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A few seconds only? That's great and gives me hope for the next device. Perhaps my Apple keyboard is a less-than-perfect specimen. 30-plus seconds was not unusual. 15 seconds was cause for celebration. The last straw was a delay of just over a minute before I could type my password. Every boot became a game of "how long is it going to take this time?"
The batteries were fresh and my patience was spent.
Man, can I relate to this! I tried turning mouse, trackpad, and keyboard on and off, hitting keys at different times during boot or wake up, holding keys down, getting coffee, mentally begging Bluetooth gods, and impatiently waiting for the next macOS update to see if anything improved!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I think Jerry Jensen may be onto something here with your mouse caching information about your computer. Something interesting to try might be to squirrel away /Library/Preferences/com.apple.Bluetooth.plist once the system is working - then do whatever you do to break the system, and grab another copy from that OS. Compare them via Xcode (or another plist editor - these are binary plists) and see if there are any substantive changes (like, maybe BluetoothVersionNumber - I'm pretty sure it's referring to Apple's implementation of Bluetooth, not protocol or any such thing).

Not that I think it's super relevant, but you can also Shift-Option-click the Bluetooth menubar icon and explore some of the information there (version is listed top).

I don't think that information I describe above is enough to conclude for sure what's going on here, but it might give some clues on next steps.
I paired the mouse with my Mac in Bluetooth Preferences and checked to see what files were modified:

/Library/Preferences/com.apple.Bluetooth.plist

And inside that file I found entries of the form below, where e8-xx-xx-xx-xx-b4 matches the Address seen for this mouse when I use your neat trick of Shift-Option-clicking the Bluetooth menubar icon:
Code:
        <key>XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX</key>
        <dict>
            <key>DeviceAddress</key>
            <string>e8-xx-xx-xx-xx-b4</string>
            <key>DeviceAddressType</key>
            <true/>
            <key>ServiceDiscoveryComplete</key>
            <true/>
        </dict>
...
        <key>e8-xx-xx-xx-xx-b4</key>
        <dict>
            <key>Appearance</key>
            <integer>962</integer>
            <key>ConnectionIntervalMax</key>
            <integer>9</integer>
            <key>ConnectionIntervalMin</key>
            <integer>6</integer>
            <key>LastNameUpdate</key>
            <date>2018-07-29T02:12:34Z</date>
            <key>Name</key>
            <string>M720 Triathlon</string>
            <key>ProductID</key>
            <integer>45077</integer>
            <key>VendorID</key>
            <integer>1133</integer>
        </dict>
...
    <key>LEPairedDevices</key>
    <array>
...
        <string>e8-xx-xx-xx-xx-b4</string>
    </array>
    <key>PairedDevices</key>
    <array>
        <string>e8-xx-xx-xx-xx-b4</string>
...
    </array>
 


I believe a great deal of the problem base with Bluetooth tech is that it shares a very narrow frequency band with a jillion other consumer electronic devices... things like cordless phones and Internet of Things appliances. That band is 80 discrete channels between 2.402 and 2.485 Ghz, and Bluetooth uses frequency hopping to find an open spot. Not only that, the current Bluetooth 4.x protocol is somewhat different than the previous 2.x standard (version 3.x was a bit of an iconoclast). Bluetooth 4 is supposed to include and work with version 2 stuff, but I've found that is not the case at all.

The bandwidth Bluetooth uses is crowded, and the tech itself is more voodoo than electrical engineering. We all live in a sea of 2.4Ghz signals amid walls of noise
 


I have a Plantronics Voyager Bluetooth headset. It is supposed to detect if it is worn or not. However, as long as it is powered on, the phone doesn't ring and Siri and dictation don't work on my iPhone X, because they all go to the headset.

Has anyone figured out how to have their iPhone ignore a Bluetooth headset if it is powered on but not on your ear? Maybe a hidden setting?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Big changes are coming (gradually) to Bluetooth audio...
AnandTech said:
CES 2020: Bluetooth SIG Announces LE Audio Standard: New Baseline For Next Decade
Yesterday the Bluetooth SIG has announced and released the newest Bluetooth standard for audio playback: LE Audio. The new standard is a complete new redesign of the audio stack, building upon the years of learnings that we’ve seen with Bluetooth audio in the past. The new LE Audio standard expends the flexibility and functionality of audio playback over Bluetooth, and is said to represent the new baseline for future developments over the next decade.

... The LE Audio standard will be released as several standalone specifications for each feature over the course of 2020. What all the features have in common though is that they rely on a new Bluetooth 5.2 core specification, which was publicly released yesterday.

The Bluetooth SIG expects chip manufacturers to be able to release new designs supporting LE Audio over the course of the next year to 18 months, with consumer products (sources and sinks) to closely follow that timeline, with an expected timeline of 18-24 months.
 


Big changes are coming (gradually) to Bluetooth audio...
I wonder how much of this will require new hardware and how much can be done on today's BLE 5 hardware with new software.

I assume an embedded microcontroller will require hardware for the new codec, since it appears to be fairly complicated, but perhaps more powerful devices (like computers and phones) can do it with an updated OS framework.
 


I wonder how much of this will require new hardware and how much can be done on today's BLE 5 hardware with new software.
Based on the article, it sounds like it will need new hardware, and can't just be retrofit onto the driver stack. I guess in the same way that computers with Bluetooth 3.0 hardware couldn't gain the features needed to support Continuity.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I'm having a lot of problems with certain Bluetooth devices in macOS 10.12 Sierra, although other devices work.

In the latest example, a Microsoft Precision mouse fails to pair with either of two different Macs running macOS Sierra, including tests in a plain vanilla Sierra boot volume.

That same mouse works fine with macOS Mojave on one of the same Macs and also with Linux Mint on an Intel NUC (though I miss the benefits of SteerMouse on Linux).

I've also had similar problems with some Logitech M720 mice, despite the fact that I'm using another Logitech M720 mouse successfully, along with a Logitech K811 Bluetooth keyboard and occasionally Bluetooth audio receivers.
 


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