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I installed the new CCC 5.1 (Carbon Copy Cloner) version and allowed it to create APFS snapshots in my macOS 10.13.4 iMac’s internal SSD and on an external SSD that also is an APFS volume. It is happening quite unnoticed. Good so far.
 
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I installed the new 5.1 version of CCC (Carbon Copy Cloner) and allowed it to create APFS snapshots in my 10.13.4 iMac’s internal SSD and on an external SSD that also is an APFS volume.
It is happening quite unnoticed. Good so far.
Thought I'd give it a try as well with new version 5.1 of CCC. With APFS SSD drives, if you run Disk Utility-Container, those "Snapshots" will appear under "Details." In my case, I have 4 Snapshots. 1st one is 13+ GB and they get progressive smaller. Nice feature, because you can choose a specific "Snapshot" and how long to keep them. We'll see how it goes.
 
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Thought I'd give it a try as well with new version 5.1 of CCC. With APFS SSD drives, if you run Disk Utility-Container, those "Snapshots" will appear under "Details." In my case, I have 4 Snapshots. 1st one is 13+ GB and they get progressive smaller. Nice feature, because you can choose a specific "Snapshot" and how long to keep them. We'll see how it goes.
Peter,
a question: when I run Disk Utility I see the APFS Containers in the left pane but do not know how to see 'Details' and the list of snapshots for each SSD (one internal, one external). Would you provide more info please?
 


Peter,
a question: when I run Disk Utility I see the APFS Containers in the left pane but do not know how to see 'Details' and the list of snapshots for each SSD (one internal, one external). Would you provide more info please?
Larry,
Sure thing, in Disk Utility, after running First Aid - "Container disk1"(my case, internal SSD) click down arrow (should be right under image of HD) and should see something like this as you scroll down:
Checking the EFI jumpstart record.
Checking the space manager.
Checking the object map.
Checking the APFS volume superblock.
Checking the object map.
Checking the fsroot tree.
Checking the snapshot metadata tree.
Checking the extent ref tree.
Checking the snapshots.
Checking snapshot 1 of 3.
Checking snapshot 2 of 3.
Checking snapshot 3 of 3.
Checking the APFS volume superblock.
Etc, etc, hope that helps..
 


If you're using a Synology for Time Machine backups, I'm here to offer some advice. In spite of the deprecation of AFP and the new-found preference for SMB in MacOS, you cannot reliably use a Synology for Time Machine backups over SMB.

It will work for some random period of time and then you will start getting errors. These errors might be "Device is in use" or "The device doesn't support the required capabilities." You can restart the Synology (or just restart smbd if you know how) and the backups will resume working for a while, but, eventually, they'll fail again. Worse, eventually MacOS will tell you that your backup is corrupted and you need to create a new one. None of these issues exist when you use AFP.

Synology uses the software package Samba to support the SMB network file standard. And they use a custom version of Samba 4.4. Unfortunately, only the (very) recent Samba 4.8 provides full support for Time Machine over SMB. Whatever Synology has done to their custom version of Samba allows Time Machine to limp along for a while, but not forever. So, learn from my pain, don't switch to SMB for backups to a Synology. If you're using it now and not having problems, you are very lucky. If you buy a Synology, use AFP for your Time Machine backups.

That said, regular file transfers over SMB seem to work fine. So feel free to use SMB for "normal" file transfers to your Synology devices.
 


Larry,
Sure thing, in Disk Utility, after running First Aid - "Container disk1"(my case, internal SSD) click down arrow (should be right under image of HD) and should see something like this as you scroll down:
Checking the EFI jumpstart record.
.....
Etc, etc, hope that helps..
Thanks for the handholding Peter.

Here's the result on my external SSD and I don't know what to make of the four warnings I got after "Verifying allocated space." "warning: Overallocation Detected on Main device: (3881104+1) bitmap address (7886)" The other three warnings differed only by the number preceding the "+1".

After the final warning "The volume /dev/disk6s2 appears to be OK".
 


Have you tried this in Terminal: "diskutil repairVolume disk0s1"
Whatever your external drive disk is, 2,3, you should see it in Disk Utility sidebar.
substitute "2, 3", whatever external disk is for "1"




 


Larry,
Sure thing, in Disk Utility, after running First Aid - "Container disk1"(my case, internal SSD)
After reading this thread I enabled snapshots in CCC. I ran First Aid on Container disk1 and received the following warning:

First Aid needs to temporarily lock the boot volume.

You are about to run First Aid against the volume that is currently booted. In order to run First Aid, the boot volume must be frozen. This will result in apps not responding during the operation. This is completely normal and apps will begin responding with the operation has completed.

After half an hour the machine was still unresponsive. Tried to SSH into it, but could not make a connection. Eventually gave up and rebooted the machine.

How long can I expect the machine to be unresponsive while First Aid is running?

This on a 2017 iMac running 10.13.4 with the original 500GB internal SSD.

Update: I ran First Aid again. The second time the machine locked up and remained unresponsive. The third time First Aid finished the task in just under 20 minutes and reported no errors.
 
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On my external SSD: No errors with this approach. Thanks Peter.

diskutil repairVolume disk7s1
Started file system repair on disk7s1 Sierra 13.4
Repairing file system
Volume was successfully unmounted
Performing fsck_apfs -y -x /dev/rdisk7s1
Checking volume
Checking the container superblock
Checking the EFI jumpstart record
Checking the space manager
Checking the object map
Checking the APFS volume superblock
Checking the object map
Checking the fsroot tree
Checking the snapshot metadata tree
Checking the extent ref tree
Checking the snapshots
Checking snapshot 1 of 7
Checking snapshot 2 of 7
Checking snapshot 3 of 7
Checking snapshot 4 of 7
Checking snapshot 5 of 7
Checking snapshot 6 of 7
Checking snapshot 7 of 7
Verifying allocated space
The volume /dev/rdisk7s1 appears to be OK
File system check exit code is 0
Restoring the original state found as mounted
Finished file system repair on disk7s1 Sierra 13.4
 


After reading this thread I enabled snapshots in CCC. I ran First Aid on Container disk1 and received the following warning:

First Aid needs to temporarily lock the boot volume.

You are about to run First Aid against the volume that is currently booted. In order to run First Aid, the boot volume must be frozen. This will result in apps not responding during the operation. This is completely normal and apps will begin responding with the operation has completed.

After half an hour the machine was still unresponsive. Tried to SSH into it, but could not make a connection. Eventually gave up and rebooted the machine.

How long can I expect the machine to be unresponsive while First Aid is running?

This on a 2017 iMac running 10.13.4 with the original 500GB internal SSD.

Update: I ran First Aid again. The second time the machine locked up and remained unresponsive. The third time First Aid finished the task in just under 20 minutes and reported no errors.
Locking your startup drive is a normal function of First Aid to initiate repairs of a boot volume.

First off, where in the repair process is it "hanging"? If you click down arrow under details it'll tell you where you are in the process. That will give you an idea of where the root problem is.
Have you tried a Safe Boot? That will try to repair any directory issues, delete caches (kernel, some sys files). Onyx or EtreCheck (I'd stay with default setting on both) are some tried & true utilities. If you're a half hour into a repair obviously there is something else going on.Terminal command: "diskutil repairVolume disk0s1"

I would try the above one at a time. See if that produces some positive results.
 
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Locking your startup drive is a normal function of First Aid to initiate repairs of a boot volume.

First off, where in the repair process is it "hanging"?
As I noted in my update, First Aid worked fine on the third try.

On the first two tries the machine locked up immediately. Clicking on Disk Utility's details box did nothing. Eventually the cursor stopped responding to mouse movement and then simply disappeared. In spite of the apparent immediate lockup, I gave the machine 30 minutes or so, just to be sure. During those 30 minutes nothing on the screen changed and the display did not go to sleep (it's set for ten minutes).

On the third and successful try the cursor remained responsive throughout and I was able to check Disk Utility's progress by clicking on the details box. Also, the display went to sleep, as usual.When the display woke up (I guess when DU was finished) I checked DU and found that First Aid was successful and found no error.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
After reading this thread I enabled snapshots in CCC. I ran First Aid on Container disk1 and received the following warning:

First Aid needs to temporarily lock the boot volume.

You are about to run First Aid against the volume that is currently booted. In order to run First Aid, the boot volume must be frozen. This will result in apps not responding during the operation. This is completely normal and apps will begin responding with the operation has completed.

After half an hour the machine was still unresponsive. Tried to SSH into it, but could not make a connection. Eventually gave up and rebooted the machine.

How long can I expect the machine to be unresponsive while First Aid is running?

This on a 2017 iMac running 10.13.4 with the original 500GB internal SSD.

Update: I ran First Aid again. The second time the machine locked up and remained unresponsive. The third time First Aid finished the task in just under 20 minutes and reported no errors.
Have you checked the SSD for problems (e.g. with SMART Utility or Drive DX)?
 


Have you checked the SSD for problems (e.g. with SMART Utility or Drive DX)?
I only have SMART Reporter:

S.M.A.R.T. status check & self-test found 1 disk(s) O.K. and 2 disk(s) not S.M.A.R.T. capable.
S.M.A.R.T.-checked disks: Amonia


Amonia is iMac's internal boot drive.
 
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Have you checked the SSD for problems (e.g. with SMART Utility or Drive DX)?
Hey Ric, just a followup to this thread. DriveDX is a very comprehensive app for diagnostic purposes. I'm currently using Disk Sensei to monitor my drives, not nearly as informative as DriveDX, hindsight being what it is, probably should have gone with DriveDX.

Being that SSDs are "basically" a memory stick, they are considerably different than traditional hard drives:

Limited life of flash storage: the downside to this process is that it causes physical degradation to the insulation material. And to reuse one data store on the floating gate, the whole gate needs to be erased and then rewritten. The cycle of programming and erasing in this way directly affects the longevity of each flash cell, resulting in a limited write endurance before the cell is completely degraded.

Bad block management maintains a table of broken cells and replaces them with healthy cells that have not yet reached their maximum P/E cycles. The new block typically comes from spare cells that designers set aside for this reason, but if at any time a spare cell does not exist to replace the bad ones, data will be lost for good. Cells are marked invalid by the controller for a number of reasons, all of which are intended to balance the system. When a cell is marked as invalid it can’t be used again until it has been erased. In flash storage, data can only be erased by entire blocks at a time, not individual pages or strings.

I understand that some of the newer SSDs exceeded 1 petabyte of writing a near-constant stream of data before failure. When data is written, an error correcting code is paired with the data. During a data read operation, the controller calculates another ECC and compares it against the stored code. The controller knows an error exists in the data bits if the two codes do not match. The controller can usually adjust and fix the errors by using the discrepancy in the code, but that is not always the case. So with all that said, are you aware of any app to repair any bad or broken cells, reformat, or is it just time for a new SSD? Sorry for the longwinded question.
 
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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Carbon Copy Cloner got an update yesterday:

Changes in CCC 5.1.1
  • Changed
    The "Use strict volume identification" setting has always been disabled when the destination lacks a unique identifier (because the setting isn't applicable in that case). Now we also uncheck that box in those cases to avoid any confusion about whether that setting will be applied.
  • Changed
    Minor adjustments to the timing of snapshot creation on the source at the beginning of the task. These accommodate archiving of the source volume's helper partitions and also resolve potential conflicts when several tasks are started simultaneously that use the same source volume.
  • Changed
    The postflight destination unmount subtask is no longer skipped when a task is aborted due to a time limit overrun.
  • Changed
    Fixed an issue related to manually mounting an encrypted source or destination volume (when clicking on the source/destination selector).
  • Changed
    Fixed a cosmetic issue in which custom filters with multiple suffixes (e.g. '*.tar.gz') would appear to not be applied to matching files in the Task Filter window, despite actually matching those files during task run time.
 
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SuperDuper 3.1.6 (v109) is available

Version 3.1.6 (v109), May 2, 2018
• Bug Fix
• Corrects a rare crash on launch

Version 3.1.5 (v108), April 27, 2018
• Enhancements & Bug Fixes
• Allows multiple Scheduled Copies to run from the Scheduled Copies window with one click
• Much more reliable backup when the Mac is sleeping; be sure to set a wake event in the Energy Saver preference pane for the same time as the backup
• Works around 10.13.4 inability to prebind earlier OS versions (and improved behavior when trying to copy later versions. too)
• Scheduled Copy “progress spinners” no longer spin forever in some edge cases
• Works around a system “pipe” problem that caused some crashes
• Disables “spell checker” for the log window and improves its behavior when a copy is in progress
• Fixes a problem that could occur if a file was deleted while it was being copied
 
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I won't go into the long backstory, but I am currently using Backblaze and Crashplan for Small Business.. I had been using only Crashplan. I began a complete backup on the same machine - a Mac Pro 5,1 with 5 drives in it, using both programs. We're talking 9.7 TBs of data, although Backblaze had a few hundred GBs less, because it just won't back up certain items. Anyway, Backblaze completed the whole backup yesterday, 9.7 TB, after about a month. Crashplan reads 22% completed so far. I know there are other differences in the data that gets backed up, but I just wanted to share that with everybody.
 
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Since 10.3, TM has gone wacky (along with a variety of other things). I find significant controls and a number of former options/controls gone - like changing backup schedule. Controls via Sys Pref has virtually no choices, only Select Disk, Backup Automatically, Options: exclude files. I see repeated error messages, "Your disk is full, select another." Clearly it no longer deletes oldest incremental backup.

I've been forced to format the disk and am using the CCC incremental backup feature. Now I'm continually harassed by the TM message, "It's been X days since you backed up."

I've done a fair amount of searching, but haven't found how to completely turn TM off. There is a command line ref in the Apple HS forum, but I'm not clear what it does. I'm not a command line wizard (though long ago I was a Sysadmin), but I am comfortable with it if I know what I'm doing!

So how can I kill TM or possibly convince it that the newly formatted disk is available? With the reformatted drive, TM reports its presence but still insists it's full, even though it reports .5 TB available. Finally, is the CCC approach viable and safe? I am currently running it and it reports success, so I guess that's all good?

Sorry for the confused request, but guess I'm confused.
 
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Ric, not sure if this fact has been posted in the MacInTouch community and is not on the CCC website, but I inquired about a CCC veterans discount and after providing them with a veterans ID (in my case a DD214), they sent me a link for 25% off or $29.95 for a CCC license. Very nice touch and much appreciated.
 


I won't go into the long backstory, but I am currently using Backblaze and Crashplan for Small Business.. I had been using only Crashplan. I began a complete backup on the same machine - a Mac Pro 5,1 with 5 drives in it, using both programs. We're talking 9.7 TBs of data, although Backblaze had a few hundred GBs less, because it just won't back up certain items. Anyway, Backblaze completed the whole backup yesterday, 9.7 TB, after about a month. Crashplan reads 22% completed so far. I know there are other differences in the data that gets backed up, but I just wanted to share that with everybody.
Paul,

It seems to me that to make this comparison more fair, you would have stopped using the Mac Pro (to ensure no more data gets written), then, assuming you have a constant & unwavering upload stream, run CrashPlan by itself until it finished, then done the same with BackBlaze by itself. Too many conflicting variables when running both apps simultaneously, in my opinion.
 


By 10.3, do you mean Yosemite?

I think there's something going on with your particular installation, because some of the things you report do not coincide with what I've seen as normal behavior. For instance, on one of my backup drives (an old Time Capsule) the disk is pretty full and it tells me that it is deleting incremental backups, which does take a long time. This was true in Yosemite as well as my newly updated El Capitan.

Assuming the reformatted backup disk is in indeed capacious enough (in other words, bigger than your backup source), you should be able to reselect it in the Time Machine Control Panel. The fact that you have started using it for CCC might complicate things in terms of capacity. If that drive is already selected, try re-selecting it anyway.

I would think that simply turning Time Machine off in its control panel — that's the big switch on the left—would make it quit nagging, but I might be mistaken about that.
 


I use both Time Machine and Carbon Copy Cloner, but I have the backups on separate disks. The CCC backup is bootable, so it could be run immediately if needed. Both seem to work better if they have the whole drive for backup, which also offers an extra layer of redundancy in case of the worst case of one backup having been corrupted somewhere along the line. Having had two hard disk crashes so far this year, I can testify that both approaches work, and Time Machine actually seemed a bit fast, although the Mac has to completely re-index email in Apple Mail after recovery, which takes hours if you have a big mail archive.
 


I have been backing up to a WD MyMirror NAS. It's been working fine, but the recent macOS update from 10.13.4 to 10.13.5 broke something, and I can no longer use it as a Time Machine drive for my Mac, although my wife's computer (10.11.x) can.

I remember reading something about APFS incompatibility with AFP shares, but it had been working. Does anyone have any ideas about how to possibly fix this?
 


I have a new question. I am trying to set up Retrospect 15 on a Mac Mini running OS X 10.11.5.

Remote access for Retrospect requires two ports to be open, 497 and 22024. I cannot get 497 to open on this computer.

I have tried two routers. I have opened port 497 successfully to several other computers on our network, but whenever I switch to the computer I want to use, port 497 shows closed.

The computer has been rebooted several times and works fine otherwise. I do not use Firewall in System Preferences.

How can I open a closed port?
 



With all this talk of Cloudberry I went there, but does anyone know...

1) Is it Java, or native? Is it native command-line with Java GUI?
2) Does it use fsevents to automatically back up files as they are created/changed?

I'd be tempted to jump ship from Arq but ...
 


With all this talk of Cloudberry I went there, but does anyone know...
1) Is it Java, or native? Is it native command-line with Java GUI?
2) Does it use fsevents to automatically back up files as they are created/changed?
It’s definitely not Java, as I don’t have Java installed, and all works well.

It doesn’t backup files as they are changed, just scheduled or manual backups. It does allow you to keep multiple versions of files, or to keep deleted files for a set period of time (which can be indefinitely if you so chose).

From the little bit I used Arq, I can say Arq is certainly more feature-rich. I went with Cloudberry primarily because it was cheaper (I also managed to get it when they sold it half off for national backup day), and my needs weren’t great... just wanted something to do a weekly offsite backup.

I can say that their support people are great and respond quickly by email, and are very prompt about following up and making sure that your issues get resolved.
 


I have a new question. I am trying to set up Retrospect 15 on a Mac Mini running OS X 10.11.5.
Remote access for Retrospect requires two ports to be open, 497 and 22024. I cannot get 497 to open on this computer.
How can I open a closed port?
Is the Mac Mini running Retrospect (the server), or the Retrospect Client? If it is Retrospect, the Retrospect Engine must have been started for port 497 to be open, because it is the engine which uses that port to communicate with clients. If it is the Retrospect Client, the client must be running.

I've also run into cases in the past where Retrospect would not listen on all interfaces unless they were active at the time the engine/client was started, but that's unlikely to be your issue.

You can use the netstat tool from Terminal to check if the standard Retrospect port (497) is open on a computer: try running

netstat -aWn | grep 497 | grep LISTEN

On my Mac Mini running Retrospect 15, that results in:

tcp4 0 0 172.16.245.1.497 *.* LISTEN
tcp4 0 0 192.168.3.1.497 *.* LISTEN
tcp4 0 0 172.16.127.1.497 *.* LISTEN
tcp4 0 0 192.168.1.10.497 *.* LISTEN
tcp4 0 0 192.168.1.2.497 *.* LISTEN
tcp4 0 0 127.0.0.1.497 *.* LISTEN


You should have at least the 127.0.0.1 address and one other listed. (I'm running VMware on this system as well, and have configured both wired & wireless interfaces, hence the extra addresses.) That will tell you what’s open on the local computer — until those are open, the router doesn’t come into play.
 


Anton Rang, when I try
netstat -aWn | grep 497 | grep LISTEN
with only Retrospect Server open, I get no response back in Terminal.

When I installed and turned on the Client, I get a proper response, as you showed.

And when I test the port using <https://www.yougetsignal.com/tools/open-ports/> my port 497 now shows open.

I wrote several times to Retrospect Support, and they never told me to turn on Client to open the port. Maybe I'm an anomaly, I don't know.

James Weisbin, thanks for your help. Fortunately, I solved the problem, your solution is a bit above my pay grade, and I've used Macs since '86.
 



Is the Mac Mini running Retrospect (the server), or the Retrospect Client? If it is Retrospect, the Retrospect Engine must have been started for port 497 to be open, because it is the engine which uses that port to communicate with clients.
Like RickCricow, I find that my server does not have port 497 open, whereas my client does - perhaps the server communicates with the client over that port, and, if the "conversation" is driven from the server, then the client is the one listening on 497?
 


Like RickCricow, I find that my server does not have port 497 open, whereas my client does - perhaps the server communicates with the client over that port, and, if the "conversation" is driven from the server, then the client is the one listening on 497?
That’s quite possible. I do see port 497 opened (listening on both UDP & TCP) by the RetrospectEngine process on my server, but that may be related to my preferences; for instance, I have “Automatically add clients using public keys” enabled.
 


Like RickCricow, I find that my server does not have port 497 open, whereas my client does - perhaps the server communicates with the client over that port, and, if the "conversation" is driven from the server, then the client is the one listening on 497?
The only way I got port 497 open on my server, was to install both the server and the client software. The client is off, the server is running, and I'm successfully backing up outside computers to our office.

Retrospect is a great product, but their extensive documentation has lots of holes. To set it up required hours of fiddling for me, but now I'm all set. Again. I've used Retrospect since it first arrived as a freebie on an old harddisk/removable. Perhaps an old Syquest?
 


It’s definitely not Java, as I don’t have Java installed, and all works well.
I think the important part is "...all works well", as the language used for local software generally has little user impact.

Just because you do not have Java installed for the system as a whole, that does not mean that any individual piece of Mac software is not written in Java. Software such as Moneydance, I believe, contains all the necessary Java software within the .app application bundle.
 


Just a quick user report on SpiderOakOne:

I installed it a while back, as I prepare for CrashPlan to disappear from my system; I liked the security aspects of it. I paid for a year in advance, which was foolish.

The interface is a little clunky but not too bad, clearly meant to be cross-platform, ideal for no platform in particular.

It's slow, though. Very slow. Not just slow to upload, which I'm used to from CrashPlan (when there was a lot to go, I'm pretty sure it throttled), but slow to act. I've isolated periodic ten-to-twenty second freezes to SpiderOakOne.

Backblaze is probably my next attempt. I'm using Arq with AWS, which seems to work well (I'd have used a different storage company, e.g. Backblaze, if it had been available when I started out). I do miss CrashPlan's fsevent-based instant backup....
 


Just a quick user report on SpiderOakOne: I installed it a while back, as I prepare for CrashPlan to disappear from my system; I liked the security aspects of it. I paid for a year in advance, which was foolish....
I did likewise, but then my daughter and wife kept telling me their 128GB MacBook Airs were warning them of "low disk space". Turns out that 70+ GB on each machine was the SpiderOakOne index. Yes, I had a massive photo library backed up, but this is too much overhead per machine. I went back to USB external hard drives and Time Machine for now.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There's a new version of a unique Mac backup system:
Propaganda Productions said:
Déjà Vu
Déjà Vu offers an intuitive, transparent, and reliable way to back up your data. It's a preference pane that lives in your System Preferences, and it allows you to schedule unattended backups of important folders, or even your entire system.
Propaganda Productions PR said:
Version 5 adds full support for APFS volumes, expanded scheduling options, a much-improved menu icon which displays information about the current or most recent backup as well as upcoming scheduled backups, and much more. The full release notes are available here:

https://propagandaprod.com/releasenotes.html

Deja Vu 5 supports macOS High Sierra and Mojave. (Deja Vu 4 remains available for older systems.) A single user license is 29 USD and a family license costs 44 USD. Licenses may be purchased at:

https://propagandaprod.com/store

Note that there is a launch sale currently in progress. Purchase a Deja Vu 5 license during the month of September, 2018, and save 30% off the regular price.
 


I was helping a friend with a Time Capsule that I had set up earlier. I noticed that the network and base station password were the same (I usually like to keep these separate), so I changed the basestation password.

Of course, the friend's MacBook Air stopped making Time Machine backups. I assumed I would be presented with a Time Machine dialog box asking for the new password when the backup operation started, but no such luck. I could select the Time Capsule from the Select Disk -> Available Disks list in System Preferences and then enter the password, but it would not recognize the existing backup (i.e. "Oldest backup: none").

I know the existing Time Machine backup is valid, because I can browse it by holding down the Option key ("Browse Other Backup Disks") when clicking on the Time Machine menu bar icon. My google-fu suggested some terminal commands using tmutil and the inheritbackup and associatedisk options, but no love there (and it was especially confusing trying to determine the correct path to use with these commands).

What I thought would be a simple task turned into a two hour journey down the Apple "it just works" rabbit hole. Does anybody have a suggestion for getting this MacBook Air to take over where it left off with Time Machine backups?
 


My experience is that it is not until the computer starts making its "first" backup before it recognized that there is already an existing backup on the Time Capsule or other network location, and then it gives the option to inherit the old backup.
 


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