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With much sadness, I read this today at the homepage for one of the greatest Mac apps I've ever used, DragThing ... Anyone know of a viable alternative to this beloved software? I do not know what I'll do without it or something resembling it. Perhaps Mr. Thomson can be convinced to open-source it?
I have found the following, which partially give features of DragThing. Unfortunately, the Process Dock (which I use a lot) and the Window Dock (which I don't use as much as I should) aren't included, but the main dock is more or less tolerable.
  1. KeyCue 9 (not earlier versions)
  2. Overview
 
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May I suggest an alternative to DragThing? I wrote a program called "Station", which is in the Mac App Store. Station is a hierarchical launcher similar to Apple's dock with the twist that it allows you to create launch folders. Launch folders allow you to group related items together thus greatly improving usability and scalability over Apple's Dock.

Version 2.0 will soon be released with a bunch of new features and enhancements!

Note, Station is fully 64-bit.

You can read a more in depth description and download a demo version of Station (version 1.5.2) at the following URL:

<http://www.truenorthsoftware.com/station/>
 


Mine in no particular order:

Super Duper! for bootable clone backups along with incremental Time Machine backups to a separate disk.
EasyFind for file searches (especially on our networked drives at work). This works so much better than Spotlight.
Onyx for various maintenance tasks.
FinderPop for better Finder navigation. No longer actively developed and I will sorely miss this one when Apple finally breaks it totally. Been using it since MacOS 8 days. I have no idea what I'll be able to replace this with.
FontAgent Pro for general font management. I'm a graphic designer by trade and I manage a collection of more than 9000 font files including PostScript fonts going back to the early '90s.
FontNuke to clear font caches when things start looking wierd. That aforementioned font collection takes it's toll on the ol' cache files. FontNuke does a better job clearing them than anything else I've used.
Little Snitch, of course.
Grand Perspective to keep an eye on what's eating the most space on my drives.
Drop Box for non-local shared folders.

I was using XMarks (and FoxMarks before it) for bookmark syncronization across MacOS, Android and iOS but Last Pass just killed it. Anybody know of a good replacement that will sync across multiple browsers and platforms?
You might look at an app called Pmenu as a FinderPop replacement. You can find it on the App Store. It is activated by keyboard command which is pretty good. I mapped their keyboard command to a mouse click using BetterTouchTool, but even just using it with the keyboard command works pretty well once you get used to it.
 


I agree, and I sent James a note asking him to survey his customers and perhaps use Kickstarter to fund the rewrite. DragThing has been my launcher since Day 1, and the native dock is nowhere near as useful as a grid with 45 of my most-used apps arranged by function.
There are many application launchers, but one that I like, because it is unobtrusive, allows for grouping of applications, and is 64-bit, is Application Wizard. It runs as a preference pane but is accessed through a small "tab" that is anchored most anywhere on the screen. The entire thing is also highly customizable.
 



Another favorite app that's going to be a pain to replace.

Cadence BPM Tapper is a great utility for tapping out the BPM of songs and directly adding them to iTunes metadata. It was a free App Store download many years ago, but the author doesn't support it anymore and it's no longer in the App Store. And it's 32-bit so it's going to stop working soon.

I started using that when I got my first Intel Mac because the app I had been using previously, iTunes BPM Inspector, is PowerPC-only and was never upgraded for the Intel platform.

(I'm not providing any links for these apps, because they are no longer being produced, and the authors' product pages no longer exist. I don't recommend downloading software via third-party servers, since there's no way to tell if you're getting a corrupted/infected package.)

Does anyone have a suggestion for a good replacement BMP tapper for iTunes, preferably a small window I can shove into the corner of a screen, tap out BPMs and directly import the results into iTunes? And not cost a lot (there are several high-priced apps that do this as a part of a large list of features I don't need)?
 


I have no idea how a calculator app (albeit a very good one) has made so much more money for DragThing's developer, James Thomson, but more power to him.
I’m going to guess that’s because PCalc is available on iOS, and the iPad has shipped without a calcuator app for many years, which prompted many iPad users to seek out a good one.
 


I just discovered you can't edit groups on iOS. Really, Apple?
Anyone have a favorite app for such?
I somehow missed this great thread the first time around. Here is a late response to this query, for which I didn't see much offered:

I've been using an app called "Connect” - the developer is named Dexem. It actually uses the Contacts data but allows groups. I've found it to be entirely pleasing for my purposes. A real bonus is that the alphabetical search list "buttons" on the right hand side of the screen are larger than those used in Apple's Contacts, which makes hitting the right letter a much higher percentage operation....
 


KJM

I used DragThing for a long time, and I loved its layers where I could group apps for different purposes. It was easier to find all my photo apps on one layer, my utilities on a second layer, and so on. But in the last years I am not using it anymore, because macOS's built-in tools have grown better and better.
  • I like to invoke the Launchpad with a trackpad gesture and to type a few initial letters to find any application very quickly.
  • Mojave's Finder has a new option to group application categories.
 


So far, Apple hasn’t killed off Automator (unless it has disappeared from Mojave). Back in the classic Mac OS era, I depended on QuicKeys for a lot of things, including application launch. (Having to abandon QuicKeys when I moved to OS X was a major disappointment.)

I have been using Automator for a few years to launch the apps I use most. The main, but fairly minor, snag is that for reasons that are not clear to me, these services are not automatically available right after startup. One has to go to the Finder menu and then to Services… After that, the key combos that I set up to launch applications work as intended. They also work without this step if some other activity has “woken up” Services. Seems to me that whatever is in Services ought to “just work” upon startup.
 


[My favorites are]

Pathfinder (at least on my large-screened iMac, because I love the dual browser, which is less useful on my 12" MacBook)

LaunchBar - when I'm on a Mac without LaunchBar, it takes a moment to adjust and I feel slowed down

1Password

My all time favorite utility application was Westcode Software's OneClick, back in the pre-OS X days; I never found anything that could really replace it. I'd used OneClick to, in some way, customize almost every other application I used.
 





macOS is also terrible at searching shares. I use NeoFinder to catalog and search all my shares and drives. It's amazing, fast, makes thumbnails, its database can be used with many clients with a server version of the software, it’s well supported by the developer, and it's very affordable....
I can’t recall when I first got CDFinder, NeoFinder’s predecessor, but it was probably over 18 years ago. It works well now, and it worked well then. This is Mac software as we wish Mac software could always be.
 


A tangential request related to Classic Menu, which Sig Software will not update for 64-bit compatibility.

I much prefer Classic Menu to the Dock or any launcher. So I hope someone can offer a hack. The contents of the modern Apple menu are encoded in a .xib file that can be edited to remove certain items (e.g. Shut Down). So it should be possible to modify it to include a single folder alias. That’s all I want, as the alias can then point to my existing hierarchical folder structure, and would appear as a line in the modern Apple menu list.

Is anyone willing to write a hack that will do this? I am happy to pay a modest amount. I will share it with anyone who wants it. (Nevertheless, I have read that Catalina will keep system files in a separate partition that is not accessible to us mortals. So that might make my wish ultimately futile.)

I have found mention here of xMenu from Devon Technologies, which I will try also, but I'd prefer my menu on the left.
 


Rather than use another resource-consuming, third-party utility app, I use macOS's built-in Script menu to stash aliases to much-used apps and folders. Anything you stick in the "User Scripts" folder becomes an item in the drop-down menu that is always available regardless of the front-most app.
#tip
 


Rather than use another resource-consuming, third-party utility app, I use macOS's built-in Script menu to stash aliases to much-used apps and folders. Anything you stick in the "User Scripts" folder becomes an item in the drop-down menu that is always available regardless of the front-most app.
But the script will not eliminate the space hog that the dock takes up. The old Apple menu saved screen space and was easy to use. I still miss it and wonder why Apple abandoned the simplicity of the apple pulldown menu.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Rather than use another resource-consuming, third-party utility app, I use macOS's built-in Script menu to stash aliases to much-used apps and folders. Anything you stick in the "User Scripts" folder becomes an item in the drop-down menu that is always available regardless of the front-most app.
A few notes:
  • See Apple's documentation, Using the Systemwide Script Menu, for critical details (like how to enable the menu).
  • The menu sits in the Mac menubar.
  • It's present in all applications (including Path Finder, as well as the Finder).
  • Putting a large folder (alias) in the Scripts folder can hang things up (at least for quite a while).
  • You can potentially get unwanted items in the Script menu.
 


A few notes:
  • See Apple's documentation, Using the Systemwide Script Menu, for critical details (like how to enable the menu).
  • The menu sits in the Mac menubar.
  • It's present in all applications (including Path Finder, as well as the Finder).
  • Putting a large folder (alias) in the Scripts folder can hang things up (at least for quite a while).
  • You can potentially get unwanted items in the Script menu.
This preference feature is available in the AppleScript Editor at least as far back as the version included with MacOS X 10.6.x Snow Leopard.
 


According to a tweet today, Volitans Software will be releasing SMART Utility 4.0 on July 1st.

I wonder what happened to 3.3, which was announced on January 8th to be out "in a few weeks".
 


But the script will not eliminate the space hog that the dock takes up. The old Apple menu saved screen space and was easy to use. I still miss it and wonder why Apple abandoned the simplicity of the apple pulldown menu.
The Dock doesn't take up any space if you use Option-Command-D, and dropping items on to dock icons is much easier than using scripts.
 


Rather than use another resource-consuming, third-party utility app, I use macOS's built-in Script menu to stash aliases to much-used apps and folders....
A few notes...
As Ric observed, the Script Menu works but is glacially slow every time I click on it, as though it builds the menu anew each time. Xcode is supposed to be able to open .xib files, but it claims not to recognise objects.xib. Is anyone here handy with Xcode?
 


Many thanks, John!
I replaced QuicKeys with Keyboard Maestro. Just like QuicKeys, it takes a while to become familiar with it. It's faster than QuicKeys ever was. I highly recommend Keyboard Maestro.

Even with Lauuchbar, I open most used apps with shortcuts. Heavily repeated typed items, like business address, my email adddresses, long bios and other blocks of text, make Keyboard Maestro a real time-saver. I probably only use 10% of its power after 60 days of using it. That will grow, considering how relatively easy it is to use.
 


According to a tweet today, Volitans Software will be releasing SMART Utility 4.0 on July 1st.
I have added emphasis:
Volitans Software said:
SMART Utility 3.2.5 is Out!
NOTE: This is the last free version. Version 4.0 will be out in July, and will be a paid upgrade, unless you purchased after May 1st, 2016 and then it is free.
While we have been waiting for some time now for a new major release, perhaps Matthew will still reach his goal of having it ready by the end of the month.
 


I saw the posting about SMART Utility 3.2.5 and decided to run the update. Errors popped up on my SSD! (Micron 2TB SSD in Mac Mini 2012.) As validation I found DriveDx and ran it, too. Same errors!

OK, I'll watch it, I thought. These might be errors that have been mapped out, and it's now stable, I hoped. After a few days of running the tests daily, another error popped up. Not stable!

I ordered a replacement SSD (Samsung 2TB 860 EVO this time) with 2-day shipping and re-did the installation ASAP. As I ran a non-incremantal backup in preparation, CCC reported a file that had uncorrectable read errors (nothing of importance - an old Youtube video). I installed the new SSD and it looks good now. Whew!

I put the failing Micron SSD into an external USB enclosure and formatted it as 1.3 TB - way over-provisioning the 2TB media. If the firmware re-maps any new errors using the extra space, it might be OK for many years. Or not. We'll see. I'll use it only for temporary purposes.

Oh, and though SMART Utility and DriveDX said the Micron SSD was failing, Disk Utility said it was fine.
 


though SMART Utility and DriveDX said the Micron SSD was failing, Disk Utility said it was fine
This is not surprising, because the utilities are designed to do different things.

The SMART standard has a drive report threshold values (beyond which a drive should be considered "failed"), in addition to the current values.

Disk Utility only reports a failure if a drive's current values are beyond the thresholds.

SMART Utility and other similar apps go a bit further. They have their own heuristics to try and predict an imminent failure instead of just waiting for the drive to report "I have already failed".
 


I've been using KeyQue for several years. It works just fine under macOS 10.14.5. My biggest problem is to remember to use it. It just displays all available shortcuts for a given environment. Quite useful. Still I would like some specialized things like in Photoshop, when selecting/eliminating photos — Command-L to turn filters on, then having to use the mouse to select the rejected flag. Would love to be able to just hit a key combo and be done. Is Quickeys the way to do this?
Keyboard Maestro came to me free as bundled software when I purchased a Matias keyboard several years back. It took a while for me to try it out, after experiencing problems with QuicKeys. Soon enough I discovered its power and it is now one of my “must-have” utilities.

KM macros are not limited to <modifier>-<key> combinations. You can create triggers using multiple keystrokes, e.g. “TypeText«space»” will trigger a sequence of first deleting those characters that you typed and then inserting the letters that you defined to be inserted. The macros are also case-sensitive, so that, in my case, “daT” will generate the present date variable in YYDDMM format. The trick is to select triggers that you would probably never type during normal text entry. How about 190807… Oops! I just typed “How about daT”!

The text generated can simulate a “paste” of your defined characters, or it can simulate actual keystrokes—handy when password fields prevent you from pasting from the clipboard.

You can create universal macros, or ones for specified application(s). Limited to spreadsheets (Excel and Numbers), I have “tD” to enter today’s date into the cell; “yD” yesterday’s date; “tM” tomorrow’s date. Quite handy is “d&T” which generates the present date and time of day. The possibilities are endless. I have been using KM for a good number of years now, and I feel I have barely scratched the surface. They have a forum where users can show off the “tricks” they have created—some too outlandish for me.

Of course, I’m always on the lookout for better alternatives, and I tried KeyCue for a while. No!

Major upgrades of Keyboard Maestro are not free, but they are few and far between. Incremental updates are always free. My copy (8.2.4) runs fine in macOS Catalina.
 


On the topic of keyboard macro tools, I've been using BetterTouchTool for years and have been continually amazed by just how configurable it is.

It has a (perhaps too) dizzying array of triggers, such as keystrokes, mouse buttons, gestures, typed words, Touch Bar input, and even network packets. It is also updated frequently, and the author is very receptive to suggestions.
 



Even if an application has a dedicated "Uninstall" tool, I follow up with AppDelete. This article covers AppDelete in the most detail I've ever seen. I've quoted text about the ability to find files that may be orphaned by an uninstall.
AppDelete: A Universal App Uninstaller for Your Mac
Thanks for the Lifewire reference! I have been using AppDelete for many years and had not seen/looked for the "Search for Orphans" option under "Tools". I just used it, and 33 orphans were found, which I have now deleted.
 


My favourite AppDelete tip is that there is a contextual menu item under 'Services' that appears with a right-click on an application. No need to open AppDelete, get it to list the contents of the Applications folder, select the unwanted app and then search for associated files.
 


The problem with AppDelete is that it hasn't been updated since May 2018 … Is it still under development? I use AppCleaner Pro.
 


Thanks for the Lifewire reference! I have been using AppDelete for many years and had not seen/looked for the "Search for Orphans" option under "Tools". I just used it, and 33 orphans were found, which I have now deleted.
So why does it ask for access to my Address Book and my Calendar? Not sure finding a bunch of Kb-size files is worth giving up privacy.
 



So why does it ask for access to my Address Book and my Calendar? Not sure finding a bunch of Kb-size files is worth giving up privacy.
I've used AppDelete for years, and do not recall it ever asking for access to the Apple Address Book and/or Calendar. I found nothing about AppDelete requesting permissions on its website (not that there's much detail there). Do you have any more specifics, Steven? Is AppDelete authorized in Accessibility? Email current developer Hans Tuchel to ask? (That's the AppDelete support model.)
The developer Reggie Ashworth died in 2017. The site says support has been taken over by a friend.
I "internet knew" Reggie and communicated with him several times about his programs, both AppDelete and VidConvert. He always responded quickly and effectively. As a one-man developer, he hadn't planned for mortality. From another who knew him much better than I, his widow was left in something of a mess regarding his business - in particular, access to his code and Apple Developer account. I was glad to see his apps continue under replacement developer Hans Tuchel.

As to not being updated, AppDelete is current into Mojave.

With ever more lockdowns and "Apple-write-only / user-read-only" added safety features in the pending Catalina, AppDelete and similar utilities may be constrained. I doubt Catalina users will be able, as I still was in Mojave, to use AppDelete to remove pre-installed Apple programs (e.g., Maps, Books).
 


So why does it ask for access to my Address Book and my Calendar? Not sure finding a bunch of Kb-size files is worth giving up privacy.
It asks because of the new security featues in Mojave — without your permission, it cannot scan those locations. It does not mean the program is going into the data to scrape out contacts or find out where you went to dinner last night.
 



Regrettably, EasyFind 4.9.3 is 32-bit, so it will die with Catalina. Pity. Great utility!
All indications on my 10.12.6 box are that it's a universal binary with both 32-bit and 64-bit components.

Maybe re-download it? (Though I checked its HTTP header and its Last-Modified date is 17 Jul 2014.)

Checked with Apple System Information, 32-bitCheck & ArchiChect from The Eclectic Light Company (Howard Oakley) and the following Terminal command
Bash:
file EasyFind.app/Contents/MacOS/EasyFind
 



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