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I just watched this video. It is a real breakdown of customer service on multiple levels. What I wrote is that he should contact Apple Customer Relations. I have used them in the past and found that they can do things, replace things more than the Genius Bar or Apple support, So, it will be interesting to see if something good comes out of this mess.
I, too, had a good experience via Apple Customer Relations when my second 2011 17" MacBook Pro 17" had a month left of extended video card warranty through AppleCare, and my video card went bad. Apple had put this model on its "vintage" list, so the usual channels didn't work. I Talked with Kori in Customer Relations. She acknowledged the rock and hard place situation I was in and then set up a free logic board replacement with Unitek Computer Stores in Santa Monica, since Apple could no longer could get the part.
 


This also crossed my mind after I got home. It has to be a case of 'trust Apple, they know what they're doing', right? (FWIW, 'Find my iPhone' has to be turned off for servicing, so I'm unable to do a remote wipe.)
Fortunately everything was backed up to iCloud,
Since Apple holds the encryption keys to iCloud, and "everything" was backed up to iCloud, what additional private data is risked by handing in the phone?

Didn't you have to give the store employees your log-in so they could work on the phone?

The most likely scenario for data theft is by a rogue employee when your phone goes behind the curtain. Want to bet whether employees are carefully monitored on HD video while the work on customer devices? Hmmm. Wonder if such video could be good enough to reveal your login code to a different rogue employee monitoring video?

TL;dr : Change your passwords.

Even if your phone is refurbed and resold without being effectively wiped, wouldn't it be impossible for a buyer to activate it and access your data? Your risk, if any, seems confined to rogue employees with your passwords.

Apple just refreshed the company's Our Approach to Privacy pages. Lot of marketing effort to persuade users to continue using Apple devices that record:
Your heart rate after a run. Which news stories you read first. Where you bought your last coffee. What websites you visit. Who you call, email, or message.
And it should be a "hard sell", as for an unknown amount of time until patched September 17, 2018, iOS was sending unencrypted analytics data. No software is perfect, and there are surely other "bugs."

This akes a much deeper dive into Apple's pages to see how the encrypted WhatsApp messages Paul Manafort backed up to iCloud were "convictingly" subpoenaed, thanks to Apple holding iCloud's encryption keys.
 


This also crossed my mind after I got home. It has to be a case of 'trust Apple, they know what they're doing', right? (FWIW, 'Find my iPhone' has to be turned off for servicing, so I'm unable to do a remote wipe.)
Regardless of whether Find my iPhone is on or not, the file system on the iPhone is still encrypted with your password, regardless. I presume Apple cannot access any more than a third party (e.g the authorities) can when it's out of your possession.
 


... After a short while another member of staff appeared and apologised, saying that the phone had apparently been damaged somehow during the battery replacement...
Apple always insists on a backup before replacing a battery and any other work just in case this happens. I wish they built iPhone to make the battery easier to replace.
 


This also crossed my mind after I got home. It has to be a case of 'trust Apple, they know what they're doing', right? (FWIW, 'Find my iPhone' has to be turned off for servicing, so I'm unable to do a remote wipe.)
If you had set up a passcode (and perhaps also Touch ID), no one else should technically be able to see any data on the phone, unless you had to provide the code to the Genius as part of the repair process.

The safest thing to always do in those situations is to ensure that "Erase All Content And Settings" is initiated before doing the final hand-off of the device.
 


If you had set up a passcode (and perhaps also Touch ID), no one else should technically be able to see any data on the phone, unless you had to provide the code to the Genius as part of the repair process. The safest thing to always do in those situations is to ensure that "Erase All Content And Settings" is initiated before doing the final hand-off of the device.
Yes, the Genius asked for the passcode whilst testing the SIM issue (TouchID was also set up). The phone was also set to wipe after 10 failed login attempts. To be honest, I should have given this more thought prior to leaving the store, but at the time I was somewhat preoccupied about how good my last backup was...
 



(I wonder if Louis Rossman requires passcodes from his customers?)
Yes (well, they asked, not demanded.) They needed the (firmware?) password to test my laptop after repairing the motherboard on an older MacBook Pro 2009. I'd sent it in with a generic drive, no personal info on it. This 13" 2009 MacBook Pro is still being used, and runs well with an SSD!
 




Here's a follow-up from Howard Oakley about printer support problems in macOS Mojave:
Interestingly enough, this morning when I fired up my new-to-me MacBook Pro 11,5 dGPU (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015), after last night finishing a clean install of Mojave and using Migration Assistant to bring over users and data (with super props to MiT Community for all the guidance and leads to info to make it pretty painless), Software Update popped up and advised that I had a printer update for my Brother monochrome printer.

Note that during my setup efforts the previous evening, I downloaded the current drivers for Mojave and installed them.

I would give you more details, like what the printer update version number was, but the new Software Update System Preferences no longer shows you what you have already updated... :-/

And I'm not enough of a guru to know where exactly to look in the logs for that information.
 


Why doesn't Apple keep all installers available for download? It's silly to think people with older machines don't have disk crashes and need to rebuild systems, that installer disks don't get lost or destroyed in home disasters, etc. Sure you can find updaters, but not the actual installer. A simple Google search turns up plenty of other people trying to do this, and eBay is littered with the disks, often for rip-off prices. Why, Apple?
 


The forums seem to be completely full of level 10 wizards who dump on everybody who asks a question. I search them for previously solved problems but I never ask questions there.
I've found the Apple "Communities" discussion forums to be one of the most useless "forums" I've ever encountered.

The previous incarnation (about 10 years ago) was nothing more than standard forum software, without any graduated "levels" or other such nonsense, which had the usual problems, but in general had a lot of good exchange of information. Then they decided to change it with a system of "user levels", points, rewards, etc. Knowing the problems with such implementations from systems like Slashdot, at the time I expressed my concerns about specifics of their implementation (which weren't clear), but was assured that it "wouldn't turn into Slashdot".

Well, they were right! They managed to make it worse - in fact, it's like they rolled Slashdot, Reddit and Twitter all into one - quite a feat!

The problems? Let's see:
  • It actively rewards benign, non-interactive 'activity' (viewing, browsing, or anything non-contributory) as a way to "elevate" the user status. Until you're "elevated" enough, there are several restrictions on the functions of the forums (discussed further below).
  • It actively encourages the user to post to similarly "elevate" their status. While posting is not a bad thing, the problem here is that it rewards posting anything, even incorrect, redundant, misleading and/or unhelpful information, which makes most of the information provided quite pointless. There's a "Helpful" button readers can click to flag a post as useful, but there's no way to flag inaccurate/unhelpful posts, and it's evident that authors of posts can click it themselves (I had tested it myself), leading to further "self-reward." (At least Slashdot and Reddit allow up/down vote of posts, and authors cannot rate their own posts). Overall, this only serves as an ego-boosting reward, nothing more. The higher the user's status/points, the more useless their answers typically are.
  • Speaking of misleading/inaccurate/unhelpful information in posts:
    • Most issues brought up by newer (lower-status) users who report problems/bugs/legitimate questions will invariably be met with replies from "elevated status" members who will either claim the problem isn't real ("bugs aren't bugs!", "don't hold it that way"), or try to place blame on the user or third-party apps, etc. instead of providing an actual answer or acknowledging the issue in a civilized manner. (Most of their responses tend to be dismissive and/or condescending - "move to Android if you're not happy" is the most common cop-out.)
    • When detailed information about problems is provided with the initial post, these same "elevated status" members will conveniently ignore that stated information and usually suggest things that have already been mentioned/tried, as stated in the initial post (again, to simply "earn" status, nothing more), or simply dial up the denials mentioned in the previous point ad infinitum.
  • It denies newcomers (those without an elevated enough user status) from reporting posts until they reach a higher status - that's right, no way to report bad, abusive or incorrect posts. All of Slashdot, Reddit and Twitter offer a way to report posts from the first day of any user's account registration.
  • How the actual status levels are achieved remains a mystery, as it's not clearly explained how this is accomplished. You're simply notified (seemingly at random) when you're been "elevated".
Overall, it's basically just a "Fanboy's Paradise". Thankfully, there are places like MacInTouch where users can can real information.

(With profuse apologies for the long rant.)
 


I've found the Apple "Communities" discussion forums to be one of the most useless "forums" I've ever encountered.
...
It actively encourages the user to post to similarly "elevate" their status. While posting is not a bad thing, the problem here is that it rewards posting anything, even incorrect, redundant, misleading and/or unhelpful information, which makes most of the information provided quite pointless.
Indeed! There is a very common pattern in the Apple "Communities" where someone posts a problem, an "expert" says "post an EtreCheck report," followed by a suggestion to remove some piece of software listed in the EtreCheck that obviously has no connection to the problem at hand, followed by the original poster saying, "I've done everything that you've suggested, but I still have the problem," followed by a suggestion to "run Malwarbytes," followed by a suggestion to "reinstall macOS," followed by "I still have the problem! Can anyone actually help?"
 


I've found the Apple "Communities" discussion forums to be one of the most useless "forums" I've ever encountered.
I appreciate your long rant. I have seen one particular member, who has very high status, giving out false information to numerous people, telling them any problem they have is their own fault and they should buy new hardware/reinstall everything from scratch/kick themselves for being dummies.

There are often workarounds, sometimes easy ones, but this guy just keeps going on, being a jerk — a very, very prolific jerk. I suspect Apple protects him largely because he fits their own “support” stance — that you’re not supposed to actually use your computer with anything it doesn’t ship with. (Yes, the people at Apple Stores are often better than that, but we’ve all read stories of blaming-it-on-user-RAM-or-replacement-hard-drives, and many of us have had problems with software updates because we have an extremely common tool, such as LittleSnitch, installed.)

Generally, there is still useful information, but you have to click on “other replies” to see it, because some fool with high site credentials has locked in a useless and misleading reply as the official answer.

It’s not what I’d expect or want from Apple — a stripped-down, poorly designed, hard-to-use forum that suffers from benign neglect. Though, come to think of it, given product decisions of the past five years — insanely designed “trash-can” Pro ignored for five years, undersized/underpowered ('til 2018) nearly-non-user-upgradable Mini, oddly hard-to-fix iMac, and now Mini that’s stunning in CPU power and kneecapped in GPU... with “use your keyboard while you can!” laptops and MacBook/MacBook Air in direct competition... well, I guess maybe it is what I’d expect from Apple.

I wonder how long Apple can survive based solely on “I can’t run MS Office or Adobe Whatever in Linux” and “Windows still stinks even worse”?
 


What could possibly go wrong with a procedure like this? Do people provide their passcodes to third-party (non-Apple-labeled) repair personnel, as well? (I wonder if Louis Rossman requires passcodes from his customers?)
I recently had my SE battery replaced at Best Buy (as they are the closest Apple certified place near me), and they never asked for my password. They needed it unlocked once to run the diagnostic, but they handed it to me to have me input the code. After they were done with the testing, they pressed the power button, thus locking the phone. Took them less than 45 minutes, and everything was fine. All in all it was a pretty pleasant experience (which is the exact opposite of previous experiences I’ve had with Best Buy’s Geek Squad).
 


I recently had my SE battery replaced at Best Buy (as they are the closest Apple certified place near me), and they never asked for my password. They needed it unlocked once to run the diagnostic, but they handed it to me to have me input the code.
Same thing happened to us at the Apple Store for a battery swap.
 


Same thing happened to us at the Apple Store for a battery swap.
+1 here. No need for a password beyond just handing my phone to the Genius.
{the Apple} “support” stance — that you’re not supposed to actually use your computer with anything it doesn’t ship with. (Yes, the people at Apple Stores are often better than that, but we’ve all read stories of blaming-it-on-user-RAM-or-replacement-hard-drives, and many of us have had problems with software updates because we have an extremely common tool, such as LittleSnitch, installed.)
I actually brought my phone in while I was having my wife's iPad mini 4 looked at. It's about worn out but I wanted the official declaration. The biggest problem is that the Lightning port is loose from long-time use.

We use only Apple-supplied or MFi-certified cables from NewerTech with our gear. But the Genius felt it necessary to comment on our use of third-party cables. Me (on the inside): "Sell one that's 9 feet long and we can talk"). Me (on the outside): "Well, then, maybe you guys should dump MFi certification since it doesn't seem to mean anything to you." Yeah, the guy has a point if I'm bringing in some $3.99 adapter I bought at the Quickie Mart -- but not when we're dealing with Apple-certified third-party goods. C'mon....
 


I've found the Apple "Communities" discussion forums to be one of the most useless "forums" I've ever encountered.
Same for the current official Adobe Forums. So much useless information with lots of official replies suggesting any problems are either not the fault of Adobe, or they are looking into it.
 


Indeed! There is a very common pattern in the Apple "Communities" where someone posts a problem, an "expert" says "post an EtreCheck report," followed by a suggestion to remove some piece of software listed in the EtreCheck that obviously has no connection to the problem at hand, followed by the original poster saying, "I've done everything that you've suggested, but I still have the problem," followed by a suggestion to "run Malwarbytes," followed by a suggestion to "reinstall macOS," followed by "I still have the problem! Can anyone actually help?"
This is true in many cases, although the Etrecheck report can be very helpful when the original poster hasn’t provided, or is not able to provide, good information about his or her system. What ensues is not always helpful, of course, but sometimes the report does help, as when someone really needs more RAM.

My pet peeve lately tends to be those bazillion-points people who just automatically encourage people to upgrade their OS to the latest half-baked version, forced out on the arbitrary schedule that we have come to mostly dread.

The redesign of a few years ago was dreadful. What idiot thinks it is a good idea to have a giant, cheesy graphic of heads in bubbles that takes up so much space that you have to scroll past it to get at anything useful? And the discussions themselves, with the persistent reminder drop-down at the top that can be dismissed but keeps coming back like acid reflux, and the masking of all replies until you click something to show them, are not helpful enough to make up for the clutter and extra maneuvering. I find some useful information there occasionally, but I don’t recall ever having a problem that was solved by anything mentioned there.

On the plus side, one Lotsa Points person who was routinely rude and childish, and apparently really thin-skinned, seems to have vanished. So there’s that.

Apple Discussions is very useful in reminding us of why we love MacInTouch, though.
 




… I actually brought my phone in while I was having my wife's iPad mini 4 looked at. It's about worn out but I wanted the official declaration. The biggest problem is that the Lightning port is loose from long-time use. …
I had something similar happening to my iPhone 6 Plus. When I had it hanging from my car’s dashboard, the charging cable kept popping out. I thought it was time to get a new iPhone. When I brought it into an Apple-authorized service provider for the battery replacement, I told the repair guy about the problematic lightning cable.

He took out what looked like a tiny pipe cleaner and worked it in, back and forth several times, in the Lightning port. Some detritus came ou,t and, sure enough, it was like brand-new again.
 


I had something similar happening to my iPhone 6 Plus. When I had it hanging from my car’s dashboard, the charging cable kept popping out. I thought it was time to get a new iPhone. When I brought it into an Apple-authorized service provider for the battery replacement, I told the repair guy about the problematic lightning cable. He took out what looked like a tiny pipe cleaner and worked it in, back and forth several times, in the Lightning port. Some detritus came ou,t and, sure enough, it was like brand-new again.
I keep my phone in my pants pocket, and once in a while the lightning port or headphone jack (what's that?) will not 'click' when inserting the cable; that's when I grab a toothpick and start pulling out all the lint that's accumulated, preventing proper seating of the connector.
 


He took out what looked like a tiny pipe cleaner and worked it in, back and forth several times, in the Lightning port. Some detritus came ou,t and, sure enough, it was like brand-new again.
that's when I grab a toothpick and start pulling out all the lint that's accumulated, preventing proper seating of the connector.
I showed my wife that trick some time ago when she complained that none of her charging cables were working, but many people do not know how little foreign matter it takes to prevent a positive connection.

In this case, however, the cable wiggles around in the connector on the iPad. There might be a way to shim it to make it mate more successfully, but that still leaves us the dying battery and the cracked screen. Time to give Tim and Jony some more money, I think...
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
More on a contentious repair issue with Apple's current Macs:
The Verge said:
Apple confirms its T2 security chip blocks some third-party repairs of new Macs
Newer Macs now require a proprietary diagnostic tool be run after replacing the logic board or Touch ID sensor
... The T2 chip, which acts as a co-processor, is the secret to many of Apple’s newest and most advanced features. However, its introduction into more computers and the likelihood that it becomes commonplace in every Mac going forward has renewed concerns that Apple is trying to further lock down its devices from third-party repair services.
... Apple confirmed to The Verge that this is the case for repairs involving certain components on newer Macs, like the logic board and Touch ID sensor, which is the first time the company has publicly acknowledged the new repair requirements for T2-equipped Macs. But Apple could not provide a list of repairs that required this or what devices were affected. It also couldn’t say whether it began this protocol with the iMac Pro’s introduction last year or if it’s a new policy instituted recently.
 


More on a contentious repair issue with Apple's current Macs...
I couldn't find any new news in this article. It mentioned the memo we already knew about and mentioned that iFixit's test (swapping two displays) didn't result in any problems.

Have they found an actual bricked computer or is this more commentary based on the same memo?

I noticed also that they mentioned a lot of nefarious possibilities why Apple would want to do such a thing, but failed to mention the obvious (and not evil) reason - that certain key parts (like the Touch ID sensor and motherboard) are critical to the computer's security. If they are replaced with shoddy (or worse, deliberately compromised) parts, then the computer's security is at risk and data could be made available to unauthorized parties.

Given the fears of China slipping chips into server boards (asserted by Bloomberg, but denied by Apple), the fact that we have seen cheap aftermarket parts sold as genuine Apple in the past, and that intelligence agencies are known to have secretly swapped parts in-transit in the past, Apple's concerns about security are not unwarranted.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I couldn't find any new news in this article.
As quoted in the reference:
The Verge said:
Apple confirms its T2 security chip blocks some third-party repairs of new Macs
... Apple confirmed to The Verge that this is the case for repairs involving certain components on newer Macs, like the logic board and Touch ID sensor, which is the first time the company has publicly acknowledged the new repair requirements for T2-equipped Macs. But Apple could not provide a list of repairs that required this or what devices were affected. It also [wouldn't] say whether it began this protocol with the iMac Pro’s introduction last year or if it’s a new policy instituted recently.
The news is Apple's confirmation of the issue (while refusing to provide any salient details).
 


I’m still in a bit of shock after an Apple Store experience this past weekend.

I made an appointment to have my iPhone 6 battery replaced for $29 before that offer expires at the end of the year. When I sat down at the “genius table” I proceeded to remove my iPhone from its Otterbox Defender case (the Hummer of iPhone cases for those unfamiliar).

As the Apple Store rep sat down next to me the first thing he did was to turn the iPhone on edge and look at it along its axis. “I don’t think we’ll be able to do the battery replacement because your phone is bent”.

I said calmly…”my phone has never been used outside of the Otterbox case and never been placed in a pocket.” When I looked at the phone along its axis I saw no bending whatsoever.

He said he would check with the technician in the back but reasserted his opinion adding that the Otterbox cases were known to do this. What?

I asked him to clarify how a case could bend a phone if the phone was always used in the case and never placed in a pocket. He really wasn’t able to do so, just that the phone was bent and they couldn’t do a battery replacement.

Trying not to be fully obnoxious I asked if I were to pay the full price for the battery replacement ($79?) would they replace the battery. He said “no, the only thing I can do is give you $150 off the $300 for a new iPhone 6”.

I am a fairly assertive guy but I was just floored by “his” position on the matter so I left the store and decided to fight this battle another day (and at another store). I would sincerely appreciate any thoughts fellow MacInTouch readers have to offer. Thanks!
 


I couldn't find any new news in this article. It mentioned the memo we already knew about and mentioned that iFixit's test (swapping two displays) didn't result in any problems.
Have they found an actual bricked computer or is this more commentary based on the same memo?
I noticed also that they mentioned a lot of nefarious possibilities why Apple would want to do such a thing, but failed to mention the obvious (and not evil) reason - that certain key parts (like the Touch ID sensor and motherboard) are critical to the computer's security. If they are replaced with shoddy (or worse, deliberately compromised) parts, then the computer's security is at risk and data could be made available to unauthorized parties.

Given the fears of China slipping chips into server boards (asserted by Bloomberg, but denied by Apple), the fact that we have seen cheap aftermarket parts sold as genuine Apple in the past, and that intelligence agencies are known to have secretly swapped parts in-transit in the past, Apple's concerns about security are not unwarranted.
I'm guessing wildly, but my first thought after reading about the T2 chip and how it limited third-party intervention was that its design was part of Apple's security and privacy strategy, and designed to defeat anything attempted by government agencies to access people's data.
 


I made an appointment to have my iPhone 6 battery replaced for $29 before that offer expires at the end of the year. When I sat down at the “genius table” I proceeded to remove my iPhone from its Otterbox Defender case (the Hummer of iPhone cases for those unfamiliar). As the Apple Store rep sat down next to me the first thing he did was to turn the iPhone on edge and look at it along its axis. “I don’t think we’ll be able to do the battery replacement because your phone is bent”.
I don't have experience with Otterbox cases, but I have recent experience with battery replacement at the Apple Store, in this case for two iPhone 6S's. After the initial exam the store rep said that if any damage was found, they may not be able to complete the battery swap. I asked if I could back out of the repair if that was the case, and was told that I could. When I got them back, the rep said that the tech noticed one of them had a questionable home button, so he had done a full home button and screen replacement to fix the issue, at no extra charge beyond the $29 battery replacement fee.

In your case I wonder what the outcome would have been if the repair had moved forward from the front-line rep to the back-bench technician. Perhaps the tech would have had no problem completing the battery replacement. I think it would be worth another shot at a different Apple Store, if you have one available, this time taking the Otterbox off before entering the store.
 


I’m still in a bit of shock after an Apple Store experience this past weekend.
I made an appointment to have my iPhone 6 battery replaced for $29 before that offer expires at the end of the year. When I sat down at the “genius table” I proceeded to remove my iPhone from its Otterbox Defender case (the Hummer of iPhone cases for those unfamiliar).

As the Apple Store rep sat down next to me the first thing he did was to turn the iPhone on edge and look at it along its axis. “I don’t think we’ll be able to do the battery replacement because your phone is bent”.

I said calmly…”my phone has never been used outside of the Otterbox case and never been placed in a pocket.” When I looked at the phone along its axis I saw no bending whatsoever.
Jon, next time you're in an Apple Store with this phone, simply request the manager / top-level supervisor be on hand to witness the lack of bentness of your iPhone -- and don't bother to relay details about your previous interaction with a "Genius." You can place the iPhone on a perfectly flat surface and demonstrate it is flush on all sides. That should silence any ridiculous assertions about cases causing iPhone deformation.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... I am a fairly assertive guy but I was just floored by “his” position on the matter so I left the store and decided to fight this battle another day (and at another store). I would sincerely appreciate any thoughts fellow MacInTouch readers have to offer. Thanks!
If your iPhone is truly not bent, then this sounds like a scam. I would want to gather all relevant facts first (including identities or photos of the people involved), then proceed to explore your various options (e.g. state attorney general, consumer advocates, etc.) as well as alerting Apple management to the issue, as I can't imagine they really want Apple Stores to get a reputation for ripping people off. You might try Apple Customer Relations, or just go straight to Tim Cook and/or Angela Ahrendts (who sure gets a lot of prime keynote time under Cook to promote Apple Stores). And please let us know here what transpires.
 


I’m still in a bit of shock after an Apple Store experience this past weekend.

I made an appointment to have my iPhone 6 battery replaced for $29 before that offer expires at the end of the year. When I sat down at the “genius table” I proceeded to remove my iPhone from its Otterbox Defender case (the Hummer of iPhone cases for those unfamiliar).

As the Apple Store rep sat down next to me the first thing he did was to turn the iPhone on edge and look at it along its axis. “I don’t think we’ll be able to do the battery replacement because your phone is bent”.

I said calmly…”my phone has never been used outside of the Otterbox case and never been placed in a pocket.” When I looked at the phone along its axis I saw no bending whatsoever.

He said he would check with the technician in the back but reasserted his opinion adding that the Otterbox cases were known to do this. What?

I asked him to clarify how a case could bend a phone if the phone was always used in the case and never placed in a pocket. He really wasn’t able to do so, just that the phone was bent and they couldn’t do a battery replacement.

Trying not to be fully obnoxious I asked if I were to pay the full price for the battery replacement ($79?) would they replace the battery. He said “no, the only thing I can do is give you $150 off the $300 for a new iPhone 6”.

I am a fairly assertive guy but I was just floored by “his” position on the matter so I left the store and decided to fight this battle another day (and at another store). I would sincerely appreciate any thoughts fellow MacInTouch readers have to offer. Thanks!
No advice but thought you might be interested in a similar experience in Perth, Australia. My daughter inherited my iPhone 6 and has been experiencing lots of battery issues. As advised by Apple, we decided to avail ourselves of the battery replacement program.

On meeting with the “genius” at our local Apple store we too were told the phone was bent. The genius said that while this wasn’t an issue in itself, it would cause problems fitting the iPhone into the automated battery replacement machine. He then somewhat infuriatingly left the conversation hanging without offering any further advice.

My daughter being a teenager just accepted this advice and was prepared to leave and just live with poor performance and erratic battery life. Being somewhat older and a bit of a curmudgeon, I informed the “Genius” this was not acceptable and the phone was well looked after and that I couldn’t see any perceptible bending.

Fairly ungraciously he said it would have to fail a battery test (contrary to advice provided by Apple itself) and only then would they would they attempt to replace the battery - but he made it clear he wouldn’t give any guarantees. That was fine with me as he hadn’t provided anything of value since we walked into the store.

Anyway, the battery did fail their test and while we waited the battery was successfully replaced. The whole experience has left a bitter taste in my mouth and it’s pretty clear to me Apple are putting barriers up to discourage people from participating in the battery replacement program.
 


As the Apple Store rep sat down next to me the first thing he did was to turn the iPhone on edge and look at it along its axis. “I don’t think we’ll be able to do the battery replacement because your phone is bent”.
...
I left the store and decided to fight this battle another day (and at another store).
If the technician/genius made a note, "bent iPhone", on your device's service record, you might not succeed at the next Apple Store.
 


I took in my iPhone 6 Plus (no appointment) to get the battery replaced. It passed their test just fine, but they said they would replace the battery anyway if I wanted to pay the $29 plus tax. The new battery charges to 100% of capacity instead of only 89%.

Something I hadn't looked at before: I leave the phone on but never touch it (no sim card), everything I can find to turn off is off, except Find My Phone, and battery charge drops 5% per day. I doubt anyone reading this never uses their phone, but I wonder if this is normal behavior.
 


Something I hadn't looked at before: I leave the phone on but never touch it (no sim card), everything I can find to turn off is off, except Find My Phone, and battery charge drops 5% per day. I doubt anyone reading this never uses their phone, but I wonder if this is normal behavior.
Battery drain when doing nothing is not normal. I've seen it with an old battery and I've seen it when there's background processing going on (including for a few days after any OS update), but not under normal circumstances with a good battery.

But the fact that you have no SIM card might be affecting this. I know that phones (including iPhones) will draw a lot of power if they can't find a cellular signal. They max-out the gain on their amplifiers in order to search for a signal, and that does consume a lot of your battery. I don't know what the system does when a SIM card is missing, but I'm wondering if you might be in the same situation.

If you have your SIM card removed, I would recommend putting the phone into Airplane mode (you can re-enable Wi-Fi while leaving Airplane mode active), which will disable the cellular radio circuitry. See if that changes anything.
 


I don't have experience with Otterbox cases, but I have recent experience with battery replacement at the Apple Store, in this case for two iPhone 6S's. After the initial exam the store rep said that if any damage was found, they may not be able to complete the battery swap. I asked if I could back out of the repair if that was the case, and was told that I could. When I got them back, the rep said that the tech noticed one of them had a questionable home button, so he had done a full home button and screen replacement to fix the issue, at no extra charge beyond the $29 battery replacement fee.

In your case I wonder what the outcome would have been if the repair had moved forward from the front-line rep to the back-bench technician. Perhaps the tech would have had no problem completing the battery replacement. I think it would be worth another shot at a different Apple Store, if you have one available, this time taking the Otterbox off before entering the store.
Wow, happy to hear of your great service experience Scott. I have to wonder if Apple keeps "device notes" whereby if I go to another Apple Store I will be told that they have already examined the phone and found it ineligible. I placed my iPhone up against a metal straightedge and for the life of me I can't see any bending. I'll likely try another Apple Store and since I live in the "home town" of Otterbox (Fort Collins, Colorado) and they have a flagship retail store downtown I'll go amuse myself there and report anything of interest.
 


Two random thoughts:

1. You might be able to view any Apple case notes on your devices by requesting your account dossier from Apple. Go to
2. In my city, a lot of office supply stores and mobile phone repair shops are matching the $29 battery replacement. I also recall reading something here that said Best Buy was matching as well.
 


Two random thoughts:

1. You might be able to view any Apple case notes on your devices by requesting your account dossier from Apple. Go to
2. In my city, a lot of office supply stores and mobile phone repair shops are matching the $29 battery replacement. I also recall reading something here that said Best Buy was matching as well.
In our city, Best Buy is an Apple certified repair place, and they replaced my battery for $29 last week.
 


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