MacInTouch Amazon link...

Apple photo software/alternatives

Channels
Apple, Troubleshooting, Products, Questions
Has anyone tried RAW Power from Gentleman Coders? It's a plug in for Photos that provides editing tools for RAW images and generally gets good reviews. I shoot a little RAW, and I've had concerns about using Photo as the DAM tool instead of Aperture, particularly with large RAW image files.
I use RAW Power and like it. It is inexpensive, and it uses the Apple raw engine as Aperture did - so if you like the Aperture RAW conversion and editing controls, you will like RAW Power. Version 3 of RAW Power is due out later this year - new features are being added all the time. Nik Bhatt (the developer - and former Aperture Manager at Apple) is very responsive and listens to users. Highly recommended,
 


In the context of this discussion, does anyone have comments on Luminar v3?
I use RAW Power and like it. It is inexpensive, and it uses the Apple raw engine as Aperture did
Just thinking out loud, does anything else in macOS use the RAW engine - so that Apple is likely to keep it around more than one more major rev? I'm seeing flashes of Apple dropping the RAW engine and then BOOM! end of the line. If we're learning anything the hard(er) way the last couple years, it's that we can't rely on Apple for anything beyond the base OS, and even that can be sketchy in areas.
 


I've been worrying about Lightroom for quite a while (since they went subscription-only)
and about a year ago decided to give Luminar a go. The concern is multiplied by Mojave
telling me Lightroom (6.1.4) won't run in [macOS 10.15].
I tried running Lightroom 6.14 (note that you refer to it as 6.1.4) in Mojave for the first time today, and I did get the message. But Lightroom is 64-bit and has been since at least v5, so it's not clear why this message pops up.

As a test, I made changes to NVRAM to allow only 64-bit apps to run. Launching Lightroom 6.14 starts up the application, but selecting a menu brings up the spinning cursor. Console reports the following:
Code:
Process:               AdobeIPCBroker [532]
Path:                  /Applications/Utilities/Adobe Application Manager/*/AdobeIPCBroker.app/Contents/MacOS/AdobeIPCBroker
Identifier:            AdobeIPCBroker
Version:               ???
Code Type:             X86-64 (Native)
Parent Process:        ??? [1]
Responsible:           AdobeIPCBroker [532]
User ID:               501
Date/Time:             2019-05-02 11:40:26.354 -0700
OS Version:            Mac OS X 10.14.4 (18E226)
Report Version:        12
Anonymous UUID:        64C329FD-F202-C4FE-5B22-265FA267AB93

Termination Reason:    EXEC, [0xd] This binary requires 32-bit x86 support, which has been disabled with boot-arg: -no32exec.
It appears the AdobeIPCBroker is not 64-bit. After a bit of time, the spinning cursor vanishes and Lightroom begins to function again but eventually crashes.

Summary: Lightroom 6 is probably not compatible with a 64-bit only system.

Also, see this post from Graham Needham discussing Adobe products and 64-bit mode.
 


Has anyone found a suitable replacement for Aperture's web gallery export feature?
Has anyone found something that can do this? If I have to export the images from Aperture (or Capture One Pro) and then have another app package them up, I could live with that, even though it's not ideal.
Two thoughts. One is the Capture One plug-in Prodibi. I'm not sure it can pull captions, but since it is still in beta, the developer might be willing to add the feature.

The other possibility is Softpress's Freeway and Exhibio. At present these are 32-bit apps, so won't run past Mojave, but the developer has stated he is working on 64-bit versions. I have no idea whether this will materialize, but it is worth watching to see what happens.
 



The "Photography plan" with Lightroom and Photoshop now costs $19.99/month, or are you on the Lightroom-only plan at $9.99/mo.?
I doubt anyone will be surprised - it's the new software model. Companies will 'addict' you with low pricing and once you're 'hooked' they can increase to their shareholder's content.

With Adobe it was always just a matter of time. I'm pleased I went with Capture One rather than Lightroom. Hopefully Affinity will continue to improve and I'll rid myself of Photoshop as well.
 


The "Photography plan" with Lightroom and Photoshop now costs $19.99/month, or are you on the Lightroom-only plan at $9.99/mo.?
Apparently that $19.99 plan is the one with 1 TB of storage; the $9.99 plan is still available, just not featured on their website. My suspicion (and I'm as suspicious as you ;-) is that they're testing the waters...
 


An A/B & C/D & F Test?
9to5Mac said:
Adobe doubles the price of its $10/month Creative Cloud plan for Photoshop and Lightroom
Adobe gave an official response to PetaPixel that essentially said the pricing change might be a test, only seen by some users.
“From time to time, we run tests on Adobe.com which cover a range of items, including plan options that may or may not be presented to all visitors to Adobe.com. We are currently running a number of tests on Adobe.com.”
TidBits said:
Aperture Won’t Run after macOS 10.14 Mojave
in the next major release of macOS after macOS 10.14 Mojave, citing “technical reasons.” Although Apple is dropping support for 32-bit Mac apps in macOS 10.15 (see “macOS 10.14 Mojave Will Be the Last to Support 32-Bit Apps,” 12 June 2018), that isn’t the reason, because Aperture has been a 64-bit app since version 3.0
Compared to my earlier experiences when Microsoft seemed to use releases of MS-DOS, and later Windows, to kill third-party software, with peripherals also at danger, my Apple experience has been better. Still, it seems there's always something, from that Brother P-Touch Label Printer to my ScanSnap S1300, things that needn't have died?

Until seeing the TidBits statement that Aperture isn't a 32-bit app, I'd assumed that was the cause of death.

Just for curiosity and the sake of discussion, is anyone here a software coroner with knowledge of what other "technical reasons" will keep Aperture from running in macOS 10.15?
 


Apparently that $19.99 plan is the one with 1 TB of storage; the $9.99 plan is still available, just not featured on their website. My suspicion (and I'm as suspicious as you ;-) is that they're testing the waters...
They are, indeed, testing the waters. Not all countries/locations are seeing the new price. There is an article on PetaPixel discussing this—and in an update at the bottom includes a link that will take you to the old price.
 


Summary: Lightroom 6 is probably not compatible with a 64-bit only system.
Interestingly, Lightroom 5 runs just fine in a 64-bit only system. One big difference between Lr5 and Lr6 is the phone-home license (yes, even in the perpetual license version) in Lr6. It would appear that these are part of the problem with Lr6.
 


The "Photography plan" with Lightroom and Photoshop now costs $19.99/month, or are you on the Lightroom-only plan at $9.99/mo.?
Both Lightroom and Photoshop. That was the cost I signed up for, and it hasn't changed since. I don't use their cloud storage at all, so I don't mind being 'limited' to 1 TB.
 


Until seeing the TidBits statement that Aperture isn't a 32-bit app, I'd assumed that was the cause of death.

Just for curiosity and the sake of discussion, is anyone here a software coroner with knowledge of what other "technical reasons" will keep Aperture from running in macOS 10.15?
I have no first-hand knowledge myself but it's possible that even though Aperture itself is 64-bit, some of the plug-ins or other processes contained within may only be 32-bit.
 


In the context of this discussion, does anyone have comments on Luminar v3?
Just thinking out loud, does anything else in macOS use the RAW engine - so that Apple is likely to keep it around more than one more major rev? I'm seeing flashes of Apple dropping the RAW engine and then BOOM! end of the line. If we're learning anything the hard(er) way the last couple years, it's that we can't rely on Apple for anything beyond the base OS, and even that can be sketchy in areas.
Well, Apple Photos uses the Apple RAW engine, so I don't think it is likely to disappear.
 


I bought Capture One at the end of last year, and I really like it a lot (though I'm not totally up to speed with it, and the catalog/session models can be a bit confusing). It's expensive if you need support for Nikon and other cameras (as we did), but you get a license for three computers, and it's cheaper if a Fuji or Sony-specific version covers your needs.
Capture One is what I imagine Aperture might have become had it not been so precipitously thrown off the cliff in one of Apple's worst decisions of late. It provides stunning RAW capture edits, better than any other option. Yes, the interface is decidedly European in its approach, and the learning curve takes a bit of effort. The lynda.com tutorials are much easier to follow than most of what the company provides, and they're well worth the price. But once you experience the capability to do precise color edits and see the results, you'll never look back.

Also: you have choice of a permanent license or subscription. Note also that Adobe is rolling out a doubling of the Photo plan from $10 to $20/month. No doubt similar to follow with the full Creative Suite.
 


Given that almost five years have passed since the announcement, it is amazing that Aperture is still popular. It is now in the category of many OS X-based applications that may live on while running in virtual machines -- unless the graphics are a problem. Not ever being or supporting an Aperture user, I can't speak to that.
I still use Aperture as my image editor of choice. Even after 5 years it is still an extremely competent image editor, but more importantly, no one has a better, more flexible DAM [in my opinion]. I own Capture One Pro and have a subscription to Lightroom/Photoshop. Don't use either, just Photoshop, and with the recent price increase, I'll be dropping that. I love the editing prowess of Capture One Pro, but it has a very "European" interface with a steep learning curve, and its DAM is not anywhere near as flexible [in my opinion]. I suspect I'll be moving Aperture to a dedicated Mac and leaving it at Mojave. (sigh)
 



I've heard several people describe Capture One Pro's interface as "European." What does that even mean?
Here's a clue: take a look at the owner's manual of a BMW. You'll go into learned treatises about the technology in its radio and so much more. It's a culture that assumes the user is schooled in the disciplines of that craft and motivated to study. American culture is attuned to software and systems that the user can intuitively grasp and run with, featuring simple interfaces. Not saying one is better than another, but that's how I'd describe the difference.

Apple's Aperture was in ways the best of both worlds; easy to grasp and with great depth of capability. I agree its DAM is still the best, and am reminded whenever I open up my old libraries to find something. But the editing has hit its limit, and Capture One delivers just stellar results and it is fast. Meanwhile, Adobe's domination with Lightroom allows it to slog on with neither elegance in its workflow nor its performance, but I know those are fighting words.

I've had to devise my own workflow in Capture One, which Aperture made second-nature. But it works well, and the program does keep improving, as it's still young.
 


I bought Capture One at the end of last year, and I really like it a lot (though I'm not totally up to speed with it, and the catalog/session models can be a bit confusing). It's expensive if you need support for Nikon and other cameras (as we did), but you get a license for three computers, and it's cheaper if a Fuji or Sony-specific version covers your needs.
Here's a hint for those trying to sort out the confusing workflow options Capture One throws at you from the start: For most users, forget about Session-based workflow. Use Catalogs, importing images by leaving originals in their stored location. Focus on the difference between Folders (just an analog to the Finder structure), and Projects, Albums, and Smart Albums. Those three are your main tools. I can offer more if anyone wants.
 


I've heard several people describe Capture One Pro's interface as "European." What does that even mean?
Well... I was just trying to be kind. Like a fine German motor vehicle, I find the interface extremely technical and highly efficient, but almost completely unintuitive. I've been a Mac user since the 128K Mac. I am a staunch believer in Apple's software philosophy of "it just works." Aperture "just works" [for me], and Capture One Pro doesn't, and much of its innate power can only be harnessed after a very steep learning curve. Simply put, Aperture is fun to use [for me, while] Capture One Pro isn't.
 


What I personally am more anxious to get is GPS tagging of RX100 photos via the iPhone's GPS capability, but I'm not sure how to do that (or if it's actually possible).
I'm finally getting a chance to set up my new RX10 M4 (not RX100) today. However, trying to set up the Bluetooth connection to link location data from my iPhone wasn't easy.

How hard is Bluetooth pairing? It takes about an hour the Sony way.

One can't pair via iOS Settings > Bluetooth. One has to pair from within the "Imaging Edge Mobile" app (maybe the name makes more sense in Japanese). But wait, there's no Location Linkage button in the app, as there should be.

So, first, one has to use "transfer via WiFi" to transfer an already-taken photo from the Sony to the iPhone. Only then does the Location button appear in the app and can it be turned on. One also has to "Always Allow" location for the app in iOS Location Settings.

Despite all that, it does seem to work. With the phone in Standby, I was able to turn on the Sony and immediately take a shot, and it successfully added location to the shot. I did notice that it fails to add altitude to the location info (unlike GPS4Cam and photos taken with iPhones going back as far as the iPhone 3GS). I'll be doing more extensive field testing tomorrow on a hike.

Though adding location info is what I'm most interested in, I was able to control the camera via my phone. That requires an ad-hoc WiFi connection, which is achieved by scanning a camera-generated QR code. Fairly straightforward.
 


Here's a clue: take a look at the owner's manual of a BMW. You'll go into learned treatises about the technology in its radio and so much more. It's a culture that assumes the user is schooled in the disciplines of that craft and motivated to study...
Being “motivated to study,” I would happily go with that approach if it meant getting real, detailed manuals, rather than these d@%# useless web FAQ’s that are passed off as manuals these days.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Being “motivated to study,” I would happily go with that approach if it meant getting real, detailed manuals, rather than these d@%# useless web FAQ’s that are passed off as manuals these days.
Capture One has an online manual (very handy as a reference when working in it), also available as a PDF manual, plus video tutorials, webinars and more at a learning hub. Within the app are both tooltips and a Help > Tips menu item that describes the various user interface sections. The user interface is customizable to individual preferences.

You can also download a fully functional, 30-day free trial.

I think of Capture One primarily as an outstanding, detailed, and responsive tool for "development" of raw images (as Lightroom does) and less as a Photoshop-style "retouching" tool (though Capture One does have masking layers, spot healing, etc.).
 


Here's a hint for those trying to sort out the confusing workflow options Capture One throws at you from the start: For most users, forget about Session-based workflow. Use Catalogs, importing images by leaving originals in their stored location.
There are, of course, multiple ways to skin a cat... I would have said the opposite - work in Sessions. I like the encapsulated structure of a session, which makes it perfectly trasnportable. Images, exports, edits are all neatly stored in a folder, which can be dragged anywhere and makes for simple backups and sharing. Once the sessions are done, you can make a catalog from them and just add new sessions as required.

It definitely is a European interface - I just can't describe exactly what that is. :)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There are, of course, multiple ways to skin a cat... I would have said the opposite - work in Sessions. I like the encapsulated structure of a session...
It's definitely dependent on personal preferences and workflows, and the good news is that you have choices!
 


The one thing I like about Lightroom is the print module. Is there anything comparable out there? I still have Lightroom 5.5 but have not upgraded my iMac past El Capitan yet.
 


Well... I was just trying to be kind. Like a fine German motor vehicle, I find the interface extremely technical and highly efficient, but almost completely unintuitive.
To chime in on European software approaches here (but not intending to throw those across the pond under the bus, as my heritage is purely of German decent...), I have pretty much the same experience with Enfocus's Switch and ConnectAll products, which are German-owned as well. Switch gives you the technical facts but no "story" examples on how to employ those tools, let alone a string of them in some hypothetical scenario. I suspect that's the part that the lynda.com tutorials fill in?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Simply put, Aperture is fun to use [for me, while] Capture One Pro isn't.
Interestingly, I have had the opposite experience. After a fairly short startup period - using the 30-day demo, manual, and available tutorials and webinars - I have found Capture One compelling and encouraging to do more photography with its excellent results, responsive performance and organizational features, all of which have made it worth the purchase price for me. (By contrast, I didn't find Aperture's model natural or easy to use, personally, although you and others obviously feel differently.)
 


Can someone suggest which program is best for DAM and would best allow transfer from Aperture? I just shoot JPG's, so don't need RAW processing, and do relatively minor post-shot stuff (mostly cropping and maybe adjusting contrast or exposure). That all processing is reversible is very handy, but if necessary I could do without.

However, I have some 14,000 photos in more than 600 projects, plus some two dozen albums. All the photos of interest have a title (not just the file name) and a description attached, such as with the photos I've uploaded here: Ned's photos.

Within Aperture they also have a star rating. Thus, I would hope to move these things without having to deal with individual photos.

Maybe just go to Apple Photos? Something else?

Thanks for your advice.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts