloud Photos. I knew I didn’t want this, so scrolled down the list. Ooops. Instead of scrolling I accidentally hit the "Enable" button. And then it began. No chance for me to confirm that I really wanted to do that. It just went ahead.

I quickly went to iCloud settings to turn it off. I did, but it was too late. My Photo Stream was already gone.

A few hours later I checked the Photos app on my phone and was horrified to see that it was trying to put my entire iCloud Photo library into the Camera Roll album on my phone. Yes, it was attempting to download over 20K photos onto the iPhone. The iPhone was quite hot to the touch.

Before this fiasco, the Camera Roll only had about 300 photos in it. I had just pruned it the other day.

I soon got another message telling me that storage was running low. iPhone Storage told me that I was using 49GB out of 64GB, but that I could save about 60GB by enabling iCloud Photos. How could I save 60GB if I’m only using 49GB?

I had no idea what to do at that point. How to stop this from happening?

Luckily, that morning I had done an encrypted backup of the iPhone to my iMac.

I decided to restore from that backup. During the restore I got a message that the iPhone storage was full. The restore appeared to finish, but then I got a message saying that it had failed. (Possibly because there was no storage left as a result of the attempt to put 20K photos into the Camera Roll.)

I finally decided on the nuclear option: Erase All Content….

I did that and then did a successful restore from the encrypted backup on the iMac. Of course, after doing that I had to re-do many things including Touch ID, Apple Pay cards, Location Services, Music downloads, Kindle books, etc.

Needless to say, I am not a fan of Photos. It has been nothing but trouble since I first tried iCloud Photos earlier this year. (On purpose that time!) I’m done with it.
 


Just a heads up: the latest (last) free version of Nik does not work with the current version of Photoshop....
M,
I respectfully disagree. Just tested every Nik plug-in from the last free release by Google within Photoshop CC 2018 on a 27" tapered-edge iMac running OS X 10.11.6. Not a single problem. They all work fine.
 


I thought I had Photos set up just as I wanted. I had iCloud Photos turned on on my iMac and off everywhere else. That way all my photos end up on the Mac and in the cloud.
I had My Photo Stream turned on, on both my iPhone (6s) and iPad. That way, I had instant access (no waiting for download) to my one thousand most recent photos on both devices.
… I quickly went to iCloud settings to turn it off. I did, but it was too late. My Photo Stream was already gone.
Deja vu. I, too, lost a huge block of photos due to iCloud setting mixups. Most unsettling about Apple's iColud products is what device(s) are in control. If I turn Off or On iCloud settings, what happens to data already there?

Does anyone know if Apple has a diagram of the iCloud and what is where, and what has control? It is endlessly confusing and ripe for disaster, in my opinion.
 


I thought I had Photos set up just as I wanted. I had iCloud Photos turned on on my iMac and off everywhere else. That way all my photos end up on the Mac and in the cloud.

I had My Photo Stream turned on, on both my iPhone (6s) and iPad. That way, I had instant access (no waiting for download) to my one thousand most recent photos on both devices.

It worked well for me.

Yesterday I got a notice on my iPhone that the device was running low on storage. I anticipated this, as I had downloaded a large number of songs and videos in preparation for what I thought would be a lot of down time after cataract surgery. (There was no down time at all.)

The iPhone offered a list of suggested solutions. Top of the list was to enable iCloud Photos. I knew I didn’t want this, so scrolled down the list. Ooops. Instead of scrolling I accidentally hit the "Enable" button. And then it began. No chance for me to confirm that I really wanted to do that. It just went ahead.

I quickly went to iCloud settings to turn it off. I did, but it was too late. My Photo Stream was already gone.

A few hours later I checked the Photos app on my phone and was horrified to see that it was trying to put my entire iCloud Photo library into the Camera Roll album on my phone. Yes, it was attempting to download over 20K photos onto the iPhone. The iPhone was quite hot to the touch.

Before this fiasco, the Camera Roll only had about 300 photos in it. I had just pruned it the other day.

I soon got another message telling me that storage was running low. iPhone Storage told me that I was using 49GB out of 64GB, but that I could save about 60GB by enabling iCloud Photos. How could I save 60GB if I’m only using 49GB?

I had no idea what to do at that point. How to stop this from happening?

Luckily, that morning I had done an encrypted backup of the iPhone to my iMac.

I decided to restore from that backup. During the restore I got a message that the iPhone storage was full. The restore appeared to finish, but then I got a message saying that it had failed. (Possibly because there was no storage left as a result of the attempt to put 20K photos into the Camera Roll.)

I finally decided on the nuclear option: Erase All Content….

I did that and then did a successful restore from the encrypted backup on the iMac. Of course, after doing that I had to re-do many things including Touch ID, Apple Pay cards, Location Services, Music downloads, Kindle books, etc.

Needless to say, I am not a fan of Photos. It has been nothing but trouble since I first tried iCloud Photos earlier this year. (On purpose that time!) I’m done with it.
I'm not sure why you didn't just set Photos to "Optimize" on your phone. I have 50k photos in my library with a complete set of full size ones only on my iMac. The thumbnail versions are available on my iPhone and iPad. Even without internet access to download the full version, the thumbnails on my iPhone are adequate if I want to show someone an old photo.
 


I'm not sure why you didn't just set Photos to "Optimize" on your phone.
I tried that earlier this year and hated it.

What irritated me about iCloud Photo Library on the iPhone was that it insisted on instantly "optimizing" every photo I took even though I had 32GB of free space on the phone.

So, say I'm out for coffee. I snap a photo of the shop’s exterior and go in and make an order. By the time the order is done the photo is already optimized so I have to wait for it to download in order to edit it. I pick up my coffee and sit down. I’m ready to upload to Instagram, but the edited photo has, again, been optimized so I have to wait for it to download in order to post.

Or, I’m on the airplane from Phuket to Bangkok after a dive trip. I’d like to kill some time by looking at and editing my trip photos. Sorry. No Internet, no editing possible. Very irritating.

My Photo Stream does what I want and keeps high resolution versions of recent (1000) photos on my device. I can edit and upload without waiting.
 


I tried that earlier this year and hated it. What irritated me about iCloud Photo Library on the iPhone was that it insisted on instantly "optimizing" every photo I took even though I had 32GB of free space on the phone.
If you expect to do creative photo and video work on a phone or store full resolution items there, you really need to have storage. I find incremental prices for storage to be comparatively insignificant, so I usually opt to get the max possible in the technology. Since you can't add more later, this is vital.
 


If you expect to do creative photo and video work on a phone or store full resolution items there, you really need to have storage.
All I expect to do is minor edits on recent photos. What I want is to have full resolution versions of recent photos on both my iPhone and iPad. iCloud Photo Library wouldn't (couldn't) do that, even with 32GB of free storage on my iPhone. My Photo Stream does just what I want.

At first I was deceived by Apple's statement:
https://support.apple.com/en-us/ht204264
Your library is optimized only when you need space, starting with the photos and videos you access least.
Someone on an Apple Discussion thread said that I could believe that, if I wanted, but that no matter what I did, all of my photos would be "optimized". He was right. Even with 32 GB of free storage, Photos insisted on instantly optimizing every photo I took. I really hated that.

So, I ditched iCloud Photo Library and am now pretty happy with My Photo Stream.

your milage may vary
 


All I expect to do is minor edits on recent photos. What I want is to have full resolution versions of recent photos on both my iPhone and iPad. iCloud Photo Library wouldn't (couldn't) do that, even with 32GB of free storage on my iPhone. My Photo Stream does just what I want.

At first I was deceived by Apple's statement:
https://support.apple.com/en-us/ht204264
Your library is optimized only when you need space, starting with the photos and videos you access least.
Someone on an Apple Discussion thread said that I could believe that, if I wanted, but that no matter what I did, all of my photos would be "optimized". He was right. Even with 32 GB of free storage, Photos insisted on instantly optimizing every photo I took. I really hated that.
So, I ditched iCloud Photo Library and am now pretty happy with My Photo Stream.

your milage may vary
[But...] others, including me with 10 GB free on an iPad Air 2 that I uploaded about 100 photos to, from an SD card recently, have not had this issue. I edited the 100 on the iPad while on WiFi the next day and had no slowdown while waiting for the photos to download from iCloud....
 


[But...] others, including me with 10 GB free on an iPad Air 2 that I uploaded about 100 photos to, from an SD card recently, have not had this issue. I edited the 100 on the iPad while on WiFi the next day and had no slowdown while waiting for the photos to download from iCloud....
So, what did I do wrong? What should I have done differently?
 


So, what did I do wrong? What should I have done differently?
I'm not sure but I think you said you have iCloud Photos turned on on your iMac but off everywhere else. You might have run into a storage issue because you turned it on on your phone while it still had a local library (Photo stream plus whatever else). It didn't know yet which photos were duplicates so it inflated your library and you started getting out of space warnings. If you feel like experimenting, try turning off Stream and wiping all the photos from your phone (which is probably easiest to do from iTunes).

Then turn on iCloud Photos/optimize and wait until everything syncs up. You will lose immediate access to the previous last 1000, but new photos you take shouldn't be optimized immediately as you experienced.

Someone else mentioned getting lots of storage. When I got an iPhone 8 last year I went for 256 GB. So, even though I uploaded photos from an SD card to my iPad (only 64GB) and some there have now been optimized, my iPhone has the full-resolution copies of all of them (and shots I took with my phone, too), because I have gobs of space.
 


I'm not sure but I think you said you have iCloud Photos turned on on your iMac but off everywhere else.
Let me clarify that when I had the problem of immediate optimization I had iCloud Photos turned on on all devices. This was earlier this year.

I solved that problem by turning iCloud Photos off on my iPad and iPhone and leaving it on on the iMac. Instead I use My Photo Stream on the iOS devices.

My recent havoc was when I turned iCloud Photos on by accident on my iPhone. To solve that problem I had to wipe the iPhone and reinstall from a recent encrypted local backup.
 


Let me clarify that when I had the problem of immediate optimization I had iCloud Photos turned on on all devices. This was earlier this year.

I solved that problem by turning iCloud Photos off on my iPad and iPhone and leaving it on on the iMac. Instead I use My Photo Stream on the iOS devices.

My recent havoc was when I turned iCloud Photos on by accident on my iPhone. To solve that problem I had to wipe the iPhone and reinstall from a recent encrypted local backup.
I'm not sure this is any help but I have an old iPad 2 (iOS 9.3.5) used as a music server. I had iCloud Photos active on it. A few months ago I decided to get rid of the photos to free up more space for music. Bottom line, I never could do it either on the iPad itself or via iTunes. I ended up restoring as new and starting over without Photos. I wrote up the problem to iOS 9 but maybe you ran into the same issue and your photos never cleared. Restoring from a backup wouldn't have solved this since I'm pretty sure the photo library is backed up and restored.
 


I'm not sure this is any help but I have an old iPad 2 (iOS 9.3.5) used as a music server. I had iCloud Photos active on it. A few months ago I decided to get rid of the photos to free up more space for music. Bottom line, I never could do it either on the iPad itself or via iTunes. I ended up restoring as new and starting over without Photos. I wrote up the problem to iOS 9 but maybe you ran into the same issue and your photos never cleared. Restoring from a backup wouldn't have solved this since I'm pretty sure the photo library is backed up and restored.
Right. When I disabled iCloud Photos on my devices, I was left with over 400 empty folders on all devices including an iMac, three Apple TVs, an iPhone and an iPad. Deleting the Photos library got rid of the folders on the iMac, but not on the other devices. The bottom line is that I know have over 2000 empty folders across five devices that will have to be deleted one-by-one; a tedious and time consuming project.
 


MacRumors via 9to5mac is reporting that Apple is discontinuing physical photo books printing service later this year (30th September 2018) and replacing it with a "Photos Project Extension" (download from the Mac App Store) for third parties to offer similar services via Photos. I wonder what this extension will require as a minimum? Photos in macOS 10.14 Mojave, I suspect - more forced obsolescence in my opinion. :-(

My wife and I are planning to get all our planned photo books done this summer while we still can… YDVOAMV [Your Dystopian View Of Apple May Vary]
 


On the subject of Photos, it appears Apple have now dropped their integrated printing services. The last date for Apple print orders is some time in September.

It would appear in their race for minimalism they know no bounds in what features they will drop. Whilst I appreciate there will probably be other options, isn't the whole premise of Apple been to do everything within their eco-system?

After 30-odd years using Apple products I can seriously see fewer and fewer reasons to continue. Pretty soon Macs will be little more than a dumb terminal with a browser and an iCloud account.
 


MacRumors via 9to5mac is reporting that Apple is discontinuing physical photo books printing service later this year (30th September 2018) and replacing it with a "Photos Project Extension" (download from the Mac App Store) for third parties to offer similar services via Photos. I wonder what this extension will require as a minimum? Photos in macOS 10.14 Mojave, I suspect - more forced obsolescence in my opinion. :-(
My wife and I are planning to get all our planned photo books done this summer while we still can….
There are many services that offer photo book services (Costco comes to mind), most using web-based tools to configure them.
 


There's an online book printing supplier, PrestoPhotos, that can print books and calendars from the PDF files generated by iPhoto and Photos. I've not used them but there are many at the Apple Support Communities in the iPhoto and Photos communities that have and have reported favorably on the resulting products.
 


MacRumors via 9to5mac is reporting that Apple is discontinuing physical photo books printing service later this year (30th September 2018) and replacing it with a "Photos Project Extension" (download from the Mac App Store) for third parties to offer similar services via Photos. […]
Funny, a day after this news hit, the Wirecutter published The Best Photo Book Service review, recommending Apple Photo Books for Mac users.
thewirecutter.com said:
If you have a Mac, Apple Photo Books makes it effortless to create an elegant photo book. The images in an Apple book are brighter and more striking than in any other photo book, and the software will feel second nature to any Mac user. Apple also offers a curated variety of elegant ready-made layouts, which include some of the nicest panoramas we saw in any photo book service.
 


There's an online book printing supplier, PrestoPhotos, that can print books and calendars from the PDF files generated by iPhoto and Photos. I've not used them but there are many at the Apple Support Communities in the iPhoto and Photos communities that have and have reported favorably on the resulting products.
Thank you very much for pointing me towards Presto Photo - a service that can use the Apple photo books PDFs would be perfect, but unfortunately they are based in the USA, so shipping cost, shipping time and customs charges will probably make them a no-go for me. :-( we're in the Czech Republic/European Union).

I will check out the options later this summer and compare with alternatives.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's the PrestoPhoto page about printing Apple photo books:
Presto Photo said:
Apple Photo Book Printing
Apple has discontinued their own printing for iPhoto and Aperture, however PrestoPhoto can happily still print for these programs.
I'm confused, though, about the distinction (if any) between PrestoPhoto and the company's PhotoBooks.Pro and couldn't find a page that explained it. Does anyone else have a handle on that?
 


There are many services that offer photo book services (Costco comes to mind), most using web-based tools to configure them.
I thought I had read that Aple was providing a plug-in interface, so companies could write an add-in that would let Photos use their system to print - so you could choose the print service but interact with it like the Apple service. No idea where I read that though.
 


I'm confused, though, about the distinction (if any) between PrestoPhoto and the company's PhotoBooks.Pro and couldn't find a page that explained it. Does anyone else have a handle on that?
I don't think there's any difference between the two. At least I've not been able to find it. Same snail mail address and same prices for the different book sizes and papers. Don't know which came first, but maybe they were being marketed to different segments of the populace, the Pro to businesses and Presto to the general populace.
 


It would appear in their race for minimalism they know no bounds in what features they will drop. Whilst I appreciate there will probably be other options, isn't the whole premise of Apple been to do everything within their eco-system?
I would put it a little differently. Apple's premise is to do everything in their ecosystem which they can do better than others can and sell with high margins. I'm not sure the better color reproduction of Apple's books over comparably priced consumer grade services are obvious to most — too subtle. And I doubt the margin was ever great.

Apple Photo Books is akin to Apple's old DVD-R media. Apple sold them not because of the inherent profitability, but to encourage sales of Macs. Existing providers were too expensive or too poor quality, so Apple took it on. Apple Photo Books were a product of the 2002 iLife "Digital Hub" product strategy, part of the iPhoto experience of making digital photography easy for mere mortals.

The surprising thing, to me, isn't that Apple is dropping photo books. It's that they kept making photo books as long as they have. 16 years is a pretty long run for an Apple product.

Photo books are this generation's floppy drive. My daughter turns nine today. She has would like a Fuji Instax camera because of the instant real photo it gets her — but it hasn't quite sunken in that she will not be able to iMessage or WhatsApp them to friends and family, nor that there is a high per-photo cost.
 


I remember going to an Apple presentation for architects some years back here in the UK. The photobooks were being touted as a 'high value' presentation / marketing / promotion tool on the basis that they were very easy to produce, had superb printing, a choice of binding and sizes and that short runs were more economical than going to a printer.

When pressed about the production of the books we were told that they were made by Kodak for Apple. Is the demise of the Apple photobook connected to the demise of Kodak?
 


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