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A reality check, please: For years, my music library worked with Sonos on a Mac Mini server in “/Users/Shared/Music.” Just before Thanksgiving, Sonos released a 9.2 update to their controller software, and our whole 4-room Sonos system went down. None of the Sonos devices could access my music library anymore.
...
Although the system had been working for months with no change other than the Sonos update, Sonos support blamed my network. Three printers, an Apple TV, plus at least a Mac, iPad, and iPhone for all three current residents are networking fine, but it was my network? Now, Sonos is blaming the need for my above workaround on Apple. Is that at all likely?
Could be.

But if you're sorta serious about your music, you might want to consider sidestepping Sonos. I use Roon to manage all my music, on a networked old Mac Mini. Roon can see and send music to any Sonos device, so you're not dependent on Sonos as a music server. Your investment in Sonos 'end points' continues. You can control Roon from iPad, iPhone (etc., etc.) or from almost any computer, as long as they're all on the same network.

You can also start to edge away from Sonos. I've replaced a Sonos ZonePlayer-plus-NAD D3020, which were driving a pair of speakers in the living room (the main music system is elsewhere), with a BluOS PowerNode (the old version, because it suddenly became cheap.) This gave me fewer wires and boxes than the Sonos solution. All (except speakers) now hides behind a curtain.

Roon happily drives BluOS thingies too.

Upsides: Roon plays anything digitised, include netradio, Tidal, DSD, high resolution music etc., etc., etc. And MQA. I taught my Oppo player to capture the DSD data from my SACDs - Roon plays them. Sonos only does 16 bit 44-48KHz; I like more, and Roon does that. As do the various BluOS products.

Downsides: Roon can't do the synchronised same music in every room thing that Sonos can do - but I never used that anyway. And Roon costs serious money - $500 for a lifetime license. I'm happy to have paid.
 


Stick the music on a spare Mac, hook it up to the network, and play it (using iTunes or Roon or BluOS or whatever), replacing the Aurender. If all works well, the Aurender is the problem. If it doesn't, now you've got a computer that's misbehaving, and there's probably a bunch of software that can help you find out what's going on. (Personally, I run Roon on an old Mac Mini; I'm not at all convinced that blingy expensive computers pretending to be hifi by being called music servers help a great deal, except in making money disappear quickly. But then I don't use expensive interconnects nor unobtainium ethernet cable...)
OK, thanks for the input/advice. To follow up: perhaps someone could advise on which system logs to peruse to help sort out what may be happening re: network/server drops (as previously mentioned, a bit over my head). And on the personal note side of things, yes, in hindsight, perhaps a bit blingly acquisition. It seemed to optimize the capacity and quality playback needs for my collection. I probably should have outfitted an old Mac with a couple external drives attached. I do feel a bit conflicted, but not more than with my 2017 MacBook Pro purchase that needs to stay virtually unused in a drawer, due to its overly fragile display and useless keypad.
 


OK, thanks for the input/advice. To follow up: perhaps someone could advise on which system logs to peruse to help sort out what may be happening re: network/server drops (as previously mentioned, a bit over my head). And on the personal note side of things, yes, in hindsight, perhaps a bit blingly acquisition. It seemed to optimize the capacity and quality playback needs for my collection. I probably should have outfitted an old Mac with a couple external drives attached. I do feel a bit conflicted, but not more than with my 2017 MacBook Pro purchase that needs to stay virtually unused in a drawer, due to its overly fragile display and useless keypad.
Eh, don't feel bad. The Aurender's a good bit of kit. I'm a cheapskate, and have carefully avoided trying out a purpose-built server. In case it's better :-)

The Mac Mini with Roon works fine enough. I'd rather spend the blingly bucks on improving the turntable - I have a new arm and a new bearing in mind, but they've been in mind for getting on for a couple of years. Meanwhile, have to shell out to upgrade the system in the holiday home in France. It's got a Mac Mini with Roon, too, but it's getting an upgraded replay chain next time we're over (we moved secondary houses, and now have much more room, so better speakers, and to drive them...)
 


. . . Video is the same way, with motion artifacts, moire patterns, stutter and skipped frames not just accepted, but cheered because it's digital.
Likewise, satellite radio apparently deems audio quality as irrelevant—or perhaps impossible with the low bandwidth available to streaming music from space. I frequently remark (to anyone who will listen) that Sirius/XM's sound quality is like listening to music through a tin can telephone. It's a triumph of marketing for "pure digital" over what your ears actually hear.
 


Hopefully my experiences might help someone else.

I've been testing old audio recordings that I made on recordable CDs. Some of them were made more than 10 years ago. Some play normally in a CD player. Some play all tracks but skip and jump ahead on every track. Some play fine on most tracks, but not at all on either the first couple of tracks, or the last track or two. Sometimes there is a type of fluttering distortion on some tracks which follows the speed of the music. On some discs a track will start out and play normally and then half way through, just stops dead.

I discovered that if I just put a bad disc into the computer, and don't allow iTunes to try and play it, I can just copy all of the audio files from it into a folder that I can use to burn a new CDr that plays perfectly. In other words, the original old disc won't play properly by itself, but the audio files seem fine, as well as all of the track information such as track sequencing and delay time between tracks. I've tried this on several "bad" CDs, and so far, it has worked fine.

One reason that I don't allow iTunes to try and play the disc (if I know that it is bad) is that it sometimes becomes very difficult to eject a bad disc from the computer. I've tried this on computers from my G5 to an iMac on Snow Leopard, and in High Sierra on my Retina 5k. Sometimes the keyboard eject button works, and sometimes not. Sometimes Disk Utility doesn't seem to recognize that there is a disc in the drive, and so it can't be ejected that way. Sometimes, I can hear that the CD eject motor is cycling on and off, over and over again but never ejects.

Sometimes Disk Utility won't even open, and the wheel keeps spinning and spinning for several minutes, until I've finally given up and had to force quit the program. Sometimes the method of holding the mouse button down while restarting will cause the disc to eject, but other times that method causes my Snow Leopard iMac to just stop at the blue screen in the start-up sequence, and then the computer never fully starts up. I've had to use the power button to shut the computer down and restart.
 


... One reason that I don't allow iTunes to try and play the disc (if I know that it is bad) is that it sometimes becomes very difficult to eject a bad disc from the computer. I've tried this on computers from my G5 to an iMac on Snow Leopard, and in High Sierra on my Retina 5k. Sometimes the keyboard eject button works, and sometimes not. Sometimes Disk Utility doesn't seem to recognize that there is a disc in the drive, and so it can't be ejected that way. Sometimes, I can hear that the CD eject motor is cycling on and off, over and over again but never ejects.

Sometimes Disk Utility won't even open, and the wheel keeps spinning and spinning for several minutes, until I've finally given up and had to force quit the program. Sometimes the method of holding the mouse button down while restarting will cause the disc to eject, but other times that method causes my Snow Leopard iMac to just stop at the blue screen in the start-up sequence, and then the computer never fully starts up. I've had to use the power button to shut the computer down and restart.
I had a USB to SATA interface to a full-size DVD-RAM/DVD-R drive with eject button for just such media. It will read all but newest DVD-R DL and BluRay (I have separate BluRay drive for that...). I also have a FireWire 400 DVD-RAM drive for when someone needs to access one (recovery... you never know).

Warning: I stored CD-Rs in a sleeved jacket for years. When I found it, while clearing up "Apple junk... or treasure", not one was readable. The sleeves transferred a pattern on every disc. Sigh....
 


Warning: I stored CD-Rs in a sleeved jacket for years. When I found it, while clearing up "Apple junk... or treasure", not one was readable. The sleeves transferred a pattern on every disc. Sigh....
I used CD sleeves manufactured by Univenture that are poly sleeves, which are lined with a soft, fabric-like liner. I've not only used these to replace every single jewel box for my music collection but also for data disc storage, and I've been quite fortunate as far as data longevity goes. I've also gravitated to Taiyo Yuden CD media, as many of my broadcast colleagues have had excellent luck with them, even though I have twenty-year-old media from CompUSA that can still be read.
 


The complexities of CD-Rs and audio CDs are, indeed, many.
FYI, Taiyo Yuden CD-Rs were really the best (by error rate analysis), but they were subsequently sold to JVC, then to CMC. The error rates are now much higher, but they are still decent for error rate and, hopefully, longevity.
 


Most audio interfaces have some kind of hardware monitoring mode, which is non-latent, but in this mode, the signal you hear at the output does not pass through your recording software, so you won't hear plugins or previously-recorded tracks play back.
Yes, this is the case with the following interfaces I have used: Shure X2U, Edirol FA66, AT2020 USB+ mic. While recording, you can hear what you are playing/singing and what the DAW software is playing but without any effects, like reverb. The above devices let you adjust with a dial the balance of what you hear while recording.
 


I wonder if anyone can tell me whether an alternative exists for the very pricey iZotope RX-7 Advanced software.

I am interested in its "Dialogue Isolate" module, which can apparently isolate a conversation from distracting background noise. This feature seems only to be available on the $1.2K high-end tool set.

I have to process about seven hours of a talk with simultaneous translation, hoping to reduce forced air heating noise in the background.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... I have to process about seven hours of a talk with simultaneous translation, hoping to reduce forced air heating noise in the background.
Amadeus (even the Lite version) includes noise reduction processing. You can sample some noise and then use that sample to suppress noise in selected audio. Settings let you choose Alogorithm (long vs. short FFT), noise type (Peaked or Smooth) and sensitivity (%). This is all within an Effects > Denoising menu, where there's an additional "suppress white noise" command.

I haven't tried this, but it might be worth a look:

 


I have to process about seven hours of a talk with simultaneous translation, hoping to reduce forced air heating noise in the background.
I've done this with Audacity. Similar to the procedure Ric described, you sample a section of your audio that is only noise (e.g. when nobody is talking) and then apply the noise reduction algorithm to your entire clip.

Depending on the nature of the noise and how you tweak the parameters, the results can be very good. I've used it extensively to remove tape/radio hiss when digitizing music from cassette.

See also Noise Reduction - Audacity Manual.
 


I've done this with Audacity. Similar to the procedure Ric described, you sample a section of your audio that is only noise (e.g. when nobody is talking) and then apply the noise reduction algorithm to your entire clip.
I've used Audacity, too, and in addition to being cross-platform, it's free.

An alternative I'm aware of because I listen to Allision Sheridan's Nosillacast Podcast is:
Auphonic said:
Auphonic
Automatic audio post production web service for podcasts, broadcasters, radio shows, movies, screencasts and more
Allison, who is very particular about the quality of audio she produces, writes about moving from Levelator and reviews Auphhonic here, with, er, one of my audio submissions I recorded in Audacity as an example of its abilities.
Podfeet Podcasts said:
Making Happy Audio
George from Tulsa’s recording had a rumble underneath his audio that wasn’t bad but when I heard it during the live show as I assembled the recordings in GarageBand, I thought I’d give Auphonic a test real time. I dropped his original wav file into Auphonic, clicked the box to denoise/dehum and left it set to “auto” and in just a few seconds I had a beautifully clean recording. I’ve tried to use denoise filters before and the recording ALWAYS sound weird afterwards, but not with Auphonic, it was perfect!
 



That's very interesting, but it appears to be a service, rather than an app, such that you have to send your recordings to the company for processing?
There are local, desktop, applications here:
I have to process about seven hours of a talk with simultaneous translation, hoping to reduce forced air heating noise in the background.
Toby could (if his recording isn't confidential) test the online service. If this is a one-off, and online does the job, it might be a more economical choice than buying applications.
 



I wonder if anyone can tell me whether an alternative exists for the very pricey iZotope RX-7 Advanced software. I am interested in its "Dialogue Isolate" module, which can apparently isolate a conversation from distracting background noise. This feature seems only to be available on the $1.2K high-end tool set. I have to process about seven hours of a talk with simultaneous translation, hoping to reduce forced air heating noise in the background.
RX is amazing software. It doesn't sound to me like you need the specific capabilities of the high-end "Advanced" version, however.

The noise you describe is presumably fairly constant and steady, which is generally an easy thing to reduce (often to the point of inaudibility). RX Advanced should not be necessary for this application; even the entry-level RX Elements (currently on sale for $29) should do the trick. Its "Repair Assistant" provides specifically for dialog cleanup.
 


I’ve used [Brian Davies's] audio restoration suite (DeNoise, DeNoiseLF, and ClickRepair) with great success on old reel-to-reel, tape cassette, and vinyl recordings in the past. See
for info and downloads.
I've also found the Brian Davies restoration suite tools more than adequate for the specific tasks they target. Additional software is needed for levelling and other sweetening.
 


Many thanks to those generous folks who took the time to respond.

As Dan Phillips points out, it is indeed not certain that I need the big gun, RX-7 Advanced. The recording is, however, a challenge, with the mikes placed far from the people speaking and the noise varying in level and especially frequency.

I am very impressed with Amadeus. I bought a licence some years ago. Last month I purchased a licence for RX-7 Elements, to see if that would do it. Alas, the former produces unacceptable distortion if the level of noise reduction is set high enough to make a noticeable difference, while the RX-7 Elements denoising tool finds no noise to dispose of! I do actually have the utilities by Brian Davies, as well, but have not felt optimistic enough to try them, given the other failures.

If I could just manage to lift the vocals into the foreground somewhat, I would be delighted. Auphonic looks well worth a try. I suppose, after that, my final option might be to look for a contractor who uses RX-7 Advanced or its equal, and can guarantee success for a fee.
 


I wonder if anyone can tell me whether an alternative exists for the very pricey iZotope RX-7 Advanced software. I am interested in its "Dialogue Isolate" module, which can apparently isolate a conversation from distracting background noise. This feature seems only to be available on the $1.2K high-end tool set. I have to process about seven hours of a talk with simultaneous translation, hoping to reduce forced air heating noise in the background.
I am an audio engineer and do a fair amount of audio post production, which includes a lot of dialogue cleanup. There are options available, but I will say upfront that Izotope RX is really at the top of the heap in terms of power, it does what it does so very well, which is why it costs what it costs.

That said, you could probably get by with a noise-reduction plugin. Waves makes a couple, X-Noise and Z-Noise being the two I would look at (they offer free, fully functional trials). I am also a huge fan of McDSP and their NR800 noise reduction plugin. I use it with RX all the time. Again, McDSP offers a fully functional trial. For both trials you will need an audio editor [app] that supports AU, VST or AAX plugins.

Hope that helps!
 


You can also try test-driving Adobe Audition CC to see if that does what you need to do. From my last go-around I believe they offer a 7-day fully functional demo period before you're required to sign up.

At $21/month [for Audition CC], I found it a better value to jump on the discounted Izotope RX 7 Elements and then upgrade to RX Standard when the upgrade was offered on sale.
 


... Last month I purchased a licence for RX-7 Elements, to see if that would do it. Alas, the former produces unacceptable distortion if the level of noise reduction is set high enough to make a noticeable difference, while the RX-7 Elements denoising tool finds no noise to dispose of! ...
I think you will find RX 7 Elements to be quite coarse in how it processes. It is good for small touch-ups, but Izotope puts all the good modules in the Advanced version.

I just remembered another option: Brusfri. It's being used by some of the Hollywood post houses. I don't have any experience with it, but some people I trust do say it is a worthy tool for the toolbox.

From what you describe, the best tool will probably be Dialogue Isolate in RX Advanced. But you may find acceptable results with other options.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This might be a fun project:
Balena said:
Turn your old speakers or Hi-Fi into Bluetooth receivers with a Raspberry Pi and this step-by-step guide
A lot of people have older and probably still great, high-quality audio systems that no longer get used, simply because they’re inconvenient. We’ve decided to address that with this very simple project we're calling balenaSound. We will show you how to build your own Bluetooth audio receiver which connects to the auxiliary(AUX) input of any audio device to give it modern streaming functionality. You’ll then be able to stream music to your audio setup from your phone, tablet, or laptop.

All you need is a Raspberry Pi and a little bit of time. We’ve done all the hard work by configuring Bluetooth and setting everything up in a repeatable format to get you up and running with minimal effort. It’s the perfect introduction if you’ve never tried a project like this before.

We’re going to guide you through setting up the Raspberry Pi, deploying the balenaSound project code onto it and then show you how to connect your audio system and get started with streaming. Let’s get to it!
 


There are a couple of audio projects involving the use of a Raspberry Pi which have piqued my interest. Had considered playing around with one for a DAC project using add-ons from Allo or HiFiBerry. When I added up the costs and possible benefits I realized other products, such as the Schitt Modi 3, accomplished the same in a much more polished design.
John Darko said:
As I dug deeper into what I already had, and what and where I would most benefit in improving my music listening, away from the living room, I got to considering portable DACs such as the Cambridge Audio DacMagic XS and the AudioQuest DragonFly. These can be used easily with laptops, cellphones, or digital music players.
I'm guessing my Raspberry Pi project will end up being to set up a Pi-Hole for the entire house.
 


There are a couple of audio projects involving the use of a Raspberry Pi which have piqued my interest. Had considered playing around with one for a DAC project using add-ons from Allo or HiFiBerry. When I added up the costs and possible benefits I realized other products, such as the Schitt Modi 3, accomplished the same in a much more polished design.
As I dug deeper into what I already had, and what and where I would most benefit in improving my music listening, away from the living room, I got to considering portable DACs such as the Cambridge Audio DacMagic XS and the AudioQuest DragonFly. These can be used easily with laptops, cellphones, or digital music players.
I'm guessing my Raspberry Pi project will end up being to set up a Pi-Hole for the entire house.
There are several good portable DACs that work well with headphones. I like my AudioQuest Dragonfly, but it doesn’t help me with getting music to an older stereo system. For that, I got this NuForce WiFi gizmo (Air DAC) a few years ago:
Digital Trends said:
As far as I know, it’s no longer made, although AudioEngine and NAD, among others, have units that work over WiFi. The NuForce unit works well, although it has a few “gotchas”, such as the little USB transmitting piece being small enough that it would be painful to find if one were to misplace it.
 


Between 2004 and 2006 I ripped all my CDs into mostly MP3 format at VBR, because at the time, that was the disk space available and what the laptops would let me play. And my demands were low.

Within the last 13 years, this changed. I can no longer tolerate the low quality where the high notes are cut off, the bass is lousy and the dynamic range leaves much to be desired.

So, this year, I dug up my CDs and re-ripped them in Apple Lossless format - this made a huge difference.

Unfortunately, I left the foam pads that cushion the CDs inside some of the multiple-CD cases, which over the years baked themselves into the tops of some CDs. Some, I was able to rescue by carefully washing away the foam without removing the silver reflective coating, but that didn't work for all. So I suggest, if you have a CD collection that you value and haven't looked at in a while, go and remove those foam pieces before it's too late (just a side note).

I then dug up my 2006 iPod 5.5th-generation, Enhanced Video iPod, 80GB hard drive, and decided to give it new life. Ordered a new battery and an iFlash card with four microSD card slots and populated it with four 128GB cards. After connecting it to iTunes, it said it needs to be be formatted, which worked fine. So now I had an almost as new iPod with 512 GB where all my currently imported music (only 80 GB of Lossless media, 3500 songs) could be listened to.

Being married, my wife confiscated that iPod immediately, leaving me dry... so I went to eBay and got a few with broken drives, dirt cheap (like $10 - $15), but in otherwise acceptable cosmetic condition and performed the same conversion. The last one of the 5th/5.5th Generation now has 1TB of microSD (I used Samsung EVO 256GB cards) and is working great.

I also tested a 7th Gen (the aluminum classic) with a broken drive, but the same iFlash card only addresses a maximum 128 GB, no matter what size microSD cards I add or how many. I should get the regular SD card and the iFlash board for just a single SD card and see if that makes a difference. I have heard that others managed to do that. But since the sound quality of the 6th and 7th get iPods is not as great as the 5th get, I have no big incentive to do this.

As for listening using a headset: I have used many. Bought a Bose QC2 and a QC3 - both put too much pressure on my head. Went to Apple and tested their Beats - same issue. In-ear sets never worked for me, I believe my ear canal is too small. I have a Sennheiser HD 414 (1968 model!) with nice on-ear cushions, which I can wear for hours on end without issues. But there's better sound quality from my Sennheiser PX-100 IIi. Unfortunately it comes with small cushions that become uncomfortable after a while - but the cushions from the HD 414 fit and I don't feel that I'm wearing them at all.

As for listening from a stereo system: When I work, I'm on conference calls a lot – for those, I have yet another Sennheiser, this one is a professional SC 165. It's USB but has a 3.5mm connector, too. However, it's not good for listening to music. So I decided to get a little amp (Harmon Kardon AVR 145) from eBay for $50 (I could have gotten a newer model, brand new for $900 but why?). To that, I connected a set of Polk speakers that I already had but hadn't used in the past 5 years.

The music sits all on my Mac Pro (iTunes) and it would be simple to just connect the line-out cable to the Harmon Kardon amp, but then I would get all this other noise (Skype, and soft phone ringing, other alerts and so on) via the speakers - something to be avoided. So instead, I had my son dig up an old Apple Airport Express, which has an audio-out port. That connects fine to the Harmon Kardon, and the sound is great - good enough for listening through the speakers and to drive everybody else in the house mad.

So much for my audiophile story... it works for me, but there might be other components that play some essential roles in quality for others.

Thanks for reading
 


... iPod 5.5th-generation, Enhanced Video iPod ... Ordered a new battery and an iFlash card with four microSD card slots and populated it with four 128GB cards. ... So now I had an almost as new iPod with 512 GB where all my currently imported music (only 80 GB of Lossless media, 3500 songs) could be listened to.
... I also tested a 7th Gen (the aluminum classic) with a broken drive, but the same iFlash card only addresses a maximum 128 GB, no matter what size microSD cards I add or how many.
Sounds like that unit is actually a 6th gen (or "6.5th gen" model). According to the iFlash compatibility page, the 6th-gen models only support 28-bit LBA addressing, so they top out at 128 GB, regardless of how much storage you install. Earlier and later models (5th and 7th gen) use 48-bit LBA addressing and should be able to support as much storage as you install.

There are also limits to the number of tracks, based on the size of the database. The actual limit, should you hit it, will depend on the amount of metadata (including album art) per track. I suspect you can increase this limit by not syncing album art.

The page also says that you can avoid both of these limits if you replace the iPod's OS with third-party system software – they mention Rockbox, but go on to say that they do not support doing so, and third-party software can't play DRM-protected tracks. I personally wouldn't bother, but you might feel otherwise, especially if you need the storage and don't have any DRM-protected tracks to worry about.
 


I, too, have upgraded multiple 5th-gen iPods with iFlash or other adapters. The iFlash quad is likely the best choice at this point - low power, and it combines up to 4 SDXC cards into 1 volume for the iPod to see.

Alternative mSATA adapters may draw more power (shortening battery life) and run the risk of requiring a reset / disassembly depending on the mSATA stick, if you run out of power. Thus, even if there are cheaper options out there than the iFlash stuff, I'd go with the iFlash quad.

The iFlash site has extensive documentation regarding the capabilities of the various iPods over the years. I have a preference for 5th gen due to the large battery and the relative ease with which they can be opened without damage. Later iPods can be really difficult to "pop" without damage. For folk with large audio collections, the trick is to find models with the larger on-board RAM to allow the iPod to handle large file indexes.

While the USB interface is incredibly slow, these old iPods have the advantage of a 30-pin connector that is still pretty much universally supported. Large music collections may literally take days to transfer. But, such iPods are also really cost effective compared to upgrading to a 1/2TB iPhone, for example.
 


Sounds like that unit is actually a 6th gen (or "6.5th gen" model). According to the iFlash compatibility page, the 6th-gen models only support 28-bit LBA addressing, so they top out at 128 GB, regardless of how much storage you install. Earlier and later models (5th and 7th gen) use 48-bit LBA addressing and should be able to support as much storage as you install.
This morning, I went to find out how to distinguish between the 6th and 7th gen iPod Classics and found that model numbers starting with "MB" are 6th and model numbers starting with "MC" are 7th gen iPods. Unfortunately the two I bought on eBay as 7th gen are actually 6th gen. After contacting the sellers, one has agreed to refund half the purchase price, which is great; the other hasn't responded yet.

However, seeing how complicated it is to open the metal iPods, I'm not going to look for a 7th gen unit. I think if I want to upgrade something, I'll do another 5.5th gen. I also want to see if they can take up to 2 TB, once the price for the 512GB microSD cards becomes affordable (next year, after I upgrade my Mid-2015 2.8GHz MacBook Pro to a 2TB Aurora Pro X2, one expense at a time).

As for iPods after Gen 7 classic, I believe they all have the drive (flash memory) soldered to the motherboard and can't be upgraded by some amateur like me (soldering iron in hand - I don't do that any more. Upgrading iPhones is in the same league, the last thing I managed was to replace the screen and battery on my iPhone 6s, but that's about the extent of it.)
 


Another endorser of the 5th gen iPod video upgraded with iFlash memory and a new battery. I tried the very cheap "Micro SATA Cables" CF card adapter, but like others, could not get it to work. The iFlash card worked, even though much more expensive.

With a hardshell case (undoubtably NLA), I can feel the wheel touch area without looking, perfect for driving with my old car and its AUX input. No way can I use a touchscreen phone while driving (and it's illegal here).
 


As for iPods after Gen 7 classic, I believe they all have the drive (flash memory) soldered to the motherboard and can't be upgraded by some amateur like me (soldering iron in hand - I don't do that any more.
All of the "Classic" iPods, including the 7th gen, have hard drives in them. As such, the drive can be replaced with a new hard drive (assuming you can find a 1.8" drive with the correct connector) or with a flash memory upgrade board like the iFlash. (iFlash only supports 5th gen and later iPods. I don't know if there are products that support older models.)

The only other model to use a hard drive was the "Mini", which uses a microdrive. These can accept an upgrade by replacing the microdrive with a Compact Flash card - sizes up to 128 GB have been known to work. You can also get SD-to-CF adapters which might save you some money (CF cards tend to cost a lot more than equivalent capacity SD cards).

Other iPod models (Shuffle, Nano and Touch) all have flash memory soldered to the board and can't be upgraded without specialized equipment and expertise.
 


Well, I bit the bullet and upgraded to Catalina. Are there any applications that work under Catalina that can clean up ticks and pops from records? I'm looking at SoundSoap 5 but don't know if it would work under Catalina. I notice there are two versions, one in the Mac App Store and the other from the developer. Thank you.
 



Well, I bit the bullet and upgraded to Catalina. Are there any applications that work under Catalina that can clean up ticks and pops from records? I'm looking at SoundSoap 5 but don't know if it would work under Catalina. I notice there are two versions, one in the Mac App Store and the other from the developer. Thank you.
You might look into VinylStudio from http://www.alpinesoft.co.uk
and on the App Store. It has a lot of tools for cleaning up noisy recordings. I don't recall whether it has a free trial. I haven't used it for several years, but it did a good job for me.
 


Amadeus Pro has been very helpful to me. I haven't spent much time yet with the latest version, so maybe it's far more automatic to filter out pops and clicks than it used to be, but you can make them absolutely inaudible with little work.
 


I'm now between VinylStudio Pro and Amadeus Pro. ClickRepair requires Java and trying to download the latest Java, which requires someone working for a company to create an account. I'm not going to jump through hoops for that.

VinylStudio Pro and Amadeus Pro have their pros and cons. Will be making a decision tomorrow. Todd, David, and Steve, thank you for your inputs.
 


I'm now between VinylStudio Pro and Amadeus Pro. ClickRepair requires Java and trying to download the latest Java, which requires someone working for a company to create an account. I'm not going to jump through hoops for that.
Java for macOS doesn't require an account:
  1. Go to https://www.java.com/en/
  2. Click the big "Java Download" button
  3. Click the big "Agree and Start Free Download" button
 


I'm now between VinylStudio Pro and Amadeus Pro. ClickRepair requires Java and trying to download the latest Java, which requires someone working for a company to create an account. I'm not going to jump through hoops for that.
VinylStudio Pro and Amadeus Pro have their pros and cons. Will be making a decision tomorrow. Todd, David, and Steve, thank you for your inputs.
I've been using VinylStudio for quite a while. It's intended for recording vinyl (and tape and...) into computer-based files and includes the tools you need to do that. Click repair is one such thing, which it does well on audio files it has created or imported. You can also standardise the level of the recording (I set all mine to 1dB less than max) plus various filterings that I don't use. You can also speed correct (eg you recorded a 45 rpm disk on a turntable which can only do 33rpm).

Highly recommended.
 




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