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JDW

I use a Panasonic GH5 to shoot 4K video and edit footage in FCPX [Final Cut Pro X] 10.4.3 on a 2015 MacBook Pro 15" top-end BTO model with 1TB internal SSD (Apple) and dGPU.

Regardless of whether my footage is transcoded or not, and regardless of whether the footage is on my internal 1TB SSD or external drive, I very frequently get freezes during playback, sometimes 6 freezes in 1 hour! When a freeze occurs, the audio of the footage being played keeps going (is audible), but I get the spinning beachball, and the entire screen freezes, and Force Quit won't work, so I must press the power button to shutdown, then reboot.

This problem only occurs in FCPX (I'm using 10.4.3 right now) and almost exclusively when I play back my video under edit within FCPX. It doesn't matter if Better Performance or Better Quality is chosen. Footage not transcoded (files straight out of my GH5) are very choppy during playback (which is expected), but they seem to trigger the playback freeze even faster than transcoded ProRES does. Lastly, this freeze occurs even when I am using my internal Retina display, not just when I am using my external 27" Eizo 1440p display (connected via Thunderbolt 2/MiniDisplayPort-to-HDMI cable).

I've tested FCPX editing in a Guest user account and rarely get the freeze, but I do get it. I tried eliminating all my Login Items in my primary user, but I still get freezes. Again, this is only in FCPX, and only during playback.

It would appear that I am not alone in experiencing this FCPX freezing problem on the 2015 MacBook Pro 15", as per this Apple Communities discussion thread. As you can read there, that individual had his logic board replaced, only to find the freezing in FCPX remained. That discussion ended with no resolution mentioned.

In this discussion thread, Philip Morley1 describes his MacBook Pro freeze almost exactly like mine, in that his audio continues but the machine is frozen and he can only resort to a hard power down to resolve it:

Here's another thread, exactly the same.

There are even more cases if you Google them.

I've filed a Apple Developer Bug Report and sent them SysDiagnose files and such. They merely thanked me and said they are looking into it, but nothing has been done so far.

Have any of you experienced any freezes like this on your own MacBook Pro (especially the 2015 model) during FCPX editing? If you do have this problem in macOS High Sierra, did you also have it in Sierra, too?

I have a 5K iMac at the office with High Sierra and FCPX, but I don't get the freezes during playback with it.

My 2015 15" MacBook Pro is always running the latest OS, currently on macOS 10.13.6. But I had the freeze on previous versions of High Sierra, as well, so this is not something new to macOS 10.13.6. I have 16GB RAM and the 2.8GHz i7 quad-core CPU.

Thanks.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I use a Panasonic GH5 to shoot 4K video and edit footage in FCPX [Final Cut Pro X] 10.4.3 on a 2015 MacBook Pro 15" top-end BTO model with 1TB internal SSD (Apple) and dGPU. Regardless of whether my footage is transcoded or not, and regardless of whether the footage is on my internal 1TB SSD or external drive, I very frequently get freezes during playback...
My suspicion is that the GPU may be implicated here in conjunction with Apple's new Metal 2 code in macOS 10.13 High Sierra (perhaps abetted by GPU firmware bugs). Can you do a quick test on macOS 10.12 Sierra to see if it occurs there, too?

Less likely, I'd be curious to know if there's any thermal management issue at play, and I'd suggest installing Macs Fan Control to get some feedback about that.
 


I'd also try removing all plugins (drag the plugin folder to the desktop) and restart. See if you get the freeze. It can be an incompatible plugin. If that's not the problem, simply drag them back in place.
 



JDW

Gentlemen, thank you for your replies.

Heat has nothing to do with it that I can see. I've used it in a hot room of 30°C and in a room of 20°C with a floor fan blowing full blast on it, where the MacBook Pro metal chassis was cool to the touch.

Regarding the suggestion of "removing all plugins", I believe that logging into a guest user account accomplishes that, not to mention starting you off with fresh caches, too. But as I said, the freezes are much rarer but not non-existent in a guest user account.

I've tried footage straight out of my GH5 with no transcoding, and footage transcoded by FCPX to ProRES. I get freezes in either case. I even get freezes with 1080p "screen capture" footage taken by QuickTime Player. The freezes all happen during playback in FCPX.

I can edit for hours to my heart's content in FCPX without problem. But when I go to playback, it often takes only a matter of seconds to get the beachball and freeze, with the audio continuing to play in the background until the end of the clip. It's very frustrating.
 


I use a Panasonic GH5 to shoot 4K video and edit footage in FCPX [Final Cut Pro X] 10.4.3 on a 2015 MacBook Pro 15" top-end BTO model with 1TB internal SSD (Apple) and dGPU. My 2015 15" MacBook Pro is always running the latest OS, currently on macOS 10.13.6. But I had the freeze on previous versions of High Sierra, as well, so this is not something new to macOS 10.13.6. I have 16GB RAM and the 2.8GHz i7 quad-core CPU.
My recent issue with FCP X probably is completely unrelated to yours, but similar, so I'll mention it.

I have two identical 2011 17" MacBook Pros:

Computer A: My main one is running El Cap 10.11.6 and I'm using FCP X 10.3.4 on it with 16 GBs of RAM.

Computer B: The other is running Sierra 10.12.16 and I'm using FCP X 10.4.3 with 8 GBs of RAM.

Computer B: On Sunday, I tried to do a MultiCam project with two 1080p video clips (angles) and one audio file. I first tried with the audio and main video file to "Synchronize Clips", and it never finished (appeared to freeze), so I had to quit. I rebooted the computer and tried to do a "New Multicam Clip" and that appeared that it would not finish either, so I had to force quit FCP X 10.4.3. The 1080p footage and .wav file were on an external spinning drive connected via FireWire 800 (which may have been the issue?).

I then went to my other MacBook Pro, Computer A, and opened up FCP X 10.3.4 running on El Cap. I tried the same thing but went straight to "New Multicam Clip" for the two video and one audio files. It created the new MultiCam clip in about a second. Editing went fine from that point on. (Note: all three files were contained on an internal SSD.)

Not sure what the issue was with Computer B, but I have edited many times in the past from external spinning FireWire 800 drives and have never run into this. This could easily have been the problem in speed in comparison to Computer A and working off of the internal SSD. (My son mentioned it might have been a permissions issue with the external drive, so I will check into that also.)

The reason I bring this up in this thread is because I'm considering upgrading Computer A from El Cap to Sierra and then FCP X 10.3.4 to 10.4.3. But, everything is working fine at the moment on Computer A and El Cap, so I'm not sure whether it's worth fixing something that is not broken.

I'm also having problems now with the new version of Logic X on Computer B with Sierra. You open up an older project, and the software instrument sounds have changed and must be re-set. (I've searched around on Logic forums, and others have mentioned this issue, but there doesn't seem to be a fix for it.)

I will do some testing on Computer B and move the files needed to the internal SSD and see if that solves the problem when creating a new MultiCam file. I don't think this is a RAM issue, as both had plenty at the time.

Bottom line, I'd like both MacBook Pros to be running the same OS and software, but after reading this post along with my own problems, I will wait until I'm sure that Sierra and High Sierra and FCP X 10.4.3 are not part of the problem. I'll report back when I finish testing and have some conclusions.
 


Guest accounts do not remove the plugins from the equation. Only plugins that install "for this user only" - otherwise, they are in the Library folder at the root of the boot drive.
 


JDW

To ensure that absolutely nothing whatsoever in my macOS install could possibly contribute to the freeze in FCPX, I decided to erase one of my 2TB partitions on an external USB3 hard drive, and I performed a clean install of High Sierra 10.13.6 on it. I then booted from that external hard drive and immediately installed FCPX 10.4.3. After that, I opened Energy Saver and unchecked Automatic Graphics Switching to ensure that could not be the source of the problem.

I then inserted my Sony 128GB UHS-II SD card into my 2015 MacBook Pro 15” and copied only one of my Panasonic GH5's 4K video files (about 2.5 minutes long) to the FCPX Library (saved on the external hard disk drive, not transcoded). I added my Leeming HLG Camera LUT (which converts my HLG Rec.2020 footage to Rec.709) and I then dragged the clip onto the time line. I played and replayed the clip about 3 times, and then FCPX froze as usual, with audio still playing. I could see the beachball, and, as usual, I could move it around the screen but could not do anything else. I had my Eizo external display connected. Force Quit never works, so I had to hold down the power key to shutdown, and then I restarted.

So, even with a clean install of High Sierra (albeit on my external hard drive) and no third-party apps or plugins (other than my Camera LUT) or login items installed, the freeze still occurs. And, again, it only occurs in FCPX. The freeze never occurs in any other app. And the freeze only occurs in FCPX when I playback video (transcoded or not).

Any further thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you.
 



JDW

What is your external RAID where you keep the media? How is it striped, configured, etc?
I do not own any external RAID. I have a Western Digital 6TB USB 3 external drive that contains one spinning platter hard disk that is divided into three 2TB partitions. I preferred to save all of my imported footage on my MacBook Pro’s internal Apple-branded 1TB SSD and then edit that in FCPX, and after my editing I send the edited footage to Compressor. I then save the resulting Compressor-compressed file to my external drive, on one of the 2TB partitions. So the use of an external drive has nothing whatsoever to do with the freeze in FCPX. I know that for a fact. And to repeat what I said in my previous message, login items and other extensions cannot be the root cause of the FCPX freeze either, as evidenced by the fact I erased one of my 2TB partitions, did a clean install of High Sierra, booted from that partition, installed FCPX, imported 4K footage from my SD card, and found it still freezes during playback.
 


I do not own any external RAID. I have a Western Digital 6TB USB 3 external drive that contains one spinning platter hard disk that is divided into three 2TB partitions. I preferred to save all of my imported footage on my MacBook Pro’s internal Apple-branded 1TB SSD and then edit that in FCPX
That might be the problem right there, if you said the video freezes but the audio keeps playing. You should never have media on the same drive as the system drive.

Try some fast externals and see if it still happens.
 


JDW

That might be the problem right there, if you said the video freezes but the audio keeps playing. You should never have media on the same drive as the system drive.
Try some fast externals and see if it still happens.
The “video alone” does not freeze; rather, the entire screen freezes, except for the spinning beachball, which can be moved around with the mouse. Force quit does not work, nor can I switch to any other apps. The screen is truly frozen.

I have never before heard advice that says one can never use FCPX on the same drive, even a large and fast SSD, as the boot drive, because you must use a fast external drive instead. I do not see why having media on a fast internal SSD along with macOS system files could be a problem. Can you please explain that in detail?

I get the freeze whether I use my 27” Eizo display via Mini DisplayPort-to-HDMI cable (and the MacBook Pro closed), or when I use only the MacBook Pro built-in display. But if I am using my external display and then the FCPX freeze occurs during playback, if I then open my MacBook Pro, its screen is completely black, and no matter what I do, nothing will display on it until I power down and reboot.
 


The “video alone” does not freeze; rather, the entire screen freezes, except for the spinning beachball, which can be moved around with the mouse. Force quit does not work, nor can I switch to any other apps. The screen is truly frozen.
I would need more information to make a confident diagnosis, but I can say that these symptoms are typical when a mounted volume freezes or temporarily goes off-line. The Finder freezes until the device recovers, which seems to have a cascading effect - apps already running will keep running, but they will freeze on file access, and you can't launch anything new.

I usually see it either when a storage device is flaky or when there isn't a good quality connection to a network storage device.
I have never before heard advice that says one can never use FCPX on the same drive, even a large and fast SSD, as the boot drive, because you must use a fast external drive instead. I do not see why having media on a fast internal SSD along with macOS system files could be a problem. Can you please explain that in detail?
I don't know what Warren might be referring to, but I know that this was considered a best common practice in the 80's and 90's.

Back then, hard drives would have a hard time keeping up with the high data rates of video and multi-track audio. To prevent problems, the following configurations were usually done:
  • Keep your active working project on a physical drive all to itself. Reformat it before each project and don't create more than one partition. The idea is that you want to minimize head motion (which is the big performance killer for a hard drive). By starting with an empty drive that isn't used for anything else, you minimize fragmentation so the drive can operate in sequential-access mode as much as possible
  • Your storage device should be an "AV" drive. Traditional hard drives occasionally have to undergo thermal calibration to keep them working as the drive heats and cools. This calibration will (momentarily) pause I/O, which can create recording glitches. An AV drive is designed to defer this calibration to times when the drive is idle. It's also designed to run longer between calibrations. (Note that all modern hard drives perform thermal calibration in a way that would be considered "AV" in the 90's, so this is not an issue today).
  • Don't put this drive on the same bus as anything else. Whether that's SCSI, ATA, SATA, USB, FireWire or anything else. Make sure there's no possibility of other devices stealing bandwidth from the project storage device. Don't use hubs, either.
  • Disconnect or turn off any unnecessary hardware like webcams, scanners or anything else you don't need. Or at least keep them off while capturing audio/video.
  • Make sure you have enough RAM so the system never has to page/swap memory to disk. Generally, this means maxing out the motherboard. Disable virtual memory if you can.
  • Minimize background processing. Quit as much as you can. Try to run the barest minimum software beyond the actual recording/editing app. Things like Time Machine, that self-activate and start consuming CPU cycles and I/O bandwidth, must be disabled until your recording session is complete.
In other words, the idea is to eliminate anything that might waste CPU cycles or I/O bandwidth or otherwise slow down the flow of audio/video to the storage device.

Today, this is less of a concern. Modern storage devices (especially SSDs) are much faster than they were in the 90's. And of course, systems have far more RAM and far faster CPUs than in the past.

So many of the above advice is not a problem today.

But hard drive head motion is still going to be an issue. When working on a large project, it is unreasonable to expect to have enough SSD for the entire project - you may be looking at 10's of TB for a large video production, especially if you're recording in 4K. You want to minimize hard drive head motion, and the way to do that is as it was in the past - keep the project on a physical drive all to itself and erase it before starting a new project. This will keep most access sequential and minimize fragmentation.

Of course, with modern equipment, you can get away with a lot more than in the past. For instance, if you're working on SD video or CD-quality audio (even with 24 tracks), you may have enough headroom to be able to ignore the above advice altogether. But if you're working on a high-bandwidth project (e.g. 4K video or dozens of tracks of 192KHz 24-bit audio), then these practices will probably be important even today.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... In other words, the idea is to eliminate anything that might waste CPU cycles or I/O bandwidth or otherwise slow down the flow of audio/video to the storage device....
Good points, and they remind me of one other factor:

System Preferences > Energy Saver > Put hard disks to sleep when possible

That's certainly one you want to have disabled for these sorts of tasks....
 


I don't know what Warren might be referring to, but I know that this was considered a best common practice in the 80's and 90's.
Not best practices from the 90s, it is the convention of any working post house today in 2018. The system is still doing too much in the background to reliably serve the storage for video.

Try borrowing fast external storage and try to see if this solves anything. I'm editing on FCPX 10.4.3 on a 2011 MacBook Pro 15" to a RAID with no problems, and my main system is a 12-core Mac Pro 5,1. Both are using shared storage RAID 6. No problems with 4K footage. No freezing or spinning beach balls. I'm on macOS 10.13.6.
 


System Preferences > Energy Saver > Put hard disks to sleep when possible
That's certainly one you want to have disabled for these sorts of tasks....
I agree that a drive going to sleep in the middle of a session would be bad. On the other hand, we're talking about streaming large quantities of data to/from a drive. It would be a pretty nasty system bug if the energy saver declared the drive idle and put it to sleep in the middle of all this high-bandwidth I/O.

Of course, bugs do happen from time to time and you don't want to find out about a bug while you're in the middle of capturing content that won't ever happen again, so it's probably good advice anyway, even though it shouldn't make a difference.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I agree that a drive going to sleep in the middle of a session would be bad. On the other hand, we're talking about streaming large quantities of data to/from a drive. It would be a pretty nasty system bug if the energy saver declared the drive idle and put it to sleep in the middle of all this high-bandwidth I/O.
I was actually thinking of a different drive's wake-up process interfering with macOS, as it waits for the drive to spin up (not an active drive being erroneously put to sleep).

(I have to say, I've never felt that Apple did a good job at all with real-time operations in macOS, but I don't have any handy details to prove it.)
 


JDW

Thank you for your input.

Hard disks are not put to sleep via the System Preferences on my MacBook Pro.

Borrowing a RAID is no simple task here in Japan, I assure you. The number of people still running Windows XP on ancient PC's here is just shocking.

If, indeed, macOS system files are so busy that one cannot or should not put FCPX media files in one's internal drive, even if it is a super-fast SSD capable of more than 2000MB/sec read and write speeds, I would be inclined to argue that something is seriously wrong with macOS in that case! But we do not know that to be true. It is mere speculation at this point.

Again, I would like to refer everyone to my opening post, in which I provide links to three different discussions, all from people who share my same experience. This merely shows that I am not a totally unique and isolated case. One of those users was also running El Capitan, which shows that it is not something specific to Sierra or High Sierra either.

I have a late 2015 iMac 5K at the office (top-end model with 32 GB RAM, the best CPU and GPU and Apple internal SSD). Running FCPX 10.4.x on it with the same media files and setup (everything run off the internal 1TB SSD) works fine. I've never seen even a single freeze. The freezes only occur on my 2015 MacBook Pro 15" .

It's hard to imagine a hardware problem. I booted my MacBook Pro last night with the "D" key held down and ran Apple's diagnostics. It was give a clean bill of health. Also, as I mentioned previously, I get no crashes or freezes in any other app, not even in Apple's Compressor, which uses both GPU and CPU in a major way for many hours at a time when I compress long videos.

I filed a bug report in the Apple Developer Bug Reporter. Apple engineers only replied twice in that discussion, once to ask me to send them SysDiagnose files (which I did abundantly) and a second time to thank me for sending them the files. I continued to offer test reports and other information. I asked for their input. But thus far I've received no further replies. Unsurprising. Apple engineers are not tech support. I know from having filed bug reports in the past that usually I will get no further reply after a certain point, and what Apple does on its end is uncertain.

So, for now, I continue to edit video on my 2015 MacBook Pro 15" and try not to play back video. Even then, I have to shutdown and reboot about 6 times per hour during my editing sessions. It's absolutely horrible.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
So, for now, I continue to edit video on my 2015 MacBook Pro 15" and try not to play back video. Even then, I have to shutdown and reboot about 6 times per hour during my editing sessions. It's absolutely horrible.
It would be interesting to know how Adobe Premiere Pro or DaVinci Resolve perform - do they also crash like FCPX on this same system?

Also, have you run Activity Monitor during these problems? It would be interesting to see what's happening in terms of CPU load, disk activity, memory pressure, energy, etc.
 


JDW

It would be interesting to know how Adobe Premiere Pro or DaVinci Resolve perform - do they also crash like FCPX on this same system?
I took your advice, Ric, and downloaded DaVinci Resolve 15 for MacOS and installed it on my MacBook Pro. I had never used it before, so it took me about an hour to figure out that the free version simply wasn't going to play my 10-bit 4K footage out of camera (only the audio played), so I transcoded to ProRES 422, and then I was able to get it to play in Resolve.

I was able to get my HLG Rec.2020 to Rec.709 conversion LUT (Leeming LUT One) to work in Resolve, and I edited, scrubbed and played back the footage for a half hour without problems.

iStat Menus informed me that 98% of CPU (all 4 cores) and 98% of GPU were used by Resolve at peak points in my editing. Again, no freezes.

I then created a new Event in FCPX 10.4.x with the same ProRes 422 footage, and I could not get a freeze during my 20 minutes of testing. Interestingly, FCPX never used as much CPU and GPU as Resolve, but FCPX had more dropped frames -- Resolve 15 playback was smoother.

Everything was run off my 1TB Apple internal SSD, by the way. I did not use an external drive at all.

It's late in the evening here, so I will need to allocate more time to test this until I get a freeze. The freeze is weird. Sometimes it happens quickly, and sometimes it takes a while (in FCPX).
 


... 10-bit 4K footage out of camera (only the audio played), so I transcoded to ProRES 422, and then I was able to get it to play in Resolve.
... I then created a new Event in FCPX 10.4.x with the same ProRes 422 footage, and I could not get a freeze during my 20 minutes of testing.
If you're getting crashes with your 10-bit raw 4K footage, but not when transcoded to ProRES 422, then that may be a critically important piece of data for the Apple engineers working on the bug. If you have not already done so, you should share this information with them.
 


I took your advice, Ric, and downloaded DaVinci Resolve 15 for MacOS and installed it on my MacBook Pro. I
I, too, took a look at the DaVinci Resolve web site -- but was unable to find specific information on Mac OS and hardware compatibility. I know it must be there...

I've used Adobe Premiere (back in the days of OS 9) and currently use Premiere Elements 10 for the trivial bit of video editing that I do. I'll have to upgrade/replace at some point and Resolve looks interesting -- especially as it's free for the basic version.
 


I, too, took a look at the DaVinci Resolve web site -- but was unable to find specific information on Mac OS and hardware compatibility. I know it must be there...
You have to dig into the Support section:
About DaVinci Resolve 15 Studio Software

Minimum system requirements for macOS:
  • macOS 10.12.6 Sierra
  • 16 GB of system memory is recommended and 32 GB is recommended minimum when using Fusion
  • Blackmagic Design Desktop Video version 10.4.1 or later
  • CUDA Driver version 8.0.63
  • NVIDIA Driver version - As required by your GPU
  • RED Rocket-X Driver 2.1.34.0 and Firmware 1.4.22.18 or later
  • RED Rocket Driver 2.1.23.0 and Firmware 1.1.18.0 or later
 


You have to dig into the Support section:
Minimum system requirements for macOS:
  • macOS 10.12.6 Sierra
  • 16 GB of system memory is recommended and 32 GB is recommended minimum when using Fusion
  • Blackmagic Design Desktop Video version 10.4.1 or later
  • CUDA Driver version 8.0.63
  • NVIDIA Driver version - As required by your GPU
  • RED Rocket-X Driver 2.1.34.0 and Firmware 1.4.22.18 or later
  • RED Rocket Driver 2.1.23.0 and Firmware 1.1.18.0 or later
Thanks. This looks to be above my "pay grade" as I probably have insufficient hardware to run this.
 


JDW

If you're getting crashes with your 10-bit raw 4K footage, but not when transcoded to ProRES 422, then that may be a critically important piece of data for the Apple engineers working on the bug. If you have not already done so, you should share this information with them.
I actually have already done so. I filed a bug report with Apple in their Developer Bug Reporter on August 15, 2018. They replied on August 18th to request a SysDiagnose file from me, which I sent to them the same day. I sent them subsequent SysDiagnose files after freezes in various test conditions, and on August 20th Apple wrote back to say, "Thanks, we are working on the new information you provided. We appreciate your help!" After that I have been regularly sending them more test scenarios and the outcome, including more SysDiagnose files, but as of today, September 7th, Apple has not responded further.

In my past experience filing reports through the Developer Bug Reporter, this is typical. You submit the report, they request something of you, you give it to them, they say thanks, and then no matter what you say thereafter, you get complete silence. That is why I made the decision to post here on MacInTouch on August 28th. Waiting around for Apple usually yields nothing.

I tested again for an hour last night with existing ProRes footage, and I could not get a freeze in FCPX. So testing in Resolve is meaningless, because I have the free version which won't allow me to test playback with footage that came straight out of my GH5 (which is not ProRES). I get the freeze in FCPX 10.4.x pretty quickly with that footage straight out of the camera, which is supported by FCPX.

Why edit with raw footage in FCPX instead of transcoding? Time and storage. It takes time to convert the files, and they eat a huge amount of space. I agree that editing is smoother with transcoded ProRES, but the fact remains that FCPX should not freeze when editing with supported footage. The *.mov files coming out of my GH5 are supported insofar as they are editable and do actually play back in FCPX.

I've not tested Premier, but there are two reasons I don't like Premier: (1) the subscription model and (2) it's a dog when it comes to performance on the Mac when compared to FCPX (or even Resolve 15).

Obviously, if there is anyone else out there with a Panasonic GH5 or GH5s who uses FCPX 10.4 and edits 10-bit HLG footage without transcoding, I'd love to hear your experiences. Thanks!
 


... I agree that editing is smoother with transcoded ProRES, but the fact remains that FCPX should not freeze when editing with supported footage. The *.mov files coming out of my GH5 are supported insofar as they are editable and do actually play back in FCPX.
An earlier entry of yours says that it does work on an iMac 5K. Varying workloads won't work the same across the whole Mac product line-up. FCPX will run on a MacBook 2015, but the range of workload without missing frames and gaps won't be the same as the higher-end desktop systems.

The stats on where the MacBook Pro 15" is running on heat (the bottom having access to radiative cooling etc.) may play a role here. The external drive doesn't have to be a classic RAID. Another 500GB-1TB SSD connected though Thunderbolt 2 could be used to split the load (e.g. boot another macOS image off the internal and use the external as the OS/apps drive). The CPU/GPU load may not be as informative at the DIsk I/O rate. (Since they are all closely packed in a MacBook Pro, the cooling issue of one may influence the others.) If the Disk I/O rates on the iMac and the MacBook Pro are the same for the same tasks, then the problem lies elsewhere.
 


Thanks. This looks to be above my "pay grade" as I probably have insufficient hardware to run this.
Most of those requirements are not necessary if you don't have that other associated hardware. No RED cameras means no RedRocket needed. No Nvidia GPU means no Nvidia drivers or CUDA. Those two external hardware elements are more than half the list.
(CUDA isn't required to get performance out of Resolve. It helps when you have the proprietary hardware that goes with that proprietary software.)
 


After reading a lot of your testing, it looks like you have a piece of original bad media, or the media on a few ‘sectors’ on the SSD drive is/are corrupt. The way to test this to copy all the media off the drive to a fast array (or another fast SSD.). Also, your recent test... well points to that being the case but also changes the entire dynamic. Your original file sizes / data throughout requirements are huge, and those files need to be processed to play in FCPX. Your new ProRes files play natively, and the file sizes / throughout are tiny by comparison. From all your testing, just doesn’t seem like a FCPX or macOS bug. Could be. But sounds far less likely than corrupt media / drive.
 


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