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Anton Rang, when I try
netstat -aWn | grep 497 | grep LISTEN
with only Retrospect Server open, I get no response back in Terminal.

When I installed and turned on the Client, I get a proper response, as you showed.

And when I test the port using <https://www.yougetsignal.com/tools/open-ports/> my port 497 now shows open.

I wrote several times to Retrospect Support, and they never told me to turn on Client to open the port. Maybe I'm an anomaly, I don't know.

James Weisbin, thanks for your help. Fortunately, I solved the problem, your solution is a bit above my pay grade, and I've used Macs since '86.
 



Is the Mac Mini running Retrospect (the server), or the Retrospect Client? If it is Retrospect, the Retrospect Engine must have been started for port 497 to be open, because it is the engine which uses that port to communicate with clients.
Like RickCricow, I find that my server does not have port 497 open, whereas my client does - perhaps the server communicates with the client over that port, and, if the "conversation" is driven from the server, then the client is the one listening on 497?
 


Like RickCricow, I find that my server does not have port 497 open, whereas my client does - perhaps the server communicates with the client over that port, and, if the "conversation" is driven from the server, then the client is the one listening on 497?
That’s quite possible. I do see port 497 opened (listening on both UDP & TCP) by the RetrospectEngine process on my server, but that may be related to my preferences; for instance, I have “Automatically add clients using public keys” enabled.
 


Like RickCricow, I find that my server does not have port 497 open, whereas my client does - perhaps the server communicates with the client over that port, and, if the "conversation" is driven from the server, then the client is the one listening on 497?
The only way I got port 497 open on my server, was to install both the server and the client software. The client is off, the server is running, and I'm successfully backing up outside computers to our office.

Retrospect is a great product, but their extensive documentation has lots of holes. To set it up required hours of fiddling for me, but now I'm all set. Again. I've used Retrospect since it first arrived as a freebie on an old harddisk/removable. Perhaps an old Syquest?
 


It’s definitely not Java, as I don’t have Java installed, and all works well.
I think the important part is "...all works well", as the language used for local software generally has little user impact.

Just because you do not have Java installed for the system as a whole, that does not mean that any individual piece of Mac software is not written in Java. Software such as Moneydance, I believe, contains all the necessary Java software within the .app application bundle.
 


Just a quick user report on SpiderOakOne:

I installed it a while back, as I prepare for CrashPlan to disappear from my system; I liked the security aspects of it. I paid for a year in advance, which was foolish.

The interface is a little clunky but not too bad, clearly meant to be cross-platform, ideal for no platform in particular.

It's slow, though. Very slow. Not just slow to upload, which I'm used to from CrashPlan (when there was a lot to go, I'm pretty sure it throttled), but slow to act. I've isolated periodic ten-to-twenty second freezes to SpiderOakOne.

Backblaze is probably my next attempt. I'm using Arq with AWS, which seems to work well (I'd have used a different storage company, e.g. Backblaze, if it had been available when I started out). I do miss CrashPlan's fsevent-based instant backup....
 


Just a quick user report on SpiderOakOne: I installed it a while back, as I prepare for CrashPlan to disappear from my system; I liked the security aspects of it. I paid for a year in advance, which was foolish....
I did likewise, but then my daughter and wife kept telling me their 128GB MacBook Airs were warning them of "low disk space". Turns out that 70+ GB on each machine was the SpiderOakOne index. Yes, I had a massive photo library backed up, but this is too much overhead per machine. I went back to USB external hard drives and Time Machine for now.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There's a new version of a unique Mac backup system:
Propaganda Productions said:
Déjà Vu
Déjà Vu offers an intuitive, transparent, and reliable way to back up your data. It's a preference pane that lives in your System Preferences, and it allows you to schedule unattended backups of important folders, or even your entire system.
Propaganda Productions PR said:
Version 5 adds full support for APFS volumes, expanded scheduling options, a much-improved menu icon which displays information about the current or most recent backup as well as upcoming scheduled backups, and much more. The full release notes are available here:

https://propagandaprod.com/releasenotes.html

Deja Vu 5 supports macOS High Sierra and Mojave. (Deja Vu 4 remains available for older systems.) A single user license is 29 USD and a family license costs 44 USD. Licenses may be purchased at:

https://propagandaprod.com/store

Note that there is a launch sale currently in progress. Purchase a Deja Vu 5 license during the month of September, 2018, and save 30% off the regular price.
 


I was helping a friend with a Time Capsule that I had set up earlier. I noticed that the network and base station password were the same (I usually like to keep these separate), so I changed the basestation password.

Of course, the friend's MacBook Air stopped making Time Machine backups. I assumed I would be presented with a Time Machine dialog box asking for the new password when the backup operation started, but no such luck. I could select the Time Capsule from the Select Disk -> Available Disks list in System Preferences and then enter the password, but it would not recognize the existing backup (i.e. "Oldest backup: none").

I know the existing Time Machine backup is valid, because I can browse it by holding down the Option key ("Browse Other Backup Disks") when clicking on the Time Machine menu bar icon. My google-fu suggested some terminal commands using tmutil and the inheritbackup and associatedisk options, but no love there (and it was especially confusing trying to determine the correct path to use with these commands).

What I thought would be a simple task turned into a two hour journey down the Apple "it just works" rabbit hole. Does anybody have a suggestion for getting this MacBook Air to take over where it left off with Time Machine backups?
 


My experience is that it is not until the computer starts making its "first" backup before it recognized that there is already an existing backup on the Time Capsule or other network location, and then it gives the option to inherit the old backup.
 


There's a new version of a unique Mac backup system:
Deja Vu sounds good; I have to admit that I've turned my current focus for online backups to Backblaze, which claims to do a sort of instant backup that I assume is based on fsevent. It's doing the initial backup now as part of a 15-day trial. One very handy feature for those of us with desktop computers: it lets you specify the work directory. I have an SSD primary and spinny secondary drive, so that's very handy.

I am still using Arq for daily backups, Carbon Copy Cloner for monthly clones, and, um, that IMAP backup program mentioned earlier for the email servers.
 


My experience is that it is not until the computer starts making its "first" backup before it recognized that there is already an existing backup on the Time Capsule or other network location, and then it gives the option to inherit the old backup.
I let the backup proceed. The "preparing" stage took so long, I went to bed. When I checked, the backup had completed, and the "oldest backup" was what I expected, and no new sparsebundle was created. So, thanks for that. Whether there was a prompt to inherit the old backup, I have no idea.

However, is the backup ever slooooow, and there are lots of error messages in the High Sierra console. Again, google-fu tells me that Time Machine in High Sierra can be slow, especially from an APFS to HFS+ volume over WiFi. Definitely slower than my own MacBook Air, running El Capitan. I might just bite the bullet and start over with Time Machine.
 


A year ago Code42 announced that they are exiting the consumer backup market. CrashPlan for Home will stop working on October 23rd, 2018. Existing customers will be automatically migrated to CrashPlan for Small Business on October 1st. When your current CrashPlan for Home subscription expires, you can renew on the Small Business plan at a 75% discount for 1 year. CrashPlan also gives an option to migrate to Carbonite at a 50% discount.

There was much discussion in MacInTouch.

Since now we're reaching the first major decision point, it's time to reopen the discussion....

Personally I'm most interested in Arq, backing up to Wasabi. But recently I heard that Arq no longer uses fseventsd to detect file changes, and instead does a full system scan for each backup. The developer said that the full system scan is fast, but I've seen reports that it isn't. Does anyone have practical experience?

Also, in Michael Tsai's posting summary CrashPlan Discontinues Consumer Backups (which references the MacInTouch discussion!), Thomas Templemann (of Find Any File fame) mentions what appears to be another Arq-like backup program: Duplicacy, which I don't think we discussed before. (Thomas says that Duplicacy is now Acrosync, but Acrosync appears to be an Rsync client.)

One advantage to Duplicacy is that it (claims to) supports deduplication across machines. So if you have multiple computers with the same files, it only has to backup those files one time. CrashPlan for Home did not do this.

Has anyone tried Duplicacy? How does it compare to Arq?
 


Personally I'm most interested in Arq, backing up to Wasabi. But recently I heard that Arq no longer uses fseventsd to detect file changes, and instead does a full system scan for each backup. The developer said that the full system scan is fast, but I've seen reports that it isn't. Does anyone have practical experience?
I use Arq to backup to Backblaze B2. I just ran a backup on a 400GB+ dataset and it took two minutes to scan and upload around 30MB of data.

However Arq will periodically do some maintenance on the backup which can take many hours to run and often involves downloading a GB or two of data in the process. I don't find this a problem but it is only the sound of disk activity that alerts me to what it is doing. The activity is shown in the menu bar but it isn't very obvious and I believe that if the process is interrupted it has to start from the beginning again, but don't quote me on that.

Cost wise, Backblaze B2 is very good. My highest monthly bill was last month at $2.53.
 



Personally I'm most interested in Arq, backing up to Wasabi. But recently I heard that Arq no longer uses fseventsd to detect file changes, and instead does a full system scan for each backup. The developer said that the full system scan is fast, but I've seen reports that it isn't. Does anyone have practical experience?
I switched to Arq/Backblaze B2 a couple of months ago and have found it to be acceptably fast. A typical backup report is:
Backup session for / started on September 1, 2018 at 6:00:15 AM PDT
Found completed backup record for /
Saved backup record for /
Scanned 1286.260 GB (1609504 files)
Uploaded 176.1 MB
Backup session for / ended on September 1, 2018 at 6:16:55 AM PDT
One problem that I have encountered, though, is that Arq will not run if the screen is locked. When I reported the issue to Arq support, I received the following reply:
"There seems to be a bug where macOS won't let any app do anything with the UI while the screen is locked, which makes Arq Agent get stuck. Nothing has changed in Arq in that regard, but macOS's behavior has changed in High Sierra, unfortunately. "
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
(Thomas says that Duplicacy is now Acrosync, but Acrosync appears to be an Rsync client.)
Duplicacy is a cross-platform backup app from Acrosync LLC, while Acrosync is an Rsync client.
I have been aware of an "Arq"-like backup app called "Duplicati" (<https://www.duplicati.com/>) for several years...
Duplicati is apparently an open-source backup project inspired by Duplicacy:
The Duplicati Team said:
Duplicati 2 User's Manual
Duplicati is a backup client that securely stores encrypted, incremental, compressed backups on local storage, cloud storage services and remote file servers. The Duplicati project was inspired by Duplicity and had similar functionality until 2008. In that year the storage model was redesigned completely and the program was rebuilt from scratch. This manual describes Duplicati 2, the version based on the new storage model.

Duplicati can be installed on a variety of operating systems. Most common platforms are Windows, Linux and OSX.
GitHub said:
Duplicati
Duplicati is a free, open source, backup client that securely stores encrypted, incremental, compressed backups on cloud storage services and remote file servers. It works with:

Amazon S3, OneDrive, Google Drive, Rackspace Cloud Files, HubiC, Backblaze (B2), Amazon Cloud Drive (AmzCD), Swift / OpenStack, WebDAV, SSH (SFTP), FTP, and more!
 


Backblaze's backup software is very easy to use, if a bit counterintuitive to set up at first (assuming you want to change the default settings), and amazingly fast compared with CrashPlan (but what isn’t?). I am also running Arq (I know, naughty) going to Amazon Glacier "just in case." They both work well but I can't answer the fsevent question...

Backblaze's site is not always responsive when I want to restore.
 


Personally I'm most interested in Arq, backing up to Wasabi. But recently I heard that Arq no longer uses fseventsd to detect file changes, and instead does a full system scan for each backup. The developer said that the full system scan is fast, but I've seen reports that it isn't. Does anyone have practical experience?
I have a 27" 2017 iMac 3.4GHz Intel Core i5 with 8GB RAM. A recent Arq backup log (going to Backblaze B2) is:
Backup session for /Users/Larry started on September 10, 2018 at 9:00:10 AM PDT
Found completed backup record for /Users/Larry
Saved backup record for /Users/Larry
Scanned 1221.451 GB (500155 files)
Uploaded 13.3 MB
Backup session for /Users/Larry ended on September 10, 2018 at 9:03:33 AM PDT
Last night after I added some new data to the iMac:
Backup session for /Users/Larry started on September 9, 2018 at 11:00:13 PM PDT
Found completed backup record for /Users/Larry
Uploading files that were modified during this session.
Scanned 1221.550 GB (500175 files)
Uploaded 972.1 MB
Backup session for /Users/Larry ended on September 9, 2018 at 11:07:27 PM PDT
 


I have been a CrashPlan customer for 5+ years. When I got the notice last year I decided to give Backblaze a try. It really did not work for me, I keep most of my data on external drives on a server; Backblaze really wants to back everything up. I also tried a restore and that crashed and burned.

So I went with the extra year of CrashPlan for the discounted price. I have about 9 months to decide what to do next. So, right now while I still have CrashPlan backing up my 1TB of data, I have been trying out Cyberduck attached to Microsoft OneDrive. I have an Office 365 subscription and get 1 TB of storage per user. Cyberduck has been working out well, except it's a manual process.
 


Duplicati is apparently an open-source backup project inspired by Duplicacy:
While this project looked promising, I discovered one very significant gotcha when trying to run it. It requires Microsoft's Mono framework, which includes so much irrelevant code that it takes up 1.1 GB of disk space. No thanks. It amazes me that developers of an open source project like Duplicati would consider this kind of bloat to be acceptable.
 


I have been a happy CrashPlan for Home user for many years, so, a couple of weeks ago, I decided to accept the forced upgrade to the Business version. I have three Macs, each backing up to CrashPlan's cloud plus a local hard drive. Two of my machines converted fine (though upgrading my main machine required me to prune the size of the backup archive from 1.1TB to under 1TB before conversion, which was a drag).

However, the third machine remains stuck backing up to the local hard drive. (The backup to the cloud went speedily.) Code42 support said "your local backup has been impacted by a known issue. This issue presents with the symptoms you've described and is specific to the local drive being hung during synchronization."

They told me this ten days ago but have not yet offered any resolution for the problem.

I am not happy about this. Until the problem is resolved, I have no local backup for this machine.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
However, the third machine remains stuck backing up to the local hard drive. (The backup to the cloud went speedily.) Code42 support said "your local backup has been impacted by a known issue. This issue presents with the symptoms you've described and is specific to the local drive being hung during synchronization."
They told me this ten days ago but have not yet offered any resolution for the problem.
I am not happy about this. Until the problem is resolved, I have no local backup for this machine.
Is there some reason you're not using Carbon Copy Cloner to do this?
 


Is there some reason you're not using Carbon Copy Cloner to do this?
I guess I could use CCC as a temporary measure, but I like how CrashPlan maintains archives of everything according to an easily chosen, flexible scheme, something that seems less complicated than CCC's approach to archiving. Also, I have an existing CrashPlan archive for many years of this machine and would prefer to keep it. Finally, the other two local and three cloud backups are all working fine, so I'd rather get this current problem resolved than scrap the whole existing setup and years of archives.
 


I let the backup proceed. The "preparing" stage took so long, I went to bed. When I checked, the backup had completed, and the "oldest backup" was what I expected, and no new sparsebundle was created. So, thanks for that. Whether there was a prompt to inherit the old backup, I have no idea.
However, is the backup ever slooooow, and there are lots of error messages in the High Sierra console. Again, google-fu tells me that Time Machine in High Sierra can be slow, especially from an APFS to HFS+ volume over WiFi. Definitely slower than my own MacBook Air, running El Capitan. I might just bite the bullet and start over with Time Machine.
To follow up on this, my friend told me they were getting an OS alert that Time Machine had not run for something like 200 days. The previous backup, before the descent into the rabbit hole, was only about a week old, so this made no sense. Also, the sparsebundle had a recent modification date.

I once again went into the "select disk" menu in the Time Machine Preferences, selected the same disk it was using. This brought up a password dialog, but I guess (at least) the Keychain had the password, so all I had to do was hit return.

After a long "preparing backup" period, Time Machine started but did not ask about inheriting any previous backup. The amount of data to backup was not unreasonable for an incremental snapshot. The backup did seem slow, so I went to bed.

The next morning Time Machine was still showing about 400MB left and an estimated time of 14 minutes. It stayed that way for an hour (progress bar did not budge). Gave up and disconnected the MacBook Air from power (so the backup stopped).

At this point, I am raising the white flag. I am going to delete the old backup and just start over. Apple engineers are awesome at making dancing, talking fecal emojis, but they can't seem to make their own key support software "just work".
 


Happy to report that CrashPlan released a new version this week that (eventually) fixed the problem reported below. The fix did not initially install correctly, so a senior Code42 support manager spent 30 minutes remotely diagnosing the problem; a complete reinstall did the trick.

So I'm a happy camper with CrashPlan again.
I have been a happy CrashPlan for Home user for many years, so, a couple of weeks ago, I decided to accept the forced upgrade to the Business version. I have three Macs, each backing up to CrashPlan's cloud plus a local hard drive. Two of my machines converted fine (though upgrading my main machine required me to prune the size of the backup archive from 1.1TB to under 1TB before conversion, which was a drag).

However, the third machine remains stuck backing up to the local hard drive. (The backup to the cloud went speedily.) Code42 support said "your local backup has been impacted by a known issue. This issue presents with the symptoms you've described and is specific to the local drive being hung during synchronization."

They told me this ten days ago but have not yet offered any resolution for the problem.

I am not happy about this. Until the problem is resolved, I have no local backup for this machine.
 


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