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Ric Ford

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The timing on this thread is perfect. I am in the process of moving off of FastMail and onto G Suite, and I appreciate being able to learn from others' experiences. The primary reason I am doing this move is that I want to have centralized anti-malware and anti-phishing services on my email, and that is not available with FastMail, as far as I can tell.
You might want to consider Rackspace, too:
Rackspace said:
Multi-layered Email Spam Filtering
... If mail passes the blocked email checks, we apply advanced content filtering to verify whether it is considered spam. Content filtering combines many techniques to analyze email structure and content, and create key indicators that identify patterns in email. These indicators are combined with industry-wide feedback from email providers across the internet about reported spam, phishing, and viruses. The end result is an accurate, adaptive, and evolving content filtering system that is highly effective at removing spam.
I did a little searching at FastMail and elsewhere, looking for anti-virus options but didn't find any easy solutions. Here's what I did find:
FastMail said:
Sieve scripts
Sieve is a programming language for filtering incoming emails. Fastmail's flexible rules system provides most users with filtering functionality, but advanced users may choose to write custom Sieve scripts for complicated filtering (such as time-based rules).
IETF said:
RFC 5235 - Sieve Email Filtering: Spamtest and Virustest Extensions
The Sieve email filtering language "spamtest", "spamtestplus", and "virustest" extensions permit users to use simple, portable commands for spam and virus tests on email messages. Each extension provides a new test using matches against numeric "scores". It is the responsibility of the underlying Sieve implementation to do the actual checks that result in proper input to the tests.
 


The timing on this thread is perfect. I am in the process of moving off of FastMail and onto G Suite, and I appreciate being able to learn from others' experiences. ...
I'm happy to share what I've learned in terms of switching to G Suite for email. Here are the basic steps, and the instructions are actually very good. The trickiest is the DKIM part.

1. The first important thing is to have full access to editing your domain's DNS. You have to "verify" your domain to Google by adding a TXT record with a code that your the G Suite Setup Wizard gives you. You have to be patient with any steps that involve adding or modifying DNS records because of DNS caching on the internet. In my case, it usually only took an hour, but in some cases, it can take 24 or 48 hours for DNS changes to propagate.

2. Once validated, you then have to remove old MX records and add GSuite MX records to your domain DNS - and then wait for propagation again.

3. I've learned a few tricks to speed up DNS propagation. Three large DNS services have a "cache flushing" tool... It still takes up to 48 hours for full internet propagation, but by using these three you can speed up your set up process:

Google​
OpenDNS (first "check" the domain, then at the bottom an option to update appears)​
Cloudflare cache purge​

4. The G Suite Setup Wizard will guide you through setting up G Suite user accounts and options to migrate from other servers (if necessary)

5. It is highly recommended that you set up SPF, DKIM and DMARC (all TXT records added to your DNS) in order to give your domain email "reputation" going forward. There is no guarantee with email, but these are the current standards for improving authenticity between email servers, and reducing spoofing, etc.

G Suite - Enhancing email security

Set the SPF TXT record first, which looks like this, and has clear instructions:
Code:
Host name: @
TXT value: v=spf1 include:_spf.google.com ~all
For DKIM, you have to go in to your G Suite Admin > 3-lines menu at the top > Apps > G Suite > Gmail and scroll down to the section "Authenticate email (DKIM)". It expands, and there is a "Generate new record" link. Click that, and it defaults to 2048-bit and "google" as the "selector" — you can change that, but I would leave it defaulted. You will copy and paste the hostname and the key into a TXT record in your DNS, but leave this G Suite Admin window open; you'll need to come back after setting DNS...


Usually, when entering DNS records, there are two fields: Hostname and Value. In most DNS editors, when you add a hostname value without a period at the end, it "prefixes" it to your base domain name. Eg, "www" gets prefixed as "www.domain.com" Here, the DKIM host name value is:

google._domainkey

but the Support Document instructions (174124) tell you to put the full domain name, which can be misleading: google._domainkey.yourdomain.com which results in a double entry of: google._domainkey.yourdomain.com.yourdomain.com so you have to be careful. Start with just google._domainkey as the hostname.

6. Once you have set SPF and DKIM, go and flush the Google DNS caches and wait a while before going back to the G Suite Admin > Apps > G Suite > Gmail > Authenticate Email section where this started, then click the "Start Authenticating" button. It may give an error in red, which means one of two things: either DNS has not propagated yet, or the hostname or value entries are not correct – hence my caution above.

You can find out what your DNS server is sending out with any DNS lookup tool, but it's easiest to use Google's own. On this page, start with the "DIG" section:

Enter your domain name first to make sure it gets a normal result. Then to test DKIM, enter this:

google._domainkey.yourdomain.com

and click on the TXT button to see the result. You should see
v=DKIM1; k=rsa; p=blahblahblah

If so, go back to the top level of the toolbox page and, instead of Dig, go in to Check MX.
Put your domain, and "google" as the "selector".

If DKIM verifies, go back and set up DMARC

And finally, here is the most important part: Wait two days before sending any email. I made the mistake of sending an email with a single link in it, before DMARC was fully propagated and active, and Google's Artificial Intelligence spam filter locked my account!
 


Being fed up with Google/Gmail, I started looking at setting up my own email server. I went through several options, at first trying to run it from home. My ISP is Charter/Spectrum. They don't block port 25 but blacklist email to their domains. Same difference. I have Citadel running on a RaspberryPi. Then I looked at a package from New Zeland. License cost was too high.

Then I found a package called Mail-in-a-Box - open source, secure, actively supported.

I have three email servers running now in Virtual Private Servers (VPS). Two are with Linode.com. The last is in Amazon's LightSail, part of AWS. The Linode servers are $5/month. The LightSail is $5/month, but I think I could get it to run in the smallest VPS, which would be $3.50/month.

There is no user limit in Mail-in-a-Box. The VPS are running Ubuntu Server 18.04 LTS. Installing Mail-in-a-Box is easy.

Knowing what I know now, I would just use LightSail. It is a one-stop solution. You can get and manage your domain name there. Mail-in-a-Box does automatic backups of your mail to Amazon S3. Since I set it up, they now have a free snapshot feature for the server. If you mess something up, you can revert back to a previous snapshot.

I didn't figure out how to do LightSail. Someone else posted a tutorial.

The Linode.com servers have been running 11 months and LightSail server 9 months.
 


I have an issue with, what else, the macOS Mail app. For some reason, it has been directing mail to the junk folder on two Exchange (Office365) accounts.

These emails have the usual brown color coding in the junk folder with a button to "Move to Inbox". The issue is, I don't have junk mail filtering enabled on any account, let alone these two. I haven't used that Mail feature in a while.

One account already has a spam service (Proofpoint) that appears to be working fine. When I look at the headers, there are some entries like "X-Forefront-Antispam-Report:", but these are inscrutable. Worse, I don't appear to be able to train this supposedly inactive spam filter and now have to regularly check the junk folder. When I did briefly use the Mail filter, I seemed to recall there was a "not junk" button for training purposes.

As far as I can tell, this started relatively recently on my Mojave install. I did have some problems with Mail junk filtering in El Capitan, which is probably why I turned it off. There are no relevant settings I can find in the Outlook web app. Does anybody know how to really turn off this "feature"?
 


I have an issue with, what else, the macOS Mail app. For some reason, it has been directing mail to the junk folder on two Exchange (Office365) accounts.
These emails have the usual brown color coding in the junk folder with a button to "Move to Inbox". The issue is, I don't have junk mail filtering enabled on any account, let alone these two. I haven't used that Mail feature in a while.
One account already has a spam service (Proofpoint) that appears to be working fine. When I look at the headers, there are some entries like "X-Forefront-Antispam-Report:", but these are inscrutable. Worse, I don't appear to be able to train this supposedly inactive spam filter and now have to regularly check the junk folder. When I did briefly use the Mail filter, I seemed to recall there was a "not junk" button for training purposes.
As far as I can tell, this started relatively recently on my Mojave install. I did have some problems with Mail junk filtering in El Capitan, which is probably why I turned it off. There are no relevant settings I can find in the Outlook web app. Does anybody know how to really turn off this "feature"?
The issue may not be with Mail, but with your ISP. Most providers do some sort of spam filtering before it gets to the Mail app, and their filtering may be less than accurate. I have had AT&T mark a message from themselves as spam.

If you log into your e-mail with a browser via your provider's web page, you should be able to mark any of the incorrect spam as "Good" or "Not Spam". No guarantee that the marking will last, but… .
 



The issue may not be with Mail, but with your ISP. Most providers do some sort of spam filtering before it gets to the Mail app, and their filtering may be less than accurate.
That's a good thought, but M Young clearly stated that Mail was classifying the mail as spam. An ISP's spam filtering could not cause this to happen unless the setting to "Trust junk mail headers in messages" was checked...and that would also require Mail's spam filtering to be enabled; M Young stated that is not the case.
 


I have an issue with, what else, the macOS Mail app. For some reason, it has been directing mail to the junk folder on two Exchange (Office365) accounts.
I reached out (again) to our IT office and after some initially unhelpful responses, I was directed to this link. The support article (I have no idea who or what Intermedia is) has directions for disabling a junk mail filter in Exchange.

I had rooted around a couple of times in these settings on Outlook Web Access and failed to find this option. I supposed if I had been using Outlook on the Mac, it might have been more obvious. On my own I also found this workaround on the SpamSieve (Michal Tsai) help pages, which does not explicitly disable junk filtering.

So, I think the bottom line is that Mail is off the hook for this issue, as Exchange was applying a filter and moving messages to the Junk folder. Those messages, once in the Junk folder, look like they have been filtered by Mail except for the absence of the "not junk" button, although there may be other "tells" that I missed.
 




Suggested alternative: create a separate email address for every merchant, either by setting up a domain with a catch-all account or some of the other options out there. Then ban the ones that resell or otherwise abuse your trust.
For those with Gmail accounts, there is an option that gives you virtually unlimited email options. First of all, Gmail ignores any "." in an address – e.g., big.foot@gmail.com is the same as bigfoot@gmail.com or bi.gf.oot@gmail.com.

But, even better, Gmail ignores anything after a "+" sign in an email address. You can use this to set up filtering/labels for email addresses. So you can have something like "bigfoot+storename@gmail.com" and it will come in to the same email as any of the above addresses. You can then label them, because it will show up in the email "From" position.
 


For those with Gmail accounts, there is an option that gives you virtually unlimited email options. First of all, Gmail ignores any "." in an address – e.g., big.foot@gmail.com is the same as bigfoot@gmail.com or bi.gf.oot@gmail.com.
But, even better, Gmail ignores anything after a "+" sign in an email address. You can use this to set up filtering/labels for email addresses. So you can have something like "bigfoot+storename@gmail.com" and it will come in to the same email as any of the above addresses. You can then label them, because it will show up in the email "From" position.
Wouldn't it be easy for any company receiving email from these alternate addresses to simply remove the "." or anything after the "+" to get the "real" email address?
 


Gmail ignores any "." in an address – e.g., big.foot@gmail.com is the same as bigfoot@gmail.com or bi.gf.oot@gmail.com.
But, even better, Gmail ignores anything after a "+" sign in an email address.
Great tip, with one caveat: These methods only work with general gmail.com addresses; they do not work with G Suite Gmail accounts.
 


Wouldn't it be easy for any company receiving email from these alternate addresses to simply remove the "." or anything after the "+" to get the "real" email address?
Certainly an individual may notice the modifications and change things out, but this is primarily targeted at those automated responses that are never viewed by a human.
 


... Gmail ignores any "." in an address – e.g., big.foot@gmail.com is the same as bigfoot@gmail.com or bi.gf.oot@gmail.com.

But, even better, Gmail ignores anything after a "+" sign in an email address. You can use this to set up filtering/labels for email addresses.
The former (ignoring dots) is something unique to GMail (as far as I know).

The latter (ignoring anything following a "+") is known as "subaddressing" and is actually part of an IETF standard (RFC 5233 from 2008, which is based on RFC 3598 from 2003). It is supported by most mail servers, although it may be disabled by the server's administrator.
Wouldn't it be easy for any company receiving email from these alternate addresses to simply remove the "." or anything after the "+" to get the "real" email address?
Sure it would, but in actual practice, it seems that most do not.

In my experience, the bigger problem is that there are many web sites that reject the "+" character in e-mail addresses, considering it invalid, forcing you to use an address that doesn't have a subaddress. These sites are wrong, but good luck convincing them to fix their broken code.
 


The former (ignoring dots) is something unique to GMail (as far as I know). The latter (ignoring anything following a "+") is known as "subaddressing" and is actually part of an IETF standard (RFC 5233 from 2008, which is based on RFC 3598 from 2003). It is supported by most mail servers, although it may be disabled by the server's administrator.
David, thank you for the further explanation. I was not aware that the "+" sign was a mostly universal implementation. I have used it for some time and haven't run into sites that do not implement this option.
 


Apple is not the only culprit. When I recently switched from Quicken 2007 to Quicken 2020, it took some sleuthing to find that Quicken 2020 hides its documents, downloads, automatic backups and other files in ~/Library/Application Support/Quicken.
The same can be said for Mail and Thunderbird...

The data conversion I have been dreading seems finally to be forced upon me: My ISP no longer allows POP3 downloads of e-mail using the venerable combination of Eudora and Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard. Therefore I have to choose a new e-mail client and a conversion procedure for my nearly thirty-year collection of e-mail boxes, folders, and filters.

I'd really be grateful if someone could provide me some pointers to solutions of this problem.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The data conversion I have been dreading seems finally to be forced upon me: My ISP no longer allows POP3 downloads of e-mail using the venerable combination of Eudora and Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard. Therefore I have to choose a new e-mail client and a conversion procedure for my nearly thirty-year collection of e-mail boxes, folders, and filters.
I'd really be grateful if someone could provide me some pointers to solutions of this problem.
I was in a very similar situation, forced to migrate from Eudora/POP after intensive use for decades, and conversion hasn't been fun. No good replacement exists for Eudora today. Here are some related notes from my experience.
  1. Obviously, you must safely archive all your Eudora files before even thinking of doing anything else.
  2. Thunderbird is probably the best substitute for Eudora. (An abandoned open-source version of Eudora was to use Thunderbird code.)
  3. Postbox is a "prettier" commercial variant of Thunderbird, with a unified In Box. I've been using it, but I'm sick of it and will probably move back to Thunderbird. My biggest issue, which the developer refused to address, is that colors/labels/priorities are applied to threads that are arbitrarily and stupidly defined by the software, and colors/labels/priorities cannot be applied to individual messages (not even via a similarly stupid message "edit" option).
  4. Postbox's developer was also doing his best to eliminate POP. (I don't know if he killed it yet, as I'm not running the latest version that requires an update to a new version of macOS).
  5. Thunderbird/Postbox uses confusing (but documented) Mozilla-type "profiles" to hold your email, buried in an obscure ~/Library subfolder. I recommend saving your email, instead, in your own folder within your home directory, so it doesn't get lost or confused with the massive mess that is the rest of ~/Library.
  6. Another confusing/complicated thing is "identities" (though the concept was in Eudora, too). You may have to do some reading about how those work and how to configure account/identity details as needed.
  7. Migrating Eudora email to Thunderbird (or Postbox) is possible with the help of Emailchemy, but even with that highly recommended tool, conversion can be a little problematic. I didn't lose a lot, but a small percentage of my emails got unpleasantly munged.
  8. If I were doing it again, I would try to use the ancient Eudora Mailbox Cleaner prior to the Emailchemy conversion to clean things up a bit.
  9. I migrated Eudora email in one shot to Thunderbird/Postbox with my first attempt using Emailchemy, but there may be better procedures than the one I used. You might want to experiment with different options (e.g. with Emailchemy's built-in IMAP server).
  10. IMAP mail management can be quite problematic when you're accustomed to POP – with IMAP you can't easily know where your email is located/cached/moved, etc, and you can inadvertently delete all copies by accident – the rules/operations can be very confusing, as well as time-dependent. You can study all the details and try to sort them all out, but you might want to consider using something like EagleFiler to safely store and archive your emails on your Mac.
  11. You can use your Eudora mailboxes after conversion, but I strongly recommend starting over with a new set of mailboxes, copying over any old mail you want, then putting all new email in the new mailboxes – not mixing new email back into old mailboxes. This is a good opportunity to clean things up while keeping those archived copies of your original Eudora mailboxes safe and separate.
  12. See below for important tips about attachment files becoming dissociated from the original Eudora emails.
 


I was in a very similar situation, forced to migrate from Eudora/POP after intensive use for decades, and conversion hasn't been fun. No good replacement exists for Eudora today. Here are some related notes from my experience...
Couldn't agree more! I had a 15+ years conversion from Eudora and used Emailchemy with very good success (took quite a while, though!). Wish I'd known about Eudora Mailbox Cleaner, as I did suffer some corruption.
 


I was in a very similar situation, forced to migrate from Eudora/POP after intensive use for decades, and conversion hasn't been fun. No good replacement exists for Eudora today. Here are some related notes from my experience.
Ric's suggestions are good; I used a similar procedure nine years ago but switched to Apple Mail because I didn't have much luck with Thunderbird and did not want to get stuck on something else that became a dead end. If you still have Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, do the migration on that. I think it's what is needed to run Eudora Mailbox Cleaner, which was a big help. As Ric says, there sadly is nothing like Eudora today.

You inevitably will lose something, but if you keep your Eudora files, you can extract attachments from the Attachments folder, and each mailbox is a big text file, which you can search for anything crucial. I recommend keeping the files for a while.

One warning, if you migrate to Apple Mail: it takes a very l....o....n....g time to process all your files, so expect (to the best of my recollection) at least several hours before you can access your mail files.
 


The same can be said for Mail and Thunderbird... The data conversion I have been dreading seems finally to be forced upon me: My ISP no longer allows POP3 downloads of e-mail using the venerable combination of Eudora and Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard. Therefore I have to choose a new e-mail client and a conversion procedure for my nearly thirty-year collection of e-mail boxes, folders, and filters. I'd really be grateful if someone could provide me some pointers to solutions of this problem.
I converted from Eudora to Apple Mail some years ago. I used Eudora Mailbox Cleaner, which worked well. I had no choice, as Eudora's implemetation of SSL was incompatible with that of my ISP, Verizon, at the time. I tried a number of mail clients, finally settling on Apple Mail as being the best choice for replacement. It does have its quirks but is reasonably reliable, and I don't have to worry about future availability.
 


I was in a very similar situation, forced to migrate from Eudora/POP after intensive use for decades, and conversion hasn't been fun. No good replacement exists for Eudora today. Here are some related notes from my experience....
I, too, converted my Eudora mail some years ago to Postbox using Eudora Mailbox Cleaner. It went fairly smoothly. Used Postbox from versions 3 to 7. I was happy through v 5. After that things went downhill.

I was first 'encouraged' to move from POP to IMAP, which I eventually did. Then SpamSieve support was discontinued in favor of an in-house spam filter that was no match for SpamSieve. Finally, after an update to version 7 a few months ago, Postbox began sending email to senders in my address book that I didn't select! The problem was when I used the suggested match to names in my address book – it would select the one I clicked on, then after placing my cursor in the area to type the letter, a second name would be placed in the To field without my intent or approval! (I believe it was the next one alphabetically by first name in the address book, but I'm not certain.) Sometimes I caught this, but not always. After the 4th embarrassment of sending an email that was irrelevant to one of my connections, often mixing work recipients with personal recipients, I finally bailed from Postbox yesterday and went to Thunderbird. So far so good.

The final straw was that Postbox nowhere allowed me to let them know what was happening. No FAQs on the issue. No help. For a paid email program to have no support but 'read the FAQs', it was time to leave. I would definitely not recommend Postbox to a friend.

I do realize that the spam filter that Postbox uses is the Thunderbird spam filter, so no gain there. But if only Thunderbird won't send mail to people I did not intend to send to, it will be an improvement. What a security problem! What a fatal flaw in a basic and essential part of email software.
 


The data conversion I have been dreading seems finally to be forced upon me: My ISP no longer allows POP3 downloads of e-mail using the venerable combination of Eudora and Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard. Therefore I have to choose a new e-mail client and a conversion procedure for my nearly thirty-year collection of e-mail boxes, folders, and filters.
I converted from Eudora to Thunderbird back in 2014. Eudora was running on my old PowerPC Mac Mini. Eudora Mailbox Cleaner worked well.

The only downside was that attachments, which I had already moved from the Eudora Attachments folder to individual project folders, got dissociated from their original emails, meaning that once the emails were moved to Thunderbird, it was no longer possible to click on an attachment icon in the email to which it was originally attached.

This was a slight nuisance at first, but as time went on, it became less important to access those older attachments anyway. Just something to be aware of.
 


The data conversion I have been dreading seems finally to be forced upon me: My ISP no longer allows POP3 downloads of e-mail using the venerable combination of Eudora and Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard. Therefore I have to choose a new e-mail client and a conversion procedure for my nearly thirty-year collection of e-mail boxes, folders, and filters. I'd really be grateful if someone could provide me some pointers to solutions of this problem.
Others have provided migration paths. I've switched mail clients a number of times: Eudora to Mailsmith (Bare Bones) to Thunderbird to Apple Mail. Each transfer lost bits, but there comes a point where you have no choice. A very quick look shows emails dating back to 2000.

I currently have six accounts across three services. I've switched to IMAP but download email to only one Mac and delete it from the servers (not really1.). I can read the mails on my other systems but I don't delete until I have a copy on the 'master' Mac in Apple Mail's 'On My Mac' mailboxes.

The one point I would really really stress is to get a paid mail account. I personally use FastMail, but there are others. Never mind the privacy implications of 'free' email, there may/will come a time when you have to change ISPs and there goes your mail service. When I moved outside Optimum's cable service area and before I closed my account, I discovered I could no longer send emails through their servers. This makes notifying third parties of your new email service/address a major pain – prove you're you, basically, to everyone you email. (This was ten years ago; services may do a better job of handling the switch now.)


1. 'Deleting' hides the email from my mail clients; it still exists on the mail servers. You may be able to specify how long a server retains 'deleted' mail, but Gmail, for one, doesn't seem to stick to the rules – visit your mail accounts via a browser every month or so and delete from there.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I know many people use Apple Mail, but I simply don't trust Apple's software quality (and I also encountered serious Apple Mail bugs with disappearing email a few years ago when trying to help a relative with it). I advise caution with Apple's software above all when it comes to IMAP, where any number of problems can permanently erase all copies of your email from the cloud servers where it's stored and the client computers you use to read it.

Here's an example of Apple Mail issues being tracked by a veteran Mac email developer who has produced the excellent SpamSieve plug-in for many years.
Michael Tsai said:
Mail Data Loss in macOS 10.15
I’m working on more posts about the Catalina release, but I wanted to start with a short warning. I’ve heard a bunch of reports of data loss in Apple Mail. Thankfully, none seem to be caused by my apps. (Ironically, one of the bugs I’ve encountered is the inability to delete messages via AppleScript.) And, in fact, most of the damage has occurred without my Mail plug-in even being installed. Nevertheless, people contact me because it’s not unreasonable to wonder if third-party software is to blame, and I also hear from people who want a second opinion because what Apple support told them didn’t make sense....
 


8. If I were doing it again, I would try to use the ancient Eudora Mailbox Cleaner prior to the Emailchemy conversion to clean things up a bit.​
I've used Eudora Mailbox Cleaner to migrate from Eudora (Windows) to Apple Mail twice, once in 2005, when I made the seismic (some might say religious) shift from a Windows XP PC to a Power Mac (running OS X Tiger), and ten years later, when my partner changed her email client from Eudora running under a VMWare Fusion Windows XP VM to Apple Mail, under OS X Snow Leopard on a Mac Mini.

I've reviewed my notes, and Eudora Mailbox Cleaner went pretty smoothly. There were a couple of issues; they were minor and took some manual cleanup, and a few were mildly annoying.

From my notes:
  • I had to manually rename almost every Eudora mail folder after importing them, because these folders came over with the old "short" MS-DOS names. Fortunately, I had made a printout of all the mailbox folder names under Eudora (highly recommended step before migration!).
  • A few of the emails I imported had references to the same attachment files. The first email that was converted by Eudora Mailbox Cleaner would be migrated with the attachments; the rest would just have the invalid attachment path.
  • Single (non-group, non-mailing list) Eudora Nicknames were imported to Address Book fine. However, Groups Nicknames had two issues:
    • The Notes associated with the Groups Nickname were not imported into Address Book.
    • All the entries in a Group Nickname are given their own entry in Address Book, but with no name – just the email address.
Thought this might be of help for anyone preparing for a Eudora Mailbox Cleaner migration. It was a lifesaver of a tool and worth many times what I paid for it!
 


I know many people use Apple Mail, but I simply don't trust Apple's software quality, particularly after encountering serious bugs in Apple Mail when trying to help a relative with it.
A question: I'm currently running macOS Sierra, and while Apple Mail (running Gmail via IMAP) isn't bulletproof, I've encountered almost no problems.

Did significant Apple Mail problems become serious with Catalina, or did they start earlier, with Mojave? Or High Sierra?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Did significant Apple Mail problems become serious with Catalina, or did they start earlier, with Mojave? Or High Sierra?
I can only say that the Apple Mail bugs I encountered were a few years ago and must have been prior to macOS Sierra. (I think I ended up switching the users to Thunderbird, but I'd have to check on that. I'm pretty sure they were using Eudora previously – from back in the Power Mac era.)
 


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