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After a number of excellent Dell monitors in the past, I more recently bought some Viewsonic displays (24- and 27-inch IPS panels), and they’ve been great, so Viewsonic may be worth considering, too.
Have you had any contact with their customer service post-purchase and if so, how did it go?
 


Dell and LG monitors come to mind first, but there are multiple choices in each category, and I welcome any guidance with these or any other brands available.
I have always been (and remain) a fan of Dell's UltraSharp series. These are their high-end displays, so they cost a bit more than others, but they have always produced great images.

Within the UltraSharp series, the differences should be pretty obvious - sizes, resolution and ports. For size and resolution, that's going to be a matter of your personal preference. For ports, use what matches your Mac. You'll probably want to make sure you have DisplayPort (or mini-DisplayPort), since you can directly attach that to your Mac with a passive cable. I think they all have this, but double-check, just to make sure.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Within the UltraSharp series, the differences should be pretty obvious - sizes, resolution and ports.
Some (or all) of my Dell monitors were UltraSharp models, and they offered a great variety of connections, excellent adjustability, very good image quality, and amazing longevity.

Considering ports, resolution and size, plus panel technology, controls (hardware/software), adjustments/stands (!), refresh rates, contrast and brightness and black level, color profiles/calibration, color gamut, HDR support (there are multiple standards), bit depth, reflectivity, uniformity, defective pixels, and probably more that I'm forgetting, there's a lot to consider while balancing cost vs. individual needs and priorities (not to mention quality and support). For what it's worth from a quick search:
Cnet said:
Tom's Hardware said:
Fstoppers said:
 


I've preferred Dell UltraSharps for their robustness and ports (I still have a CCFL one that has RGB component input for an old console). But they are tired designs and don't always sync well with Macs.

I have a set of LG 4K displays that are pretty decent, but when I started to search for Ladd in the IPS and over-30" category, BenQ kept coming up.... If you want to spend money: LG 5K 34WK95U.
 


The 2018 Mac Mini does not have a DisplayPort. Are you suggesting getting a Thunderbolt to DisplayPort adapter or cord?
Thunderbolt has always had a "pass-through" DisplayPort mode. For Thunderbolt v3, the Type-C DisplayPort alternative mode is part of the VESA DisplayPort standard. 'Adapter' is a bit of a stretch, since this is part of the standard. It is more a cord with different physical connectors on each end - like a USB cable with Type-A and mini-B connectors on either end. That isn't adapting to a different protocol or standard; it is just physically different but the same protocol.

Thunderbolt and DisplayPort (DP) are about to get even closer with DisplayPort v2.0. It mutates the standard Thunderbolt v3 set-up into a faster, unidirectional transport,

That has the side effect of picking up active cables from Thunderbolt v3 for extended distances. (Long cables with the DisplayPort version of physical connectors will need replacement but fit into the same socket - a bit like Type-C cabling, where you need to pay attention to what kind of cable it is, rather that purely relying on "it fits, so it has to work".)
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's a review of Apple's latest display collaboration with LG:
The Verge said:
LG UltraFine 4K Display (2019) review: bigger isn’t better

Apple’s monitor strategy is… complicated.

The last standalone display sold by the company, the 2011 Thunderbolt Display, was discontinued in 2016. Later that year, Apple introduced LG-branded 4K and 5K UltraFine Displays to go along with its new USB-C-only MacBook Pro redesign. Now, both of those monitors have been discontinued, and while Apple did just announce a new display of its own that’s coming later this year, it costs $4,999... plus $999 for the stand.

It would seem, then, that LG’s new 23.7-inch UltraFine 4K Display is Apple’s proposed mainstream monitor solution from here on out. It replaces the previous 21.5-inch model while still selling for $699.95, and it’s the only monitor you can actually buy in an Apple Store today. It’s a bigger, more capable 4K display for the same price.

So what’s the catch? Reader, there’s a big one....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For anyone interested, I just did a quick visual comparison of my great Viewsonic VP2770 display (27-inch WQHD 1440p, IPS panel, lots of connections) vs. the 2017 iMac 5K Retina.

To my surprise, viewing a few good Nikon D750 raw files in Preview, I really couldn't distinguish much difference between them. I don't know if Preview is affecting results or if I need better tests, but I expected to see a more obvious distinction. (More to come, I guess.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For anyone interested, I just did a quick visual comparison of my great Viewsonic VP2770 display (27-inch WQHD 1440p, IPS panel, lots of connections) vs. the 2017 iMac 5K Retina. To my surprise, viewing a few good Nikon D750 raw files in Preview, I really couldn't distinguish much difference between them. I don't know if Preview is affecting results or if I need better tests, but I expected to see a more obvious distinction. (More to come, I guess.)
I continue to see little difference between the "wide gamut" iMac 5K and the old (but good) Viewsonic VP2770. Here's a test:
  1. Open Safari (12.1.1 from macOS Sierra)
  2. Open System Preferences > Displays > Color and choose something like Display P3. (Leave this window open.)
  3. Go to Interactive Wide-Gamut Comparisons
  4. Move the sliders and observe the differences
  5. Experiment with different color spaces (e.g. sRGB) in System Preferences > Displays > Color.
Results seem very similar to me between these two displays.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
2. Open System Preferences > Displays > Color and choose something like Display P3. (Leave this window open.)​
4. Move the sliders and observe the differences​
Of course, you have no control over the color space with iPhones, so this may just be how Apple sets things up in software, but the iPhone 7 shows a wider gamut vs. the iPhone SE at that test site.

There's more about iPhone 7 color/display differences here:

 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
2. Open System Preferences > Displays > Color and choose something like Display P3. (Leave this window open.)​
4. Move the sliders and observe the differences​
Of course, you have no control over the color space with iPhones, so this may just be how Apple sets things up in software, but the iPhone 7 shows a wider gamut vs. the iPhone SE at that test site.
I tried this on the 2018 MacBook Pro and the 2015 MacBook Pro (and even a 2011 MacBook Pro) and saw similar results (when choosing the same color space, e.g. Display P3), so the display hardware doesn't seem radically different. (If I'm missing something, I'd love to hear about a test that would demonstrate it.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Still exploring color, I started poking around Apple's ColorSync Utility app, which I hadn't really explored previously (meanwhile, reading a lot of highly technical stuff about color spaces, etc.). It seems extremely buggy in macOS 10.12 Sierra, but one of the app's features is the ability to select a color profile and display it in interactive 3D and also Hold for Comparison* so you can easily map a different profile against it.

For what it's worth:
  • The 2017 iMac gamut looks close to Display P3 and offset a ways from Adobe RGB.
  • My Viewsonic VP2770 misses parts of the iMac/Display P3 gamut but apparently can provide more additional blue/purple.
  • An LG 27UK650 4K display covers most of the iMac/Display P3 gamut (not quite all) and also has some extra blue/purple (and a bit of extra red).
  • The sRGB color space used as the standard almost everywhere is significantly smaller in comparison to the above.

*This is under a tiny pop-up menu triangle next to "Lab Plot"
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Just a quick note about using an old, great Dell 2405 display with 2018 MacBook Pro Thunderbolt 3 ports*:
  • This VGA adapter worked well, providing full resolution (1920x1200).
  • This DVI adapter did not work at all, providing massive flicker, no matter what resolution I tried via SwitchResX.
However, the DVI adapter worked fine with a 1080p Viewsonic monitor.

(*This is actually a test in preparation for attaching a Dell Inspiron 7577 laptop, which also has a Thunderbolt 3 port.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Just a quick note about using an old, great Dell 2405 display with 2018 MacBook Pro Thunderbolt 3 ports*:
  • This VGA adapter worked well, providing full resoliution.
  • This DVI adapter did not work at all, providing massive flicker, no matter what resolution I tried via SwitchResX.
However, the DVI adapter worked fine with a 1080p Viewsonic monitor.

(*This is actually a test in preparation for attaching a Dell G5 Gaming laptop, which also has a Thunderbolt 3 port.)
I bought a different DVI-D adapter, and it's working just fine with the Dell 2405FPW, offering up 1920x1200 resolution with no problem. (I had to supply a DVI-D single-link cable, which I'd been previously using.)
 


I could not get a 2019 iPad Pro 11" to work with my LG Ultrafine 4K, even though several Apple support docs indicated compatibility.

I worked with a great support agent - Jake - who really dedicated himself to escalating and solving the issue. It turns out that Apple's iPad video compatibility documentation does not distinguish between the 2017 and 2018 version of the LG display; the former only supports Thunderbolt, not USB 3.1. This leads to a lot of confusing and frustrating twisting. Furthermore, the Apple Store does not distinguish the new model with any differentiation such as: "LG Ultrafine 4K 2019", making identification, and therefore compatibility determination, problematic. Jake's submitted an update request to support docs and store; meanwhile, but careful.
 


I could not get a 2019 iPad Pro 11" to work with my LG Ultrafine 4K, even though several Apple support docs indicated compatibility. I worked with a great support agent - Jake - who really dedicated himself to escalating and solving the issue. It turns out that Apple's iPad video compatibility documentation does not distinguish between the 2017 and 2018 version of the LG display; the former only supports Thunderbolt, not USB 3.1.
The 2017 version isn't Thunderbolt. The 2019 version has Thunderbolt. Both should work. In the case of the latter, it is the cable, not the monitor, that is an issue. Technically, It is really USB alternate mode DisplayPort that is needed (part of the USB 3.1 standard but not actually USB data).
Apple said:
Charge and connect with the USB-C port on the new iPad Pro
... iPad Pro uses the DisplayPort protocol to support connections to USB-C displays with resolutions up to 5K.1. To connect iPad Pro to high-resolution displays, use a USB-C cable that supports high-bandwidth connections, such as the cable included with the display, the Belkin USB-C to USB-C Cable, or the Apple Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) Cable (sold separately).

1. iPad Pro doesn't support Thunderbolt 3 displays such as the LG UltraFine 5K Display.
That specific Apple Thunderbolt 3 cable is the 0.8m one — short, so it is a 'passive' cable.
The 2019 display comes with two cables. The longer one is Thunderbolt. The shorter one is USB. The longer cable should fail (like any other 'active' Thunderbolt 3 cable).

The iPad Pro needs the USB alternate mode for DisplayPort to work. The 2019 display has Thunderbolt but appears to fall back to using DisplayPort if you use a "USB-C" cable with no active Thunderbolt 3 element.

The 2017 display only works with alternate mode DisplayPort, so there isn't really a problem — for example:
This leads to a lot of confusing and frustrating twisting. Furthermore, the Apple Store does not distinguish the new model with any differentiation such as: "LG Ultrafine 4K 2019",
Apple does use "23.7", though, instead of the date/year. For example

The original 4K display used the same panel as the 21.5" IMac (LG tags it as "22-inch"). They are both 4K, but the pixel density is different (and resolution slightly different: 22-inch with the 4096 version of 4K and 23.7-inch with the 3840 version of 4K).

The UltraFine 5K won't work even if using a "USB C" cable. That is probably both because it has an older-generation Thunderbolt controller in it and also because it requires two DisplayPort v1.2 streams to get to 5K resolution. The iPad Pro's USB-C Alternate Mode DisplayPort can probably only deliver one stream to that monitor.
 


...Both should work. In the case of the latter [thunderbolt], it is the cable, not the monitor, that is an issue. Technically, It is really USB alternate mode DisplayPort that is needed (part of the USB 3.1 standard but not actually USB data). That specific Apple Thunderbolt 3 cable is the 0.8m one — short, so it is a 'passive' cable.
The 2019 display comes with two cables. The longer one is Thunderbolt. The shorter one is USB. The longer cable should fail (like any other 'active' Thunderbolt 3 cable).
Wow.

I am looking at getting a couple of 4K displays and connecting them to my Mac via a Thunderbolt dock (CalDigit or OWC, unless someone warns me off them) using DisplayPort connections. I had assumed I could send DisplayPort through an active Thunderbolt 3 cable... might that fail?

I hadn't really planned on doing the same with an iPad Pro, but on the other hand, I might plug one into a display while on the road; for that use case, I should not use a Thunderbolt-labeled cable?

Thanks for your informative post.
 


I am looking at getting a couple of 4K displays and connecting them to my Mac via a Thunderbolt dock (CalDigit or OWC, unless someone warns me off them) using DisplayPort connections. I had assumed I could send DisplayPort through an active Thunderbolt 3 cable... might that fail?
If you're attaching the computer to a Thunderbolt (not USB) display or if you're using a Thunderbolt (not USB) dock, an active cable should work just fine — probably not necessary if the cable is short [passive], but it shouldn't hurt.

The link will be running as Thunderbolt and the display/dock will pull off the DisplayPort data stream required for your video signal, leaving the rest for other peripherals your display/dock might provide.

If you have a USB display/dock, then don't use a Thunderbolt cable (definitely not active, I'm not sure passive will work either), since the signals carried will be USB and/or DisplayPort, not Thunderbolt.
 


This leads to a lot of confusing and frustrating twisting. Furthermore, the Apple Store does not distinguish the new model with any differentiation such as: "LG Ultrafine 4K 2019", making identification, and therefore compatibility determination, problematic.
While Apple does seem to add the different screen diagonal specification to the 2019 Ultrafine 4K docs, they appear to have screwed up on the revised 5K model (which didn't change screen size but has changed functionality). There is no distinguishing identification of the 2019 monitor in this new article:

A head scratcher is that the iPad Pro document shows an update on July 30th 2019 but still says this.
Apple said:
Charge and connect with the USB-C port on the new iPad Pro
iPad Pro doesn't support Thunderbolt 3 displays such as the LG UltraFine 5K Display.
If you change the product, then you really should have a new explicit name for the new product — even if is looks the same – "5K Display 2019" and then go back and change the references in the knowledge base to put the 2017 on the old one where there is a distinction.

The 2019 models are more alike in being able to deal with DIsplayPort USB Alternate mode now — you end up with just a 4K image on the 5K screen, so it's the same image on the new 4K and 5K displays. (A single DisplayPort v1.2 can't do 5K....)
 


... I am looking at getting a couple of 4K displays and connecting them to my Mac via a Thunderbolt dock (CalDigit or OWC, unless someone warns me off them) using DisplayPort connections. I had assumed I could send DisplayPort through an active Thunderbolt 3 cable... might that fail?
Hooking it directly to the display should fail. The Thunderbolt dock will decode the DisplayPort signal from Thunderbolt back into native DisplayPort for the dock's video-out ports.
I hadn't really planned on doing the same with an iPad Pro, but on the other hand, I might plug one into a display while on the road; for that use case, I should not use a Thunderbolt-labeled cable?
Pragmatically, short is Thunderbolt v3, Type-C cables ( < 1m) that are passive. Longer Thunderbolt-marked cables are active. The high-quality passive ones are "universal" (power delivery, USB 3.1 Gen 2, Thunderbolt, other alt modes). The one port connector and one cable " to rule them all" dream only goes 1 meter or less,

This may get incrementally better in about 2-3 years. USB4 is going to adopt Thunderbolt 3 protocols, so the longer ones of those marked for USB 4 probably will go 'active'. (We still will have a mix of older and new-standard cables, though, with what looks like the same plug on both ends.) DisplayPort v2.0 is also adopting a variant of Thunderbolt protocol. The longer cables there are highly likely to go active, also. (Again there will be a mix of new and old cables that look about the same but are different.) if all the new major modes need active longer cables, then they will all be in the "same boat."
 


I have a strange issue with my MacBook Pro and an external display, and I wonder if it's related to the current discussion.

I have a 2018 MacBook Pro running Mojave. I have it connected to an OWC USB-C dock, and there's an LG monitor attached to the dock via a Mini DisplayPort-to HDMI cable (the HDMI end is connected to the monitor).

The OWC dock is connected to the MacBook Pro via USB-C.

If I plug the dock into the MacBook Pro from a "cold" boot (I come into the office in the morning, plug the OWC dock in and turn on the MacBook Pro from a power-off state), I have to use the MacBook Pro display to select the user to log in - i.e. nothing will show up on the external monitor until some seconds after I select the user to log in.

Once that's working, I can close the MacBook Pro lid and work normally on the external display.

I can often reboot without touching the MacBook Pro again (i.e. everything still works on the external display), but sometimes the booting process seems stuck and nothing shows up on the external display nor on the MacBook Pro if I open the lid. But I know it's on, because I can hear the fan going. I end up having to do a hard shutdown (hold down power for a few seconds) and then boot up again as if I'm doing it for the first time in the morning (i.e. I have to use the MacBook Pro display to log in, and I can't use the external display until after I do that).

I think it gets stuck on the log in screen and is waiting for input, because I saw it flash once by luck when I was trying to shut it down. It seems like it gets stuck in a weird in-between state where neither monitor (external nor internal) works.

Does anyone else have a similar setup? I'm chalking the "cold boot" issue to security... so is that normal that you can't use an external monitor right off the bat? I remember the old days where I'd plug my monitor and USB hub into my MacBook Pro with the lid closed, and everything would start up and just *work*. But is this the new normal?
 


If I plug the dock into the MacBook Pro from a "cold" boot (I come into the office in the morning, plug the OWC dock in and turn on the MacBook Pro from a power-off state), I have to use the MacBook Pro display to select the user to log in - i.e. nothing will show up on the external monitor until some seconds after I select the user to log in.

I can often reboot without touching the MacBook Pro again (i.e. everything still works on the external display), but sometimes the booting process seems stuck and nothing shows up on the external display nor on the MacBook Pro if I open the lid. But I know it's on, because I can hear the fan going. I end up having to do a hard shutdown (hold down power for a few seconds) and then boot up again as if I'm doing it for the first time in the morning (i.e. I have to use the MacBook Pro display to log in, and I can't use the external display until after I do that).

Does anyone else have a similar setup? I'm chalking the "cold boot" issue to security... so is that normal that you can't use an external monitor right off the bat? I remember the old days where I'd plug my monitor and USB hub into my MacBook Pro with the lid closed, and everything would start up and just *work*. But is this the new normal?
When I took my 2018 MacBook Pro into Apple for a broken screen last month, the genius told me these recent computers will not recognize an external monitor until some account logs in. When I got it back, my tests confirmed that. I found that after the external monitor started working, it kept working, accounts logged in or not, until the system was powered down. (I don't think a reboot powers down the computer.) I considered setting up an account that always automatically logs in but has no permissions to do anything at all.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
If I plug the dock into the MacBook Pro from a "cold" boot (I come into the office in the morning, plug the OWC dock in and turn on the MacBook Pro from a power-off state), I have to use the MacBook Pro display to select the user to log in - i.e. nothing will show up on the external monitor until some seconds after I select the user to log in.
When I took my 2018 MacBook Pro into Apple for a broken screen last month, the genius told me these recent computers will not recognize an external monitor until some account logs in. When I got it back, my tests confirmed that.
I see the same behavior on a 2015 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.12.6 Sierra with an external Viewsonic VP2770 display connected via DisplayPort (i.e. a Mini DisplayPort-DisplayPort cable attached to the MacBook Pro's Thunderbolt 2 port):
  1. Power on while the MacBook Pro is connected to a power adapter.
  2. External screen is black. MacBook Pro screen shows user/password prompt for unlocking FileVault boot volume.
  3. Enter password.
  4. Both internal and external displays go black but flash various things as they proceed to:
  5. user/password login prompt displayed on both screens
I can close the MacBook Pro display during this startup routine or afterwards without affecting the external display. And, if I reboot after logging in (without powering down) while the MacBook Pro display is closed, the external display continues to work.

So, this issue doesn't appear to be dependent on either macOS Mojave or T2-based Macs.
 


If I plug the dock into the MacBook Pro from a "cold" boot (I come into the office in the morning, plug the OWC dock in and turn on the MacBook Pro from a power-off state), I have to use the MacBook Pro display to select the user to log in - i.e. nothing will show up on the external monitor until some seconds after I select the user to log in.
Is your external monitor 4K, and are you using FileVault? This is a well-known, but undocumented problem. The FileVault software cannot drive the monitor, so the screen is blank. The workaround is to login "blind." If you only have one user, just type the password. If you have more than one user, type the first character of the login you want to use, then Return, then the password.
 


Is your external monitor 4K, and are you using FileVault? This is a well-known, but undocumented problem. The FileVault software cannot drive the monitor, so the screen is blank. The workaround is to login "blind." If you only have one user, just type the password. If you have more than one user, type the first character of the login you want to use, then Return, then the password.
Well that kind of stinks, but thanks for the workaround!
 


When I took my 2018 MacBook Pro into Apple for a broken screen last month, the genius told me these recent computers will not recognize an external monitor until some account logs in. When I got it back, my tests confirmed that. I found that after the external monitor started working, it kept working, accounts logged in or not, until the system was powered down. (I don't think a reboot powers down the computer.) I considered setting up an account that always automatically logs in but has no permissions to do anything at all.
So it's a "feature", not a bug... got it. Thanks for confirming!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Regarding blank screens at startup with FileVault, I just installed macOS Mojave, and startup goes like this on a 2017 iMac 5K with no external screen:
  1. reboot computer
  2. get FileVault password prompt
  3. boot begins with background picture and progress bar
  4. screen goes black midway through startup
  5. shortly afterwards, the progress bar appears on the black screen
  6. after a while the background picture re-appears with a username/login prompt
 


Regarding blank screens at startup with FileVault, I just installed macOS Mojave, and startup goes like this on a 2017 iMac 5K with no external screen:
  1. reboot computer
  2. get FileVault password prompt
  3. boot begins with background picture and progress bar
  4. screen goes black midway through startup
  5. shortly afterwards, the progress bar appears on the black screen
  6. after a while the background picture re-appears with a username/login prompt
Perhaps you have not used the Security control panel to allow one or more users to unlock the boot volume at login time, so you need to unlock the boot volume before logging it. It can be a one-step process:

Log on with an administrator account and go to System Preferences, Security & Privacy, FileVault. Click Enable Users next to the warning “Some users are not able to unlock the disk.”
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Perhaps you have not used the Security control panel to allow one or more users to unlock the boot volume at login time, so you need to unlock the boot volume before logging it. It can be a one-step process...
Yes, that is, in fact, the case. On a vanilla Mojave installation with a single admin user, the first authentication prompt authenticates both FileVault and the user login account, and the blank screen is not displayed — the desktop background persists through the startup process.

This obnoxiously confusing new problem is not present in macOS Sierra (or HFS+) but is at least documented by Bombich Software, though apparently not by Apple.
Carbon Copy Cloner FAQ said:
Frequently Asked Questions about encrypting the backup volume
APFS volumes that contain an installation of macOS will each have a unique "secure access token". Access to this token allows users to do things like unlock the volume (e.g. if FileVault is enabled) and to change startup security settings. Because this token is volume-specific, it can't be copied to another volume; it has to be regenerated. In addition to this Secure Token, APFS volumes also have a list of users or keys that are "bound" to the volume. These "cryptographic users" are defined within the volume metadata, not within any particular file on the volume. As a result, these bound cryptographic users cannot be modified by CCC nor transferred from one volume to another. This cryptographic user list is proprietary to Apple; only Apple tools can modify the list, and only Apple tools can generate a SecureToken.

... If you can boot your Mac from the backup, but you're seeing a stall during startup, you can resolve that matter by decrypting the volume as indicated above, or by creating a new user account that has a Secure Access Token. Only the macOS Setup Assistant has the ability to create the first secure access token, so follow these steps while booted from the volume you're trying to repair...

Working with FileVault Encryption
... If your backup volume is an SSD, and if you delete files from the SSD prior to enabling encryption, then the SSD may automatically move the not-yet-encrypted underlying blocks out of rotation (for wear leveling), and those data could be recoverable by experts. Likewise, if the conversion process fails for any reason, then the data on that disk is potentially recoverable. If either of these scenarios is not acceptable, then we recommend that you exclude any sensitive data from the initial backup task. Don't exclude your whole home folder...

T2-based Macs can't boot from encrypted HFS+ volumes
Our testing has confirmed that Macs with Apple's T2 controller chip cannot boot from an encrypted, "Mac OS Extended"-formatted, external volume. Booting from an external volume works fine in general, but if your external disk is formatted using Apple's legacy HFS+, "Mac OS Extended" format, enabling FileVault on that volume will render it non-bootable, producing an error message like this on startup:

A software update is required to use this startup disk. You can update now or select another startup disk.

Spoiler alert: The "Update" option does not work. This may be a bug in the firmware of the T2 Macs, or it may be a limitation that Apple does not intend to address. In either case, if you want to encrypt your external, bootable backup of a T2-based Mac, we recommend formatting that backup volume as APFS.
In addition to the other issues involved, Apple's confusing new procedures/demands also reduce security.
Log on with an administrator account and go to System Preferences, Security & Privacy, FileVault. Click Enable Users next to the warning “Some users are not able to unlock the disk.”
Interestingly, this is not working on my current Mojave system. Clicking the button does nothing.

#apfs #boot #filevault #token #secureaccesstoken #security
 


When I took my 2018 MacBook Pro into Apple for a broken screen last month, the genius told me these recent computers will not recognize an external monitor until some account logs in. When I got it back, my tests confirmed that.
That's not my experience with my 2018 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.13.6. I have a 4K LG monitor connected via DisplayPort to a CalDigit TS3+ dock. From power off, I can press the power button then close the MacBook Pro, the Apple logo appears on the external monitor, I see the progress bar, and I get the login screen to unlock FileVault. At this point the resolution is 1080p, but once I'm logged in the monitor is recognized as 4K.
 


Apple's panel is probably close to the IPS tech in the Asus ProArt PA32UCX 4K HDR Mini LED Professional Monitor.
That's a very interesting 4K UHD alternative to Apple's 6K display and is apparently priced at $3999, complete with an adjustable stand (and VESA support).
I am kind of curious if Asus had this one in the pipeline all along and moved it up or was just testing the waters with the UCX before this UCG. The UCX is just about to go into pre-order status (shipping this month).
The Verge said:
Asus takes on Apple’s Pro Display with its new ProArt monitor
Asus has unveiled a new ProArt display, a top-spec monitor that’s designed for professional users. The company claims that the PA32UCG is the world’s first professional 4K display that supports a combination of a maximum brightness of 1600 nits and a 120Hz variable refresh rate. These specs, alongside a variety of HDR support, put the display into direct competition with Apple, which announced its own display for professional users, the Pro Display XDR, earlier this year.
... Asus didn’t announce any pricing at its conference at IFA 2019, but it said that it plans to ship the ProArt Display PA32UCG in the first quarter of next year.
So they are announcing something with "better' specs right when starting to take orders for another that was previewed back in Jan 2019. The price will probably be higher, since this new one does 1,000 nits sustained and a higher refresh rate. However, the timing is just a little odd.

Apple is in for some competition. If their whole market strategy is primarily to point at the $10-20K reference models and say "we're more affordable", then they have some problems (though Asus isn't pitching it as a reference monitor replacement but for high-end gaming, but Apple won't be on as isolated of an 'island.")
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
So they are announcing something with "better' specs right when starting to take orders for another that was previewed back in Jan 2019.
I just received this update from B&H:
B&H Photo Video said:
You are receiving this message because you asked to be notified when the ASUS 32" ProArt PA32UCX 4K HDR Mini LED Professional Monitor (B&H # ASPA32UCX) becomes available. We advised you then that we would send you interim updates. We regret the item remains unavailable.

We will continue to update you on the status of this item via email every 2 weeks until it becomes available to you.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Note that all the 32" Asus ProArt monitors are 4K (3840 x 2160) and thus have only 138 ppi,
If my math and Wikipedia's are correct, the ProArt PA32UCX has 54 pixels/cm. vs. 86 pixels/cm. for Apple's 4K, 5K and 6K displays. I'm not sure how dramatic that difference will look in real life.
ASUS said:
ProArt PA32UCX: Specifications

Panel Size: Wide Screen 32” (81.28cm) 16:9
Panel Type : IPS
True Resolution : 3840x2160
Display Viewing Area(HxV) : 708.48 x 308.52 mm
Display Surface : Non-glare
Pixel Pitch : 0.1845 mm
Brightness : 600 cd/㎡ (Typical)/1200 cd/㎡ (Peak)
Contrast Ratio : 1000 :1 (Typical)/1000000 :1 (HDR)
ASUS Smart Contrast Ratio (ASCR) : 100000000:1
Viewing Angle (CR≧10) : 178°(H)/178°(V)
Response Time : 5ms (Gray to Gray)
Display Colors : 1073.7M (10bit)
Flicker free
LCD ZBD Warranty :
Yes
HDR (High Dynamic Range) Support : Yes (HDR-10 /HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma)/Dolby Vision)
Dynamically Local Dimming : Yes, 1152 Zones
...
Then, of course, there's Dell's UltraSharp 32 8K display (UP3218K) with much smaller pixels and higher resolution vs. Apple's 6K display (and priced much lower at $3899.99, complete with adjustable stand and anti-reflective hard coating).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I stumbled on an apparently easy solution to the Mojave wake-from-sleep issue. I have a late 2018 Mac Mini, which has had the issue for several months. The most recent macOS updates (current through 10.14.6 Supplemental) subjectively reduced the problem, but it still continued occasionally, at least once a day (particularly when first waking the computer in the morning). The only immediate solution was unplugging the HDMI connection to the monitor, then plugging it back in again.

Finally, in frustration on a hunch, I unchecked two options in Energy Saver Preferences: "Put hard disks to sleep when possible" and "Enable Power Nap." In the 10 days since I did that (I've kept a log), I have not had a single wake from sleep problem. The other three options are still checked (they involve waking; I turned off the two that involved sleeping). FWIW.
Thanks for letting us know about that!

Another issue I encountered recently - but on an Intel NUC running Linux, rather than on a Mac - was with an LG 4K display (27UK650) and "HDMI ULTRA HD Deep Color" mode, set inside the monitor itself via its own controls/firmware. Things were a mess until I disabled that and some other options (Game Adjust/FreeSync etc.).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's more about the new Asus display:
DPReview said:
Asus takes on Apple's Pro Display XDR with new 1600-nit HDR ProArt Display
Asus has shown a series of new ProArt products at the IFA show in Berlin including what it describes as ‘the world’s first HDR 1600 and 120Hz variable-refresh rate professional display.’ The ProArt Display PA32UCG is a 32in monitor with 4K UHD resolution and a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio, and is aimed at those who need absolute color accuracy in standard and high dynamic range modes. The display is compatible with the Dolby Vision, Hybrid Log-Gamma and HDR10 HDR standards and uses over 1000 mini LED back lights to produce a maximum brightness of 1,600 nits.

This Asus display could be out before Apple's Pro Display XDR goes on sale. Both displays are 32in and offer a maximum brightness of 1600 nits, HDR and 10-bit color, but Apple's model has 6K resolution whereas this one is limited to 4K. The Asus ProArt Display, however, has a faster refresh rate than Apple's 60Hz - and is likely to cost less. A stand is also included with Asus' monitor.
A lower-end Thunderbolt 3 model is already available at $1499 with a bunch of the same features:
 


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