MacInTouch Amazon link...

Apple photo software/alternatives

Channels
Apple, Troubleshooting, Products, Questions
Is the demise of the Apple photobook connected to the demise of Kodak?
Maybe, but Apple could easily negotiate a contract with some other print-on-demand company if they wanted to.

My guess is that there is no longer a competitive point. There are many good print-on-demand services that make photo books for a reasonable price. Apple is not interested in a service where they have to compete on the basis of price alone - that leads to cutthroat pricing and a "race to the bottom" where you must sacrifice quality to compete. So they bow out and let everybody else compete for those customers who still want printed books.
 


I use Chatbooks.com for photo books. Their iPhone app uses swipe to rapidly choose shots from photo libraries including cloud. You can plow through thousands of photos quickly to create a book fast. Books are cheap and great quality. I'm getting quite a collection of them.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's an interesting update on Apple's abandoned book-printing service:
VentureBeat said:
RR Donnelley reveals role as Apple’s photo printer, debuts Motif plug-in
When Apple announced plans to discontinue its photo printing service, it guided users to several third-party alternatives. But one option has an advantage over the rest: Top commercial printer RR Donnelley has revealed itself as Apple’s longtime provider of photo printing services and released an app called Motif that lets macOS Photos users continue to purchase its products.
 


Here's an interesting update on Apple's abandoned book-printing service:
Woohoo!

"compatible with macOS High Sierra" Uh-oh.

"Item Not Available" in the UK store.

Bingo, completely useless!

Interestingly, my wife and I ordered some Apple photobooks, here in Europe, that we've been working on and made sure to get in before the deadline. However, at no point did we receive any warnings or notifications that the service is ending in September. Perhaps, for now, the service is only ending in the USA in September?
 


"Item Not Available" in the UK store.
Bingo, completely useless!
I wonder who Apple’s printing partner was for UK/Europe for the past decade. I suppose it’s possible, though I think unlikely, that RR Donnelly was shipping printed books & calendars from the US. Perhaps that printing partner will step forward with their own Photos plug-in.
 


I wonder who Apple’s printing partner was for UK/Europe for the past decade. I suppose it’s possible, though I think unlikely, that RR Donnelly was shipping printed books & calendars from the US. Perhaps that printing partner will step forward with their own Photos plug-in.
Highly unlikely to be printed and shipped from the USA - there'd be a hell of a lot of issues around customs and possible taxation. The ones we just ordered were shipped late last Friday (27th July) and were delivered yesterday on Wednesday morning (1st August) - just over two working days to arrive, so they definitely didn't come from the USA.

As you say, hopefully whoever is doing the printing in Europe will step-up and produce their own Photos plug-in.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The ones we just ordered were shipped late last Friday (27th July) and were delivered yesterday on Wednesday morning (1st August) - just over two working days to arrive, so they definitely didn't come from the USA.
Can you tell from the packaging or tracking info what the origin was?
 


Can you tell from the packaging or tracking info what the origin was?
I can't find any relevant information on the Apple UK web site - obviously, Apple keeps the help and Terms and Conditions naturally opaque so you don't know who's actually doing the physical printing/shipping. I didn't bother checking at the time, but the tracking links Apple provided don't work. The photobooks were bought on my UK Apple account and delivered to family in the UK. I'm in Czechia. The next time we FaceTime with the family I'll see what, if anything, can be gleaned from the packaging and report back.
 



Woohoo!

"compatible with macOS High Sierra" Uh-oh.

"Item Not Available" in the UK store.

Bingo, completely useless!

Interestingly, my wife and I ordered some Apple photobooks, here in Europe, that we've been working on and made sure to get in before the deadline. However, at no point did we receive any warnings or notifications that the service is ending in September. Perhaps, for now, the service is only ending in the USA in September?
As a follow up to my posts about the Photo Books print services ending and the new Photos Project Extensions software. I just received an email from Apple (finally) regarding the closure of the Photo Books service in Europe on 30th September 2018. They point to the new Photos Project Extensions software as the way forward and specifically list (for Europe) Mimeo Photos. They also now have a support document online with more information and a list of providers:


Motif is at the top, followed by Mimeo and then several others. The Mimeo Project Extension does appear to be in the UK Mac App Store but requires a minimum of macOS 10.13 to install. :-(
  • Motif: USA only + minimum macOS 10.13
  • Mimeo Photos: Europe and available + minimum macOS 10.13
  • Shutterfly Photo Books: USA only + couldn't find it
  • WhiteWall: wall photos only but available in the UK + minimum macOS 10.13
  • ifolor Photo Products: available in Europe but the Project Extension is not available yet (or at least I couldn't find it)
  • Mpix: USA only + couldn't find it
  • Fujifilm Prints & Gifts: couldn't find it
  • Wix Photo Albums: available in the UK + minimum macOS 10.13
It's not looking good, especially if you're in Europe/the UK. Also, looks like the Project Extensions feature of Photos requires a minimum of macOS 10.13, so it's forced macOS upgrade time....
 


OK... it is way overdue, but I've got to migrate away from Aperture. I have a non-subscription current version of Lightroom, but according to Adobe, that's the last one - no updates, no upgrades... so I'm loathe to start to learn Lightroom when I know that I'm not interested in the subscription model.

What's the current thought on current DAM's out there? And any particularly helpful links to help me migrate from a single Aperture library to a folder-based structure that most other DAM's seems to use?

Got a lot of work ahead of me, I fear...
 


What's the current thought on current DAM's out there? And any particularly helpful links to help me migrate from a single Aperture library to a folder-based structure that most other DAM's seems to use?
I'm a former Aperture user. I've been using Lightroom for the last 3 years. It works fine for me but it never really felt comfortable. It's like a wool sweater that keeps me warm, yet always itches. I'm looking forward to seeing the DAM upgrade for Luminar that was promised for this fall. I'm sticking with Lightroom until that shakes out.

I always kept my Aperture library as "referenced", meaning the original photos are in an external folder structure - not inside the library package. So far, I haven't tried to migrate any of those Aperture photos to any other DAM. I still open Aperture to access the older photos, but I haven't imported anything new since switching to Lightroom. Some day I'll have to make a move when Aperture stops working altogether. The easiest option would be to convert it to Photos, which can happen automatically. And Lightroom has an Aperture import function. I'm waiting to see what Luminar will offer. I doubt it will import any Aperture libraries though. The market for that function has likely gotten too small by now.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
What's the current thought on current DAM's out there?
FYI:
Affinity Forums said:
FAQS
Do you plan to have Web site design/Digital Asset Management/animation/video editing products too?
We’re not sure yet! but we are very interested in adding a DAM solution to the Affinity suite in future.

DAM
I am using Bridge at the moment but it is not the answer. What do members recommend for Affinity please?
...

DAM - What are people using?
I'd love to see an Affinity DAM offering so add my voice to the chorus for one. But I know it takes a while to develop a good product so I'm asking what other people are using in the meantime.

What I'm doing now is using LR5 on a Mac for DAM, color balance, and light weight retouching, and jumping right into Affinity Photo to do anything else. I have close to 1Tb of images and while I don't need immediate access to everything its nice to search metadata when I need to find an old image. Fast and accurate rendering, bulk metadata update, decent search are high up on the list of needs.

So with all that in mind, what are other people using? Are you happy with what you're using and what other products have you tried?
 


OK... it is way overdue, but I've got to migrate away from Aperture...
What's the current thought on current DAM's out there? ...
Got a lot of work ahead of me, I fear...
I feel your pain. I'm also still getting by with Aperture, dreading the migration away that inevitably must come, and waiting for other rumored DAMs to actually materialize. I expected to be past this a year ago, but am still waiting, with the work required to eventually switch increasing with each import.
 


I used Aperture from version 1.5 and have repeatedly lamented Apple's lame decision to abandon it, in their embrace of all things iOS and dismissal of the professional creative that created the brand. I never liked Lightroom, though I gave it a good try as Aperture declined. It always struck me as a bit clunky, though serviceable.

I've settled on Capture One Pro. It's not a perfect solution, but it shows where Aperture might have gone, had it been developed further. It absolutely crushes everything else with both speed and precision adjustments. It's still lagging with idiosyncratic DAM features and workflow, but the European developers keep improving it. Be prepared for a learning curve that's a bit dense for many, but it'll reward you with outstanding images if you let it. Its target market is users of high-end digital backs, which the company makes, so everything about it is oriented to the needs and skill levels of that photographic community. But as more demanding photographers discover its abilities, that market base is rapidly expanding.
 


Does anyone know (ideally from testing with the public beta) whether Aperture still works on Mojave?

I hate to be a software Luddite, but I intend to put off switching from Aperture as long as I reasonably can.
 


Ironic that the discussion appears now, as Phase One formally killed Media Pro in the past week. It was badly showing its age, and despite it being reasonably efficient, it clearly would have needed a total rewrite. A shame - it was 'Best in Class' many years ago.
Media Pro discontinuation notification

We're putting all our energy and resources into ensuring that Capture One is the image editing software choice for the future, which means Media Pro SE will be discontinued.

Effective August 30th, 2018, Media Pro SE will no longer be available for purchase.

Media Pro will continue to run on supported operating systems but will not receive updates. We will continue to offer technical support for existing Media Pro SE users.

What now?

You can consider using Capture One as your default image management software. We have created a tutorial outlining how an image library can be migrated from Media Pro SE to Capture One.
 


Ironic that the discussion appears now, as Phase One formally killed Media Pro in the past week. It was badly showing its age, and despite it being reasonably efficient, it clearly would have needed a total rewrite. A shame - it was 'Best in Class' many years ago.
That is really disappointing. I've been contemplating buying Media Pro SE for when my iView Media Pro stops working on the next computer/ macOS. Now I need to find a new DAM that is not a subscription model. I'm also looking for suggestions.
 


I am sorry if this is considered a shameless plug, because it is, but I can't resist, as this is a topic that I find very interesting.

Please check out NeoFinder as a possible replacement for iView. While NeoFinder began its life as the disk cataloger CDFinder back in 1995, the recent releases of NeoFinder 7.x have added the abilities to write Adobe XMP data to photos and movies, as well, including metadata presets and a lot more. And, of course, NeoFinder contains modern code, is 64-bit, and supports the "new stuff" from Apple.

We have seen a lot of people coming over from iView and Aperture, so this might be helpful.

Norbert M. Doerner,
Developer of NeoFinder
 



I am sorry if this is considered a shameless plug, because it is, but I can't resist, as this is a topic that I find very interesting.
Please check out NeoFinder as a possible replacement for iView. While NeoFinder began its life as the disk cataloger CDFinder back in 1995, the recent releases of NeoFinder 7.x have added the abilities to write Adobe XMP data to photos and movies, as well, including metadata presets and a lot more. And, of course, NeoFinder contains modern code, is 64-bit, and supports the "new stuff" from Apple.
We have seen a lot of people coming over from iView and Aperture, so this might be helpful.
Norbert M. Doerner,
Developer of NeoFinder
I’ve been using NeoFinder to catalog my images for several years. It’s very fast, and it “just works”. You can also use it to generate PDF catalogs. I’ve been a very satisfied user of this app since its CDFinder days.
 


I forgot about that Affinity forum DAM topic. It's been a couple of years since the discussion of an Affinity DAM started on the forums and an Affinity employee implied they were interested in working on it. I was hoping they'd have something by now.
Seems that Affinity is going gangbusters to create their antidote to InDesign, thus completing their Adobe competition suite. I suspect that's delaying their Photo DAM project... but I'd be hopeful of their intentions.
 


Does anyone know (ideally from testing with the public beta) whether Aperture still works on Mojave? I hate to be a software Luddite, but I intend to put off switching from Aperture as long as I reasonably can.
My advice is: if you have a managed Aperture library, be sure you know how to access your original images. If you've got a Referenced library, you're in better shape, as all your originals will be readily accessible in the Finder. It sure would be a good idea to export your precious images while you know you can. No, I haven't done that either. But I don't put anything new into Aperture. Cool tears just run down my cheeks as I run through tasks on older images with great efficiency that nothing else matches, lamenting what could have been.
 


It sure would be a good idea to export your precious images while you know you can. No, I haven't done that either. But I don't put anything new into Aperture. Cool tears just run down my cheeks as I run through tasks on older images with great efficiency that nothing else matches, lamenting what could have been.
I continue to use Aperture for new images. I have one computer I will not upgrade until I am certain Aperture will work; I have decided not to do a mass-migrate until I know what I'm migrating to (as it will be a non-trivial task). I currently use managed libraries, but when I move, it will likely be to something that does not.

Why have I not moved? I tried Lightroom and several other programs and did not like or find any of them sufficiently workable, and I occasionally test others. ACDSee has, to date, been the closest, but the company's track record on compatibility has been spotty (in the past, anyway).

I find Aperture's 'lift and stamp adjustments' to be intuitive and incredibly efficient as a way to edit large numbers of photos; nothing else has come close (for me). I'll stick with Aperture until forced to move; switching and experimenting is too time consuming.
 


FYI, I received the following update recently from "Riley" at DxO, regarding my inquiry about their filing for bankruptcy:
As you possibly read, the company was placed under a regime of judicial administration at the beginning of March, which became a time for us to reorganize financially. As of July 18th, with all the confidence of the judge, we are no longer under this administration. We have released upgrades for DxO PhotoLab, and have upgrades coming as well. We are confident that our customers will not be affected in any way by this measure, as it now behind us.
 


None of us wants to abandon successful workflows based on applications we know well - whether in photography or accounting.

Darktable's been mentioned on MacInTouch over the years. It's a free and open-source Lightroom / Aperture alternative I've been using some on Linux. Thanks to online tutorials, I was able to put it to useful work rather quickly.

There's a Mac version I installed and tested today on a 13" Retina MacBook Pro. It's free. It's lovely on that screen.

If you want to "own" your photo processing and management process, give Darktable a try. It's being regularly and meaningfully updated - a recent update added my Olympus camera/lens profile.

The Darktable site offers a downloadable PDF user manual and many other help resources.

Download Darktable from this link:
 


I continue to use Aperture for new images. I have one computer I will not upgrade until I am certain Aperture will work; I have decided not to do a mass-migrate until I know what I'm migrating to (as it will be a non-trivial task). I currently use managed libraries, but when I move, it will likely be to something that does not.

Why have I not moved? I tried Lightroom and several other programs and did not like or find any of them sufficiently workable, and I occasionally test others. ACDSee has, to date, been the closest, but the company's track record on compatibility has been spotty (in the past, anyway).

I find Aperture's 'lift and stamp adjustments' to be intuitive and incredibly efficient as a way to edit large numbers of photos; nothing else has come close (for me). I'll stick with Aperture until forced to move; switching and experimenting is too time consuming.
FYI: Capture One uses the same "lift and stamp" multiple-image adjustment as Aperture, with the same shortcut keys. It's easy to choose which adjustments to apply. Only exception I've noted: It doesn't apply the same star rating, so you need to make those selections after making your adjustments
 


There's lots of options but nothing that stands out as efficient as Aperture - I still mourn its demise.

I appreciate the suggestion regarding NeoFinder, but it still lacks many of the features of Media Pro (editing tools, large previews. etc.). It also concerns me - given how many applications have been discontinued over the years - about the longevity of apps from smaller companies.

I hold out hope Affinity might produce something nice. I can't stand Apple Photos, I'm not a fan of Lightroom, and Capture One's strength is image processing rather than image management.

Maybe it's time to bite the bullet and roll my own - at least then I have total control of its destiny.

Alternatively, and I think this could be the way Apple is heading, rely solely on the operating system to manage large collections via tags, keywords and Spotlight - I shudder at the thought....
 


One options also is Phocus by Hasselblad. I have an old 500CM and ran across the software on their website.

I have been using it for a while and like it. There is DAM as well as terrific adjustment tools, although some only work on Hasselblad image files. But it will import Canon and I think Nikon RAW files using the native Mac functions. I am moving my Aperture files over little by little, but I think this in combination with Luminar may meet my needs for the foreseeable future.
 


FYI: Capture One uses the same "lift and stamp" multiple-image adjustment as Aperture, with the same shortcut keys. It's easy to choose which adjustments to apply. Only exception I've noted: It doesn't apply the same star rating, so you need to make those selections after making your adjustments
I dipped my toe in, using Capture One for new projects only and discovered two things: Capture One has a "Sessions" management mode that is not like anything Aperture has, and I like it better. Most of my new stuff comes in right after shoots anyway. The RAW processing is far better than Aperture in my view. I think we can now say that Apple is a "poor to fair" choice for RAW processing relative to other companies in that space.
 


None of us wants to abandon successful workflows based on applications we know well - whether in photography or accounting.
Darktable's been mentioned on MacInTouch over the years. It's a free and open-source Lightroom / Aperture alternative I've been using some on Linux. Thanks to online tutorials, I was able to put it to useful work rather quickly.
There's a Mac version I installed and tested today on a 13" Retina MacBook Pro. It's free. It's lovely on that screen.
If you want to "own" your photo processing and management process, give Darktable a try. It's being regularly and meaningfully updated - a recent update added my Olympus camera/lens profile.
The Darktable site offers a downloadable PDF user manual and many other help resources.
Download Darktable from this link:
On a quick look, I didn't see any way to import the non-destructive adjustments to RAW files that I've already made to lots of photos in Aperture, which I would hate to lose. For me, a reasonable replacement for Aperture would need to include that ability as a minimum.
 


There's lots of options but nothing that stands out as efficient as Aperture - I still mourn its demise.
I appreciate the suggestion regarding NeoFinder, but it still lacks many of the features of Media Pro (editing tools, large previews. etc.). It also concerns me - given how many applications have been discontinued over the years - about the longevity of apps from smaller companies.
I hold out hope Affinity might produce something nice. I can't stand Apple Photos, I'm not a fan of Lightroom, and Capture One's strength is image processing rather than image management.
Maybe it's time to bite the bullet and roll my own - at least then I have total control of its destiny.
Alternatively, and I think this could be the way Apple is heading, rely solely on the operating system to manage large collections via tags, keywords and Spotlight - I shudder at the thought....
Well, to be fair, NeoFinder is a cataloging app, not a processing and editing app. That is how I use it. In terms of longevity, this app has been on my computers since the days of Mac OS 8; I was using it in its CDFinder incarnation to catalog backed up projects on optical media back in 2002 in my old office gig.

I still use Bridge and Photoshop for most processing, occasionally DxO. One thing that keeps me using Bridge, aside from familiarity, are the meta templates that I can apply with a click: name, address, email, general location, copyright status, etc. The DxO and Alien Skin apps do not have that capability. Haven’t had time to investigate On1 or CaptureOne Pro to see if they can do this.
 


I dipped my toe in, using Capture One for new projects only and discovered two things: Capture One has a "Sessions" management mode that is not like anything Aperture has, and I like it better. Most of my new stuff comes in right after shoots anyway. The RAW processing is far better than Aperture in my view. I think we can now say that Apple is a "poor to fair" choice for RAW processing relative to other companies in that space.
I agree that Capture One's RAW processing is far and above everyone else, including the newcomers like Affinity Photo. Its DAM features are dense and still a bit buggy, with initially bewildering options between Catalogs, Sessions, Folders, Albums, etc., each with its own set of abilities, limitations and quirks. Losing sync with source images is tough to straighten out. Printing has limitations, and trying to set print parameters can be exasperating, sometimes leading to print failure like totally black output.

The tutorials really can be as confusing as how the program looks initially, with its multiple configurable options. What should I do now? Do I want a new Catalog? A new Session? But it's growing and improving, and hopefully will soon achieve maturity. The ability to squeeze beautiful results in just a few steps, with speed to match today's hi-res cameras, is where the payoff is. Too bad Aperture didn't stay in the game.
 


On a quick look, I didn't see any way to import the non-destructive adjustments to RAW files that I've already made to lots of photos in Aperture, which I would hate to lose. For me, a reasonable replacement for Aperture would need to include that ability as a minimum.
Therein lies the problem with non-destructive editing: since every app vendor uses a different raw engine, there's no clear way to 'transfer' basic develop settings as you move from one image editor to another. And, if you have done any dust-spotting or masking on images, the problem gets even messier.

Your best bet is to create PSD/TIFF/JPEG versions of any file that was edited, so you have the original and the final (for that app) version. When I originally moved from Aperture to Lightroom years ago, that's what I did, adding the keyword 'Aperture' to all the exported PSDs, so I knew where it came from.

It's an inelegant solution, to be sure, and one that doesn't move forward very well. The basic 'develop' settings are pretty easy to reproduce, but once you go a bit deeper, it turns into a mess. And, the more OCD you are about your images and edits, the crazier it will drive you. (And it's one more reason, out of many, why I have stayed with Lightroom.)

For my purposes, I don't worry too much about the really old images in my library. I'll re-edit if something comes up, but when looking at portfolio stuff, or prints, most of the time, I'll just pull the old PSD and use that for whatever I'm working on. Much like the content world, the old stuff is just that: old. I've found that I go back to the ancient library images less and less over time, and when I do, it's mostly for nostalgia's sake, not to edit a photo anew.
 


On a quick look, I didn't see any way to import the non-destructive adjustments to RAW files that I've already made to lots of photos in Aperture, which I would hate to lose. For me, a reasonable replacement for Aperture would need to include that ability as a minimum.
While I was living in the "Reality Distortion Field", I acquired Aperture when v. 1.0 was selling for $499. Ordered with a new "student" Mac, I don't remember if it was a "free" or a promotional reduced-cost add.

How distorted was my "reality?" Didn't have a camera that "shot RAW." What I'd hoped for was a more transparent file/folder storage logic than iPhoto, but as I recall, it was a similarly confusing proprietary "blob." Stayed with iPhoto until I laboriously retrieved all my photos and transferred them to a YYYY MM DD folder structure. Didn't "upgrade" to Aperture 2.0 when it released in 2008.

When I did buy a camera that shoots RAW, I didn't go back to Aperture, using the Olympus and DxO software to process the photos before storing them in logical folders.

That said, according to the site linked below, Aperture itself will export "versions."
http://aperture.skydocu.com/en/export-photos/export-using-the-export-command/
  • Export versions: You can export versions of photos with the adjustments and other changes you’ve applied.
  • Export originals: You can export copies of the original files that you imported into Aperture.
Aperture Exporter is an application that says:
Blue Pill Software said:
There are plenty of guides on the internet detailing how to get your images out of Aperture and into another photo manager such as Adobe Lightroom. It's a multistep and complicated process that is easy to get wrong. Aperture Exporter consolidates the process into just a few clicks and provides features not possible with any manual process.

Aperture Exporter is also a great way to back up your Aperture Libraries in a format that is not reliant on the future use of Aperture.

Exporting will always generate files for your originals without adjustments. Versions with Aperture adjustments baked-in can be generated optionally.
Aperture Exporter is available directly from the developer, or from the Mac App Store, for $19.99. The developer provides a free trial download on its homepage.
 


When it came time for me to leave Aperture, I looked around and settled on Capture One. In order to access my Aperture library, I converted it to a Photos library. I did this knowing I wouldn’t have access to the same tools as in Aperture. But the benefit for me was that I now have a library that will be accessible into the future via Apple’s consumer, free, photo product. I can use Photos to access the library and locate images. If I want to re-edit them, I export the originals and edit in Capture One. Managing locations and faces is simpler in Photos. I understand this may not work for everyone, as not all metadata or adjustments are available. So far, it’s working for me.
 


On a quick look, I didn't see any way to import the non-destructive adjustments to RAW files that I've already made to lots of photos in Aperture, which I would hate to lose. For me, a reasonable replacement for Aperture would need to include that ability as a minimum.
Mapping all of the adjustments would be very difficult. A setting of “-1” on the slider of adjustment XYZ in Aperture may not be the same as “-1” in another application. Short of access to the source code or massive amounts of trial-and-error I don’t think it could be done reliably. Others have suggested exporting copies of all your images with the adjustments baked in. Along those lines, and assuming that a high-quality JPEG would be acceptable, the importer in Lightroom might do that for you (I say “might” because I’ve not actually done it). There is a setting in the Lightroom importer to bring in JPEG versions of your adjusted images when you import an Aperture library.

The trick is, I believe all it is doing is bringing in the previews that Aperture itself has already generated for your images. So before you run the importer you’ll want to adjust the preview quality setting in Aperture’s preferences and regenerate all of the previews for your entire library. I assume then that those JEPGs will be put into the same Lightroom collections as the original image, which may be a little better than if you manually exported versions yourself from Aperture with the resulting files being organizationally separated from the originals.

This is what I plan to do when I finally abandon Aperture. I’d be curious to hear anyone’s experiences with using the Lightroom importer for this. I’ve not yet done it because Aperture is still working and I haven’t had the time to work through the conversion process. So far, I’ve resigned myself to Lightroom being the replacement - in part, because, as much as I dislike Adobe, it seems the least likely option to leave me (once again) abandoned with unsupported software. Also, it’s the only option I’m aware of that implements good geotagging and face detection options, both of which I use in Aperture, the geotagging especially.
 


I have been testing the printing options for Photos. Motif is clunky and useful for only the simplest of photo books. Mimeo has more options for layout, but the interface is slow and buggy. I find the available typefaces not particularly useful. Recently I created a test page and it took forever to complete.

Yesterday, I was experimenting with the different themes, and Mimeo crashed every time I tried to make a layout modification.

I think that part of the problem with these “extensions” is that they don’t have access to the menu bar, so that the workarounds cause problems for the interface design.
 


I have mentioned this before with regard to book printing. There are many online services that produce books of outstanding quality without using plugins/extensions.

I produce several books a year using these services (not always the same ones) and so far have only abandoned one service that had a particularly clunky interface. They all use web-based front-ends and all are as tweakable as your imagination will allow.

My workflow is to select the images I want to use (iPhoto, Photos or whatever) stick them all in a Finder folder named accordingly, open the webpage for the relevant service and get cracking.

My Favourites are Bob Books, Blurb and Cewe. Yes, they all start up with templates, but you don't have to use them. I've never used one, so all my books are individual. If you don't get finished with a layout, there's no problem. Just save it and log in again next day and carry on.

Bob offer a downloadable app, so that you are not tied to the web. Blurb offer a number of services, including Lightroom and InDesign integration. There are 'cheap and cheerful' services from supermarkets and online retailers as well, but the three I mention produce books that pro wedding photographers would charge £1000 for.
 


I produce several books a year using these services (not always the same ones) and so far have only abandoned one service that had a particularly clunky interface. They all use web-based front-ends and all are as tweakable as your imagination will allow.

My Favourites are Bob Books, Blurb and Cewe. Yes, they all start up with templates, but you don't have to use them. I've never used one, so all my books are individual. If you don't get finished with a layout, there's no problem. Just save it and log in again next day and carry on.

Bob offer a downloadable app, so that you are not tied to the web. Blurb offer a number of services, including Lightroom and InDesign integration. There are 'cheap and cheerful' services from supermarkets and online retailers as well, but the three I mention produce books that pro wedding photographers would charge £1000 for.
DT, could you please provide links to the services named? I'm ready to try something other than Amazon and CreateSpace. Thanks in advance.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts