MacInTouch Amazon link...

competition, technology, Apple management & plans

Channels
Apple, Products

Ric Ford

MacInTouch
BGR writes about a laptop from Huawei that rather comically mimics Apple's product naming, along with Apple's slim design and fingerprint sensor, although the "MateBook X Pro" runs Windows and has a touch screen:
Huawei MateBook X Pro review: A laptop you absolutely have to try
As I said after my brief hands-on at MWC 2018, where Huawei announced the nimble laptop, the MateBook X Pro feels like a mix of Apple’s MacBook Air and MacBook Pro. Because, let’s face it, the design inspiration behind the MateBook X Pro is Apple’s iconic MacBook Air. Huawei, however, didn’t stop there, turning it into a Windows 10 Notebook that stands out, in many ways, from the crowd. After spending a few weeks working and playing with the MateBook X Pro, I can tell you, without a doubt, that Huawei managed to build a computer that you should absolutely check out in a store near you – that is if local stores do sell Huawei hardware.
 



Below is a link to a David Pogue review discussing the features that macOS doesn't have. Seems macOS has been left behind for quite some time with only minor exceptions and 'security' updates...
I don't interpret that article the same way. Aside from the Timeline including previously closed windows, I don't see evidence that macOS has been left behind. It reads like a list of features that Windows is borrowing from the Mac, which Pogue himself references.
David Pogue said:
Many of Windows 10’s recent enhancements have been clearly, ahem, inspired by features developed by Apple.
  • Timeline sounds like Mission Control
  • Focus Assist is Do Not Disturb, including a "When Mirroring to Projectors" option
  • Safari has been able to auto-fill names & addresses for a very long time
  • Nearby Sharing is the equivalent of Handoff, Continuity, & Airdrop
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I was wondering what's available for low-cost laptops...
PC Magazine said:
The Best Cheap Laptops of 2018
Gone are the days when a decent laptop would cost you north of $1,000. In this market, manufacturers are inventing new ways to outsell each other, including aggressive price cutting. It's now possible to pick up a full-size or ultraportable Windows 10 notebook with a processor powerful enough for use at home, school, or work, for around $500. It's also easy to find full-featured chromebooks and hybrid systems that give you both laptop and tablet functionality in one device for as little as $200.
 


New or used? I recently picked up a nicely refurbished Dell E7240 laptop from Newegg to replace an old MacBook Pro at home that I was running Linux Mint on. The Dell came with a 1 year warranty. It's not the fastest or newest laptop but these things sold for $2000 when new. It's lightweight, has all of the ports I need built-in and well-located, came with 8GB of RAM and a 256GB Samsung SSD and was a steal at a bit under $300 at the time. Came with Windows 10 but Windows 7 and Linux Mint (my OS of choice) all run perfectly. They're a little more expensive now but it's a very well-rounded machine for not much money.
 


New or used? I recently picked up a nicely refurbished Dell E7240 laptop...
Chris, that's a great value and a good "burner" machine for overseas trips, as well as young students in the household. Unlike the current MacBook Pros, it has all the ports one might need, uses a Dell power adapter that can be sourced anywhere with ease, and it can read SD cards without the need for a dock/dongle/whatever.

Unlike Apple, repairs at home are as easy as downloading the fully-illustrated service manual from Dell. I had a couple of failures with my work-issued Dell, but I always came away impressed with how easily they were repaired because Dell believes in modular assemblies that do not require special tools to remove them.

If I didn't already own an Air, this is the type of computer I'd drag along for trips.
 



The Dell E7240 is heavier than an Air and thicker. If you have an Air, I'd use that.

The larger model of that series (E7440) even has a second internal HD bay good for a 2.5" drive in addition to the MSATA one. A little heavier, but potentially a photographer's road trip dream machine with a 2TB drive for long term storage after manipulating a day's worth of shots on the SSD drive and the passable 14" 1080P monitor. The weight is up there, however.

The 7440 does have one issue - Symantec PGP disk encryption potentially doesn't support 4K monitors to unlock the drive. So, enter the data "in the dark" and then review hard drive activity to confirm it's still booting. Several parts also failed over the years, requiring swap-outs. Nothing dramatic if you're handy with a screwdriver, but slightly annoying.

But Windows 10 runs fine on the thing and with 16GB of RAM, I never ran out. The e-port connector also allows oodles of cheap docks to attach too, unlike the current Thunderbolt selection.
 


Very interesting - I didn't realize it was a MacBook Air-like "ultrabook" until I just did a quick lookup on Amazon. Could be an excellent option for a variety of uses if it's reliable.
It's not as svelte or quite as light as an Air, but it's not nearly as large or heavy as the 13" MacBook Pro it replaced. I consider it an excellent compromise for people wanting something very portable but needing the built-in connectivity the Air lacks.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's what Apple's current competition looks like for customers willing to consider non-Mac laptops, complete with Thunderbolt 3 and an interesting new graphics system, starting at $1299....
Ars Technica said:
Dell XPS 15 2-in-1 review: Meet the child of Intel and AMD’s unholy union
... Dell has taken one of the best 15-inch laptops on the market and made it just a little bit better in several small ways by using this new Intel/AMD configuration. The price premium won't be worth it for some consumers this iteration, but the performance benchmarks encourage optimism. I'm curious to see where Kaby Lake-G and future similar chips take us next. In the meantime, the Dell XPS 15 2-in-1 is easy to recommend if you want a 15-inch 2-in-1 with strong performance—as long as you don't mind the fan noise.

The Good
  • Kaby Lake-G doesn’t disappoint when it comes to GPU and CPU performance
  • This is still one of the best 15-inch consumer laptop screens out there
  • It’s somewhat thin for a 15-inch 2-in-1
  • The keyboard provides good feedback for what it is
  • It’s still a Dell XPS 15, so it’s still a good laptop
The Bad
  • Fan noise is a constant companion in all performance profiles
  • It doesn’t fully deliver on the promise of Kaby Lake-G in terms of size, weight, or thermals
  • RAM is no longer upgradeable
The Ugly
  • You guessed it: the webcam placement
 


DFG

And Razer also updated their Blade laptop.

Things I like:
- overall design is a good compromise between thinness and usefulness
- Al chassis
- good selection of ports
- nice thin bezels but the webcam still is on the top edge
- 80 W battery
- 8th generation Intel Core i7
- 32 GB RAM
- Max-Q NVidia GTX 1060 or 1070
- 4k screen as option

Things I dislike:
- colorful keyboard illumination and garish logo
- there would be space for a numerical keypad

I wonder how hard it would be to install macOS.
Unfortunately the configuration I want will be around $3000...
 


Here's what Apple's current competition looks like for customers willing to consider non-Mac laptops, complete with Thunderbolt 3 and an interesting new graphics system, starting at $1299....
The XPS 2-in-1 seems one to avoid based on Lisa's review, especially in terms of value for the money:
Lisa @ MobileTechReview said:
I'm more hopeful for the standard laptop format Dell XPS 15, that's cheaper, and should have better "thermals."
Digital Trends said:
Can't imagine - with AMD's Ryzen mobile APUs and 8th Gen Intels appearing in some very appealing (and less appealing, but quite inexpensive) laptops - that Apple won't soon release some varied MacBook refreshes.
 


Engadget said:
After dropping $18,000 worth of phones, these are the toughest
So, what's the toughest (nonrugged) phone out there? The $500 Motorola Moto Z2 Force. ...

Apple's least-expensive phone didn't prove very tough at all. In fact, the $399 iPhone SE was rendered unusable before all of the others. ...

Four other phones — the $999 Apple iPhone X, the $810 LG V30, the $720 Samsung Galaxy S9 and the $329 LG X Venture — made it through to, and survived, our toilet test.
 


Post on Barton George's blog...

(Barton George says that hs is: "a Senior Architect in the office of CTO, focusing on Dell EMC’s efforts in the developer and DevOps spaces as well as the open source community. I am also the founder and lead of Project Sputnik, an Ubuntu-based laptop for developers, now in its fourth generation.")
Welcome the new Dell Precision developer editions!
Today I’m proud to announce the new the Linux-based Dell Precision Mobile workstation line: the 3530, 5530, 7530 and the 7730. These systems, which represent the fourth generation of the Precision developer editions, come preloaded with Ubuntu and have been RHEL certified.

These new thinner, lighter, premium-built Precision mobile workstations feature the latest Intel Core and Xeon processors, blazing-fast memory and professional graphics.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
PC World reports on some interesting computer technology from the Computex 2018 trade show. Highlights include massive CPU core collections, dual-screen designs that fold like a book, thermoelectric coolers, the lack of upcoming GeForce cards, Intel low-power display technology, a very innovative keyboard with Aimpad technology, screenpad technology that makes an interesting comparison with Apple's Touch Bar, and more.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This is a bit of an odd comparison, since I normally think of Chromebooks as inexpensive and MacBook Pros as high-priced, but these two models aren't so drastically different in price, and for the purposes noted here, an interesting comparison of end-user capabilities between two very different platforms. (This also highlights the concept of running smartphone apps on a laptop computer, as Apple is starting to do in a different way with its Marzipan initiative.)
Brooke Crothers/Forbes said:
Has The Google Pixelbook Reached Parity With The 13-inch MacBook Pro?
Overall Winner: Pixelbook (with a qualifier). A great convertible design, good performance, good battery life, and a beautiful display.

Qualifier: The Chrome OS won't run some popular applications. As I said above, though it now runs Microsoft Office and Microsoft OneDrive, Office is not quite the full-blown version you get on Windows. And while you can run things like Photoshop Express and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC (and more Photoshop apps are available on the web), the full Photoshop application isn't available. Of course, applications like iTunes aren't available, though there are workarounds, as Google spells out here.

But the fact is, Chrome is moving rapidly in the other direction: more and more popular apps are available and you can also run Android apps. So, it's fast approaching parity with the Mac and Windows. And the fact that it runs Android apps is leg-up on both Windows and the Mac.

I really like the ChromeBook platform now because it's secure, stable, easy to use, and self-maintains. And Chrome OS is more like mobile operating systems such as Android and iOS -- a refreshingly clean break from the old, creaky DOS/Windows/Mac platforms.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
With frequent commentary about Apple (AAPL) reaching the $1 trillion level, and all its related strategies and changes, I had never thought about Microsoft (MSFT) challenging Apple on the gaming front, though games comprise a large part of Apple's App Store profits and Apple often highlights them.
Business Insider said:
Microsoft is trying to become the 'Netflix of Gaming,' putting it on the path to $1 trillion
  • Microsoft could soon finish developing the next big thing in gaming.
  • Some on Wall Street haven't appreciated Microsoft's gaming potential, according to Morgan Stanley analyst Keith Weiss.
  • The gaming business is seeing a shift away from hardware and into software and streaming, which is in Microsoft's wheelhouse.
  • That puts Microsoft on the path to becoming a $1 trillion company.
 


DFG

Phoronix has a very interesting report, a comparison of macOS, Linux, and Windows 10 on the same MacBook Pro 15".
macOS 10.13 vs. Windows 10 vs. Clear/Fedora/openSUSE/Ubuntu Linux Benchmarks
The tested operating systems included:
- MacOS 10.13.4 as the latest at the time of testing with Apple LLVM 9.1.0 and the now default APFS file-system.
- Windows 10 Pro as of build 17134 with an NTFS file-system.
- Windows 10 Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) using Ubuntu 18.04 on the above-mentioned Windows 10 configuration.
- Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the Linux 4.15 kernel, GCC 7.3.0, and an EXT4 file-system.
- Clear Linux 22780 with the Linux 4.16 kernel, GCC 8.1.1, and EXT4.
- Fedora Workstation 28 with updates is the Linux 4.16 kernel, GCC 8.1.1, and EXT4.
- OpenSUSE Tumbleweed with the Linux 4.16 kernel, GCC 7.3.1, and its default file-system configuration of Btrfs root file-system with XFS home partition.
If you thought that the proprietary, "most advanced," OS on its proprietary hardware would swipe the field, think again. It turns out that plain Ubuntu beats macOS most of the time. This frankly surprised me--I guess too many years spent in the "reality distortion field."

I guess the Linux community is hard at work while in Cupertino the most they can produce these days is Dark Mode. In any case, good news for those like me that are ready to jump ship to Linux should Apple not deliver a decent MacBook Pro or lock down macOS too much in the near future.
 


DFG

Sorry, I posted a bit too hastily. Ubuntu wasn't faster than macOS in most benchmarks, but the other three Linux distributions were.
 


If you thought that the proprietary, "most advanced," OS on its proprietary hardware would swipe the field, think again. It turns out that plain Ubuntu beats macOS most of the time. This frankly surprised me--I guess too many years spent in the "reality distortion field."
I admit I didn't scan the entire article in detail, but that's not what the conclusion said - only ClearLinux was consistently faster, and macOS the winner the next most often. (I know little about ClearLinux, but understand it is a build sponsored by Intel and focused on speed). Worth noting that the Windows tests were the worst of all.

Leaving aside the details of the results, I think I'm not unusual in not caring much except when there's something very wrong (Finder performance, for example). I care about the user experience and whether that works for me, not raw speed of benchmarks. I'm not saying this means other users should be happy with the current state of Mac software, but raw speed is for many way down the list of important items.

There's a funny dichotomy in comments here: long threads about how support should go back to seven-year-old computers, contrasted with comments about pure, raw speed.

To each their own, but there are trade-offs. Personally, slightly better user software and compatibility and support for older machines are more important.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This cross-platform Phoronics test suite looks interesting - thanks for pointing it out - and I hope to dig into it a little further to see how useful it might be for Mac benchmarking. One thing I'd like to see, and haven't so far, is storage system benchmarks. I'm particularly interested, for example, in HFS+ and APFS performance versus Windows and Unix file systems.
 


But to be fair, nobody (or I should say very few) people are going to make a Linux-vs-Mac decision based on raw performance. They are going to use factors like application availability and ease-of-use.

And this is nothing new.

Back in 2002, when I got my Power Mac, I was seriously considering a Linux PC, a PC running Solaris and an inexpensive Sun workstation. If I was going to use applications available on all three platforms (probably all open source), I would've gone with one of the two Solaris options because it was the most stable (at the time) OS of the three.

I ended up going with the Mac because I could get commercial software like Microsoft Office and FileMaker for it, and the BSD system underneath Mac OS X (especially with the X11 component) was close enough to the Linux and Solaris environments that I could port over those applications as needed. But the decision was never based on raw performance numbers.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
But to be fair, nobody (or I should say very few) people are going to make a Linux-vs-Mac decision based on raw performance. They are going to use factors like application availability and ease-of-use....
I understand and appreciate what you wrote, but let me just note one potential twist:

As Apple drives harder and harder into automation and A.I. technologies (machine learning, A.R., face detection, media "memory" analysis/processing, ad infinitum), it's possible that the company could begin hurting performance of some tasks more noticeably and problematically.

We're already discussing macOS 10.14's demand for "Metal-capable" graphics hardware and software, and we've seen in the past some stunning performance problems creating by these sorts of Apple changes - for example, the performance impact on hard-drive systems starting with OS X 10.9, which was very dramatic in some cases (like mine, with terrible Finder delays for multiple drives with large numbers of files), or the system-crippling problems with Spotlight indexing, photoanalysisd, networking problems, etc.

On the flip side, automatic Windows 10 upgrades have been equally crippling, or worse.
 


As Apple drives harder and harder into automation and A.I. technologies (machine learning, A.R., face detection, media "memory" analysis/processing, ad infinitum), it's possible that the company could begin hurting performance of some tasks more noticeably and problematically.
No doubt about it. But that's not the question I was answering (but maybe it was the one that was asked?).

I don't think anyone today cares about how many "gigaflops" or whatever is reported by benchmark software. But they absolutely care about a UI that feels sluggish. If the apps feel slow or if they take too long to complete tasks, people will notice that. But if the perceived performance of several systems are all "good enough" (which is, of course very subjective), then the decision will shift over to factors other than performance.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I don't think anyone today cares about how many "gigaflops" or whatever is reported by benchmark software. But they absolutely care about a UI that feels sluggish. If the apps feel slow or if they take too long to complete tasks, people will notice that.
I agree completely, and I don't think these sorts of synthetic benchmarks reflect the end-user experience very well. On the other hand, I do have a good idea of how hard it is to do valid benchmarks on complex end-user environments vs. simple synthetic tests.
 


No doubt about it. But that's not the question I was answering (but maybe it was the one that was asked?).

I don't think anyone today cares about how many "gigaflops" or whatever is reported by benchmark software. But they absolutely care about a UI that feels sluggish. If the apps feel slow or if they take too long to complete tasks, people will notice that. But if the perceived performance of several systems are all "good enough" (which is, of course very subjective), then the decision will shift over to factors other than performance.
How about for a simpler UI? One that does not have infinitely nested menus or features that keep changing from version to version? One that actually reduces the number of clicks required to complete a task? One that does not require you to secretly know about hidden Option-menu choices? One that may actually have some form of documentation for these features?

A UI that feels sluggish is one thing; one I struggle to use is another.
 


How about for a simpler UI? One that does not have infinitely nested menus or features that keep changing from version to version? One that actually reduces the number of clicks required to complete a task? One that does not require you to secretly know about hidden Option-menu choices? One that may actually have some form of documentation for these features?

A UI that feels sluggish is one thing; one I struggle to use is another.
And keeping some UI features because they just work and everyone is familiar with them. For example, the Save As command that went away in Pages (and others). Or in Canvas Draw, where there is no Page Setup command (you have to pretend to print, then save the 'pretend to print' settings).

A consistent UI from all app makers would help. Page setup or document setup settings are scattered nearly everywhere and often buried in other dialog boxes. In the beginning, I believe that the consistent UI was extremely powerful, in that if you knew how to use one application, you effectively knew how to use the core of any other application. That seems to have gone away.
 


... I don't think anyone today cares about how many "gigaflops" or whatever is reported by benchmark software. But they absolutely care about a UI that feels sluggish. ...
Agreed. Benchmarks are mostly useful to compare hardware in situ. In a quiescent system they can be quite accurate at measuring CPU, GPU, disk access, et al. Benchmarking a system that is not quiescent is far from deterministic. Benchmarking a modern OS is a can of worms...
 


DFG

While we were left wanting for a MacBook Pro update at WWDC, Dell has updated their XPS line on their website. You can have the following system—an XPS Touch 15—for $2,299, a significant breakthrough in terms of value:
  • 8th generation i7-8750H 4.1 GHz (6 cores)
  • Ultra HD touchscreen 3840 x 2160 dpi (100% of AdobeRGB, 400 nits)
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050Ti (4 GB DDR5)
  • 32 GB DDR4 RAM (2x16 GB)
  • 1TB M.2 PCIe SSD
  • 97 Wh battery (!)
Dell XPS 15" configuration

You can also upgrade the processor to an i9-8950HK 4.8 GHz (6 cores) for an additional $350.

in my opinion this is quite a nice laptop that strikes a good balance between performance and thinness. The only downsides being the terrible webcam placement and the perhaps slightly inferior screen. I haven't checked the number of PCI lanes for the Thunderbolt 3 port and the SSD speed.

In terms of value for the money, this looks like a bargain compared to the $3,199 one has to shell out for a "comparable" MacBook Pro 15, which has an older processor (7th generation i7), 16 GB RAM, and a smaller battery.

Update:
  • Thunderbolt 3 has full 4 lanes PCIe, but performance with eGPU is low
  • SSD write speed is low
UltraBook Review has been posting a 'live' review.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This comparison highlights Apple's neglect and abuse of the Mac hardware market:
Wired said:
The Best Mac Alternatives
Another WWDC has come and gone, and even though Tim Cook and company showed off the future of Apple software, the company's Mac hardware has been left untouched. The Mac faithful, those devoted members of the community that kept the company afloat in the dark days, cling to every shred of hope that Apple throws their favorite Mac a little love.

Unfortunately, many Macs have been left behind by cheaper, better options on the Windows PC side of the fence. Consider for a moment that Apple still sells the 2013-era Mac Pro for $3,000—highway robbery from a pure performance perspective. Would you buy a car at its original MSRP even though it's been sitting on the lot for five years? I don't think so.

With that in mind, I've put together a list of excellent Windows alternatives to the most popular Mac models. Especially if you rely on your computers for your livelihood, there's no reason to wait on Apple to finally cater to your needs. From the low-end to beastly 32-core prosumer rigs, the PC world is getting really exciting again.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
No mention of macOS, but that sure would be interesting (and closer, given its Unix foundation, than Windows is to the Chrome/Android platform):
Digital Trends said:
The Pixelbook could soon run Windows 10
If you don’t want Chrome OS on Google’s Pixelbook, Windows 10 may become a native operating system alternative. Evidence of Windows 10’s eventual support appear in Chrome OS commits and code-reviews listing Microsoft’s Windows Hardware Certification and its Windows Hardware Lab Kit. Both are used to certify devices for Microsoft’s platform.
... Google is seemingly attempting to cram four worlds into one flagship laptop. In addition to dual-boot support for Windows 10 and Android apps running natively on the device, Chrome OS will support Linux-based apps too starting with the Pixelbook. Technically, Chrome OS and Android are based on the Linux core (aka kernel), but much like what Google is doing with Android apps, Linux applications will simply run in a virtual container on the platform without any major modifications.
 


This comparison highlights Apple's neglect and abuse of the Mac hardware market:
But please do remember that iFixit declares the Surface Notebook to be unrepairable. See their tear-down here: https://www.ifixit.com/Device/Microsoft_Surface_Laptop

There may be deadline pressure to publish but it doesn't excuse Brendan Nystedt's failure to exercise due diligence. Just a few moments of web research would have done it.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
It's not just Rogue Amoeba and Wired that noticed Apple's lack of Mac hardware support, but Apple's fighting back... with advertising (rather than hardware).
The Verge said:
Apple’s ‘Behind the Mac’ ads have a double meaning
Apple just released four new ads focused on the Mac. The ads are teeming with emotion, showing earnest people doing creative things behind their Mac computers. Unfortunately, the series is dubbed ‘Behind the Mac’ at a time when many worry that Apple has lost the plot causing the Mac to fall behind the competition.

... I’m sure the message we’re supposed to take away from the new ad campaign is that Apple is committed to the Mac platform, despite evidence to the contrary. Great. But instead of new ads, wouldn’t it be better if Apple released some new Macs instead?
 


This comparison highlights Apple's neglect and abuse of the Mac hardware market:
Part of that may just be due to computer years having dropped from 20 man years to about five, i.e. a 4-year-old computer that used to be like an 80-year-old man is now a 20-year-old man.

But has anyone gone into an Apple Store recently? We had a Genius Bar appointment yesterday, and I was surprised to see that Macs now take up a very small amount of the vast floor space - less than that ridiculous watch!
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Part of that may just be due to computer years having dropped from 20 man years to about five, i.e. a 4-year-old computer that used to be like an 80-year-old man is now a 20-year-old man.
I don't think that excuse holds any water here, when Windows computer makers are doing frequent updates that have left Apple's moribund Macs far behind, and Apple hasn't made any significant Mac hardware updates for years and years at a time in many cases. The Mac Pro and Mac Mini and MacBook Air are all prime examples with much better modern alternatives in the Windows world at much more competitive prices (plus Dell's "developer edition" Linux laptops from the XPS series).
 



But have you seen the Samsung phone ad, pretty much spot-on against Apple iPhone? I was surprised at how I wanted to replace mine with a Galaxy phone.
The ad made no sense to me. Androids also run into slow WiFi and cellular networks. It came off as a feeble attempt to disparage the iPhone based on disinformation. It reminds me of the visionaries at Microsoft who held a mock funeral for the iPhone's imminent demise back in 2010.
 


The ad made no sense to me. Androids also run into slow WiFi and cellular networks. It came off as a feeble attempt to disparage the iPhone based on disinformation. It reminds me of the visionaries at Microsoft who held a mock funeral for the iPhone's imminent demise back in 2010.
I agree. The woman approaches TSA and hasn't pulled up her boarding pass on the app (or added it to Wallet where it's available without even unlocking the phone). But then, whoever has the Samsung has pulled up the pass before standing in front of the agent.

Or the Uber thing. WTF was that about? Use a Samsung and you will never get in a wrong car again?

The only relevant item might be the game play which will slow down if the battery has depleted in an older phone. So spend $29 and get a new one.

Weak.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts