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Louis Rossmann posted an updated video this evening to his YouTube account with updated details.

In this video he describes an email he received from an Apple support individual who discusses the fact that they had gone through specific training on this topic, and what is happening in the Apple Community Forums should not be. They were taught to provide information very much along the lines of the internal policies for computer hard drive data recovery, and pointed to an available Apple technical document.

Has Apple just become so large that the upper-tier managers no longer know what is happening down in the trenches? Perhaps this is just a matter of trimming a few bad apples from the tree.
 



I suppose, after all our griping about how Apple (Jony Ive) doesn't have a clue about how to design repairable computers, we should become more platform-agnostic and always refer to iFixit's repairability ratings.
All your iPhone are belong to us…
Motherboard said:
Apple Is Telling Lawmakers People Will Hurt Themselves if They Try to Fix iPhones

... Experts, however, say Apple's and CompTIA's warnings are far overblown. People with no special training regularly replace the batteries or cracked screens in their iPhones, and there are thousands of small, independent repair companies that regularly fix iPhones without incident. The issue is that many of these companies operate in a grey area because they are forced to purchase replacement parts from third parties in Shenzhen, China, because Apple doesn’t sell them to independent companies unless they become part of the “Apple Authorized Service Provider Program,” which limits the types of repairs they are allowed to do and requires companies to pay Apple a fee to join.

“To suggest that there are safety and security concerns with spare parts and manuals is just patently absurd,” Nathan Proctor, director of consumer rights group US PIRG’s right to repair campaign told Motherboard in a phone call. “We know that all across the country, millions of people are doing this for themselves. Millions more are taking devices to independent repair technicians.”

The CompTIA letter is the same as letters sent to lawmakers in other states that are considering substantially different bills, and very similar to a letter sent last year by the organization.
 



Apple really ought to be required by law to place a big warning label on the iPhones, saying that the use or repair of this phone may injure you. I know that there have been quite a few cases where people have been injured when using phones while walking or driving.
Either the print would be tiny or the label would be huge:
Apple Support said:
Important safety information for iPhone

WARNING: Failure to follow these safety instructions could result in fire, electric shock, injury, or damage to iPhone or other property. Read all the safety information below before using iPhone.
 


Apple really ought to be required by law to place a big warning label on the iPhones, saying that the use or repair of this phone may injure you. I know that there have been quite a few cases where people have been injured when using phones while walking or driving.
How about something like “the surgeon general has determined that the use of this device while walking, driving, or operating machinery may be hazardous to your health.” For all mobile devices.
 


"Right to repair" isn't much good if devices are designed so they can't be repaired. Waiting on the rumored iPhone, I delayed replacing my Palm Treo, which barely survived my DIY battery replacement with the only battery I could find, a crappy third-party one sold through Amazon. The phone was difficult to snap apart, the battery wasn't easy to extract, and disassembly damaged the clips that held it together. Damaged case, battery life barely improved, and adding injury to insult, I recall poking a hole in one of my fingers.

The next version after my early-adopter Treo was the 650. A major design upgrade over mine: replaceable batteries.

Had there been a shop to which I could have taken my Treo, I'd have done that, though would that shop have been able to obtain an "original" OEM battery?

I've been in one of those phone repair franchise locations and witnessed a woman with a cracked iPhone screen have it replaced for a very reasonable cost while she waited.Though that on a phone that preceded the TouchID complexity. Again, the shop had a screen that worked.

Even though I was ready to replace my Treo with the new iPhone, I didn't. No replaceable battery. For as long as I could, I resisted buying gear with sealed-in batteries, but that's become nearly impossible. I currently have two Bluetooth speakers ready to deliver to the electronics recycle because their batteries are dead, I can't figure out how to get into them non-destructively nor really have any idea if there's a reason to try.

At work we're still using two 2010-vintage Mac Minis. They work, but the PRAM coin battery is dead, and the clock has to be reset if they're off the Internet. After I destroyed two old iMacs that didn't boot while trying to reach the coin battery for diagnosis, I'm reluctant to open the Mini. Having destroyed two, I took a third still-functional iMac to a third-party Mac shop for a new PRAM battery, and it died on the operating table.
iFixit said:
My wife's last ThinkPad, assigned to her by IBM, was entirely modular. While IBM security rules meant she couldn't let me help her diagnose her running laptop when a critical project was about to be delayed when her entire teams' set had become unreliable and they didn't have time to ship their computers to the service center. I presumed a heat problem, and she did let me snap hers apart to use the Can O'Air (while she watched carefully). Fixed, simply. In her case, the Ball O'Cat Hair was one gagged up by Lenovo, not the cat.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I think it's interesting to see how Apple operates:
The Verge said:
An Apple lobbyist just sneakily pushed California to postpone its right-to-repair bill

... According to sources in the California state Assembly who spoke to The Verge, committee members met with Apple lobbyist Rod Diridon, who’s listed as Apple’s senior manager of “State and Local Government Affairs — West.” He’s also listed as an Apple lobbyist at CompTIA’s website, and he appears to be the same Rod Diridon Jr. who abruptly left his role as the city clerk for Santa Clara, California last year, a town whose border runs along the edge of Apple’s new “spaceship” Apple Park headquarters.

One staffer in the California state Assembly tells The Verge that Diridon didn’t necessarily focus on the fire risk, and that he outright admitted a lot would have to go wrong with a repair before a battery would necessarily catch fire. Other topics included the difficulty of opening the phone and the risk of breaking the screen.

But one might point out that if Apple wanted to make the phones safer to repair, it could arrange to make that process less difficult.
 



Also true for screens. Thin fonts and low contrast gray on gray or blue on blue just don't cut it with aging eyes.
It doesn't take much visual impairment for small or low-contrast type to become unreadable. I started having problems several years before I needed cataract surgery. Another set of problems comes from poor placement or poor lighting of the type, which is inevitable when you have small type low on the back (or bottom) of devices. It takes quite a bit of contortion, the right set of reading glasses, and a good flashlight to be able to read the codes on my Verizon FiOS modem.
 


Another offender in the small light type category is the iTunes/App store. Descriptions of an app are so tiny and cannot be resized, I'm forced to use a magnifying glass to read the text.
 


Another offender in the small light type category is the iTunes/App store. Descriptions of an app are so tiny and cannot be resized, I'm forced to use a magnifying glass to read the text.
Try holding down the command key and scrolling upwards with the Magic Mouse. This magnifies the screen. Scrolling down returns the screen to its normal size.
 


Try holding down the command key and scrolling upwards with the Magic Mouse. This magnifies the screen. Scrolling down returns the screen to its normal size.
I wasn't certain from the original post whether the poster mean iOS or macOS. If it is indeed the latter, there's also the Accessibility System Preferences pane "increase contrast" button and "Display contrast" slider. Or if you want to help Apple's bottom line, replace your older system with a new one with a Retina 5K (or better, should they, as rumored, become available) display.

Obviously, everyone's mileage will differ, but I stopped having problems with the skinny/low contrast fonts when I got a Retina 5K iMac.
 


Try holding down the command key and scrolling upwards with the Magic Mouse. This magnifies the screen. Scrolling down returns the screen to its normal size.
Providing you have this option turned on in System Preferences > Accessibility (I had mine set to "Control" not Command... not sure what the default is).
 



Try holding down the command key and scrolling upwards with the Magic Mouse. This magnifies the screen. Scrolling down returns the screen to its normal size.
Great tip, thanks. But it may not work in all applications. It works in Firefox with my aftermarket MacAlly Icemouse2 wired USB mouse w/scroll wheel. However, it doesn't work for me with App Store or Safari. Even so, I'm glad to now have this feature in Firefox.
 



OK, so I went to the page to manage my Apple ID. Of course, the one thing I wanted to do it will not let me do - merge the multiple Apple IDs that I have.
Also, I wanted to add my home phone (land line) as a contact, but again it won't allow me to. It verifies the phone with a text. Of course, my home phone does not accept text messages. There is no option to actually call the number and give me a code over the phone.
Apple, get with it. Not everyone who has a computer (or Apple ID) has a phone that is capable of receiving text messages.
Yet another way that Apple is becoming less attractive to me.
On my wish list for the Apple ID site, which seems rather logical to me, would be for AppleCare information/details be noted in the pop-up pane for each device... to be honest, mainly what I want to see is a confirmation that my 2017 MacBook Pro has the extended keyboard coverage detailed in the notes next to the serial number... three repairs and counting. 8-\
 


Indeed. I also posted this query in Apple Discussions, and the response (interesting avatar) referred me to this same thread, where there are 5 pages of replies. I also noted that the "I have this question too" button said "99"; I clicked it, expecting it to change to 100, but it stayed 99, which must be the maximum it can register. So there are at least 99 users with this problem – and I'd guess many more.
Ah, hah! According to this StackExchange discussion, you must type Option-D at startup (despite Apple's contradictory documentation). Let us know if that works!
Yes, I saw several threads at Ask Different (where I initially intended to post the query also), some of them dating several years back. There may actually be more than one problem cause involved; I just don't have time now to try to figure it all out.

Browsing through the Apple Discussion above, it seems the most likely cause is some bug in the firmware, a.k.a. "Boot ROM" (in System Information), which gets changed when the OS version is upgraded. I'm pretty sure I installed Mojave on this MacBook Pro, sometime after the first time I ran Apple Hardware Test on it, and before I tried to run Apple Hardware Test again and couldn't.

I'm presently working on/with 3 MacBook Pros (MacBooks Pro?), 2013, 2014, and 2015 models (all running 10.12.6 Sierra), trying to get one of them to work reliably so I can then fix the other two and sell them. I checked the Boot ROMs in them:

2013: Boot ROM Version: 253.0.0.0.0​
2014: Boot ROM Version: 153.0.0.0.0​
2015: Boot ROM Version: 192.0.0.0.0​

I then installed the latest Security Update on the 2013, and the Boot ROM changed to 255.0.0.0.0. Note that the 2013 has a later Boot ROM Version than the other two. I don't believe either the 2014 or 2015 has had Mojave (or High Sierra) installed.
It's a very long shot, but if you want to try it, you could wipe the drive (SSD) completely and then try reinstalling the original macOS:
I think I tried that at some point. Anyway, again from the Apple Discussion above, it seems that once Mojave (or maybe High Sierra) has been installed, there's no way to revert the Boot ROM version back to one that will allow loading Apple Hardware Test's EFI.
Thanks. It appears (from Apple's link) that starting with "D" launches Apple Hardware Test from your recovery partition. Option-D does an Internet Recovery to re-generate that partition first.

It would appear that Andrew (and many others) don't have a working Apple Hardware Test in their recovery partition. Sounds like some macOS update since system installation (Mojave?) failed to update AHT along with the rest of the system, resulting in the symptoms reported here.
Well, this got me more curious. I don't remember when the Apple Hardware Test first appeared, but it was a feature at least by the PowerBook "Pismo" (from 2000). Initially it came on disc with a new Mac, each model having its own specific utility version. Most of them are listed on the GitHub page linked at the Apple Discussion.

At some point the Apple Hardware Test was also included in new Macs as an invisible folder at /System/Library/CoreServices/.diagnostics, which would open when the computer was started with the D key depressed. However, if another OS version was installed on the computer, this would be lost, as each hardware model had its own version, and Apple Hardware Test thus was not included in generic OS installers.

Next it became possible to load Apple Hardware Test over the Internet by holding down the D key. But so far as I knew, Apple Hardware Test was never a feature of the Recovery HD which is installed with all OS versions since 10.7 Lion. So I thought I'd take a look to make sure.

I found View & Mount Hidden Partitions in Mac OS X at the excellent OSXDaily site, and experimented. See my comment at the bottom of the page there for preliminaries. Results:

I mounted Recovery HD/com.apple.recovery.boot/BaseSystem.dmg in the Recovery HDs for OS X 10.7 and 10.11, then looked in OS X Base System/System/Library/CoreServices but found no (invisible) .diagnostics folder. The same is true of the macOS 10.12 Sierra Recovery HD.

However, I did find an invisible .diagnostics folder in com.apple.recovery.boot/ in the High Sierra and Mojave Recovery HDs. Presumably this Apple Diagnostics utility (v.1.0.31 in High Sierra, 1.0.34 in Mojave) is generic for all Macs that can run these versions of macOS; there is a "SupportedProducts.plist" with a long list of (identifying?) numbers. The Apple Hardware Tests were specific to Mac models, which is why Apple Hardware Test would come installed on a new Mac, but later erase & installs from generic macOS installers could not install Apple Hardware Test.

So Apple Hardware Test is now included in the Recovery partition, as of High Sierra. However, in the Apple Discussion above, even users running those versions encounter the same problem: "Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi".

As I did on my 2013 MacBook Pro, whether trying to get Apple Hardware Test from the Internet, from a USB stick, or from a .diagnostics folder I put in /System/Library/CoreServices/. The problem is not that Apple Hardware Test is not available, it is that its EFI booting software cannot be loaded, and the most probable cause is the Boot ROM update applied (permanently) by Mojave.

So holding D does (theoretically) get Apple Hardware Test from the Recovery partition, but only in High Sierra and Mojave. Except, apparently, it doesn't, or at least not always. It's not entirely clear to me what the difference is between D and option-D, but neither is a solution to the "Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi" error. (I don't think option-D actually creates or recreates a Recovery partition, which is not a simple task.)

So anyway, it's out of my hands; it's not my computer's problem, it's Apple's. Who indeed don't seem to be in any hurry to fix it. Too busy counting their money, I guess – and ignoring all the other problems that seem to be proliferating increasingly. It's pretty telling that the software utility Apple supplies its customers to help figure out what's wrong with their computers… doesn't work.

I've owned/used five MacBooks Pro; every one has given me grief. I'm kinda worn out.
 


Thanks. It appears (from Apple's link) that starting with "D" launches Apple Hardware Test from your recovery partition. Option-D does an Internet Recovery to re-generate that partition first.

It would appear that Andrew (and many others) don't have a working Apple Hardware Test in their recovery partition. Sounds like some macOS update since system installation (Mojave?) failed to update AHT along with the rest of the system, resulting in the symptoms reported here.

Sloppy, Apple. Really sloppy.
I have a similar issue with a 2013 MacBook Pro. I've erased the SSD and reinstalled the current version of Mojave (10.14.5) but still can't run Apple Diagnostics. When I boot with D held down, it goes immediately to the internet diagnostics then gives the same EFI error Andrew reported above. I know I have a good recovery partition, because I can boot with R held down and get the normal recovery interface without connecting to the internet first.
 


Just to cover all the bases…
It's a very long shot, but if you want to try it, you could wipe the drive (SSD) completely and then try reinstalling the original macOS...
Okay, I tried that (on the 2013 MacBook Pro, whose Boot ROM version was now 155.0.0.0 after installing the latest Sierra Security Update). Started in ⌘-R Recovery, erased the internal drive, shut down. Started again with Shift-Option-⌘-R ("Install the macOS that came with your Mac, or the closest version still available."), and indeed it offered to install Mountain Lion 10.8.2, this model's original OS. Which I did. Boot ROM is now 255.0.0 (how that differs from 255.0.0.0 I don't know). Still cannot load AHT; same error message.
I'm presently working on/with 3 MacBook Pros (MacBooks Pro?), 2013, 2014, and 2015 models (all running 10.12.6 Sierra), trying to get one of them to work reliably so I can then fix the other two and sell them. I checked the Boot ROMs in them:
2013: Boot ROM Version: 253.0.0.0.0
2014: Boot ROM Version: 153.0.0.0.0
2015: Boot ROM Version: 192.0.0.0.0
The 2014 MacBook Pro, I just got, so don't know if it's ever been upgraded from Sierra. I started it in Recovery mode (⌘-R: “Install the latest macOS that was installed on your Mac."), and it offered to install Sierra. So I started it from an external Mojave drive, erased the SSD and installed Mojave from a macOS 10.14.2 Installer I have on the drive. The Boot ROM was still 153.0.0.0.0, unchanged. And AHT loaded without problem.

Then I updated it to the latest Mojave v.10.14.5 via Software Update. Boot ROM still 153.0.0.0.0. Loads AHT okay.

Then I reinstalled Mojave v.10.14.5 via ⌘R Recovery. Boot ROM still 153.0.0.0.0. Loads AHT okay.

So it appears that the "Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'" problem is not caused by installing Mojave, at least in the mid-2014 15" MacBook Pro. Though it does appear the problem appeared on the 2013 MacBook Pro sometime after I installed Mojave on it. Note that the Boot ROM version on the 2013 is 255.0.0.0.0, a considerably higher number than that in the 2014 MacBook Pro, which was not changed from what it had with Sierra by any of the installations I did.

I'm stumped. But I must say that considering the prices Apple charges for its products, forcing large numbers of its users to act as unpaid beta testers – to the tune of thousands of hours of stress and lost work time – is as good a case of "adding insult to injury" as I've seen.
 


I have a similar issue with a 2013 MacBook Pro. I've erased the SSD and reinstalled the current version of Mojave (10.14.5) but still can't run Apple Diagnostics. When I boot with D held down, it goes immediately to the internet diagnostics then gives the same EFI error Andrew reported above. I know I have a good recovery partition, because I can boot with R held down and get the normal recovery interface without connecting to the internet first.
See my post(s) here for further discussion of this mess. Not only has no solution been found, but it seems it is not caused by upgrading to Mojave (didn't try High Sierra; I've wasted enough time on this).

However, if you really want to check out your MacBook Pro, it is still possible to run Apple Service Diagnostic, Apple's in-house testing suite, but only the OS version, not the EFI version. As with AHT, different Mac models need different versions of ASD; as noted in the linked article, they can be found here and there online. In particular, there's a torrent available through a Russian site that seems to include the entire series, ~56GB; but you should be able to grab only the one(s) you want. If your MacBook Pro is an Early 2013, that would be ASD 3S155; for the late 2013, ASD 3S162 (which is also used for the 2014 models, the very last Macs for which the ASD can be obtained; since then it is available only over the Internet, and a password is required; i.e. you have to be an AASP).

My post at Apple Discussions.
And here's the post at Apple Discussions to which I was referred, whose "I have this problem too" box now has 129 clicks. You can add yours. (Eventually I'll update my post there with the information I've posted here.)
 


Just tried the "D" startup and it worked.... My motherboard had a very strange memory failure that took the Apple service manager quite a while to figure out at the local Apple Store. I paid the $500.00 to fix it, and now everything is ok.... I couldn't run the hardware test on the pre-replacement motherboard.
 


If anybody wants to follow the "Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'" issue preventing use of Apple Diagnostics / Apple Hardware Test, see my post at Apple Community:

And the thread at Apple Community whose "I have this problem too" box now has 152 "I have this problem too" clicks:

See my new post on page 6. (I quoted DaveGoldstein but not by name.)

I spent an hour and a half on the phone with an Apple Senior Advisor on Tuesday (May 28) about this issue, trying everything he could think of (he apparently hadn't heard about this before), ending with sending a bunch of information, which he said would be forwarded to some "engineers", who would get back to me in a few days. I provided links to the two Apple Community threads (above) and emphasized that there are over 150 people now waiting for an answer. I'll post whatever I hear in
 


If anybody wants to follow the "Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'" issue preventing use of Apple Diagnostics / Apple Hardware Test, see my post at Apple Community:
And the thread at Apple Community whose "I have this problem too" box now has 152 "I have this problem too" clicks:
See my new post on page 6. (I quoted DaveGoldstein but not by name.)
I spent an hour and a half on the phone with an Apple Senior Advisor on Tuesday (May 28) about this issue, trying everything he could think of (he apparently hadn't heard about this before), ending with sending a bunch of information, which he said would be forwarded to some "engineers", who would get back to me in a few days. I provided links to the two Apple Community threads (above) and emphasized that there are over 150 people now waiting for an answer. I'll post whatever I hear in
I know it's a lousy, expensive fix, but I "think" it may well be a common memory failure. My idea is to get the right AHT software from other sources and run it and see if that flags the error. I have already lost what little confidence I had in Apple's products. My iPhone 7 and Macs are the last. Too many problems with too little pretesting, indifferent service and they still are made in China.
 


I have a 2012 MacBook Pro Retina (10,1), 2.6GHz Intel Core I7 with 16GB of memory.

I tried to install the latest security update for High Sierra (10.13.6), and when it came to restart, that was the end of the story. I came back to the computer after some time with a black screen (the cursor was still visible, and moved in response to the mouse). I thought perhaps it couldn't restart, but after a forced shutdown and startup, I discovered that the computer simply won't shut down.

I tried installing the downloaded security update, and the combo update; I tried resetting the NVRAM and the SMC; and I booted up in Safe Mode. The computer will always start up after I have shut it down by holding the on/off key, but it absolutely will not shut down or restart – it always hangs at a dark screen with a responsive cursor.

I tried the Apple Diagnostics Test and received the "InitializationFailed: Unable to run diagnostics. DEC500" response. When I typed "R" to restart the computer as advised, I received the following prompt:
Setting shutdown/restart after 5 seconds
Could not determine if product is Gibraltar based or not.
HelloSMC(TRUE) status = Not Found
Setting shutdown/restart after 5 seconds failed. Status was Not Found
So I held down the on/off button to shut down, and restarted. Then I got the spinning globe with "Starting Internet Recovery. This may take a while." This, of course, was followed by
Error: 0x8000000000000003, Cannot Load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'
Status: 0x00000003
So I forced shutdown and started up again with the Option key, chose my startup disk, and everything booted up normally.

I suspect I won't be able to install Mojave until this is somehow fixed. Since I am on the cusp of getting a new Mac Mini, and since this laptop is long out of warranty (but a stalwart companion it has been!), I may just forget about it until a fix is found.
 


Just tried the "D" startup and it worked.... My motherboard had a very strange memory failure that took the Apple service manager quite a while to figure out at the local Apple Store. I paid the $500.00 to fix it, and now everything is ok.... I couldn't run the hardware test on the pre-replacement motherboard.
What Boot ROM does your Mac have? See About This Mac > System Report > Hardware Overview > Boot ROM version. And do you happen to know what Boot ROM it had before the logic board was replaced? What macOS version were, and are, you running on it?

I suspect the solution to the "Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'" issue in your case might have resulted (inadvertently) from replacing a logic board with another whose Boot ROM has not been modified by installation of High Sierra or Mojave – which seems to be the most likely explanation for this problem (although, as noted in my post at Apple Discussions, when I experimented by installing Mojave on a 2014 MacBook Pro, it did not change the Boot ROM, and it still loaded AHT properly, so the mystery persists).
I know it's a lousy, expensive fix, but I "think" it may well be a common memory failure. My idea is to get the right AHT software from other sources and run it and see if that flags the error.
Well, yes, my 2013 MacBook Pro which can't load AHT does also have some memory problems. However, it had the same memory errors back when it could load both both AHT and ASD (Apple Service Diagnostic) EFI version. So that's not what changed.

One thing that did change was that I installed both High Sierra and Mojave between the last time I ran AHT on it, and the time it couldn't load its EFI driver. And I note its Boot ROM version is now in the 200's (I don't know what it was previously), while the Boot ROM versions of the 2014 and 2015 MacBook Pros I have (which both load and run Apple Diagnostics, the current version of AHT) are both in the 100's (including the 2014 MacBook Pro on which I installed Mojave, which didn't change its Boot ROM). Again, see my posts at Apple Discussions here and here for more detail and follow-up.

Don't know what you mean by "the right AHT software". There's only one version of AHT (or ASD) that will run on a particular Mac model, and I know I have the right ones, which ran fine as late as last December (And the OS version of ASD will still run).
 


I have a 2012 MacBook Pro Retina (10,1), 2.6GHz Intel Core I7 with 16GB of memory. I tried to install the latest security update for High Sierra (10.13.6)…. This, of course, was followed by… Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'. …
I suspect I won't be able to install Mojave until this is somehow fixed.
Since you're running High Sierra (which was installed/upgraded on a Mac that didn't come with it originally), this seems like another case supporting the hypothesis that the Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi' error results from said upgrade.

You might take a look at the Apple Discussions thread about it (Unable to launch Apple Diagnostics), in particular my two posts here and here. And click on "I have this problem too" while you're there.

Although your MacBook Pro is "long out of warranty", it seems these days that Apple is willing to talk to folks with older Mac problems – at least they've accommodated me. You might give them a call about your inability to run AHT, help get their attention to the problem. Ask to talk to a Senior Advisor, so as not to waste time with the first low-level person who answers the phone. You might even mention my Case #20000052150237, which has been escalated to the "engineers," who, we hope, will find a solution.
 


I have a 2012 MacBook Pro Retina (10,1), 2.6GHz Intel Core I7 with 16GB of memory. I tried to install the latest security update for High Sierra (10.13.6), and when it came to restart, that was the end of the story.
This happened to me, also on essentially the same machine, about a month ago. Eventually the machine did reboot (but without the security update and without any communication about what it was doing); unfortunately I didn't take notes. But I resigned myself to being in this iteration of High Sierra until the computer dies, with a future of dismissing the "software updates" notification on a daily basis. Good grief, that notification is intrusive and intensely annoying.
 


I recently obtained an iPhone 7 (like new) that needed a new battery. I made an appointment at the local Apple store and brought it in. I showed the "Genius" that the phone was in perfect condition and I wanted it back that way. He said not to worry.

After only a 45 minute wait, the phone was ready. They brought it out and nonchalantly (like this happens everyday) said they ripped the display cable and had to replace the display. At first glance it looked fine, so I said ok. They put a new screen protector on it for free and I was on my way.

I noticed later that evening that the display was somewhat yellow. I checked the settings to make sure night shift was off, which it was. I then compared it to a couple of other iPhones and confirmed my observation.

I contacted Apple Customer Service and was told they would provide a "new" replacement device. Before I agreed to this, I did some research and found that their replacements have a different model number prefix (N instead of M).
  • "F" = Refurbished
  • "M" = Retail (new)
  • "N" = Replacement
  • "P" = Personalized (engraved)
Does anyone know if these replacements are really brand new (from the factory)? If so, why the different model number? Is there any affect on resale value?
 


Following up on my previous post, I made the trek to my local Apple store to replace my iPhone. After being promised by Customer Service that they would replace it, the store manager said it was policy to "try" another display replacement. I refused and told them I was there to replace the phone, which they finally agreed to do. Total time: 2 hours. Ugh.

When I got home I took a close look at the phone and noticed that not only was there a pronounced off-angle color shift (compared to similar iPhones), but there was a small scrape between the iPhone body and the rubber seal on the display. (Easy to see with a black iPhone.) In addition there were a few cycles on the battery, which I was told was brand new. Clearly, this phone had been repaired at some point, and it was not what Apple claims it to be (i.e. "like new").
 


Try Batteries and Bulbs+ or another such store. It will cost you out of pocket, but they will replace your battery without pushback. (Just a happy customer, no other relationship.)
I’m still in a bit of shock after an Apple Store experience this past weekend....
Update: After the Apple Store fiasco, a runaround from my local Simply Mac store (Fort Collins, Co. - now closed) about battery unavailability, Best Buy wanting the phone overnight, and a precipitously failing battery, I summoned the courage to change the battery myself.

On Amazon I purchased a 4.5 star battery replacement kit with an "A" fakespot.com rating for $19 delivered, watched a couple YouTube videos and crossed my fingers. About 40 minutes later, I had the new battery installed with increased capacity (new battery is 2200mAh versus 1810mAh) and a fully functioning iPhone 6. Why didn't I do this months ago?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I didn't see this one coming. I wonder how it will play out?
Apple P.R. said:
Apple partners with Best Buy for expanded repair service
Apple today announced the completion of a major expansion of its Apple authorized service network. With nearly 1,000 Best Buy stores across the US now providing [Apple-authorized repair services].
The Verge said:
All Best Buy stores can now repair your Apple devices
... This gives consumers an important alternative to visiting their nearest Apple store — if there even is one — for service on an iPhone or Mac. Repairs are done with genuine Apple parts and are fully backed by the company, just as if Apple had done the work itself.

Best Buy has offered Apple repairs at many locations for some time now, but the completed expansion brings that number up to nearly 1,000 stores.
 


I didn't see this one coming. I wonder how it will play out?
Here in my small(ish) college town we already have two Apple-authorized service providers, which is good as the nearest Apple Store is an hour away. I don't think adding Best Buy as a third option will have much of an impact but I could be wrong.
 


Here in my small(ish) college town we already have two Apple-authorized service providers, which is good as the nearest Apple Store is an hour away. I don't think adding Best Buy as a third option will have much of an impact but I could be wrong.
Here in my large(ish) college town, the Apple department at the local Best Buy is much more knowledgable and customer-focused than the undergrads who work at the Apple Store near campus, so I'm on board with this!
 


After the Apple Store fiasco, a runaround from my local Simply Mac store (Fort Collins, Co. - now closed) about battery unavailability, Best Buy wanting the phone overnight, and a precipitously failing battery, I summoned the courage to change the battery myself.
Here in my large(ish) college town, the Apple department at the local Best Buy is much more knowledgable and customer-focused than the undergrads who work at the Apple Store near campus, so I'm on board with this!
Being familiar with Simply Mac, referenced by Jon McIntosh in the "college-ish" town we apparently share, it couldn't get any worse... :-{
 


I didn't see this one coming. I wonder how it will play out?
There are newer stories than this one from 2013, which I chose because the website is credible:
Cult of Mac said:
Apple Created These Neat Tools To Make The iPhone More Repairable Than Ever
Apple likes to keep its secrets close to the chest, but Cult of Mac has grabbed an exclusive look at some behind the scenes video of Apple iPhone 5s repair processes . . . as well as the crazy little repair tools Apple uses to ensure quality repairs.
For the Geek Squad to do the work, Best Buy stores would need those tools, training, and service guides. One way it could play out, notwithstanding NDAs: leaks.
 



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