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It's not just us, apparently:

Forbes said:
Apple iOS 12.1.3 Release Has A Nasty Surprise

... At this stage, serious questions must be asked of Apple’s iOS quality control. The WiFi problems started in iOS 12.1.2 and have gotten worse in iOS 12.1.3 while the cellular data bug can be tracked back to iOS 12.1.1 before getting worse in iOS 12.1.2 and ultimately leading to a carrier warning with iOS 12.1.3.
So what does all this mean for iPads without cell service? Our iPad (latest standard version) has not yet been upgraded to iOS 12. I presume that, if I do the upgrade, it will go to 12.1.3. What kind of problems am I likely to run into and is there any way back if those problems occur? Yes, I can back up to the computer (I don't back up to iCloud) and I encrypt, so all is backed up. Would a "restore" bring me back to 11.5? And, since WI-FI is all the connection it has, would this create a problem?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Yet, Apple seems completely unable to fix the problems, time after time. (I keep wondering if this has something to do with Apple's battle vs. Qualcomm over modems.)
Forbes said:
Apple iOS 12.1.4 Has A Nasty Surprise
If you have read my iOS 12.1.4 Upgrade Guide, you will know Apple's latest release is an essential upgrade for all iPhone and iPad owners. Unfortunately, that essential status means you’re also set to experience some nasty surprises…

The problem is Apple iOS 12.1.4 not only introduces some new bugs, it also carries over serious WiFi and cellular data problems from previous releases (1,2,3,4,5) and they are affecting iPhone and iPad owners who had previously managed to avoid them.
 


Yet, Apple seems completely unable to fix the problems, time after time. (I keep wondering if this has something to do with Apple's battle vs. Qualcomm over modems.)
Yet the Forbes article still advocates users installing the 12.1.4 update, despite these reported "carryover" problems, because 12.1.4 fixes other urgent problems:
Forbes said:
And yet, you should install iOS 12.1.4. It contains crucial fixes to the audio and video snooping flaws in Group FaceTime calls and a serious Live Photos vulnerability which was being exploited by hackers in the real world.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Software quality continues to be a problem at Apple:
Peter Kirn said:
Apple’s latest Macs have a serious audio glitching bug
... all T2-based Macs, that is all Mac models from the 2018 generation, are evidently unusable with USB 2.0 audio interfaces, irrespective of vendor. Audio interfaces using FireWire or Thunderbolt are reportedly unaffected by this particular bug, but USB 2.0 is for the moment the most popular bus for audio devices, so nearly all owners of the new machines are encountering the issue. (There are also some reports that USB3 devices are unaffected, but I can’t confirm that.)

This of course has led some users to simply buy a new Thunderbolt 3 audio interface. But this situation is unacceptable – plenty of standard, inexpensive PCs have no such issues with Thunderbolt and USB audio hardware. Apple has shipped their entire computer line with buggy firmware that renders those machines unusable for the majority of people working with sound (so music, video, and audio production), and have lagged in finding a solution for months after shipping these expensive machines.
 


Software quality continues to be a problem at Apple:
Peter Kirn said:
Apple’s latest Macs have a serious audio glitching bug
... all T2-based Macs, that is all Mac models from the 2018 generation, are evidently unusable with USB 2.0 audio interfaces, irrespective of vendor. Audio interfaces using FireWire or Thunderbolt are reportedly unaffected by this particular bug, but USB 2.0 is ...
This is a bit of an odd cause assignment, since the T2 isn't connected to the USB 2 bus of the PCH chipset at all (at least in the block diagrams for iMac Pro I've seen). It does have audio input interfaces, but those appear to funnel up through the T2's x4 PCI-e v3 connection (or eSPI for the System Management bus features... which setting the clock could perhaps go through).

The end of the article points to the glitch being in the new iPad Pro. To me, that makes it at least as likely that this is some iOS/macOS USB driver issue, as much as it has to do with the T2. They may be linked by the audio part that the Apple ARM SoC are tasked with handling, but the "pause" being mentioned here with the "time sync" is at least being handled on the macOS side (some 'alarm' interrupt that triggers every hour). Most likely, there is a clock that both the T2 and main system are using to keep the date/time. The T2's bridgeOS and macOS need to be on the same page as far as time goes, but if using the same clock, it really shouldn't be that hard.

It's also telling that if you have a second USB 2.0 bus (via a USB controller connected via Thunderbolt, not in the main PCH chipset) the bug probably doesn't exist either. The driver handling that other controller doesn't get the "stop, everyone out of the pool" pause, but the PCH one does.

Perhaps there is some giant kludge where Apple is trying to make T2 look like the Intel audio in the PCH and somehow coupled the two (USB and audio) in the PCH driver(s), but that the "other driver works" somewhat also likely points to a software issue. (Perhaps any 'new' audio interface would stumble, because it isn't so much software quality but a skill set gap that Apple has to deal with something new.)
 



I've run a 2018 Mac Mini with Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 through the USB Type A ports for around 18 hours for audio playback - no glitches yet that I've heard.

Before that I did similar tests with my 2018 MacBook Pro 15" for several hours - no glitches with it either (the 2018 MacBook Pro was connected through a StarTech USB-C to USB Type A adapter).

According to the documentation the Scarlett 2i4 is USB 2.0.

Notes:
1) I haven't been in the room with the audio every second, so there could be rare issues that are occurring that I just haven't been witness to, but after this many hours I'm sceptical.

2) I'm only testing playback of multi-channel audio, not recording, so there may be glitches with recording that I won't see.

I'll be testing with a USB Behringer with 4 channel output, early next week
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The design flaw behind MacBook Pro’s “stage light” effect
The Touch Bar generation of MacBook Pro always had its quirks, but the thin-at-all-cost design may finally be proving more trouble than it was ever worth. The latest issue to crop up—dubbed “flexgate” by one of our users, Alex—reveals that the compact design for the display’s flex cables is prone to fatigue and failure, leading to a host of display problems that can’t be easily (or cheaply) fixed.
...
But the bigger problem is that, in an apparent effort to make the display as thin as possible, Apple designed the cables as part of the display, so they cannot be replaced. This means that when (not if) those cables start to fail, the entire display unit needs to be replaced, as opposed to one or two little cables—effectively turning a $6 problem into a $600 disaster.
Here's an update:
iFixit said:
Apple’s 2018 MacBook Pros Attempt to Solve Flexgate, Without Admitting It Exists
... You can see there is dramatically more room with the longer cable. We’ll have to wait another year or two to see how this actually affects the prevalence of flexgate issues on 2018 MacBook Pros. While we didn’t predict precisely this failure mode, expensive repairs like this are exactly why this device earned a rather pathetic repairability score of 1 out of 10.

Worst of all, this implies that Apple knew about the flexgate issues before public backlash hit its fever pitch, and still refuses to even acknowledge the issue, let alone take responsibility and offer free repairs. In fact, multiple people claim Apple has deleted support threads regarding the issue on Apple.com, attempting to sweep this under the rug rather than offer an extended warranty program to those affected. You can sign this petition to try and get their attention, or fill out their feedback form here. Unfortunately, this feels like par for the course.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
It's not so much that Apple makes mistakes in engineering and manufacturing, it's denying those mistakes and abusing its customers that's the big issue.
The Verge said:
Flexgate is real, and Apple should acknowledge it
Apple prides itself on great customer service, but it’s currently dodging that responsibility

I have a late-2016 MacBook Pro, and, like many people with that generation of laptop, I recently fell victim to the Flexgate display problem. Flexgate refers to a design flaw in the ribbon cable connecting the body of the laptop to the display: that cable is supposed to flex with the opening and closing of the computer, but it’s wearing down too quickly with conventional use. Uncovered by an iFixit report and named by one of the site’s users, this problem is dramatically compounded by the fact that the cable in question is affixed to the display — so the only means of repairing a fault with the cable is the total replacement of the display. Which isn’t cheap.
...
I reached out to Apple repeatedly to try and get a comment from the company on the Flexgate situation, but have received no response. In my conversations with Apple support staff, which included phone calls with support centers in the UK and the US, as well as repeat visits to the Apple Covent Garden store in London, no one within the company seemed aware of Flexgate as a problem. Worse, threads started by aggrieved MacBook Pro owners who’ve suffered the Flexgate calamity have reportedly been deleted from Apple’s support forums.

Apple, I’d like to believe, is better than this. And yet, the company has previously shown itself slow to acknowledge issues with its butterfly keyboards and iPhone batteries. Both problems were eventually addressed in a satisfactory manner, though they did undermine the sense of trust that Apple works hard to engender in its users. The infamous Bendgate episode surrounding the iPhone 6, which Apple would later be shown to have known was more likely to bend under pressure, was left unresolved. The subsequent iPhone 6S just magically happened to be made of stronger stuff.
Apple's bad behavior has forced customers into creating petitions and even suing the company for redress... over and over again, e.g.:
 



The new macOS 10.14.4 update released yesterday (25th March) includes:
  • Fixes a graphics compatibility issue that may occur on some external displays connected to a Mac mini (2018)
  • Improves the reliability of USB audio devices when used with the MacBook Air, MacBook Pro and Mac mini models introduced in 2018
 


The new "News" app (v. 4.2) crashes on every launch, on both the recently released iOS 12.2 and macOS 10.14.4. Apple has release issues... again.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The new "News" app (v. 4.2) crashes on every launch, on both the recently released iOS 12.2 and macOS 10.14.4. Apple has release issues... again.
Confirmed:
The Verge said:
Apple News crashing for some users a day after launch of subscription service
Apple News is crashing for some users a couple of seconds after being opened on both iOS and Mac. Several of us at The Verge have been able to replicate the issue, and reports of the problem are also hitting Twitter. In my case, the app seems fine initially, but it crashes once you scroll down a bit on the iPhone.
 


The new macOS 10.14.4 update released yesterday (25th March) includes:
  • Fixes a graphics compatibility issue that may occur on some external displays connected to a Mac mini (2018)
  • Improves the reliability of USB audio devices when used with the MacBook Air, MacBook Pro and Mac mini models introduced in 2018
I will admit I feel a little foolish for the strength of my complaints... apparently Apple did hear us! The USB audio thing was quite annoying, but I'd been assuming it was a problem with my USB hub!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple's Downloads "support" page remains confoundingly out of date, showing macOS 10.14.3 and Security Update 2019-001 as the latest releases a day after Apple released macOS 10.14.4 and Security Update 2019-002. What in the world is Apple's problem with simple, essential documentation?
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Wow, this is a fun web column (I'm trying to understand how the code works...):
Joanna Stern/WSJ said:
Appl Still Hasn’t Fixd Its MacBook Kyboad Problm
Nope, I haven’t fogotten how to wite. No did my edito go on vacation.

You see, to shae the pain of using an Apple laptop keyboad that’s failed afte fou months, I could only think of one idea: take all the boken lettes out of my column. Then I ealized that would make the whole thing uneadable. So to...

Read with E’s On
Read with R’s Off
Why is the beaking of my MacBook Ai keyboad so insanely maddening? Let’s take a tip down Memoy Lane...
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
More on Apple's problem:
The Verge said:
Apple apologizes for continued reliability problems with its MacBook keyboards

... iFixit found Apple’s solution to be an improvement in defending against debris, but it was far from perfect, with particles like sand still able to get through and jam up the butterfly mechanism. But reports of key problems have persisted even with the third-generation keyboard. Stern wrote her column without the letters E and R to illustrate how annoying the problem is. Daring Fireball’s John Gruber similarly held back no punches when linking to the Journal’s story. He said “I consider these keyboards the worst products in Apple history. MacBooks should have the best keyboards in the industry; instead they’re the worst. They’re doing lasting harm to the reputation of the MacBook brand.”

Apple’s apology is at least a recognition that this is still a problem, though the company is simultaneously trying to give the impression that it’s not a big deal. That’s not good enough. Apple will have to make some legitimate design changes over the coming months to finally distance itself from this narrative and, as Gruber said, the sinking reputation of its laptop keyboards. These are premium machines with keyboards that just aren’t up to par.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I don't recall this level of Apple vaporware and abandonment happening previously (at least not publicly):
BBC News said:
Apple abandons AirPower wireless charging product
In a highly unusual step for the firm, Apple has given up on a product because it could not make it work adequately.

AirPower, announced in 2017, was a mat meant to charge multiple devices without needing to plug them in. But it is understood the firm’s engineers were perhaps unable to stop the mat from getting too hot.

"After much effort, we’ve concluded AirPower will not achieve our high standards and we have cancelled the project," the firm said. The company did not elaborate further....
 





I don't recall this level of Apple vaporware and abandonment happening previously (at least not publicly):
The distinctive feature of Apple's wireless charger was to have been managed charging of up to 3 different devices with different power requirements — simultaneously. Apparently they were never able to get that to work, at least on a shippable product. So they took the responsible decision to abandon the product.
 



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