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OK, I now have iPhoto running just fine under OS X 10.10.6. Except for one problem. I have been using iCloud Photo Sharing to share with relatives. But now the new shares are not showing up in iPhoto. They do show in Photos. . . . So my question is, how do I get iPhoto to now recognize new shares from others?
I was hesitant about transitioning from iPhoto to Photos, so after initialing converting to Photos, muscle memory caused me to go back to iPhoto, but I encountered your very question. To regain iCloud photo sharing, go to the iPhoto Preferences > iCloud tab and check the box for Photo Sharing. (The My Photo Stream options are also available.) Subsequently, I transferred to Photos for good about a year ago. Hope this helps.
 



I was hesitant about transitioning from iPhoto to Photos, so after initialing converting to Photos, muscle memory caused me to go back to iPhoto, but I encountered your very question. To regain iCloud photo sharing, go to the iPhoto Preferences > iCloud tab and check the box for Photo Sharing. (The My Photo Stream options are also available.) Subsequently, I transferred to Photos for good about a year ago. Hope this helps.
Thank you for suggesting this idea. When I checked the preferences on iPhoto, Photo Sharing was checked. Figuring I had nothing to lose at this point, I did the old one-two that sometimes fixes problems: I turned it off, which of course disconnected all the shared streams, then turned it back on again. Well, what do you know, the photos that were missing now show up. I hope this is the answer and that the problem doesn't recur.
 


What does it mean that Photos is “part of the system?” How is it more part of the system than iPhoto or Aperture were? Or any of the iWork programs are?
My understanding (subject to revision by those more in the know) is that there is no separate download for Photos. The only way to get it (and its upgrades) is through the OS upgrades. This can make it a pain, as we all know how Apple likes to hide other changes when you upgrade, whether an OS upgrade or an application.
 


Glad to know that iPhoto works (sort of) with later versions of the OS. I do have iPhoto 9.6.1, as I (finally) found it under my purchased software, not under upgrades.
I say 'sort of' works, because, as I noted, it doesn't find shared photos in iCloud shared photos. I haven't tried sharing yet from iPhoto but hope that works as expected. As for shared photos, I can see them in Photos and, if I like, can pull them into iPhoto.
Once you have upgraded your iPhoto.app to Photos.app, iCloud Photos now will only sync/interact with Photos. In fact, it will only interact with one Photos Library on your Mac. If you go to the Pictures folder in your user folder, you will see that the Photos library file is called "Photos Library (original)". If you create a new library, it will not start syncing that library with iCloud until you turn that on in Photos Preferences (General > Library Location > "Use as System Photo Library").

I only use iPhoto 9.6.1 now to create slide shows that I can export to video. The create and export options are much better than with Photos (specifically the ability to add the photo title to each slide). When I do this, I export the shots from Photos and import into iPhoto.
 


... the photos that were missing now show up. I hope this is the answer and that the problem doesn't recur.
Glad that worked. Bear in mind that if you launch Photos, it might re-takeover Photo Sharing. So, then if you relaunch iPhoto afterwards, you might need to reset the iPhoto preferences.

As for the capabilities of Photos, you can use third-party extensions.

As for Apple no longer supporting iPhoto, that is the normal of many companies as they work on current and next versions at the same time of hardware and software. The cost to support old/legacy versions becomes a drain on their bottom line. Some companies will state end-of-life dates.
 


Glad that worked. Bear in mind that if you launch Photos, it might re-takeover Photo Sharing. So, then if you relaunch iPhoto afterwards, you might need to reset the iPhoto preferences.
As for the capabilities of Photos, you can use third-party extensions.
As for Apple no longer supporting iPhoto, that is the normal of many companies as they work on current and next versions at the same time of hardware and software. The cost to support old/legacy versions becomes a drain on their bottom line. Some companies will state end-of-life dates.
I really haven't investigated what is available for Photos, as I just installed the OS in the last week. As for Photos taking over again, at least I know what to look for, and it is pretty easily corrected.

And, as to Apple not supporting iPhoto, I didn't expect them to. But I also didn't expect them to interfere with my continued use of it. I don't know that there are any malware attacks on iPhoto, and I really do like its ease of use in organizing, labeling, and rating what is admittedly a casual photographer's collection.

Thanks again for the suggestion and to all MacInTouch users for the continued ideas to work better in spite of Apple's continued changes.
 


My wife has ordered a Sony RX100 VA digital camera and I'm trying to prepare myself for the questions on how to use the camera's wi-fi and NFC communications to upload JPEG images.

Her main computer is a iPad Pro 11-inch, but she also has an iPhone 8 plus. The iPad has a USB-C port and the iPhone a Lightning port. She has an SD card adapter for the iPhone. The two Apple devices share photos via her Apple ID iCloud Photo sharing. Images could be loaded through the adapter to the iPhone, but it would nice if a Wi-Fi connection could be used.

First question is whether the camera Wi-Fi can upload to the Photos library on the iPad or only to the Sony Image Edge app from the iOS App Store. Searching the web so far hasn't provided an answer.

Is anyone already doing Wi-Fi uploads from any of the RX100 series to iOS or macOS? Or know where I might find the answers that I so far haven't found in Sony's documentation?
 


Is anyone already doing Wi-Fi uploads from any of the RX100 series to iOS or macOS? Or know where I might find the answers that I so far haven't found in Sony's documentation?
[See:]
(“This product is also known as RX100 VA”)

Find “Using network functions > Transferring images to a Smartphone,” which includes
Internet search challenge accomplished! #internetsearchchallenge
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Is anyone already doing Wi-Fi uploads from any of the RX100 series to iOS or macOS? Or know where I might find the answers that I so far haven't found in Sony's documentation?
See also the free Capture One Express (for Sony) and $109 Capture One Pro for Sony for the Mac or Windows, and Sony's recently renamed mobile app:
iTunes/Sony said:
Imaging Edge Mobile
Imaging Edge Mobile is a free application that succeeds PlayMemories Mobile.
It allows images/videos to be transferred to a smartphone/tablet, enables remote shooting, and provides location information to images captured by a camera.
There's also an Imaging Edge app for Macs and Windows.

Personally, I prefer to get images into the Mac via Apple's Image Capture app and an SD card reader, rather than fiddling with WiFi operations. Apple's Lightning to SD Card Camera Reader may be helpful with the iPad Pro and iPhone Plus.
 


I have an RX-100 VI. Sony has a free Mac app called "PlayMemories". You connect the camera to the same wi-fi network that the Mac is on, then register the camera to the app, using a bar code from the app, if I remember correctly. Setup was not intuitive, but it works. I could not to get it to work via bluetooth to my iPhone, though.
 


My wife has ordered a Sony RX100 VA digital camera and I'm trying to prepare myself for the questions on how to use the camera's wi-fi and NFC communications to upload JPEG images.
Her main computer is a iPad Pro 11-inch, but she also has an iPhone 8 plus. The iPad has a USB-C port and the iPhone a Lightning port. She has an SD card adapter for the iPhone. The two Apple devices share photos via her Apple ID iCloud Photo sharing. Images could be loaded through the adapter to the iPhone, but it would nice if a Wi-Fi connection could be used.
First question is whether the camera Wi-Fi can upload to the Photos library on the iPad or only to the Sony Image Edge app from the iOS App Store. Searching the web so far hasn't provided an answer.
Is anyone already doing Wi-Fi uploads from any of the RX100 series to iOS or macOS? Or know where I might find the answers that I so far haven't found in Sony's documentation?
I regularly upload JPEG images from my RX100m3 to my iPad Air 2 running Sony's “Play Memories Mobile” app.

You might be interested in Alexander White's book, Photographer's Guide to the Sony DSC-RX100 III. It's available in a Kindle edition and seems to cover many details that apply to other versions of the RX100.
 


Is anyone already doing Wi-Fi uploads from any of the RX100 series to iOS
I have the RX100 VI and have a 2018 iPad 9.7".

Just installed the recently updated / renamed Sony Imaging Edge Mobile on the iPad. Entered network settings in the camera. For whatever reason, the "Snd to Smrtphn Func" did not instantly work, though the "Ctrl w/ Smartphone" brought up the QR Code. Sony's app on the iPad successfully read the code and connected to the camera, and I was able to take a photo using the remote control function on the iPad. The photo was, without further interaction by me, "fetched" to the iPad Camera Roll, where I could open it in the native "Photos" app. (As a test, I was also able to open in it Google's free and excellent Snapseed interactive editing program.)

I did notice, as the photo was "fetched", a message that it was resized. I couldn't find a way in "Photos" to see what its new size is. Snapseed reports it is 2.1 MB. On the camera's SD card it is a 12.5MB JPG.

Apple's Photos did interpose an iCloud suggestion. I don't have iCloud "turned on."

The 9.7" iPad is an awkward size and weight for use as a hand-held mobile remote control.

I have set up the new version of Sony's app on my LG V30 Android phone. Seems to work much the same, but, again, have not used it enough to find out if it is possible to bulk-transfer images from the camera card. I was frustrated by the lack of that "basic" feature when I first started using the Sony, as both the apps for my Olympus and Lumix cameras have it, and it's easy. It'd be nice if it is there and just not easy to surface, Android or iOS.

Last comment: I read the "Privacy Terms" when I installed the Android version on my phone. Ugh. I should have read them for a sense of comparison when I installed on the iPad but didn't take the time. On Android, I turned off most permissions Sony wanted, but have the sense the app is a kind of spyware, given how much deep info it said it wanted to collect. As an Android user, I'm sensitive to that, and not certain that no matter how carefully I set restrictive permissions, data won't be pumped out of phone anyway.

As we've recently read discoveries of iOS apps collecting and sending out data that iOS users may expect their OS to shield, it would be a good idea to pay attention.
 



My wife has ordered a Sony RX100 VA digital camera and I'm trying to prepare myself for the questions on how to use the camera's wi-fi and NFC communications to upload JPEG images. Her main computer is a iPad Pro 11-inch, but she also has an iPhone 8 plus. The iPad has a USB-C port and the iPhone a Lightning port. She has an SD card adapter for the iPhone. The two Apple devices share photos via her Apple ID iCloud Photo sharing. Images could be loaded through the adapter to the iPhone, but it would nice if a Wi-Fi connection could be used.
First question is whether the camera Wi-Fi can upload to the Photos library on the iPad or only to the Sony Image Edge app from the iOS App Store. Searching the web so far hasn't provided an answer. Is anyone already doing Wi-Fi uploads from any of the RX100 series to iOS or macOS? Or know where I might find the answers that I so far haven't found in Sony's documentation?
She might be better off by getting a USB-to-Lightning cable and connecting the Sony micro USB-to-USB cable to that to transfer her photos. It will certainly be faster.

One could use a SD card-to-Lightning adapter except for one thing: Sony's version of MP4 video (XAVCS) evidently isn't recognized if trying to transfer via SD card, but there's no problem if one connects directly through the camera.
YouTube said:
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
First question is whether the camera Wi-Fi can upload to the Photos library on the iPad or only to the Sony Image Edge app from the iOS App Store. Searching the web so far hasn't provided an answer. Is anyone already doing Wi-Fi uploads from any of the RX100 series to iOS or macOS?
I just tried this with a Sony RX100m3, after updating its firmware.*

The process is a bit strange.
  1. On the iPhone, download the Sony app - Image Edge Mobile, a.k.a. .PlayMemories - and launch it.
  2. (On the RX100, I went into the array of camera settings via the Menu button and navigated through the maze to its WiFi settings, where I eventually chose my WiFi access point and provided a password to access it. This doesn't actually seem to be necessary.)
  3. Next, navigate to the Send to Smartphone option in the camera menus - I chose Select on Smartphone (vs. Select on This Device).
  4. The camera displays network details for its own network that it has creates at this point.
  5. Go to iPhone > Settings > WiFi and select the camera's WiFi network.
  6. Now switch back to the Sony app, and you will be able to choose from among the photos on the camera. Select some and touch the little arrow-phone icon at the bottom.
  7. The photos get copied to the iPhone.
  8. Click the select (center) button on the RX100 to Cancel operations.
  9. Force-quit the Sony app on the iPhone.
  10. Check iPhone > Settings > WiFi to make sure you're back to normal there.
  11. The photos should now be in the Camera Roll on the iPhone, but I found only JPEGs on the iPhone, none of the Raw versions, and one of the JPEGs had some kind of problem.
This is the first time I've really tried this, and I may be missing several things, but it should give you an idea about the system. To me, pulling out the SD card and popping it into my MacBook Pro and using Image Capture makes more sense.

What I personally am more anxious to get is GPS tagging of RX100 photos via the iPhone's GPS capability, but I'm not sure how to do that (or if it's actually possible).

Here are some RX100 support resources from Sony:

including:

* The firmware update, in the form of a Mac app, required a fresh battery in the camera, connection to the Mac with Sony's original cable in Mass Storage USB mode, making sure the Mac wouldn't sleep, then trying twice. The first time failed (when I turned off WiFi on the Mac after the process stuck), but the second try worked (with WiFi disabled on the Mac), though it took a remarkably long time to complete (showing a progress bar as it went).
 


Go to iPhone > Settings > WiFi and select the camera's WiFi network
That procedure is necessary only if you want to create an ad hoc network - for example, if you are out of range of wi-fi, or in a hotel and don't want to connect to their network. If you are on your own wi-fi network, then you can just connect the camera to that, and the Mac app will see the camera on that network. At least that has been my experience.
 


I just tried this with a Sony RX100m3, after updating its firmware.*
The process is a bit strange....
Ric, thanks very much. Fearlessly, I did Sony menu browsing and hit upon the WiFi connection process, and at the end was able to upload several images into the Imaging app. I will try your steps and links now to compare.

My spouse's main computer is an iPad Pro 11-inch. An Anker USB-C to Lightning adapter didn’t work with an Apple SD card reader, so she used it with her iPhone 8 successfully. Definitely faster. Too bad Sony WiFi can’t upload to the Photos app's data store on iOS.
 


What I personally am more anxious to get is GPS tagging of RX100 photos via the iPhone's GPS capability, but I'm not sure how to do that (or if it's actually possible).
I've been a location-tagging enthusiast since the automatic tagging of iPhone photos came into being in 2008. I've had a series of digital cameras that had no GPS ability, necessitating hand-tagging. I started using HoudahGeo in 2013 and pulling .gpx tracking files from MotionX GPS (which I was already using as a hiking GPS tracker) to tag my digital photos.

I generally use ImageCapture to import from the camera and then add the shots to Photos after tagging. The AllTrails app will also export a .gpx file, as will stand-alone GPS devices.

Last year I bought a Panasonic Lumix that has WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity, so I thought, great, easier tagging!

The location tagging can be done by running the Panasonic iOS app when one is shooting photos and then connecting the phone to the camera wirelessly later to tag the photos in the camera. It works, but it is very (very) slow. I found it easier to return to my previous tagging workflow. Last year I also started using the iOS app GPS4cam Pro, which generates a QR code that you photograph and which is then readable by HoudahGeo (or the Mac GPS4cam.app) to tag the photos.

I'm not sure the Sony iOS app works the same, though I'm betting it does and will have the same workflow problems as Panasonic. I'll be finding out soon, since an RX100 IV [R100m4] is in my future next month.
 


I've been a location-tagging enthusiast since the automatic tagging of iPhone photos came into being in 2008. I've had a series of digital cameras that had no GPS ability, necessitating hand-tagging. I started using HoudahGeo in 2013 and pulling .gpx tracking files from MotionX GPS (which I was already using as a hiking GPS tracker) to tag my digital photos.
I generally use ImageCapture to import from the camera and then add the shots to Photos after tagging. The AllTrails app will also export a .gpx file, as will stand-alone GPS devices.
Last year I bought a Panasonic Lumix that has WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity, so I thought, great, easier tagging!
The location tagging can be done by running the Panasonic iOS app when one is shooting photos and then connecting the phone to the camera wirelessly later to tag the photos in the camera. It works, but it is very (very) slow. I found it easier to return to my previous tagging workflow. Last year I also started using the iOS app GPS4cam Pro, which generates a QR code that you photograph and which is then readable by HoudahGeo (or the Mac GPS4cam.app) to tag the photos.
I'm not sure the Sony iOS app works the same, though I'm betting it does and will have the same workflow problems as Panasonic. I'll be finding out soon, since an RX100 IV [R100m4] is in my future next month.
Have you investigated the GPS capabilities of the $35 GraphicConverter app? It has quite a lot of GPS functionality and integrates with Apple Maps, Google Maps, Google Earth. It uses GPX, NMEA formatting and inputs/outputs KML/KMZ files. GPS data can be copied or pasted.

GraphicConverter's Batch actions might allow you to GPS tag a lot of pics at once - in Browser mode you can select any number of images, then Control-Click to open an "Add or Edit GPS Data..." tool. GPS also similarly shows up in context menu tools that edit MetaData and EXIF.

My Nikon D5300 DSLR camera's built-in GPS system is crude and can be outrageously inaccurate, sometimes off by a half mile or more even after allegedly locking onto satellites. It can take several minutes to initialize, and is also huge battery drain, so I do not use it as much as I'd like in the field. What I do instead is open a GraphicConverter browser on one screen and Google Earth on the other monitor, and insert GPS data into the original camera JPEG file manually.

Hope that helps.
 


Have you investigated the GPS capabilities of the $35 GraphicConverter app ? It has quite a lot of GPS functionality and integrates with Apple Maps, Google Maps, Google Earth. It uses GPX, NMEA formatting and inputs/outputs KML/KMZ files. GPS data can be copied or pasted.
I have GraphicConverter and have used it for other reasons (the current price is $40) but not for GPS tagging.

The GPS4cam Pro iOS app (also for Android) is $4 and integrates with the free GPS4cam desktop app (Mac or Windows). This is probably the cheapest and easiest way to tag your photos.

HoudahGeo is $39 but has the advantage of being able to see the map of the GPS track and where each photo was tagged along the way. In addition, it is able to use .gpx files from a variety of sources to tag (in addition to GPS4cam QR codes). It can also access photo libraries in Photos, iPhoto, Apeture, and Lightroom media browsers, as well as in the Finder.

If one has an untagged photo, but one that also taken in the same location with my iPhone, I can copy and past the location from one to the other within HoudahGeo. Or, If I know the address where the untagged photo was taken, I can type it in to an address window and tag the photo. Or, I can just drag a pointer on a map and tag it that way.

I have nothing to do with either of the above app companies, just a satisfied user.
 



I, too, like to tag all photos with locations. However, I keep the GPS turned off in my Canon point-and-shoot as it burns too much battery. Instead I try to remember to squeeze off an iPhone photo at key locations that I've taken shots with the Canon. Then in Photos, I have an AppleScript (tied to Keyboard Maestro) to copy the GPS coordinates of any photo (iPhone), after which I can then paste to the other photos at the same location. Happy to provide the AppleScript if anyone (who uses Photos) wants it.
 


GPS appears to be a battery-drainer in most cameras, judging from this discussion. My Pentax K3 II has GPS. Its battery life was noticeably shorter than that of other dSLRs I have owned. It occurred to me that GPS might be the culprit, and sure enough, adjusting that setting resulted in immediate improvement. Nice to know that there are other ways to capture that info, should I need to do that.
 


While it seems obvious, I never thought of GPS as a battery-draining option - probably because I have never had the feature on a dedicated camera.

I recently moved from a dSLR to a Sony mirrorless (a6400). The one feature that most reviewers don't like about this camera is the battery life. It hasn't been an issue for me, but it is much shorter than my previous dSLR (Canon 50D). I can only imagine what GPS would do to the Sony's battery life.

What I do find interesting is Sony's solution. They have a companion app (was PlayMemories, now called ImagingEdge). It runs on the iPhone and connects to the camera via Bluetooth.

This allows the camera to use the phone's built-in GPS and presumably uses less battery. It works fairly well. I don't know if this is applicable to the RX100, but it is worth looking into.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I recently moved from a dSLR to a Sony mirrorless (a6400). The one feature that most reviewers don't like about this camera is the battery life. It hasn't been an issue for me, but it is much shorter than my previous dSLR (Canon 50D)
I'd guess that a lot of that is the power demand of the electronic viewfinder (and/or screen).
 


I'd guess that a lot of that is the power demand of the electronic viewfinder (and/or screen).
I have a D5300 and use the GPS all the time. The first time I turn it on at a site it may take a couple minutes to lock on, but after that it can get a lock in a few seconds. If I am concerned about it, I leave the camera and GPS on. It will eat one battery in 5-6 hours, but I always carry 1-2 spares. Only problem is its inability to get a lock in our redwood forests; I guess large trees can block the signals.
 


GPS is a battery drain on my Olympus TG-3, too. When the batteries were a couple of years old, the GPS would drain them to nearly empty in 1 week just sitting in my house with the camera turned off. I finally bought a new battery and I turn off GPS unless I am actively using the camera.
 


For years I have had the habit of taking what I call a "location shot." This can be something like a street sign, a sign with a town name, an event name, even a restaurant menu and when those were not available I would shoot a photo of my hand held GPS after pressing the "Where am I" button.

Recently I have been using the iPhone in place of my old GPS. I either shoot a photo with the iPhone which records the location or I use the compass app and shoot a photo of the iPhone screen with my camera or record a screen shot of the compass app on the phone. When I get back to my computer the iPhone and camera times allow me to know where the shots were taken.

Additionally, to make it easier to search my photo library by locations, I keyword each location shot with the words "location shot."
 


For years I have had the habit of taking what I call a "location shot." This can be something like a street sign, a sign with a town name, an event name, even a restaurant menu and when those were not available I would shoot a photo of my hand held GPS after pressing the "Where am I" button.
Similarly, I occasionally take a photo of Emerald Time1, an iOS app that shows an NTP-synced time, so I can correct photos’ timestamps if needed. Often I do this after I forget to change the camera’s clock for Daylight Savings, to mark the error and the point where the camera clock is set correctly.

1Pretty sure I learned of this handy app on MacInTouch. Thanks to whoever it was!
 


For years I have had the habit of taking what I call a "location shot." This can be something like a street sign, a sign with a town name, an event name, even a restaurant menu and when those were not available I would shoot a photo of my hand held GPS after pressing the "Where am I" button.

...Additionally, to make it easier to search my photo library by locations, I keyword each location shot with the words "location shot."
Yes. I've been taking location shots on my landscape and wildlife shoots for a while, though I hadn't thought of tagging the location shots with the keywords "location shot" in Lightroom. Excellent idea.
 


For years I have had the habit of taking what I call a "location shot." This can be something like a street sign, a sign with a town name, an event name, even a restaurant menu and when those were not available I would shoot a photo of my hand held GPS after pressing the "Where am I" button.
... Additionally, to make it easier to search my photo library by locations, I keyword each location shot with the words "location shot."
Additionally, if you use Apple's apps (iPhoto or Photos), you can manually assign location data to photos by dragging pins on a map. (I assume other photo management apps can do this, but I don't have experience with them.) I do this with everything I shoot using my point-and-shoot camera (since it has no geotagging feature).

I will take location shots, as well, as a reminder, in case I don't get around to offloading the pictures while the location is still fresh in my memory.
 


While it seems obvious, I never thought of GPS as a battery-draining option - probably because I have never had the feature on a dedicated camera....
Another option is to use a geologger, completely separate from and not connected to the camera. Later, you can use software to geotag the photos - the software figures out where you were at the time a photo was taken.

I use a fairly old Amod geologger and HoudahGeo, but I'm sure there are other and possibly newer equivalents. The Amod uses 3 AAA batteries, and I generally get a little more than a day per set, so I actually replace them daily and leave the AAA batteries "used but not dead" for the maid.

This also has the advantage of giving you complete control over which photos you want to geotag, which you might not want to post with GPS coordinates (privacy, safety, etc.), etc.
 


Another option is to use a geologger, completely separate from and not connected to the camera. Later, you can use software to geotag the photos - the software figures out where you were at the time a photo was taken.
I'm aware of the 3rd-party options. I had looked into them with my previous camera. In the end, it seemed like an extra piece of equipment to carry around and a process to get photos properly tagged.

I pointed out the Sony iPhone app because, in my opinion, this offers the simplest method (for those using a compatible Sony camera). My phone is always with me, anyway, so no extra hardware or software to purchase/carry. No additional battery to worry about, because my phone is running GPS with or without the camera. While not a feature I need, it can also be turned on/off.

The biggest advantage for me is no additional steps... the GPS data is written directly to the file on the camera's storage card. I can import the photos from the card into Lightroom (or other software (I do miss Aperture), and the location tags are already there.

That said, I'd be interested to know if HoudahGeo or other options offer features or advantages. I quickly looked at the Houdah website, and I'm unclear how it actually tags the photos.
 


The Amod uses 3 AAA batteries, and I generally get a little more than a day per set, so I actually replace them daily and leave the AAA batteries "used but not dead" for the maid.
I would suggest that this is a perfect situation for rechargeable batteries. I have a small radio that I use at night when traveling. It takes AAA batteries. I can usually get a couple nights (the radio is not very efficient). I just carry a small travel charger and recharge one set while the other one is in use. Cheaper in the long run and much better for the environment (he says on Earth Day).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
What I do find interesting is Sony's solution. They have a companion app (was PlayMemories, now called ImagingEdge). It runs on the iPhone and connects to the camera via Bluetooth. This allows the camera to use the phone's built-in GPS and presumably uses less battery. It works fairly well. I don't know if this is applicable to the RX100, but it is worth looking into.
I'm not sure what newer RX100 models have, but the RX100m3 doesn't show QR codes, doesn't have Bluetooth or NFC, and doesn't seem able to pull GPS data from a smartphone (as much as I wish it could).
 


The latest 'Cam Remote' from Fujifilm allows GPS info transfer from iPhone to camera metadata via Bluetooth for all supported Fuji cameras. The list of supported cameras is part of the documentation.

As an aside, this version (4.0.1), of the Fuji app is far superior to the older Fuji remote app. The position indicated on the Lighroom map is accurate, although the named location might be a different nearby physical feature.

The app's other features are quite extensive, including the ability to download and transfer firmware updates from iPhone to camera/lenses.
 


I have been using an iPhone app, Geotag Photo Pro, for this purpose.

The major gotcha is that the clock in the camera has to match that of the phone. The desktop app includes the ability to change the time stamps on photos to make them consistent with the GPS data, but to do that, you have to figure out the correct offset. Otherwise, this has worked well for me.
 


For Olympus owners, the iOS app OI.track nicely coordinates use of iPhone GPS with geotagging of photos. First, link OI.track to your camera via WiFi, then start OI.track recording when you begin using your camera. When you are done with a day's shoot, stop OI.track recording. Connect your iPhone to your camera via the camera's WiFi, and upload the track created by OI.track. All the photos taken during the time covered by the track are geotagged. I just used this feature for the first time a week ago, and it seems to work very well.

Another advantage is, when OI.track is linked to the camera, the date and time are automatically synced. This enables precise matching of the iPhone's GPS data with the time at which a photo was taken. Also, by setting the camera to the date and time which iPhone has received from a local server, the mislabeling of photo date and time data which may arise if you travel to a new time zone and forget to adjust your camera is avoided.

For cameras which have GPS capabilities, OI.track includes the A-GPS function, previously a macOS-only application. A-GPS downloads current satellite date, decreasing the satellite acquisition time for the camera's GPS.
 


I'm not sure what newer RX100 models have, but the RX100m3 doesn't show QR codes, doesn't have Bluetooth or NFC, and doesn't seem able to pull GPS data from a smartphone (as much as I wish it could).
Not checked, but I know that the Alpha 7R II didn't show QR codes either, but it does now, when spoken to by ImagingEdge, the new Sony iPhone/iPad app for capturing photos. (My RX100 III is loaned out at the moment, so I can't check.)
 


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