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8. Apple's treatment of independent resellers and repair shops, forcing most of them out of business.
This, to me, has been one of Apple's most egregious actions. Visiting the independent resellers used to be an enjoyable experience. Because the ones in my area stocked a wide range of third-party Mac software and accessories, it was a great way to learn what was available for the platform. Often, the sales people were passionate about the Mac, and would enthusiastically recommend solutions.

Now they have all been forced out of business by the opening of our local Apple Store, where there is virtually nothing in the way of third-party product and where the sales staff's eyes glaze over if you want to discuss anything other than watch bands.

Since I find 90% of the stuff in the App Store to be shoddily programmed rubbish, with often only a handful of ratings and wildly varying reviews, it is now much more difficult to find useful things to use with my Mac's. I rely now almost completely on MacInTouch for this sort of information!
 


MacBook Pro, (Retina, 13-in., Late 2013)
MacBookPro11,1
2.8 GHz Intel Core i7
16 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Intel Iris 1536 MB
1TB SSD
I agree 100%. This is the same machine I use. It's a gem! (Mine has only a 500GB SSD, but it's fabulously fast anyway.) Doesn't have very many "warts." Lots of ports. No dongles. I'm not looking forward to the day Apple forces it to deprecate with a system "upgrade."
 


Doing the bean-counting here (since Apple no longer seems driven by anything but numbers and an unhealthy obsession with thinness), why bother with the expense of maintaining a competitive desktop/laptop platform/OS to hold 10% of the market?
A lot of that 10% of the market are the pro's - content creators, programmers, consultants, etc. If Apple loses those people, then who is going to write programs for iPads and iPhones? Why would consultants want to live in a Mac ecosystem if there are no pro computers for them? Apple would be shooting themselves in the foot if they lost that share.
 


MacBook Pro, (Retina, 13-in., Late 2013)
MacBookPro11,1
2.8 GHz Intel Core i7
16 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Intel Iris 1536 MB
1TB SSD
I have a very similar model: MacBook Pro, 15-inch, late 2013, 2GHz i7. I really love this laptop. But what will I buy next? For that matter, I want to buy my granddaughter a new Mac for her first year in college. But Apple's new models are overpriced and apparently fraught with design issues. Do I try to find a refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro? Any suggestions out there?
 


I have a very similar model: MacBook Pro, 15-inch, late 2013, 2GHz i7. I really love this laptop. But what will I buy next? For that matter, I want to buy my granddaughter a new Mac for her first year in college. But Apple's new models are overpriced and apparently fraught with design issues. Do I try to find a refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro? Any suggestions out there?
A while back, after the announcement that my 2011 MacBook Pro 17" was being orphaned, I found a refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro 15" - 2.8GHz, 16 GB RAM, 1TB SSD, and AMD R9 M370X graphics. It seemed kind of expensive at the time, but I guess it was good I jumped on it. Near as I can tell, it was probably a BTO model with maxed CPU and SSD. I guess it was good to get it, I don't see this configuration come up for sale very often.
 


A while back, after the announcement that my 2011 MacBook Pro 17" was being orphaned, I found a refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro 15" - 2.8GHz, 16 GB RAM, 1TB SSD, and AMD R9 M370X graphics. It seemed kind of expensive at the time, but I guess it was good I jumped on it. Near as I can tell, it was probably a BTO model with maxed CPU and SSD. I guess it was good to get it, I don't see this configuration come up for sale very often.
I recently purchased a 2015 MacBook Pro 15" Retina 2.2GHz, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD from macofalltrades for $1,299. They have quite a few of these superb machines on their web site, the last of the great MacBook Pros in my opinion, some of which, like mine, are in 'excellent' condition. (I am not an employee but just an extremely satisfied customer of theirs from years of doing business with them.)
 


My 2015 MacBook Pro 13" was configured with 16 GB of RAM, and I upgraded the 1TB Apple SSD to a 2TB SSD from OWC recently. I maxed the Core i7 CPU clock speed at 3.1 Ghz at time of purchase. Have another new one in the box as my battle spare. It does all I need and travels the world with me.
 


I have a very similar model: MacBook Pro, 15-inch, late 2013, 2GHz i7. I really love this laptop. But what will I buy next? For that matter, I want to buy my granddaughter a new Mac for her first year in college. But Apple's new models are overpriced and apparently fraught with design issues. Do I try to find a refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro? Any suggestions out there?
I agree that the "older" models seem to have been built much better, and with more usable features. I have purchased multiple MacBook Pros from Other World Computing ("OWC") and with good results. They stock "reconditioned" models from 2013 forward; my last order was a "mid-2015 MacBook Pro Retina, and I was allowed to customize my order with varying SSD size, memory, and video card choices. Immediately before finalizing my order, I was provided the opportunity to "upgrade" my order to a model in "better" condition (i.e., upgrade from "very good" to "excellent") for a nominal charge, which I elected to do. All in all, very satisfied with both my purchase, and the opportunity to remain with a viable, older model.
 


My desktop machine is a 2012 build-to-order MacBook Pro Retina with 2.6GHz Core i7. It has 16 GB of memory, and I have upgraded the internal SSD to 1TB. It is attached to an Apple Thunderbolt Display, and I have a number of external Thunderbolt drives attached. Maybe 4 or 5 times a year I detach it from the desktop system and travel with it.

This machine has quite a lot asked of it: regular Photoshop and Illustrator use with large files; regular Logic Pro X use, with up to 18 channels; occasional Final Cut Pro use; and regular Aperture/Lightroom/Photos use. Once or twice a year I use it for MainStage on 4-hour gigs, and it has never failed me. It is on almost 24/7 – it shuts down Saturday night until Sunday morning. I probably use it 4 to 6 hours a day. I know it won't last a lot longer, and it will probably collapse all at once (I have 3 levels of backup). When that happens, I'll have to get a new machine. What I'll get, I don't know – I've looked at getting a Mac Mini (the least expensive option) or a new MacBook Pro, and haven't been able to make a decision, or I probably would have bought a replacement by now.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... What I'll get, I don't know – I've looked at getting a Mac Mini (the least expensive option) or a new MacBook Pro, and haven't been able to make a decision, or I probably would have bought a replacement by now.
Thinking about your type of work, the Mac Mini seems pretty nice, with both HDMI and multiple DisplayPort/Thunderbolt 3 outputs, two extra USB 3 ports, Ethernet, and the option of a 6-core CPU, which seemed pretty fast to me, and it's also silent/quiet, even when doing a bunch of work. (My MacBook Pro ramps up the fans when taxed with photo work.) If you don't need mobility, the Mini seems like a pretty attractive option (though I guess you could also consider an iMac 5K... equpped with an SSD... for the benefits of dedicated graphics hardware).

You'd probably also want to get a Thunderbolt 3-Thunderbolt 2 adapter and possibly an SD card reader (if you don't use your existing MacBook Pro for that).
 


My desktop machine is a 2012 build-to-order MacBook Pro Retina with 2.6GHz Core i7. It has 16 GB of memory, and I have upgraded the internal SSD to 1TB. It is attached to an Apple Thunderbolt Display, and I have a number of external Thunderbolt drives attached. Maybe 4 or 5 times a year I detach it from the desktop system and travel with it.
This machine has quite a lot asked of it: regular Photoshop and Illustrator use with large files; regular Logic Pro X use, with up to 18 channels; occasional Final Cut Pro use; and regular Aperture/Lightroom/Photos use. Once or twice a year I use it for MainStage on 4-hour gigs, and it has never failed me. It is on almost 24/7 – it shuts down Saturday night until Sunday morning. I probably use it 4 to 6 hours a day. I know it won't last a lot longer, and it will probably collapse all at once (I have 3 levels of backup). When that happens, I'll have to get a new machine. What I'll get, I don't know – I've looked at getting a Mac Mini (the least expensive option) or a new MacBook Pro, and haven't been able to make a decision, or I probably would have bought a replacement by now.
I have found the 2018 Mac Mini (i7, 16GB, 512GB) to be an extremely satisfactory successor to the 2012 Mac Mini (i7, 16GB, 512GB). Except for needing a Thunderbolt 3-to-Thunderbolt 2 adapter to connect my external storage, and a Thunderbolt 2-to-FireWire 800 adapter at the end of the chain to keep my FireWire devices working, it was a drop-in replacement. I used these two adapters in another drop-in replacement for a client with only FireWire 800 storage.

Mojave has not been a problem for this machine.... If you were reasonably satisfied with the 2012 Mac Mini built to your requirements, the 2018 BTO will be more than satisfactory.

The newer i7 CPU may still perform better for you than the older model with hardware multithreading turned off (to avoid side-channel vulnerabilities). The higher memory, I/O, and internal SSD speeds all contribute greatly to this.
 


Thanks, Ric and James, for your input. I have definitely been thinking along the lines of a Mac Mini. The other thing is, for MainStage work, the Mini actually would be portable, with a smaller display. I always have to plug in my laptop anyway when using MainStage, since a 4-hour gig, with 4 MIDI devices and untold audio processing, would leave laptop's battery in the dust before the end of the second set, if it lasted that long. I already have a 2015 MacBook Air 11" as a spare, and may eventually upgrade that to a new 13" MacBook Air.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I already have a 2015 MacBook Air 11" as a spare, and may eventually upgrade that to a new 13" MacBook Air.
I was shocked when I looked at a new MacBook Air yesterday (at Costco) that it seemed to be the same size as a 13" MacBook Pro. The specs show that there's not much difference in size, while the MacBook Pro certainly packs more power, if the price difference isn't a barrier (and if you don't need a "gold" color).

MacBook Air:
Height: 0.16–0.61 inch (0.41–1.56 cm)​
Width: 11.97 inches (30.41 cm)​
Depth: 8.36 inches (21.24 cm)​
Weight: 2.75 pounds (1.25 kg)​


MacBook Pro:
Height: 0.59 inch (1.49 cm)​
Width: 11.97 inches (30.41 cm)​
Depth: 8.36 inches (21.24 cm)​
Weight: 3.02 pounds (1.37 kg)​
 


I recently purchased a 2015 MacBook Pro 15" Retina 2.2GHz, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD from macofalltrades for $1,299. They have quite a few of these superb machines on their web site, the last of the great MacBook Pros in my opinion, some of which, like mine, are in 'excellent' condition. (I am not an employee but just an extremely satisfied customer of theirs from years of doing business with them.)
I made a similar purchase on eBay. Machine was mint and had only 3 (three) power cycles. I strongly believe the current era will be referred to as Apple's "malaise era", similar to American carmakers in the 70's, when they couldn't make a decent car to save their lives. You really have to wonder what they are thinking in Cupertino.
 


I made a similar purchase on eBay. Machine was mint and had only 3 (three) power cycles. I strongly believe the current era will be referred to as Apple's "malaise era", similar to American carmakers in the 70's, when they couldn't make a decent car to save their lives. You really have to wonder what they are thinking in Cupertino.
When John Sculley was running Apple (without Steve), he used the same sales technique as when he was running Pepsi: Stuff the shelves with as many variants as possible, in order to squeeze the competition off said shelves. It may work in the supermarkets, but the computer stores told Apple to take a hike, as the cheaper HPs and Dells came in very few variants, and, therefore, were easier to differentiate and sell (for the salespeople).

Steve's return reduced the product matrix to four quadrants, and the success of that was reliant upon great hardware, not gimmicky half-baked, designed-for-failure components. Today's Macs are awful (well, the iMac, as unrepairable as it is, works fairly well). Tim Cook will look back at his tenure at Apple and wonder where it all went wrong....
 


I already have a 2015 MacBook Air 11" as a spare, and may eventually upgrade that to a new 13" MacBook Air.
I had forgotten about the MacBook Air. This would seem a good choice for my granddaughter as she goes off to college. Are the new Airs as problematic as the new Pros? Maybe a refurbished 2015 or 2016 Air would be a good choice?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I had forgotten about the MacBook Air. This would seem a good choice for my granddaughter as she goes off to college. Are the new Airs as problematic as the new Pros? Maybe a refurbished 2015 or 2016 Air would be a good choice?
Apple is still selling the 2017 MacBook Air, which is a great computer with a good keyboard, MagSafe power connector, SD Card slot, USB 3 Type A and Thunderbolt 2/DisplayPort connectors, but it lacks a modern "retina" screen (though it can drive a 4K external monitor), and Apple's pricing is ridiculously high for it. (You can get third-party SSD upgrades at lower prices than Apple charges for those.)

Honestly, a Windows laptop is probably a better bet than Apple's latest laptops, as much as I dislike/distrust Windows personally, unless Apple fixes its laptop keyboards and gains sanity on pricing.

It might be a good idea to wait and see what Apple announces at WWDC in less than a month, though.
 


Honestly, a Windows laptop is probably a better bet than Apple's offerings, as much as I dislike/distrust Windows personally, unless Apple fixes its laptop keyboards and gains sanity on pricing. It might be a good idea to wait and see what Apple announces at WWDC in less than a month.
While I agree that a Windows laptop is a possible replacement for the MacBook Air, I would caution anyone suggesting such a computer to be well aware of the necessity of "protection". This includes a good anti-virus and regular (weekly?) updates of the OS. If the student is responsible enough to do such updates (or has the auto-update turned on), then it could save a significant amount of money.

With many of the new college students already having iPhones (with auto-update on), not even thinking about such things as updates, the proper attitude about such updates may be hard to curate.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
While I agree that a Windows laptop is a possible replacement for the MacBook Air, I would caution anyone suggesting such a computer to be well aware of the necessity of "protection". This includes a good anti-virus and regular (weekly?) updates of the OS.
I think that goes without saying, and my understanding is that Microsoft has advanced security software built into Windows 10, as well as auto-updates (which, of course, have had issues of their own).

What additional Windows anti-virus software do you recommend?
 


I think that goes without saying, and my understanding is that Microsoft has advanced security software built into Windows 10, as well as auto-updates (which, of course, have had issues of their own). What additional Windows anti-virus software do you recommend?
As I mentioned (somewhere else in MacInTouch, I haven't had much exposure to Windows over the last few years, so I would be hesitant to recommend anything specific. And, while I know that Microsoft has improved the virus protection in Windows, I do know that my former employer (where my experience with Windows was gained) still uses some kind of third-party virus protection. I believe it is Norton or McAfee, but wouldn't swear to which might now be used.
 


As I mentioned (somewhere else in MacInTouch, I haven't had much exposure to Windows over the last few years, so I would be hesitant to recommend anything specific. And, while I know that Microsoft has improved the virus protection in Windows, I do know that my former employer (where my experience with Windows was gained) still uses some kind of third-party virus protection. I believe it is Norton or McAfee, but wouldn't swear to which might now be used.
On my Windows 10 VM, I use the Microsoft Windows Security that is built in.
 


While I agree that a Windows laptop is a possible replacement for the MacBook Air, I would caution anyone suggesting such a computer to be well aware of the necessity of "protection". This includes a good anti-virus and regular (weekly?) updates of the OS. If the student is responsible enough to do such updates (or has the auto-update turned on), then it could save a significant amount of money.
FWIW, many schools require that student computers have anti-virus software installed when connecting to the school network, regardless of whether the computer is a Mac or a Windows PC. For example, my niece attends a university that requires Macs to have Sophos anti-virus tools installed. Most schools that have such requirements provide the software free of charge to students.

By the way, it's worth checking a school's website before making hardware or software purchases for a student. While academic hardware discounts aren't as large as they used to be, they still can save a reasonable amount of money, especially for higher-end systems. Also, many universities have site licenses that allow students to install common software programs at little or no cost. For example, students at my niece's university can install Office 365 at no charge, and they are eligible for significant discounts on many other tools.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
By the way, it's worth checking a school's website before making hardware or software purchases for a student. While academic hardware discounts aren't as large as they used to be, they still can save a reasonable amount of money, especially for higher-end systems.
Thanks for mentioning that - it's a really good point.

As an example, Apple's absurdly overpriced 2017-vintage MacBook Air drops from $999 retail to $849 with educational pricing. (In the past, I've found education discounts similar to discounts for refurbished models.)

The MacBook Air, by the way, got two friends’ kids through four years of college each (the younger just graduated), and the computers are still working well. Their prices haven’t dropped in 7 years, though. :-(

The next one is heading to college with a 15” Dell Gaming laptop, bigger, more powerful, and completely accessible/upgradable (and equipped with Thunderbolt 3 and M.2 SSD).
 


By the way, it's worth checking a school's website before making hardware or software purchases for a student. While academic hardware discounts aren't as large as they used to be, they still can save a reasonable amount of money, especially for higher-end systems.
I would go so far as to say you need to speak personally with the specific department of the school (university or college) being considered for the latest information. This information can sometimes be hidden, obscure, not available, or, in some cases, out of date online due to the rapid pace of obsolescence. This information is best collected on school visits during the decision process. Even the model of calculator required can vary widely from discipline to discipline.

Engineering students can have a much different set of hardware and software needs even when compared to similar disciplines within the department, depending on the school. At Penn State, for example, the College of Engineering has the following guidelines. Note how the Architectural and Biomedical Engineering departments have slightly different requirements, and that none of them mention Linux at all.

At Carnegie Mellon, they take a slightly different approach, and include Linux support in a similar department.

Most all institutions of higher education still maintain large computer labs scattered around campus for student use containing all the software a student may need outside of the basics. It should be of importance for the student to familiarize themselves with these in case of problems with their personally owned hardware.

Which brings me to my final recommendation. Where will the student get technical support or repairs when away from home? If bringing Apple hardware, is there an Apple Store local to the school? How does the student get there if needed? Does the school itself provide onsite warranty service? Regardless, it is best to purchase an AppleCare plan for such needs. In the case of Penn State, there is no Apple Store within hours of the campus. Choosing a Windows laptop from Dell or Lenovo may get you onsite warranty repairs depending on the policy selected at the time of purchase.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch


Thanks, Ric and James, for your input. I have definitely been thinking along the lines of a Mac Mini. The other thing is, for MainStage work, the Mini actually would be portable, with a smaller display. I always have to plug in my laptop anyway when using MainStage, since a 4-hour gig, with 4 MIDI devices and untold audio processing, would leave laptop's battery in the dust before the end of the second set, if it lasted that long. I already have a 2015 MacBook Air 11" as a spare, and may eventually upgrade that to a new 13" MacBook Air.
Please consider a small UPS for field work with a Mini. Riding through power glitches is the main advantage of the laptop battery. You won't have that with the Mini. And you don't want to tell anyone that you lost their performance because the power flickered.
 


I think that goes without saying, and my understanding is that Microsoft has advanced security software built into Windows 10, as well as auto-updates (which, of course, have had issues of their own). What additional Windows anti-virus software do you recommend?
I would highly recommend Malwarebytes.
 


Please consider a small UPS for field work with a Mini.
Or a big one, if you have the money.

My home server is a Mac Mini. I have it attached to an APC SmartUPS 1500 (SMT1500). Including a few external hard drives, an LCD monitor and some network gear (cable modem and router), I have over 90 minutes of run-time.

This is enough to ride out most power outages, and for the longer ones, I have plenty of time to finish my work and shut down. And Apple's Energy Saver control panel recognizes it when the USB cable is attached, so it will auto-shutdown when the battery runs below 10%.
 



One other tip for college purchases: if you buy through the campus stores (which usually have decent deals), you may not have to pay sales tax. Worth checking out!
 



If I were to use that UPS for a gig using the Mac Mini and MainStage, it would weigh more than the rest of my performance rig combined!
I wouldn't consider trying to carry it - it weighs far too much to be portable.

For such a situation, the best (but sadly, far from inexpensive) solution would be to get a rack-mountable UPS and bolt it onto the bottom space of a road-case A/V rack (along with other gear, like your amplifier and mixer). As long as the rack is on wheels (so you or your roadie don't get a hernia), it could be good solution.
 


Apple’s prices are outpacing not only inflation but also other gadget makers. Yet would switching be worth the cost?
Washington Post said:
Your Apple products are getting more expensive. Here’s how they get away with it.
Apple has never made cheap stuff. But this fall many of its prices increased 20 percent or more. The MacBook Air went from $1,000 to $1,200. A Mac Mini leaped from $500 to $800. It felt as though the value proposition that has made Apple products no-brainers might unravel.

For some perspective, we charted out the past few years of prices on a few iconic Apple products. Then we compared them with other brands and some proprietary data about Americans’ phone purchase habits from mobile analytics firm BayStreet Research .

What we learned: Being loyal to Apple is getting expensive. Many Apple product prices are rising faster than inflation — faster, even, than the price of prescription drugs or going to college. Yet when Apple offers cheaper options for its most important product, the iPhone, Americans tend to take the more expensive choice. So while Apple isn’t charging all customers more, it’s definitely extracting more money from frequent upgraders.
 


Apple’s prices are outpacing not only inflation but also other gadget makers. Yet would switching be worth the cost?
It's Apple's version of the subscription plan. Get people invested in the system - iTunes, iCloud, App Store etc - and once they're hooked, jack the prices up.

It's trivial for Apple to 'force' people to upgrade by bombarding them with system updates that either deprecate their existing hardware or exclude them from security or new features.
New phone? You need the new iTunes and a new machine to run it on.

It's no different to banks and insurance companies. They figure they can put the prices up as much as they want, because people think it's too much trouble to 'switch.'
 


It's Apple's version of the subscription plan.
I've been running an architectural company for more than 30 years. I've purchased hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of gear from Apple. The following comments are based on that experience and are my very abbreviated thoughts on buying Apple products:

Rule #1: Never ever buy the latest and greatest. Incremental improvements are most often very minor, after all. The performance delta is barely noticed, except by the heaviest users. Other office users are usually provided hand-me-downs from workstations; nowadays any Mac will wallop any spreadsheet or word processing document. (Apple's lionization of a dark background exemplifies just how difficult it is to obtain real performance gains.)

Rule #2: Upgrading is more often driven by compatibility, either hardware or software. A five-year-old Mac is stunningly capable, unless (giving two examples out of many) you need Thunderbolt 3, or unless iWeb just will not run.

Rule #3: This is the Big Magilla - buy refurbs, and always buy the Apple Protection Plan. Refurbs, walking hand in hand with Rule #1, take the edge off the price delta that accompanies Macs.
 


A testament to Apple longevity: my 2006 white MacBook still runs perfectly, though it's on its third fan and second battery, owing to heavy use. With a modified ISO from Matt Gadient, I converted it to a MintBook, now running the latest 64-bit Linux Mint Cinnamon. No speed demon, but it would be a fine backup machine for email and web browsing if my Mac Mini goes down....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
  1. As a quintessential example of abusive behavior, you can't say "no." Apple won't let you stop its very forceful demands for confusing and problematic "upgrades", Apple ID, iCloud, and 2FA (with its Apple device dependencies), its invisible A.I. "photo analysis" daemon, various forms of advertising, and you can't even remove unwanted Apple apps.
  2. Apple's pricing for memory and storage upgrades is abusive.
  3. Apple's confusing hide-and-seek user interfaces are abusive.
  4. Apple lies to customers in Apple Stores are blatently abusive.
  5. Apple "stonewalling" on product defects is extremely abusive.
  6. (Apple's treatment of developers and partners also offers examples of various abuses.)
7. Apple forcing unwanted content onto customers' devices without asking permission: quintessential abusive behavior.
8. Apple's treatment of independent resellers and repair shops, forcing most of them out of business.
10. Sherlocking Apple developers.​
#abuse #appleabuse
 



I've been running an architectural company for more than 30 years. I've purchased hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of gear from Apple.
....
Rule #3: This is the Big Magilla - buy refurbs, and always buy the Apple Protection Plan. Refurbs, walking hand in hand with Rule #1, take the edge off the price delta that accompanies Macs.
I would echo similar feelings about system purchases for medium-sized businesses, except for the last item. Refurbs are super, but if you are buying multiple multiples of Apple hardware, then the statistics strongly favour not paying for AppleCare. On average you will not pay more for repairs than you pay in AppleCare premiums, and people who buy a lot of Apple hardware have enough "on average" purchases to ensure that they will come out ahead. "Self insurance" is really the way to go. I generally recommend that if you are going to purchase five or more systems from Apple over the long haul (and most families hit this mark fairly easily, businesses even more so), you are better off forgoing the AppleCare.

Of course, it doesn't feel like a smart decision when you are stuck with a multi-hundred-dollar repair bill. You have to keep reminding yourself that you would have been worse off paying for many multiple-hundred dollar AppleCare purchases over the years.

If a system craps out in the first year and gets repaired under the "standard" coverage, I tell people that in that situation it might be ok to buy the extended coverage, but even then, I suspect that the numbers still come out in Apple's favour for most businesses.
 


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