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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
It might be worthwhile to look at the Received: headers to see which Apple servers received each message...
Bounced/blocked messages came from, for example:

mx1.mail.icloud.com[17.57.8.139]
mx1.mail.icloud.com[17.57.8.134]
mx3.mail.icloud.com[17.178.97.72]
mx5.mail.icloud.com[17.172.34.68]
mx2.mail.icloud.com[17.172.34.11]
mx5.mail.icloud.com[17.178.97.74]
mx3.mail.icloud.com[17.172.34.65]
mx2.mail.icloud.com[17.57.8.135]
mx5.mail.icloud.com[17.57.8.143]
mx3.mail.icloud.com[17.57.8.141]
 


Bounced/blocked messages came from, for example:
mx1.mail.icloud.com[17.57.8.139]
mx1.mail.icloud.com[17.57.8.134]
mx3.mail.icloud.com[17.178.97.72]
mx5.mail.icloud.com[17.172.34.68] ...
Well, the IP 17.57. network is out of Mesa, Arizona and the IP 17.172. and .178. networks are unknown in North America, but all rare egistered to Apple.

After resting up after removing some weeds and vines, I'll contact Apple.

(Just noticed that I haven't been receiving any notices from this thread since my reply to Ric's post of me seconding his post.)
 


And I don't see email errors with your email address. So... Apple's email blocking is changeable and random? Nice.
I wonder if Apple is relying on a flaky spam-filtering protocol provided by some other company or group. I've been having problems with mail from my personal domain sometimes either bouncing (cited as possible spam) or vanishing when sent to some people but having no problems when sent through a Google email account. Because at least some spam-filtering algorithms are based on counting "points" that supposedly reflect the degree of 'spamminess', all it takes to get flaky results is a flaw in the system that assigns several spam points for a word that could be used innocently, but could put some emails you send over the 'spam' threshold.

Spam filters often are based on machine learning and artificial intelligence software, which are vulnerable to false positives when misused.
 


FYI: blocked emails is not specific to MacInTouch. I also get blocked messages (from mac.com, I presume) sometimes when I use my mac.com email to send a message to another email (non-mac.com) address. But the message always shows up anyway even though it was supposedly blocked.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
FYI: blocked emails is not specific to MacInTouch. I also get blocked messages (from mac.com, I presume) sometimes when I use my mac.com email to send a message to another email (non-mac.com) address. But the message always shows up anyway even though it was supposedly blocked.
Unfortunately, the blocked emails (notifications about updates in this forum) are apparently not getting through in this case, and Apple email users are the intended recipients, not senders, of these emails.
 


For work, I have to use MS Outlook for Mac, the latest and greatest (cough) version, now available from the App Store. I have an Office 365 account, paid by the company and plenty of space (maybe).

Since I have several hundred clients that I deal with, I have set up email rules. I started with setting them up on the server side, so that they'll be always there. That worked fine, until I hit some magic number around 100, when new rules would no longer fire. Our IT department told me that I had exhausted the space available to store rules on the server and I should move to local mail rules. Over the last year, I have configured about 250 of them and they work just fine.

Now, I need to move them all to a new Mac, which should be a simple task, one would think. But not so. When googling it, there are references to using the File menu and then selecting "Manage Rules and Alerts". Huh? That option probably exists in Outlook for Windows, but no such thing on a Mac. Looking at further articles, I found a message thread at Microsoft (two in fact), where Microsoft forum moderators proclaim that "it is not feasible to export mail rules on a Mac" (their words). Say what? Importing and exporting data from one program to another - or one machine to another in this case - are fundamental functions that every semi-decent software should allow for.

The other issue I have with mail is that over time, more and more of it accumulates. I'm not entirely sure about my total mailbox size - the Microsoft pricing page says that it's either 50 or 100 GB, depending on what I bought. Since I didn't actually buy anything, the company did, and getting that info out of them is just as complex as getting anything from Microsoft, I decided to archive stuff today. The initial arrive was simple: Copy a mailbox into the archive folder within Outlook. Since I have a mailbox hierarchy set up, all it took was to copy/paste 4 high-level mailboxes and copying was very fast. Microsoft tells me that Mailbox archive space is unlimited. So this is the way to go.

But this is also where the issue starts: I want Outlook to automatically move (not copy) all emails that are older than 92 days from my regular "current" folder to the corresponding archive folder. Like in:
move everything older than 90 days from Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ to Archive/Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ and do that automatically in the background.

When I make this request, people look at me like I have 3 heads (I only have one, I checked), is that feature really so outlandish? To me, this would be the most normal thing to have.

Does anybody have similar issues and maybe solutions to these?

Thanks
 


For work, I have to use MS Outlook for Mac, the latest and greatest (cough) version, now available from the App Store. I have an Office 365 account, paid by the company and plenty of space (maybe).

Since I have several hundred clients that I deal with, I have set up email rules. I started with setting them up on the server side, so that they'll be always there. That worked fine, until I hit some magic number around 100, when new rules would no longer fire. Our IT department told me that I had exhausted the space available to store rules on the server and I should move to local mail rules. Over the last year, I have configured about 250 of them and they work just fine.

Now, I need to move them all to a new Mac, which should be a simple task, one would think. But not so. When googling it, there are references to using the File menu and then selecting "Manage Rules and Alerts". Huh? That option probably exists in Outlook for Windows, but no such thing on a Mac. Looking at further articles, I found a message thread at Microsoft (two in fact), where Microsoft forum moderators proclaim that "it is not feasible to export mail rules on a Mac" (their words). Say what? Importing and exporting data from one program to another - or one machine to another in this case - are fundamental functions that every semi-decent software should allow for.

The other issue I have with mail is that over time, more and more of it accumulates. I'm not entirely sure about my total mailbox size - the Microsoft pricing page says that it's either 50 or 100 GB, depending on what I bought. Since I didn't actually buy anything, the company did, and getting that info out of them is just as complex as getting anything from Microsoft, I decided to archive stuff today. The initial arrive was simple: Copy a mailbox into the archive folder within Outlook. Since I have a mailbox hierarchy set up, all it took was to copy/paste 4 high-level mailboxes and copying was very fast. Microsoft tells me that Mailbox archive space is unlimited. So this is the way to go.

But this is also where the issue starts: I want Outlook to automatically move (not copy) all emails that are older than 92 days from my regular "current" folder to the corresponding archive folder. Like in:
move everything older than 90 days from Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ to Archive/Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ and do that automatically in the background.

When I make this request, people look at me like I have 3 heads (I only have one, I checked), is that feature really so outlandish? To me, this would be the most normal thing to have.

Does anybody have similar issues and maybe solutions to these?

Thanks
Outlook for Mac (2016 or later) rules are stored in:

your home directory > Library > Group Containers > UBF8T346G9.Office > Outlook > Outlook XX Profiles > Main Profile (or a different profile name if you have changed it) > Data > Rules

I don't know whether they can simply be copied from one Mac to another. I personally suspect not, as paths/accounts/profiles may change from one computer to another, but if you have full backups, you could always try. There's certainly no easy way to import/export rules in Outlook for Mac. Make sure you send feedback of your desire for this feature to

In addition, as far as I am aware, you can create a rule for archiving emails older than XX days but it can only be applied manually - you cannot create a rule that will do this automatically. There used to be a script menu in Office, but that's long gone. However, I believe Office for Mac is still AppleScript-compatible, so you might be able to pursue that route. Again, feedback to Microsoft for feature requests/old features to be resurrected.
 


I'm looking at outsourcing email for my main account. The complicating factor is that the domain is used by two family members as well.

Normally I'd just dump it into Fastmail for $50/year, but with the other small accounts I end up at $150/year, which isn't practical. What to do?

I looked at cheaper options. Namecheap has inexpensive email, but I'm not sure I trust them that far. MXrate is apparently trustworthy but relies on a single person who can apparently sometimes be thin-skinned and kick people out without notice (there's one incident where a person apparently opened two support tickets, because the first one hadn't gotten a reply in a few days, and was kicked out with his mail lost.) Greatmail looks good, $100/year for eight mailboxes, but I can't find any impartial reviews or experiences related to them. Zoho has its share of detractors. Hover is there but, again, I don't know anything about it other than its relation to Tucows. Protonmail is $$$ per account.

I haven't found a review site (like the ones they have for web hosts), and the articles I’ve seen are sophomoric at best. Can anyone here provide some insights or experiences?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I'm looking at outsourcing email for my main account. The complicating factor is that the domain is used by two family members as well. Normally I'd just dump it into Fastmail for $50/year, but with the other small accounts I end up at $150/year, which isn't practical. What to do? ...
Maybe inexpensive hosting, like this, which includes 500 email addresses at $5.95/mo.:

 


Outlook for Mac (2016 or later) rules are stored in:

your home directory > Library > Group Containers > UBF8T346G9.Office > Outlook > Outlook XX Profiles > Main Profile (or a different profile name if you have changed it) > Data > Rules

I don't know whether they can simply be copied from one Mac to another. I personally suspect not, as paths/accounts/profiles may change from one computer to another, but if you have full backups, you could always try. There's certainly no easy way to import/export rules in Outlook for Mac. Make sure you send feedback of your desire for this feature to

In addition, as far as I am aware, you can create a rule for archiving emails older than XX days but it can only be applied manually - you cannot create a rule that will do this automatically. There used to be a script menu in Office, but that's long gone. However, I believe Office for Mac is still AppleScript-compatible, so you might be able to pursue that route. Again, feedback to Microsoft for feature requests/old features to be resurrected.
So I copied that entire folder from one machine to another, and all emails and rules are on the new machine. This seems to work, as long as you stay on macOS - I haven't checked yet if there is a similar structure under Windows.

And it looks the data is in SQLite databases, for which one could write a utility to import/export. There is a business idea for somebody.
 


I'm looking at outsourcing email for my main account. The complicating factor is that the domain is used by two family members as well. Normally I'd just dump it into Fastmail for $50/year, but with the other small accounts I end up at $150/year, which isn't practical. What to do?
I don't know if this is still possible, but a while ago, I was able to let Google host my email by pointing mail.mydomain to one of the Google servers. They also gave me 10 free accounts at the time, so everybody in my family is sorted out for as long as I keep the domain alive. At $13 a year, that's affordable, but I'm sure, these days, you can get domains even cheaper.
 



As long as you're not concerned about Google privacy problems.
I use S/MIME email encryption, with its own problems, to send emails that I don't want everybody to read. All you need is a certificate, which you can get for free for personal use at several providers.

Sure, there are still the messages which are not encrypted or signed, but with unencrypted email, you never know who can read it in between you and the other party, as with everything you send in clear text from A to B. But then, for the most part, I don't really care who reads what I write, there isn't too much they can figure out from my messages. For everything else, there is Signal (signal.org), :)
 


But this is also where the issue starts: I want Outlook to automatically move (not copy) all emails that are older than 92 days from my regular "current" folder to the corresponding archive folder. Like in:
move everything older than 90 days from Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ to Archive/Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ and do that automatically in the background.
Automatic archiving is an Outlook for Windows feature; you could set it to do exactly what you describe. We should ask Microsoft: for feature parity, why can't we have this in Outlook for Mac?
 


For work, I have to use MS Outlook for Mac, the latest and greatest (cough) version, now available from the App Store. I have an Office 365 account, paid by the company and plenty of space (maybe).

Since I have several hundred clients that I deal with, I have set up email rules. I started with setting them up on the server side, so that they'll be always there. That worked fine, until I hit some magic number around 100, when new rules would no longer fire. Our IT department told me that I had exhausted the space available to store rules on the server and I should move to local mail rules. Over the last year, I have configured about 250 of them and they work just fine.

Now, I need to move them all to a new Mac, which should be a simple task, one would think. But not so. When googling it, there are references to using the File menu and then selecting "Manage Rules and Alerts". Huh? That option probably exists in Outlook for Windows, but no such thing on a Mac. Looking at further articles, I found a message thread at Microsoft (two in fact), where Microsoft forum moderators proclaim that "it is not feasible to export mail rules on a Mac" (their words). Say what? Importing and exporting data from one program to another - or one machine to another in this case - are fundamental functions that every semi-decent software should allow for.

The other issue I have with mail is that over time, more and more of it accumulates. I'm not entirely sure about my total mailbox size - the Microsoft pricing page says that it's either 50 or 100 GB, depending on what I bought. Since I didn't actually buy anything, the company did, and getting that info out of them is just as complex as getting anything from Microsoft, I decided to archive stuff today. The initial arrive was simple: Copy a mailbox into the archive folder within Outlook. Since I have a mailbox hierarchy set up, all it took was to copy/paste 4 high-level mailboxes and copying was very fast. Microsoft tells me that Mailbox archive space is unlimited. So this is the way to go.

But this is also where the issue starts: I want Outlook to automatically move (not copy) all emails that are older than 92 days from my regular "current" folder to the corresponding archive folder. Like in:
move everything older than 90 days from Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ to Archive/Clients/DatabaseManagement/G-N/MyClient/ and do that automatically in the background.

When I make this request, people look at me like I have 3 heads (I only have one, I checked), is that feature really so outlandish? To me, this would be the most normal thing to have.

Does anybody have similar issues and maybe solutions to these?

Thanks
You need to set up an Archive Policy. This can be set up as a default policy, or as a folder by-folder policy (so you could have your main Inbox move everythingg after 18 months and specific client folders after 24 months). I believe you could tag individual messages, as well (say, to never archive the email with the client agreeing to projects). This is very much an existing functionality, and quite useful. You can definitely set up your default policy in webmail, and I believe that the functionality is coming now that the Mac and Windows code bases are becoming more closely aligned.
 


I use S/MIME email encryption, with its own problems, to send emails that I don't want everybody to read. All you need is a certificate, which you can get for free for personal use at several providers.
Another option, for occasional correspondence is that you can compose a document in your favorite app (TextEdit, Word, whatever) and print it to an encrypted PDF. Only someone with the password will be able to open it.

I use this for those rare occasions when I need to send someone a document securely and we haven't exchanged certificates. I will send the password out-of-band (usually via phone call or text message).

Of course, this is far too cumbersome to use on a regular basis, but it works fine if you only need to do it infrequently.
 


Maybe inexpensive hosting, like this, which includes 500 email addresses at $5.95/mo.:
I thought about that, but I have deliverability with CPanel, so I assumed I'd have it with web hosting. I'm currently doing a two-month tryout of Namecheap with a new, semi-disposable address and will post a status update; I'm also corresponding with FastMail to make sure they really do charge $50/year for each and every mailbox. Hover has some less than favorable ratings out there, though I mildly like their parent company.

Google... the issue is indeed privacy - privacy, and I suspect you have no control over the spam filters?
 



I don't know if this is still possible, but a while ago, I was able to let Google host my email by pointing mail.mydomain to one of the Google servers. They also gave me 10 free accounts at the time, so everybody in my family is sorted out for as long as I keep the domain alive. At $13 a year, that's affordable, but I'm sure, these days, you can get domains even cheaper.
I'm showing Google at $5/user/month, unless there's another offer somewhere I can't find.
 


Huh? I don't understand what you're saying here....
On my own web server, there are email deliverability issues, because everything has to be set up just... right... for certain companies to accept it (e.g. AT&T), and after much work, I still can't make it past that 99% barrier. (Or does Pair have hosted email as a separate product? Liquidweb does, and it's “sort of” affordable—the first account is a doozy, then the rest are cheap.)
 


I'm looking at outsourcing email for my main account. The complicating factor is that the domain is used by two family members as well. Normally I'd just dump it into Fastmail for $50/year, but with the other small accounts I end up at $150/year, which isn't practical. What to do? I looked at cheaper options. Namecheap has inexpensive email, but I'm not sure I trust them that far. MXrate is apparently trustworthy but relies on a single person who can apparently sometimes be thin-skinned and kick people out without notice (there's one incident where a person apparently opened two support tickets, because the first one hadn't gotten a reply in a few days, and was kicked out with his mail lost.) Greatmail looks good, $100/year for eight mailboxes, but I can't find any impartial reviews or experiences related to them. Zoho has its share of detractors. Hover is there but, again, I don't know anything about it other than its relation to Tucows. Protonmail is $$$ per account. I haven't found a review site (like the ones they have for web hosts), and the articles I’ve seen are sophomoric at best. Can anyone here provide some insights or experiences?
I have moved myself and my clients over to Namecheap for name registration and Machighway for hosting of website and email.

I did this after reading recommendations here a few months ago.

I moved the domain registrations away from GoDaddy and Hostgator due to poor service, performance, and privacy. Namecheap has free proxy registration, so I, as well as my clients, no longer get spam physical mail and spam email and spam phone calls from companies that automatically call and send junk to new domain, existing domain, and renewal registrations.

I did a test registration of a domain with someone else and the next day got spam emails and calls to the temporary email address and phone number I put into the registration info.

For web hosting and email I have the domains point to Machighway. I can’t express how pleased I am with them. CPanel is fast, and their tech support is prompt and has helped with anything I had questions about.

The email and web loads fasters, sends faster, FTP's faster. I have the medium plan for hosting email, which is about $12 a month for unlimited space and email boxes and forwards and web site space.
 


I'm looking at outsourcing email for my main account. The complicating factor is that the domain is used by two family members as well.
Normally I'd just dump it into Fastmail for $50/year, but with the other small accounts I end up at $150/year, which isn't practical. What to do?
After two decades of loving EIMS and being my own host, I switched to Rackspace. They are $2 per hosted email address, with unlimited domains and mail aliases. When setting it up, I found both their chat and phone support fast and knowledgable. I've had no problems since and can't complain.

I wish they would let me view mail logs but that is the only feature I miss to date. Their spam filtering is as good/bad as I got from Postini/Google.
 


After two decades of loving EIMS and being my own host, I switched to Rackspace. They are $2 per hosted email address, with unlimited domains and mail aliases.
I have moved myself and my clients over to Namecheap for name registration and Machighway for hosting of website and email.
Have you gotten good deliverability to Yahoo, AOL, and Bell/AT&T customers? Those are my main three problem areas. Setup of the free trial at Namecheap was easy enough but I can't get email through to my test account at Yahoo.

Rackspace looks good, too.
 


Google... the issue is indeed privacy - privacy, and I suspect you have no control over the spam filters?
One should probably distinguish between the GSuite and your basic Google email domain account. For the former there are pretty specific contractual promises made by Google, including that there be no advertising (and consequently no need for advertisement-driven data gathering). GSuite comes in various flavors, but broad privacy compliance seems a reasonable expectation across all of them. We use GSuite for educational institutions and non-profits, where privacy is a significant concern. So far, so good :-)
 


Have you gotten good deliverability to Yahoo, AOL, and Bell/AT&T customers? Those are my main three problem areas. Setup of the free trial at Namecheap was easy enough but I can't get email through to my test account at Yahoo.
I am using Machighway as hosting and email. Only name registration is on Namecheap. I have the nameservers for my domains at Namecheap [point to] the name servers for Machighway. When I send or receive email, all the records come from Machighway. I have no trouble emailing to my best friend, who only has a Yahoo email address, and a client who still uses AOL.
 


I am using Machighway as hosting and email. Only name registration is on Namecheap. I have the nameservers for my domains at Namecheap [point to] the name servers for Machighway. When I send or receive email, all the records come from Machighway. I have no trouble emailing to my best friend, who only has a Yahoo email address, and a client who still uses AOL.
Ah... thanks. Namecheap sends email to Yahoo and AOL just fine now, by the way... SPF is set up by default; DKIM isn't, and I'm not sure how I would do it. It is cheap and has filters. The downside is, as far as I know, absolutely no way to control the spam settings.

I haven't found the place where you can get cheap Google email accounts, and as ZMjol said, there's no privacy guarantee for those, only for the pricier GSuite.

Machighway also seems to be a hosting account that also gives you email, which I might end up going with . Trying a unique IP address for each email account I have with Liquidweb might just solve my problems. I guess my next experiment will be Rackspace, though... there are advantages to outsourced email, including not having to pay for multiple online backups of the mailboxes (Horcrux can save them locally).
 


After two decades of loving EIMS and being my own host, I switched to Rackspace. They are $2 per hosted email address, with unlimited domains and mail aliases. When setting it up, I found both their chat and phone support fast and knowledgable. I've had no problems since and can't complain.

I wish they would let me view mail logs but that is the only feature I miss to date. Their spam filtering is as good/bad as I got from Postini/Google.
Rackspace does look good but they are now $2.99 per mailbox per month with a minimum of four mailboxes... which takes me right into Fastmail turf!
 


I, too, am a longtime EIMS user and I've started using SurgeMail. It's software you need to run yourself (I run it on a Mac Mini). Not as easy and intuitive as EIMS, but so far it is rock stable and there are tons of options. There is a free version, I believe, but I opted for the $75/year version that gives me unlimited aliases and domains, tech support, but only 5 actual accounts. You interact via a web interface (for Admin work).
 


I'm looking at outsourcing email for my main account. The complicating factor is that the domain is used by two family members as well.

Normally I'd just dump it into Fastmail for $50/year, but with the other small accounts I end up at $150/year, which isn't practical. What to do?
You don't say exactly how you share with family, but here's an option. Fastmail provides one email account at $50/yr associated with one main email address. However, you can create both subfolders in the email account and aliases that forward specific email addresses to specific subfolders. So make subfolders for each family member and forward their email addresses to those subfolders. I think (not sure) that you can even create separate logins restricted to specific subfolders. Hope this helps.
 



I've been using Greengeeks.com for hosting my website and providing email. The only issue I have seen is that certain of my VPN's exit points have been blacklisted, so, when I try to send from my domain's server through Apple Mail, the email is not sent until I disconnect from the VPN. Funny that Google's and Yahoo's email servers don't seem to have this issue. Sigh. But in all other respects, I'm satisfied with Greengeeks and have no thoughts of changing. Maybe another VPN will resolve the (minor) issue.
 


And while I am writing about FastMail, I will say that I am a fully satisfied refugee from Godaddy, which consistently deleted important emails from well-known domains. Despite numerous discussions with support, they were unable to fix the problem.

At FastMail, one email account at the main domain receives all email. FastMail correctly configures and hosts the nameservers for that and two more domains. There are 200 aliases to emails at any of the three domains that sort emails into subfolders, which are then accessed by POP. FastMail even took a CSV file of my Godaddy forwards and installed them as aliases. $50/yr., and it all works flawlessly.

FastMail's spam filter is very competent, but you can define custom rules in addition. For example, immediately delete any email to a specific address (already harvested by scammers) that mentions "hacker" or "bank routing". Spam has gone for 20/day to zero.

After getting fed up with Godaddy's bait/switch/upsell tactics, I also switched hosting to Dreamhost for web hosting. It's both cheaper and works flawlessly.

I regret that for years I let the dread of the change stop me from leaving Godaddy. In fact, the transition took up up more than a day of reading docs, contacting support, and learning new procedures. But the outcome in terms of reliability, functionality, and sustainability has been undeniably worth it.
 


As far as I know, that’s not possible, but I’d like to be proven wrong.
I think you are right. Separate logins require separate accounts.

Maybe the original poster could forward from FastMail to separate free Gmail accounts, if they don't mind Google scanning their email into machine learning networks. I mean, what could possibly go wrong?
 


I don't know if this is still possible, but a while ago, I was able to let Google host my email by pointing mail.mydomain to one of the Google servers. They also gave me 10 free accounts at the time, so everybody in my family is sorted out for as long as I keep the domain alive. At $13 a year, that's affordable, but I'm sure, these days, you can get domains even cheaper.
I'm showing Google at $5/user/month, unless there's another offer somewhere I can't find.
Google Apps (as it was called then), stopped giving out free accounts in 2012. Microsoft's Outlook.com for domains followed suit soon after. As far as I know, Zoho is the only company of any repute or size that is still giving free e-mail hosting for a limited number of users.

People who signed up for Google Apps while it was free continue to receive that service at the level at which they signed up, indefinitely so far.
One should probably distinguish between the GSuite and your basic Google email domain account. For the former there are pretty specific contractual promises made by Google, including that there be no advertising (and consequently no need for advertisement-driven data gathering).
Maybe the original poster could forward from FastMail to separate free Gmail accounts, if they don't mind Google scanning their email into machine learning networks. I mean, what could possibly go wrong?
The free Gmail product no longer scans e-mails either, since 2017. There is still advertising, but it is not targeted based on the e-mail data, since it is no longer looking at that.
 


You need to set up an Archive Policy. This can be set up as a default policy, or as a folder by-folder policy (so you could have your main Inbox move everythingg after 18 months and specific client folders after 24 months). I believe you could tag individual messages, as well (say, to never archive the email with the client agreeing to projects). This is very much an existing functionality, and quite useful. You can definitely set up your default policy in webmail, and I believe that the functionality is coming now that the Mac and Windows code bases are becoming more closely aligned.
Outlook & Exchange have completely different features for archiving.

The older one is "AutoArchive" and is only available in Outlook for Windows. It is set by default to periodically move items older than a specified age to an Archive .PST file, but the user can override the settings by account or by folder, changing the criteria, where it archives to, the age limit, and if it just purges the old items instead.

Instead of AutoArchive, Outlook 2016 for Mac or later are supposed to have a "one-click Archive" button that just manually moves the item to a user-designated Archive folder. (It is missing from my Outlook 2019 for some reason.)

But these archive features may be superseded by Online Archive for Office 365, which moves messages to a separate Archive folder. The Exchange administrator can set a policy to automatically move older messages. Does the user have any control over this?

And worse, Microsoft thinks Online Archive is so great that it will disable local archives:
Outlook Help said:
The Archive command and feature doesn’t appear for any account in your Outlook profile if you include an Exchange Server account and your organization uses Microsoft Exchange Server Online Archive. Your network administrator can also disable this feature.
 


And worse, Microsoft thinks Online Archive is so great that it will disable local archives:
That's not exactly how I read it. Quoting from the Help file you referenced (emphasis mine):
The Archive command and feature doesn’t appear for any account in your Outlook profile if you include an Exchange Server account and your organization uses Microsoft Exchange Server Online Archive. Your network administrator can also disable this feature.
If it applied to all Exchange Server accounts, there would be no reason to include the and.

It all depends on what the server administrator does, rather than what Microsoft chooses to do, unless you happen to be using a server administered by Microsoft.
 


Ah... thanks. Namecheap sends email to Yahoo and AOL just fine now, by the way... SPF is set up by default; DKIM isn't, and I'm not sure how I would do it. It is cheap and has filters. The downside is, as far as I know, absolutely no way to control the spam settings.
I haven't found the place where you can get cheap Google email accounts, and as ZMjol said, there's no privacy guarantee for those, only for the pricier GSuite.
Machighway also seems to be a hosting account that also gives you email, which I might end up going with . Trying a unique IP address for each email account I have with Liquidweb might just solve my problems. I guess my next experiment will be Rackspace, though... there are advantages to outsourced email, including not having to pay for multiple online backups of the mailboxes (Horcrux can save them locally).
So, yes, I’m paying for a “hosting account”. You don’t have to actually set up a website, however, to just use email. In my case, I have a couple of websites under the account and some emails setup for domains that I have no website set up for.

I provide some in my family with a family domain name with their own email address. I do this to eliminates their spam problems. With MacHighway, you have account-level spam filtering and global spam filtering, as well as account-level rules and global level rules.

In this situation I use global rules with som regex expressions to do things like block all mail coming into every email account setup for all my domains that comes from places like .xxx , .fun, .party, etc.

I use the Spam Assassin settings for each account separately, depending on how some family likes it deleted before it gets to them, others like it labeled spam.

The reason to not have hosting of email or website at the same place as domain registration for me was ease of moving my name to a different registrar, or hosting and email to another company, if one gets bought out or starts acting up. Plus the further free privacy registration that Namecheap offers.

As well, for my own emails, I create a new alias every time I set up an account with a forum, a business, mailing lists, etc.

For instance I have houzz@mydomain.com homedepot@mydomain.com ... those forward to my real email box.

Then, in iOS and macOS, you add the alias in your outgoing email, and you can send from those aliases, as well, for direct correspondence back and not expose your real email box name.

Now comes the good part: I was notified yesterday that Houzz had a breach last May.

All I do now is go make a new alias “houzz2019@mydomain.com”, change my email at houzz to that, and delete the old alias. Any spam that was going to, or will be going to, the old address I’ll never get. And that email address is useless and isn’t used on any other site for loggin.

So it’s the same concept of a different password for each website you log into. That’s only half the equation of security. The other half is a unique email address (which is often your login name) for each website.

By setting up cPanel and a link to email forwarding in the program 1Password, I can within 30 seconds be standing in line at a new store and create a new email forwarding address and give to the clerk while checking out. When signing up or buying something on the net the same applies.

Over a period of a few days, everytime I went to a site or place I buy from, I logged in and changed my real email to the new unique forwarding address.

Also, if a website, mailing list, or company decides to sell my email, or they get hacked and don’t tell me for a while and I start getting spam, I know ahead of time where the spam came from.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
As well, for my own emails, I create a new alias every time I set up an account with a forum, a business, mailing lists, etc. For instance I have houzz@mydomain.com homedepot@mydomain.com ... those forward to my real email box.
This is also a fundamental feature of FastMail, for what it's worth, and you can choose from a wide variety of FastMail domains, also, for the alias (as well as your own domain name).
 


So it’s the same concept of a different password for each website you log into. That’s only half the equation of security. The other half is a unique email address (which is often your login name) for each website.
Even though I am a FastMail customer, I use spamgourmet.com to generate alias addresses dynamically. The alias is automatically created when the first message is received, and the first ‘n’ messages (configurable and updatable) are forwarded to my actual e-mail address.

By logging in, I can enable or disable any of my aliases at any time, and I can send messages, either originals or replies, for any of my aliases.

This has the extra advantage of not revealing my private e-mail domain name.

Granted, I recently encountered one web site whose “create account” process started with “Enter your e-mail address” as the only field on the page. After entering an alias, it returned “Invalid address”. Even after I e-mailed their support group from the alias address, they would not budge. In addition, the reply from the support group was immediately followed by a “Rate your interaction” e-mail from a third party.

I chose not to do business with that site, despite their mendacious claim that “We do not share our users’ personal information”. It seems obvious that they would only accept user addresses that they can tie to other sites and services for data aggregation.
 


Even though I am a FastMail customer, I use spamgourmet.com to generate alias addresses dynamically. The alias is automatically created when the first message is received, and the first ‘n’ messages (configurable and updatable) are forwarded to my actual e-mail address.
This sounds interesting! It seems like it would be a lot of work, though, for a site that you might want to hear from regularly. I would worry that I may miss an email whose alias I forgot to "extend", or from a sender who suddenly had a valid reason to increase frequency.

While it's true that spamgourmet may not be a good fit for such cases, I'm not sure how many senders I have that absolutely would be good candidates for it, apart from maybe the extremely rare truly one-off situation.
 


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