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I would echo similar feelings about system purchases for medium-sized businesses, except for the last item. Refurbs are super, but if you are buying multiple multiples of Apple hardware, then the statistics strongly favour not paying for AppleCare. On average you will not pay more for repairs than you pay in AppleCare premiums, and people who buy a lot of Apple hardware have enough "on average" purchases to ensure that they will come out ahead. "Self insurance" is really the way to go. I generally recommend that if you are going to purchase five or more systems from Apple over the long haul (and most families hit this mark fairly easily, businesses even more so), you are better off forgoing the AppleCare.

Of course, it doesn't feel like a smart decision when you are stuck with a multi-hundred-dollar repair bill. You have to keep reminding yourself that you would have been worse off paying for many multiple-hundred dollar AppleCare purchases over the years.

If a system craps out in the first year and gets repaired under the "standard" coverage, I tell people that in that situation it might be ok to buy the extended coverage, but even then, I suspect that the numbers still come out in Apple's favour for most businesses.
...unless you buy any MacBook/Pro with a butterfly keyboard; then you have a $700 repair bill in your future. Bank on it.
 


...unless you buy any MacBook/Pro with a butterfly keyboard; then you have a $700 repair bill in your future. Bank on it.
Not quite true though. Apple will cover your butterfly keyboard repairs costs for 4 years from purchase (and that's longer than AppleCare would cover you). Accordingly, you should make sure to sell on and upgrade any eligible MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro model within that 4 year period. Given Apple's current pushy nature for software/OS/security updates and forced obsolescence practices, that's probably not that difficult to plan for.
 


Not quite true though. Apple will cover your butterfly keyboard repairs costs for 4 years from purchase (and that's longer than AppleCare would cover you). Accordingly, you should make sure to sell on and upgrade any eligible MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro model within that 4 year period. Given Apple's current pushy nature for software/OS/security updates and forced obsolescence practices, that's probably not that difficult to plan for.
Graham, you've actually made my point: A Mac with the butterfly keyboard is essentially worthless at the four year mark unless you can find a sucker to take it off your hands for something($) before the keyboard fails yet again. In the case of a low-end 15" MacBook Pro selling today for $2400, that means you are essentially renting it for $600 per year but hoping you can recover some of that expense if another poor soul is willing to accept an inevitable $700 repair on a machine that's past the four-year-old mark; although I suppose you might simply discount the value of the machine by that $700 when you sell it. The invisible hand will probably do this for you.
 



A testament to Apple longevity: my 2006 white MacBook still runs perfectly, though it's on its third fan and second battery, owing to heavy use. With a modified ISO from Matt Gadient, I converted it to a MintBook, now running the latest 64-bit Linux Mint Cinnamon. No speed demon, but it would be a fine backup machine for email and web browsing if my Mac Mini goes down....
I would be interested in that modified ISO from Matt Gadient if you could point me in the general direction! Thanks.
 




I've heard good things about Apple refurbs, but then I saw this video and cringed at how well Apple "refurbished" it.
Apple uses water damaged boards in Apple refurbished devices
The majority of Apple products I've bought since around 1995 have been Apple-direct refurbs. I don't doubt that it's possible Apple and (especially) third-party refurbishers cut corners, but I haven't had any problems at all with:
beige G3 tower​
iPod Touch, 3rd or 4th generation​
iPad Mini​
iPad Mini 2​
iPad Mini 4​
2017 iMac​

And don't forget Apple not only provides its standard 1 year warranty on refurbs but also sells AppleCare for them. So, I think it would be pretty self defeating for Apple to sell shecky refurbs.
 


7. Apple forcing unwanted content onto customers' devices without asking permission: quintessential abusive behavior.​
I am rebuilding a Mac Mini Mid-2010 (Mac Mini 4,1), building it from Snow Leopard to High Sierra, one update at a time, just, well, because. I had just installed an SSD, and wanted to play.

I'm not using previous downloads (of which I have saved installers for each major macOS release from 10.3-ish up), but instead installed from the Snow Leopard DVD and downloaded each OS from a new download direct from the Mac App Store. Again, well, just because.

After installing Yosemite (10.10.5) I had the machine auto-check for updates. I saw 4 updates noted under the single Update button, so I clicked the More button to see what each suggested update was listed for a base Yosemite 10.10.5 install: it listed Safari, Remote Desktop client, a Yosemite Security update, and... macOS High Sierra (10.13)!
 


I am rebuilding a Mac Mini Mid-2010 (Mac Mini 4,1), building it from Snow Leopard to High Sierra, one update at a time, just, well, because. I had just installed an SSD, and wanted to play. I'm not using previous downloads (of which I have saved installers for each major macOS release from 10.3-ish up), but instead installed from the Snow Leopard DVD and downloaded each OS from a new download direct from the Mac App Store. Again, well, just because.
After installing Yosemite (10.10.5) I had the machine auto-check for updates. I saw 4 updates noted under the single Update button, so I clicked the More button to see what each suggested update was listed for a base Yosemite 10.10.5 install: it listed Safari, Remote Desktop client, a Yosemite Security update, and... macOS High Sierra (10.13)!
Other than to play and see what is installed — and this is fine for learning — if your intention was to get to a specific OSX version, then the recommended procedure is to install that version only. Otherwise, you end up with extra system files from previous versions that don't get cleaned up.

Also keep in mind that starting with macOS 10.13 or higher, the file system changed from Mac OS Extended (HFS+) to APFS, which can affect whether older apps work or not. Plus, make sure that you have some kind of backup, whether Time Machine or clone, because currently there are no tools to repair APFS volumes if directories get corrupted.

Again, Apple's not giving the developers the necessary technical documentation for APFS, etc.
 



While I do have tremendous respect for the Linux aficionados, the lack of certain specific categories of professional-level software available only from commercial, for-profit developers makes Linux a nice stop-gap OS between unsupported in macOS and the recycling center - nice for a hand-me-down machine with few requirements other than Web, email, and LibreOffice. (I've opined on this elsewhere on MacInTouch and won't repeat the specifics here.)

What I've done for otherwise-decent Macs for which Mojave is not an option is install Windows 10, so they remain updated security-wise from an OS vendor (which Linux can do but macOS can't) and can take advantage of commercial software whose developers have not seen fit to make available in Linux.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For what it's worth:
Laptop Magazine said:
Best & Worst Laptop Brands 2019
... After two years in the top spot, Lenovo has been dethroned by our 2019 Best and Worst Brands winner, HP. Over the course of our testing period, the company has earned nine Editor's Choice awards for industry-leading systems like the 13-inch HP Spectre x360, HP Envy 13t and the HP Chromebook x2. The company wasn't afraid to innovate, launching the leather-clad HP Spectre Folio. And while kudos go to the winner, keep an eye on Asus, which earned a solid second-place finish. Dell was right on its tail in third place.

...

10. Apple (69/100)
Apple keeps falling further from the head of the pack, ranking 10th out of 12 places this year after being 7th out of 10 last year. This past year saw the company face a lot of scrutiny over its keyboards, and while it delivered the Retina display MacBook Air most everyone wanted, all of its laptops felt too iterative, with little to truly boast about.

...

BrandReviews (40)Design (15)Support & Warranty (20)Innovation (10)Value & Selection (15)Overall (100)
HP36141391486
Asus311414101483
Dell30131681481
Alienware3412169980
Lenovo29121191576
Razer3112186875
Acer27121481475
Microsoft33111351072
Huawei31101361070
Apple3010184769
MSI3011681166
Samsung278155964
 



What I've done for otherwise-decent Macs for which Mojave is not an option is install Windows 10
Learn something new on MacInTouch all the time. I honestly did not know it was even possible to install Windows on a Mac, other than through Boot Camp but found that an internet search brought up a good number of "tutorials," beginning, it seems, with obtaining Apple's unique Boot Camp drivers for Windows on Macs.

I never actually installed Windows in Boot Camp, going the VM route when a Mac user needed Windows. But is my memory correct that Apple deprecates Boot Camp support as it ages out versions of the OS?

Barry, share with us more about how you install Windows? Are Boot Camp drivers needed? Can they be obtained for Macs that "aged out" before currently supported versions of MacOS (pre-Sierra)?
 


How many of those HP systems, mentioned by Laptop Magazine, will be around 5 years from now? 10 years?
Anecdotes do not data make, but I recently pulled a 2002 Sony laptop from storage, together with its PCMIA SCSI 250GB Zip Drive and disks. It booted and I was able to transfer all the data off the Zip Drives to archive on Synology.

We also have a 2003 Compaq, which I guess we could say is an HP as HP swallowed CPQ in 2002. It is used semi-regularly for a couple of Windows-only applications updated by sneaker-net. Neither of those old systems are allowed on the network.

I have a friend who rehabs old systems. He has a storage bay filled with old PCs (mostly tower boxes) he's able to fix by scavenging or even buying parts. Then, since he's a Windows guy, and installs Windows on systems he gives on, he gets to keep fixing them for recipients when they inevitably become infested with malware.

I know Macs can last a long time. But oldest we have at work are Minis from 2010. We had some 2006 original Intel iMacs I'm pretty sure died as part of the great capacitor plague.

Those 2010 Minis? Their .82 cent Cr2032 PRAM batteries are dead and they inconveniently no longer keep time.

I'm not opening them to do a replacement.
iFixit said:
My fatality rate on Macs really isn't encouraging.
  • 17" Pixar Lamp iMac - was never reliable from new
  • 17" Intel iMac - started having USB issues after expiration of AppleCare
  • G3 iBook (white polycarb) - died of the flexing logic board fail
  • 2007 15" MacBook Pro - two Nvidia graphics / logic board fails, didn't repair second
  • 2 20" Intel iMacs - capacitor fails?
  • 1 17" Intel iMac - died on operating table at 3rd party service when I took it in for PRAM battery
  • G3 Powerbook, Lombard. Years of good service, though many of those years on deprecated OS. One day, just stopped.

Along the way, I've had good ones, too. The longest run has been a 2007 White MacBook that still works, though on Snow Leopard, which isn't allowed on the network but is useful for peripherals not supported on newer versions of the OS.
 




Some new competition for Apple's laptops:
From the photos at the linked page, it looks like the keyboard keys have reasonable travel (unlike the MacBook/Pro). The 13" model, on the other hand, appears to have the same almost-nonexistent travel as the MacBook/Pros and, therefore, removes itself from consideration. What a pity.
 


Also Luna and PCalc this time around (ignoring past examples).
To be, ahem, "fair," Microsoft was Sherlocking long before the term was coined, and on a scale that eclipses anything Apple has done.

Remember WordPerfect, Lotus 123, dBase, or the "market research" the Windows 95 installer did, scanning the target hard drives for over 200 applications, and phoning the results home to Microsoft? I can't find any links to that anymore, but it was reported in one of the major PC magazines at the time, by a writer who disassembled the Windows installer. They did it again with the next major release.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
To be, ahem, "fair," Microsoft was Sherlocking long before the term was coined, and on a scale that eclipses anything Apple has done. Remember WordPerfect, Lotus 123, dBase, or the "market research" the Windows 95 installer did, scanning the target hard drives for over 200 applications, and phoning the results home to Microsoft? I can't find any links to that anymore, but it was reported in one of the major PC magazines at the time, by a writer who disassembled the Windows installer. They did it again with the next major release.
I don't think "Sherlocking" refers to creating competing mainstream applications so much as stealing features. If you're talking about apps, how do you justify Final Cut, Aperture, Logic Pro, FileMaker, and all the rest of Apple's apps that compete with third parties who came first?

As to Lotus 1-2-3, you actually have that backwards, because Microsoft created Multiplan before Lotus 1-2-3 existed, and Lotus 1-2-3 didn't come to the Mac platform until 1991, well after Microsoft Excel (1987).

Of course, if you want to extend "Sherlocking" to such an extent, you should probably note that Windows is a ripoff of the original Macintosh... :-)

(And, as far as tracking apps goes, how about Apple’s Mac App Store?)
 


... As to Lotus 1-2-3, you actually have that backwards, because Microsoft created Multiplan before Lotus 1-2-3 existed, and Lotus 1-2-3 didn't come to the Mac platform until 1991, well after Microsoft Excel (1987)....
However, the first spreadsheet program for a personal computers was VisiCalc, first introduced for the Apple ][ and then later ported to other platforms, including the IBM PC. However, both VisiCalc as a program, and its developer, Software Arts as a company, got killed by Lotus 1-2-3, which made better use of the IBM PC's hardware.
 


I don't think "Sherlocking" refers to creating competing mainstream applications so much as stealing features. If you're talking about apps, how do you justify Final Cut, Aperture, Logic Pro, FileMaker, and all the rest of Apple's apps that compete with third parties who came first?
No argument that the term "Sherlocking" is Apple-specific. Over in Microsoft land, it is "embrace, extend, extinguish." Think "MS-DOS isn't done until Lotus 1-2-3 won't run."

It wouldn't surprise if Microsoft had persuaded developers that iterating the OS provided opportunities to profit from forced paid upgrades. Some of the applications I remember buying did stop working with new versions of DOS and Windows and had to be upgraded. I remember in particular a text-to-speech program that was the only one I could find that would read spreadsheet data. It stopped working following an OS update. When researching why (anyone remember AOL?), I didn't find a technical explanation but did find Microsoft had a free replacement, as I recall, as part of its Power Toys. Free from Microsoft? Pay to buy a software update that might only work until the next OS update? I chose free, as I presume did most of the application's users, as it quickly disappeared from the marketplace.
As to Lotus 1-2-3, you actually have that backwards, because Microsoft created Multiplan before Lotus 1-2-3...
Dates:
  • VisiCalc, 1979, Apple II
  • SuperCalc, 1981 CP/M
  • Multiplan, 1982 CP/M
  • Lotus 1-2-3, 1983, DOS
  • Multiplan, 1984, Mac
  • Excel, 1985, Mac
  • Excel, Windows, 1987
  • [Lotus 1-2.3, 1991, Mac]
I didn't find where Multiplan for MS-DOS falls in that range, but my workplace then chose Victor 9000 computers, because they were faster and had more storage and better monitors than IBM PCs. Multiplan was for some time the only spreadsheet on those DOS systems, and they were just proprietary enough that only software released specifically for them would work. Ugh, Multiplan was terrible by comparison to the much more VisiCalc-like SuperCalc on my CP/M-based Osborne 1.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Dell's XPS 15 line seems also to have gone for "thin and cool" in the Jony Ive sense.
Well...
  1. Dell gives you a choice (the excellent G5 Gaming series, for instance, takes the opposite approach).
  2. Dell lets you open the computer and change things inside (if not RAM in the XPS).
  3. Dell gives you more ports [PDF] even on its thin laptops.
  4. Dell's laptops are often a lot cheaper than Apple's.
Do I have a Dell? No, because I have 30+ years invested in all aspects of the Mac ecosystem, including all my critical software, and I don't like/trust Windows. Not everyone is in that position, of course.
 



Well...
  1. Dell gives you a choice (the excellent G5 Gaming series, for instance, takes the opposite approach).
  2. Dell lets you open the computer and change things inside (if not RAM in the XPS).
  3. Dell gives you more ports [PDF] even on its thin laptops.
  4. Dell's laptops are often a lot cheaper than Apple's.
Do I have a Dell? No, because I have 30+ years invested in all aspects of the Mac ecosystem, including all my critical software, and I don't like/trust Windows. Not everyone is in that position, of course.
I recently came up on my replacement cycle for my work laptop (a 4-year-old XPS13 running Linux), and I looked at the MacBook Pro again, and just couldn't justify it.

Ended up going with a Lenovo T490, quad-core i7 processor, Nvidia MX250 graphics, 8GB on-board RAM, 128GB SSD. With Memorial Day sale, and 10% eBates rebate, cost before tax on this base configuration was $1,070.

Once the laptop arrived, popped open the case to add 16 GB RAM (24 GB total) and swap out the SSD for a 1TB. Total cost from Crucial $200. So total system cost, before tax and shipping was < $1,300.

A MacBook Pro 13" with dual-core i7/16GB/1TB would have cost $2,599, a MacBook Pro 13" with quad-core i7/16/1TB would have been $2,899. Yes, the MacBook Pro 13" has a nicer screen, and slightly faster processors, but only integrated graphics. Tthe keyboard on the Lenovo (or pretty much anything on a non-Apple laptop) is so much better. And USB-A and HDMI ports on the Lenovo mean no dongles.

There's been a lot of talk about the Apple premium, but I couldn't justify the 2X price for arguably a lesser machine. The Lenovo is humming along nicely running Pop OS 18.04 (Ubuntu Linux derivative).

My desktop will remain a Mac for the foreseeable future, because of Adobe (and a few other pieces of software). Been a Mac user for 30 years, and went through countless PowerBooks/MacBooks since my first PowerBook 170, but it's harder and harder to justify springing for the outrageous Apple tax these days. If only Apple would make MacBook Pros again with upgradable RAM/SSD, at a reasonable Apple tax...
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
If only Apple would make MacBook Pros again with upgradable RAM/SSD, at a reasonable Apple tax...
I was just talking with a friend today whose wife has a 2012 MacBook Pro that I want to buy for its easy upgradability in conjunction with Mojave compatibility, USB 3 support, FireWire, Ethernet port, SD Card slot, optical drive, etc. Dell gives you easy access/upgradability today even in its slim laptops, but Apple just doesn't...

I wonder how many people would buy Macs at today's Apple prices if they could run macOS on non-Apple computers, even if Apple were charging a couple hundred dollars for its software. (But Apple won't even let you run macOS in a VM on non-Apple hardware.)
 


I wonder how many people would buy Macs at today's Apple prices if they could run macOS on non-Apple computers, even if Apple were charging a couple hundred dollars for its software. (But Apple won't even let you run macOS in a VM on non-Apple hardware.)
There's another question, I guess... how many Mac users would have stayed despite apparently better (given the costs and expandability) hardware on the other side, except that macOS 10.15 will break an awful lot of the software that would normally hold us to the Mac? I mean, if we have to buy all new software anyway, why not just switch over? (Using Windows 10 for around 20 minutes usually answers that question for me, but others may disagree, or go to Linux and like it.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Remember WordPerfect, Lotus 123, dBase, or the "market research" the Windows 95 installer did, scanning the target hard drives for over 200 applications, and phoning the results home to Microsoft? I can't find any links to that anymore, but it was reported in one of the major PC magazines at the time, by a writer who disassembled the Windows installer. They did it again with the next major release.
I just received this in email from a PR company:
As you know, Facebook announced this week that its new app will allow users to sell the company data on how they use competitors’ apps. Facebook says it is recruiting participants to download its new app called 'Study' from the Google Play that will send data with Facebook on what other apps the users have, what features they use, and how much time is spent on each feature.

Dan Goldstein is the president and owner of Page 1 Solutions, a full-service digital marketing agency. He manages the needs of clients along with the need to ensure protection of their consumers, which has become one of the top concerns from clients over the last year. Goldstein is also a former attorney so he balances the marketing side with the legal side when it comes to protection for both companies and their consumers. Goldstein says he's surprised about the move by Facebook,

"I'm surprised Facebook went ahead with an app that offers users money for their data when so many consumers are concerned about privacy," Goldstein says.

"This move signals, at best, willful ignorance on Facebook's part to the current climate of online security and data privacy," Goldstein says.
 


There's another question, I guess... how many Mac users would have stayed despite apparently better (given the costs and expandability) hardware on the other side, except that macOS 10.15 will break an awful lot of the software that would normally hold us to the Mac? I mean, if we have to buy all new software anyway, why not just switch over? (Using Windows 10 for around 20 minutes usually answers that question for me, but others may disagree, or go to Linux and like it.)
Buying new software is not the only cost of switching away from the Mac. There also are the hassles of learning to use the new software (including the OS) and the problems of accessing old files in formats unsupported by the new software. The older we get, the more those factors may hold us back. Of course, the way Apple keeps changing things for the sake of change, the best deal may be staying with the old software and hardware ;-) .
 



I was just talking with a friend today whose wife has a 2012 MacBook Pro that I want to buy for its easy upgradability in conjunction with Mojave compatibility, USB 3 support, FireWire, Ethernet port, SD Card slot, optical drive, etc.
A non-profit that I provide Mac tech support for was complaining that the 2012 i7 MacBook Pro 13" they use to teach photography to kids has become slow as molasses. Popped open the case, replaced the 750GB 5400RPM HD (which was nearly full) with a 2TB Samsung SSD, maxed out the RAM to 16GB, and loaded Mojave. It's like a whole new machine.

Subjectively, it feels about as responsive as last year's i5 Macbook Air. The screen isn't great, but it's usually plugged in to a monitor anyway. The <$300 upgrade probably extended the useful life of the machine a good three years. No wonder Apple doesn't want to make drives/RAM user-replaceable anymore.
 


Buying new software is not the only cost of switching away from the Mac. There also are the hassles of learning to use the new software (including the OS) and the problems of accessing old files in formats unsupported by the new software. The older we get, the more those factors may hold us back. Of course, the way Apple keeps changing things for the sake of change, the best deal may be staying with the old software and hardware ;-) .
I learned the hard way over the years to try to do most of my computing using, preferably, open-source or, at a minimum, truly cross-platform software.

20 years ago, I wrote my dissertation using Framemaker. A year or so after I was done, Adobe bought Frame and unceremoniously discontinued all support. I made a PDF copy, but the Frame document is now useless.

I really liked Apple's iWork for a while, until they pulled the file format switch in '09, which left me with a bunch of files I certainly wasn't going to sit there and convert. And of course, iWork documents require a Mac. The Quicken debacle of the mid 00's got me to move to Moneydance. etc. etc.

These days I try to do as much of my writing using Markdown or LaTeX as I can. If I absolutely have to use an office suite, I use the online version of Office or Google Docs - not nearly as full featured, but good enough for my purposes, and I know I can get to it using any web-browser.

At this point, 90% of what I do can be done just as easily on Mac or Linux (or I suppose, Windows). The one thing that is keeping an iMac on my desk is Lightroom and Photoshop. I've looked at Darktable and other photography software, but having done the Aperture to Lightroom move a few years ago, I just don't want to do that again.... (Is that what you mean by "the older we get..."? :-)
 


A non-profit that I provide Mac tech support for was complaining that the 2012 i7 MacBook Pro 13" they use to teach photography to kids has become slow as molasses. Popped open the case, replaced the 750GB 5400RPM HD (which was nearly full) with a 2TB Samsung SSD, maxed out the RAM to 16GB, and loaded Mojave. It's like a whole new machine. Subjectively, it feels about as responsive as last year's i5 Macbook Air. The screen isn't great, but it's usually plugged in to a monitor anyway. The <$300 upgrade probably extended the useful life of the machine a good three years. No wonder Apple doesn't want to make drives/RAM user-replaceable anymore.
I already own two 2011 17" MacBook Pros that I'm very happy with. I just purchased two 15" 2012 MacBook Pros for my sons last week at an eBay auction, one for $300 and the other for $335 (there was a listing error in the $335 posting, as the HD was actually 500GB and not 750GB, but the seller immediately emailed me and knocked $35 off the purchase price).

From my initial pre-purchase research, I got some bad feelings about some of the eBay sellers and good feelings about others. For me, it all came down to support, perceived honesty, and their ability to communicate back to the buyer or potential buyer, me, in a reasonable amount of time....

We should receive them in a few days. I will report back here as to what condition they arrive in. We have pre-purchased Samsung 860 EVO 1TB SSDs and have already Carbon Copy Cloned, so that they are ready to pop in when the laptops show up. Both MacBook Pros come with 8 GB of RAM, so we'll start there and see if we need to upgrade the RAM to 16 GB. Hopefully, the battery cycles are reasonable.
 


I already own two 2011 17" MacBook Pros that I'm very happy with. I just purchased two 15" 2012 MacBook Pros for my sons last week at an eBay auction, one for $300 and the other for $335 (there was a listing error in the $335 posting, as the HD was actually 500GB and not 750GB ... We have pre-purchased Samsung 860 EVO 1TB SSDs and have already Carbon Copy Cloned, so that they are ready to pop in when the laptops show up. Both MacBook Pros come with 8 GB of RAM, so we'll start there and see if we need to upgrade the RAM to 16 GB. Hopefully, the battery cycles are reasonable.
So, you buy a 2011 MacBook Pro for $300, you then add a Samsung 1TB SSD and another 8 GB of RAM, then when you check the battery cycle you find you need a new battery, and this is beginning to sound like my old 2012 Toyota Prius. At what point do you say that the machine has enough miles on it that it's time for a new machine with all the benefits that come with that? It's more a philosophical question—I was able to sell that Prius, after all. And if one is a "shade-tree mechanic" and can do the upgrades oneself, you might save enough to think the project is worthwhile. But at what point is a Mac, any Mac, simply too old to upgrade?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
But at what point is a Mac, any Mac, simply too old to upgrade?
I guess that would be when 1) the old Mac stops working, or 2) the old Mac's upgrade cost is greater than the costs of buying and migrating to a newer Mac system, or 3) greater than the costs of buying and migrating to a hackintosh, or 4) greater than the costs of buying and migrating to a Windows or Linux system... when everything is considered, including the costs of buying the new hardware, buying new software, migrating old files, changing procedures/workflows, additional backups, archiving, support, etc.

On Apple's side, of course, new Mac purchases/upgrades are nothing but profit with no downside, other than unhappiness among customers regarding prices and changes, or defects and downtime, but Tim Cook has repeatedly highlighted the fact that most of Apple's new Mac purchases come from "switchers" leaving other platforms, not from the existing base of Mac customers.
 


I guess that would be when 1) it stops working, or 2) the upgrade cost is greater than the costs of buying and migrating to a newer Mac system, or 3) the upgrade cost is greater than the costs of buying and migrating to a hackintosh, or 4) the upgrade cost is greater than the costs of buying and migrating to a Windows or Linux system... when everything is considered, including the costs of buying the new hardware, buying new software, migrating old files, changing procedures/workflows, doing additional backups, archiving, support, etc.
I'm a huge fan of older Apple systems, simply because they continue to work so well with minimal maintenance. My wife's 2012-era MacBook Pro, now on its third battery and second hard drive, gets daily use with almost no problems. I keep a Mac Pro built in December of 2007 as a server, and have it running Mojave courtesy of DosDude1's hack. The hardware just keeps on going....
 



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