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Looks like Apple has a new 23.7-inch 4K LG monitor to promote/sell, the 24MD4KL. Page 9 of the PDF manual for the monitor clearly shows the Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports are orientated vertically, halfway up the back of the monitor.

This is the same design as the previous model which disastrously failed for me (as reported by myself here on MacInTouch). I would personally highly recommend not buying this monitor, due to this design flaw (the height and vertical orientation puts a huge strain on the cable connection inside the casing which is very likely to eventually fail)!
 



If at first you do not succeed, try, try... ∞
Ars Technica said:
Apple again updates the MacBook Pro keyboard (and adds 8-core CPUs, too)
In the second update to the current crop of MacBook Pros since they were released in July 2018, Apple this week has expanded the available CPU options for both the 13-inch and 15-inch models. The 15-inch MacBook Pro has moved to Intel's 9th generation CPUs and offers 8-core options for the first time in the product line's history. The 13-inch saw a more modest CPU specifications bump. The MacBook Pro's price points remain the same.

Just as importantly, Apple has made another update to its butterfly keyboards in the MacBook Pro. This marks the fourth generation of the butterfly keyboard that has divided users and seen some widely publicized hardware failures that resulted in an ongoing repair program from Apple. Apple claimed significant improvements to reliability in the third generation that shipped with laptops introduced in 2018, but users continued to report issues.

Apple says it has changed the material it is using in the new, fourth-generation keyboards, and the company expects the change to substantially reduce the prevalence of issues with keys double-typing without user input, or failing to type at all with user input. The company hasn't yet gotten more specific than that, so we'll have to wait on teardowns and testing to learn more.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
iFixit examines Apple's fourth attempt to fix its defective "butterfly" laptop keyboards:
iFixit said:
MacBook Pro 15" Touch Bar 2019 Teardown

... There are myriad possible reasons for this switch to crack or wear out—manufacturing defects, plain old fatigue, prolonged heat, moisture, outgassing from other components, and corrosion are all common culprits.

It's entirely possible that several of these factors are contributing to switch failures, which could explain why Apple is having such a hard time untangling the problem. Fourth time's the charm?
 


Looks like Apple has a new 23.7-inch 4K LG monitor to promote/sell, the 24MD4KL. Page 9 of the PDF manual for the monitor clearly shows the Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports are orientated vertically, halfway up the back of the monitor. This is the same design as the previous model which disastrously failed for me (as reported by myself here on MacInTouch). I would personally highly recommend not buying this monitor, due to this design flaw (the height and vertical orientation puts a huge strain on the cable connection inside the casing which is very likely to eventually fail)!
That's the same port orientation as the original 21.5" and 27" Apple/LG 4K and 5K displays. We have three of them in service with no failures. It's also the same orientation as in iMacs. We have about a dozen of those, also with no such failures.

I'm struggling to figure how a near weightless USB-C or Thunderbolt 3 cable, however oriented, can be responsible for a "huge strain."
 


That's the same port orientation as the original 21.5" and 27" Apple/LG 4K and 5K displays. We have three of them in service with no failures. It's also the same orientation as in iMacs. We have about a dozen of those, also with no such failures.
I'm struggling to figure how a near weightless USB-C or Thunderbolt 3 cable, however oriented, can be responsible for a "huge strain."
The cable is not "weightless". I experienced the problem; you didn't, good for you.

The additional issue is that the monitor is sold by Apple but Apple don't cover it, e.g. AppleCare. Apple tell you to deal with LG. LG tell you they can't repair those monitors. Did you read the write-up of my experience?

I'm glad you like the monitor. Personally, I will never, ever buy that style of monitor and certainly not from Apple.
 


I realize that this solution is completely inelegant, but you could always plug in the monitor cable, pull it up to relieve any stress on the connector, then tape the cable in place.
 


I realize that this solution is completely inelegant, but you could always plug in the monitor cable, pull it up to relieve any stress on the connector, then tape the cable in place.
Some other LG monitors — I just bought and set one up this week — have a cable guide that clips on to the vertical support post. That would be easy enough to replicate with a simple tie-wrap.

However, I repeat that USB-C cables are not heavy and generally need no special care, other than not abusing them. Graham Needham seems to have been unlucky with his sample quantity of one, but... we have a sample size an order of magnitude larger with no problems experienced. (And, as it happens, I'm one of those 21.5" LG/Apple monitor users.)

He did get an terrible runaround on the warranty coverage, though.
 


The keyboard is, in my not so humble opinion, subtly, but welcomingly, better.
I concur with this assessment. The keyboard is definitely improved. We'll see if the stuck, missing, and inexplicably repeating keystrokes I experienced with my 2018 MacBook Pro 13" make a reappearance.
 


The cable is not "weightless". I experienced the problem, you didn't - good for you. The additional issue is that the monitor is sold by Apple but Apple don't cover it, e.g. AppleCare. Apple tell you to deal with LG. LG tell you they can't repair those monitors. Did you read the write-up of my experience?
I'm glad you like the monitor. Personally, I will never, ever buy that style of monitor and certainly not from Apple.
OWC make a cute USB-C cable attachment device that secures the cable to your monitor:

 






Maybe the portable devices like that iPad Mini in the video that children may be more likely to (ab)use would be iffy purchases, but I've had really good luck with my Apple refurb purchases. My last 3 towers (G5, Mac Pro 2008, and the trashcan) and last laptop (11" MacBook Air 2012) have been great machines. The MacBook Air in particular has held up better than expected. I dropped the darn thing a year ago on ceramic tile, and the upper right corner got bashed in. The screen hinge is a little crooked and the bottom metal part is bent too much to ever be able to trade this one in, but the USB port adjacent to the impact works fine, as does everything else. The screen didn't crack or show any color degradation. As delicate as that laptop seems, it's been a tank for me.
 


Wow, I just got an email from Apple that a bug I reported in early macOS 10.13 High Sierra is finally fixed in the current macOS 10.15 beta... ;-)

In fairness, it was a fairly cosmetic bug related to APFS.
 



This is an older issue, seeing it on multiple Macs, but I've never found an answer to it. In Sierra (10.12.6), if you have a custom ColorSync profile (i.e. created with i1Profiler), the OS "forgets" which one you have chosen every time you reboot. But, if you go into System Preferences, Displays, and click on the "Color" tab, somehow it suddenly remembers what profile you originally had chosen, and chooses it right there on the spot as the "Color" tab displays. But reboot, and you get to do it all over again. Every. Single. Time. Has anyone found a solution to this issue?
 


In Sierra (10.12.6), if you have a custom ColorSync profile (i.e. created with i1Profiler), the OS "forgets" which one you have chosen every time you reboot. But, if you go into System Preferences, Displays, and click on the "Color" tab, somehow it suddenly remembers what profile you originally had chosen, and chooses it right there on the spot as the "Color" tab displays. But reboot, and you get to do it all over again. Every. Single. Time. Has anyone found a solution to this issue?
Perhaps moving the CS Profile in question from
/Users/home/Library/ColorSync/Profiles​
to
Macintosh HD/Library/ColorSync/Profiles/Displays​

(or vice-versa) and then rebooting and selecting it in the Displays System Preferences and rebooting again will fix this issue. Worth a try...
 


This is an older issue, seeing it on multiple Macs, but I've never found an answer to it. In Sierra (10.12.6), if you have a custom ColorSync profile (i.e. created with i1Profiler), the OS "forgets" which one you have chosen every time you reboot.
There was one problem with macOS 10.13.x and later, which should only happen at the time you're calibrating your screen and creating a custom profile. That problem should no longer exist if you update to the latest version of display calibration software.

(For macOS 10.12, there shouldn't be any issues with Sierra with any company's display calibration software, at least not what I'm going to describe below. macOS should always remember the last profile you set, and it shouldn't be resetting the profile on startup, unless in your specific case an XRite component is doing it.)

This is what happened with macOS 10.13.x and later: in 2018, there were changes in macOS that meant that any display calibration applications (such as Datacolor Spyder software; XRite i1Profiler) that had been using Apple's "old" 32-bit API for setting the display profile found that this API no longer worked in macOS 10.13, even though 32-bit mode was still supported. (Same comment about macOS 10.14.) The old 32-bit API, which had been used by 3rd-party developers for many years, didn't stop working until one of the incremental updates to 10.13 silently disabled it.

As a result, you'd calibrate your screen, but the profile that you saved didn't "stick". A solution was to manually select the custom display profile in System Preferences > Displays > Color after calibration was complete and the display calibration application quit. After that, the profile you selected should have remained "set" as the current display profile, until you went and calibrated again. (Then, rinse and repeat - the problem with the old 32-bit API still exists.)

The best way to "solve" this was for display calibration applications to be updated to 64-bit and then to use macOS's new 64-bit-only API to set the display profile. This has already been done in both Datacolor's new SpyderX software (which is fully 64-bit) and XRite's i1Profiler (which was updated for 64-bit last fall). Datacolor Spyder5 software (while still 32-bit) has solved the problem for the moment using a different technique, and it also behaves correctly with macOS 10.13 and later.
 


This is an older issue, seeing it on multiple Macs, but I've never found an answer to it. In Sierra (10.12.6), if you have a custom ColorSync profile (i.e. created with i1Profiler), the OS "forgets" which one you have chosen every time you reboot. But, if you go into System Preferences, Displays, and click on the "Color" tab, somehow it suddenly remembers what profile you originally had chosen, and chooses it right there on the spot as the "Color" tab displays. But reboot, and you get to do it all over again. Every. Single. Time. Has anyone found a solution to this issue?
I saw this after upgrading my Mac from El Capitan to Sierra.

I selected a different profile then closed and re-opened System Preferences and re-selected the correct profile. It seems to have stuck after doing this.

I suspect that some internal ID (UUID? File-reference URL?) for the profile changed after the system update, so the system startup code couldn't find it, but the preference panel had some other information and was able to auto-select it after loading. By changing the setting, the preference panel re-wrote that ID to the representation required by the currently-running system. At least that's my theory.
 


I saw this after upgrading my Mac from El Capitan to Sierra.
Same here. I tried your suggestion - no joy on the external, OWC Thunderbolt dock-connected Dell display for my 2012 MacBook Pro. However, the internal display profile is always correct.

I also tried Scott_E's suggestion - no joy, as well, on the MacBook Pro. Tonight I will confirm results on my 2015 iMac that underwent a similar path with the same OSes and i1Profiler calibration (where I did the steps of Scott_E's method but haven't confirmed results). If no joy, I'll try your suggestion on the iMac, as well. Thanks!
 


(For macOS 10.12, there shouldn't be any issues with Sierra with any company's display calibration software, at least not what I'm going to describe below. macOS should always remember the last profile you set, and it shouldn't be resetting the profile on startup, unless in your specific case an XRite component is doing it.)
This is not what I'm seeing. My iMac (Retina 5K, Late 2014) is running Sierra and the latest version of i1Profiler. This Mac often reverts from my custom monitor profile to the default iMac profile. Whenever I want to do color-critical work, I need to open the Displays preference panel and verify that my custom profile is selected. Another glitch: the Displays preference panel often shows duplicates in the list of installed (default or custom) profiles. I don't know what causes these problems, but I've seen the symptoms on multiple Macs, running calibration software from DataColor and X-rite.
 


Another thing to try (I realize I'm grasping at straws here) is to blow away your profiles and re-create them. If something in the file is corrupt (or maybe just some cruft from an older version of the calibration tool is getting in the way) then that might explain the symptoms.
 



Just got a notification today to upgrade my iPhone 8 Plus to iOS 12.3.2, which corrects a camera depth field of view issue. Apparently this upgrade is only for iPhone 8 Plus devices.
 


Not necessarily. Apple still sells EarPods with Lightning Connector and a Lightning to 3.5 mm Headphone Jack Adapter (and a USB-C version for those who need it).
Bluetooth is definitely more convenient, especially if you need to charge your device at the same time you're using headphones, but even then, you can use a lightning splitter to let you attach a charger and your headphones at once.
For cars, however, it's even easier. An ordinary Lightning-USB cable is sufficient to connect an iPhone to most car audio systems. And Apple seems to be recommending this because CarPlay only works over USB, not over Bluetooth (at least that's the case in our 2018 Kia Sedona).
... In my experience those cheap splitters don't work for more than an iOS update or two. I wish Apple would help someone make a reliable one — the Belkin, which may be the only licensed MFi version of that device, appears to be hit or miss on quality.
 




New recall for some older MacBook Pros
Apple said:
Important notice for batteries in certain MacBook Pro units
Apple today announced a voluntary recall of a limited number of older generation 15-inch MacBook Pro units which contain a battery that may overheat and pose a safety risk. The units were sold primarily between September 2015 and February 2017 and can be identified by their product serial number. ... Because customer safety is a top priority, Apple is asking customers to stop using affected 15-inch MacBook Pro units. Customers should visit apple.com/support/15-inch-macbook-pro-battery-recall for details on product eligibility and how to have a battery replaced, free of charge.
 



My lovely bride's new-to-her MacBook Pro mid-2015 has a serial number that falls within the range. The confirming website says the MacBook Pro may be eligible for a free battery replacement and no matter where you take the MacBook, it is going to be shipped to a repair facility for evaluation. You won't find out if the battery will be replaced nor receive the MacBook back for "one to two weeks".

Even though this MacBook Pro is only used for personal use, having had a used-daily computer for over 15 years, that's still a really long time to go without one.
 


Even though this MacBook Pro is only used for personal use, having had a used-daily computer for over 15 years, that's still a really long time to go without one.
Mine is eligible (by s/n), but it's my work computer. I can't stop work for two weeks!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch


I make a point of always having a spare working computer available in case of emergencies. I just replaced my 2010 Mac Mini with a 2018 version, but left the old one set up on a side table. I also have a MacBook Air, which I needed to check for information while I was migrating my work from the 2010 to the 2018. I am not keeping the 2010 Mini updated, but I have a CCC clone on the 2018 Mini from which I could retrieve information as needed. That way I could deal with a recall, sending a machine out for repairs, or a lengthy recovery and rebuilding of a crashed disk. I don't think that would work for everybody, but it works for me.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I make a point of always having a spare working computer available in case of emergencies....
That's great if they both run the same OS X/macOS1.. If not... moving your complete "working environment" back and forth between them is... well, if anyone has a good way to cleanly and completely swap back and forth between a newer macOS and an older one while preserving all work and changes you've made on the incompatible system, I'd sure love to know about it.2.


1.MacBook Pros and Airs from 2012 to mid-2017 can run all of Apple's currently supported macOSes from 10.12 Sierra to 10.14 Mojave, along with most other models in that time range, but not the iMac Pro and the 2012 Mac Pro only via a special video card upgrade.
2.Yes, I do know about Migration Assistant. It's a one-way street. App and file format differences can be a huge issue.
 


For what it's worth, I find it faintly remarkable that I own two 2018-vintage Apple products, one with a keyboard that may potentially fail at any moment (the MacBook Air), and the second which apparently has issues outputting an HDMI signal (the Mac Mini). This is basic, fundamental stuff; I suppose over the years I've been spoilt by ownership of computers with functional keyboards and reliable video outputs.

Perhaps Apple needs to spend less time designing credit cards and commissioning television shows to focus on these little details.
 


That's great if they both run the same OS X/macOS....
Ric makes a good point. I view my old machines as standbys, usable in a pinch but not systems I would run indefinitely if the new one died and I had money to replace it. If you need serious computing power to run sophisticated applications, you would feel hobbled. If you need features available only in the latest version of some apps, you would be stuck. So this is not a fix for everybody.

That said, you could get along with an older machine for many personal things like reading email, checking (many) web sites, and doing basic office tasks like reading and writing documents. I make my living writing, and the only problem I have encountered in using Office 2011 is that I can't migrate it to my new machine, because Microsoft has shut down its authorization system. TenFourFox can make the web accessible with older OS versions, although it's inevitably slow.

On the flip side, some of us also are using older apps, because new ones can't match their capabilities. I doubt I'm the only person still using Quicken 2007.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
That said, you could get along with an older machine for many personal things like reading email, checking (many) web sites, and doing basic office tasks like reading and writing documents. I make my living writing, and the only problem I have encountered in using Office 2011 is that I can't migrate it to my new machine, because Microsoft has shut down its authorization system.
When you're trying to use an older machine to replace a newer one (temporarily, perhaps), you may have problems if the newer machine is running newer apps with different file formats (and/or preferences/settings), and the older Mac/macOS won't run the newer app you were using nor open its newer files.

If you're using a newer machine to temporarily substitute for an older one, the newer OS may require newer apps, which may change file formats to something you can no longer use when you get the older machine back after you have made changes to the newer files.

(And, of course, these imcompatibility issues apply to Apple's own apps, such as the abandoned/changing Aperture, iPhoto, iTunes, FileMaker, iWorks, etc., as well as lots of third-party software. And this will all suddenly get much worse with macOS 10.15 and all new Macs that require it, with its abandonment of all 32-bit software and media,)
 


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