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Why Bento is unlamented for me:

Bento was my first experience with Apple's iOS-centric view of the Mac. It "hid" the Bento file (package, as I recall) in the Library because the iOS worldview is that files don't matter.

Bento wouldn't let me separate my personal data from my work data, though I seem to remember that I could accomplish that by creating different log-ins on my Macs, one for personal, one for business, and Bento would be different in different log-ins.

I found no useful way (I bought a 5 pack of licenses the day Bento released) to share Bento files (remember, we're not supposed to think about files) with my co-workers. Stopped using it long before Apple deprecated the application.

A quick review of the Tap Forms website does suggest that application might be Bento, as it should have been - though without installing, I don't know if it would permit separate files for personal, work, and to share with coworkers.
 


You mean other than Valentina Reports for LiveCode, which is alive and well?

Valentina Reports for LiveCode is an implementation of our reporting tool and available on macOS, Windows and Linux. You create reports in Valentina Studio Pro which are stored in a project file, and then that project file can be used with Valentina Reports for LiveCode.

A number of the RAD tools out there have third party vendors that create add-ons within the RAD tool itself. There are positives to doing that, but the negative is that you cannot sell it to users of other tools. That often leads to third party eco-systems perishing for lack of continuous revenue. Our reports do not work like that. If you have created reports to use with Valentina Reports for LiveCode, you can use the same reports with Valentina Reports for .net, Valentina Reports for Ruby, Valentina Reports for Xojo and the like.

You can also 'play back' reports (if set up correctly) in the free Valentina Studio Reports Viewer.
I stand corrected regarding Valentina; my apologies as I should have remembered it. I was originally referring to Quartam, whose website is dated from 2013, and apparently is designed for LiveCode 6. (LiveCode 9 is current).

I should also note that there was an unsupported "Report Builder" in LiveCode 7, but it has been abandoned. And that was my point: HyperCard had a fantastic report editor; it's a shame it's not part of LC by default.
 


Jumping in here with a related database question: I've been searching for a couple of years now for a way to have an address book, similar to Contacts, that I could use in Linux. I searched for a template for LibreOffice or OpenOffice and did not find anything. Thunderbird is just not robust enough and most address book apps don't have a useful notes section, if they have one at all. (I'm not at all interested in what Microsoft or Google offer.)

I primarily use Contacts in El Cap (which I will say is much more error-prone/klugy than Address Book in 10.6.8) as a "life" database. About 95% of my use with it is in the Notes section. The search function is instantaneous and it allows me to keep notes about software, companies, hardware, people, appliances, misc. products, heath issues, etc. I use it every day, all through out the day.

The Notes functionality and easy integration with the calendar and mail is the one major thing that keeps me from moving to Linux for day-to-day work. I would still need to boot up to a Mac for Final Cut Pro X and Logic X, but aside from that, I could survive fine in Mint or similar on a Dell laptop for virtually everything else. Any thoughts?
Sounds like you're a candidate for KDE Kontakt.
Kontact
The Kontact suite is the powerful PIM solution of KDE that handles your email, agenda, contacts and other 'personal' data together in one place. Kontact delivers innovations to help you manage your communications more easily, organize your work faster and work together more closely, resulting in more productivity and efficiency in digital collaboration.
These programs together form Kontact:
  • Akregator - Read your favorite feeds
  • KAddressBook - Manage your contacts
  • KMail - Mail client
  • KNotes - Sticky notes for your Desktop
  • KOrganizer - Calendar and scheduling, Journal
  • Summary - Summary screen in Kontact
  • KJots - Your ideas organized in a Notebook
 



Sounds like you're a candidate for KDE Kontakt.
For "klarity", I add here that to use KDE's Kontact "Suite", you would probably want to be running a KDE distribution. Kubuntu may be the most widely used, but many "distributions" release KDE versions. The KDE community directly supports KDE Neon, a stripped-down version based on Ubuntu, intended to "show off" KDE's Plasma desktop.

Mint is dropping its KDE version in the Mint 19 series, due next month.

The KDE community has worked hard to develop applications and integrate them with its Plasma desktop. The applications will run on the more common distributions derived from Gnome (which include Mate and and Cinnamon and Ubuntu's deprecated Unity), but there are a lot of KDE-specific dependencies required, and no Plasma desktop for that "integrated" Mac-esque experience.

I've tried several versions of Plasma 5 through the latest stable 5.12 and always returned to Mint and Cinnamon.

After reading that the Plasma team has simplified its interface, so changing something in one panel doesn't disrupt a setting made in another, I have downloaded the KDE Neon "daily" beta to try the new 5.13 pre-release version, and it really does seem improved.
 


I should also note that there was an unsupported "Report Builder" in LiveCode 7, but it has been abandoned. And that was my point: HyperCard had a fantastic report editor; it's a shame it's not part of LC by default.
The problem with 'native' (and that was an issue with Quartam) is also its strength - it can leverage the tools it was built with. At the same time, you are stuck deploying only with the tools it was built with.

The cards products seemingly have a solution that each card itself becomes a form of record, with various fields inherited from the stack. I have seen several who have deployed solutions that way. But then you end up with performance issues and old hard maximums for numbers of cards you can have in a stack.

Probably like many here, I also used HyperCard quite a bit. I loved it. Its true living successor is LiveCode. But back in the day, I used HyperCard quite a bit for making useful utilities that worked with data (my earliest projects of that sort were managing translation strings and files for console games back in the early '90s, ie SNES, TurboGraphix, Sega, Jaguar), and also a bit of AppleScript, too, when that came along.

But here's the thing now - while I used to handle relatively small amounts of data, those small amounts would grow massively if I wanted to access it on an ongoing basis after a few years.

It really isn't doing your customers any good if you select a system which won't handle hundreds of thousands of records efficiently (or more) from the get go. A critical issue arrives if a vendor selects a system because it is easier or more fun to develop with, but ultimately leaves your customer wanting, if they use your app for many years and it becomes sluggish and hard to use and support.
 


The thing I like about Panorama (warning: the developer, Jim Rea, is a friend of mine) is that you can use as much or as little of its massive power as you like.

Here's my original TidBITS review: https://tidbits.com/2001/11/19/seeing-the-light-with-panorama/

And here's Joe Kissell's recent review: https://tidbits.com/2017/11/03/panorama-x-brings-the-legendary-mac-database-back-to-the-future/

What is a database, really? A "flat-file" database is just a grid of rows (records) and columns (fields). A "relational" database is just a collection of those grids, linked by the ability for one record to find records in another grid via a matching key. Panorama lets you work with grids that way, through the "data sheet" representation of your data, where you can do many powerful things, including sorting, searching, filtering, grouping, etc. Thus, this alone might be all you need.

But if you want to put a visual form in front of that as a custom designed interface, you can do that too. You can build an interface just like Xcode lets any Mac developer build an app interface. Thus you can easily see your data, e.g. one record at a time, with the fields laid out in some nice way.

Finally, if you want to go all the way, there's a programming language that lets you add power under the hood, so that you can e.g. click a button and run code on demand that does any kind of powerful stuff with your data and/or its representation in the interface. In effect, you are now writing and running a full-fledged Mac app, with the special feature that the underlying model data is a database that will scale way up as needed.

It only takes a moment to watch the wonderful demo movie at https://vimeo.com/225452340 and see what I'm talking about.
 


EFB

Give Tap Forms a try as it is Bento plus a lot more and it imports Bento databases, giving you a quick jump start. You also can view the table as a spreadsheet and the form at the same time.
I bought Tap Forms only to find that it requires 10.12. Asking for a refund!
 


I bought Tap Forms only to find that it requires 10.12. Asking for a refund!
10.11 is from 9/15 and is is approaching 3 years old. I know a lot of people hold out, but I am glad the developer keeps moving forward. The app probably requires some feature that is not available on prior OSX versions and my guess is that it could be related to synchronization.
 


For "klarity", I add here that to use KDE's Kontact "Suite", you would probably want to be running a KDE distribution. Kubuntu may be the most widely used, but many "distributions" release KDE versions. The KDE community directly supports KDE Neon, a stripped-down version based on Ubuntu, intended to "show off" KDE's Plasma desktop.

Mint is dropping its KDE version in the Mint 19 series, due next month.
George,

Almost 2 years ago now when I extensively researched and played around with Linux (and you were very helpful back then with your thoughts too), I took a look at every single Address Book app I could find. I just took another look at Kontact and it as well all others I looked at back then, did not have a "notes" section which is all I really care about. This is why I thought if I could find, buy, or make an address book template in LibreOffice or similar and import my .vcf files, my problem would be solved. I guess I will have to keep looking. I don't think what I want exists, so if possible, it will need to constructed with some database app.

You mentioned Mint. After months of trying every distribution of Linux that I could, I did settle in on Mint. I also have a 2011 MacBook Pro 17" which was a major pain in the buttocks because of the AMD Radeon card and I never could get it to sleep, but other then that, I thought Mint was very nice and usable. If or when I make the move to Linux, I would start with a brand new laptop PC that is recommended for Linux. But, this one issue might keep that from ever happening.

Thanks,
Dave
 


Currently I am focusing more on Filemaker these days (mostly for business reasons), but I would like to say that I am a big fan of ProVUE Panorama. It is a great product - worthy of checking into.
 


I have been using FMP9 in El Capitan successfully. The only difficulty I have encountered is exporting reports to Excel. My work around is to run exports in Snow Leopard Server that I run in Parallels. I haven't bothered to upgrade as I am only a casual user now, and V9 works fine for my use.
I’m still running FMP9 on different versions of macOS and not willing to upgrade for GUI changes and prices of course.

But i’m willing to pay (reasonable amount) if someone can solve two recurring printing bugs when running on recent macOS versions:

- The current record doesn’t get printed: if many records are displayed and we only want to print the current selected one, then the first displayed record gets printed instead.

- FMP crashes consistently when printing after a few records have been printed.

Any suggestion would be greatly appreciated because FileMaker Pro is a fantastic piece of software and I wouldn’t have been able to run my own company for 20 years without it!
 



I’m still running FMP9 on different versions of macOS and not willing to upgrade for GUI changes and prices of course.
But i’m willing to pay (reasonable amount) if someone can solve two recurring printing bugs when running on recent macOS versions:
• The current record doesn’t get printed: if many records are displayed and we only want to print the current selected one, then the first displayed record gets printed instead.
• FMP crashes consistently when printing after a few records have been printed.
I tested this with FMP 10, 13 & 16 in MacOS 10.12 (Sierra). In FMP 13 & 16, printing either the current (selected) record or all records in the found set works perfectly. In FMP 10, attempting to print the current record prints all records in the found set instead.
 


I’m still running FMP9 on different versions of macOS and not willing to upgrade for GUI changes and prices of course. But i’m willing to pay (reasonable amount) if someone can solve two recurring printing bugs when running on recent macOS versions:
Did you try the menu command "Save Records as PDF"? In FMP 10, it correctly outputs only the current record even though this does not work with the print command. You can select the option to immediately open the PDF, which you then can print.
 



Did you try the menu command "Save Records as PDF"? In FMP 10, it correctly outputs only the current record even though this does not work with the print command. You can select the option to immediately open the PDF, which you then can print.
Thank you for this suggestion, but printing PDFs is not a solution [for me], and I really want to stay with FMP9.
 


I've got FileMaker Pro 13 under macOS 10.13, and many scripts (and sometimes even trying to modify an unsuccessful search) cause it to crash completely (not even a hang, just a full crash).

I can even get it to happen by using the network browser to open a network database - it will see the databases available, but it will quit when you hit the Open button. Using an opener file instead works fine to open it (and I have to reopen frequently).

Has anyone else seen that kind of instability? I'm currently running FileMaker on a local machine on an older OS and just remoting into that to handle anything more than basic data entry.
 


I've got FileMaker Pro 13 under macOS 10.13, and many scripts (and sometimes even trying to modify an unsuccessful search) cause it to crash completely (not even a hang, just a full crash).

I can even get it to happen by using the network browser to open a network database - it will see the databases available, but it will quit when you hit the Open button. Using an opener file instead works fine to open it (and I have to reopen frequently).

Has anyone else seen that kind of instability? I'm currently running FileMaker on a local machine on an older OS and just remoting into that to handle anything more than basic data entry.
FileMaker Pro 13 had all sorts of issues on my iMac with High Sierra installed—including hard crashes—that I had to toss the app and grab a demo version of 16 to open and export my data. Later, I tried FM 13 on my MacBook Pro and didn't have anywhere near as many problems. Strange.

I ended up with a FileMaker 16 license, and my databases have been updated, so I'll stick with that for now.
 


I've got FileMaker Pro 13 under macOS 10.13, and many scripts (and sometimes even trying to modify an unsuccessful search) cause it to crash completely (not even a hang, just a full crash).

I can even get it to happen by using the network browser to open a network database - it will see the databases available, but it will quit when you hit the Open button. Using an opener file instead works fine to open it (and I have to reopen frequently).

Has anyone else seen that kind of instability? I'm currently running FileMaker on a local machine on an older OS and just remoting into that to handle anything more than basic data entry.
FileMaker Pro 13 was certified through Yosemite, so anything beyond that has no guarantees. The last version of FileMaker Pro 13 was 13.0.5. If you're not there, try updating to that to see if it helps with what you're experiencing.
 



I’m still running FMP9 on different versions of macOS and not willing to upgrade for GUI changes and prices of course.
- The current record doesn’t get printed: if many records are displayed and we only want to print the current selected one, then the first displayed record gets printed instead.
Any suggestion would be greatly appreciated because FileMaker Pro is a fantastic piece of software and I wouldn’t have been able to run my own company for 20 years without it!
Check your printing prefs after you click Command-P - use the pull-down to go to the FileMaker pane - you can choose...

1) current record
or
2) records being browsed

Generally FileMaker will remember your last choice, so if you are always going back and forth then you can create a script to set one for each.
 


Anyone using 4D these days? I seem to remember it started life as Silver Surfer in the 1980s. I was a (not very good) 4D developer for a few years. I enjoyed its power but was frustrated by certain aspects. Does the fact that 4D has had only one previous mention in this forum mean that it is now not highly-regarded by the DB fraternity?
Hi Tim,

I have been using 4D for the last 25 years and have been able to access databases like 4D, SQL, MySql, Sqlite - creating xlsx files on the fly, doing some php requests, building compiled 4D databases for professional use.... I did retire last year.

Regards
Alain
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I saw this review on Amazon and was wondering if anyone here had opinions about the new FileMaker Server 17:
Amazon said:
FileMaker Pro 17
One step forward, dozens back.

Pros: Finally rid of JAVA. Now your organization can deploy FileMaker without the extra maintenance and security risks of JAVA. Next, the Data Migration Tool may prove useful to those who enjoy working with command lines, as there is no GUI, even on macOS; a system made famous for having a GUI.

Cons: During the rewrite to Node.js and Angular, dozens of features have been removed entirely, and more have been moved to the command line. Completely gone are useful features such as Standby / Failover, database folders, support for Spanish, Chinese, Dutch and other languages, the view of client details, and the view of detailed database protocols.
 


Hi Tim,

I have been using 4D for the last 25 years and have been able to access databases like 4D, SQL, MySql, Sqlite - creating xlsx files on the fly, doing some php requests, building compiled 4D databases for professional use.... I did retire last year.

Regards
Alain
I think it may be that people are using more mainstream products and web development is where it is at. Not that native databases are bad thing, but you see developers following the money and there are very few opportunities for 4D developers.
 


I saw this review on Amazon and was wondering if anyone here had opinions about the new FileMaker Server 17:
One additional piece, FWIW, FileMaker, Inc. has added an Admin Console API that one could use to build an interface providing many of the "lost" features, in a format that specifically meets one's needs.

I expect that we'll begin to see some custom-built Admin Console interfaces popping up within the next few months.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's some database/development news from Google:
Google said:
App Maker
Build apps that help fill gaps, like accelerating business workflows or scaling internal operations, with G Suite’s low-code development environment. App Maker is included with G Suite Business and Enterprise editions as well as with G Suite for Education.

Templates, drag-and-drop UI design and declarative data modeling make it easy for IT developers and enthusiasts to build apps that empower your teams.

... App Maker comes with built-in support for Cloud SQL (GCP account for your domain required), offering high performance, scalability, and convenience. You can also connect App Maker to your own (non-Google) database using JDBC or REST API.

Whether it’s to build project tracking, travel approval or people directory apps, App Maker has many templates to get you started.

Use HTML and CSS to white label your apps and control the way they look on desktop and mobile.


App Maker Guides
Use these guides to get started app making. Note: Some tutorials won't work until a G Suite administrator sets up Cloud SQL for your domain.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

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