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In spite of a few issues, I rather like Path Finder, which was mentioned once or twice earlier in this thread. I have not tried the 8.0 paid upgrade yet and am curious to hear any first impressions. TIA
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I rather like Path Finder, which was mentioned once or twice earlier in this thread. I have not tried the 8.0 paid upgrade yet and am curious to hear any first impressions.
Due to the abysmal quality of Apple's Finder, I bought Path Finder 7 in 2016 as a replacement/alternative and have been using it full-time ever since. The new Version 8 has a 30-day free trial available, so you can experiment freely with it. I'm doing that now, and there's no difference for my workflow vs. the previous version (which is a good thing). So far, there's nothing compelling for me to purchase the update, but I'll probably do so just to support a company that supports Mac owners better than Apple does, in terms of the user "shell" environment.

The only problem I've personally had with Path Finder 7 is when doing searches for some text string within all files (an extremely large number of files); this seems to create some sort of problem scenario (memory problem?), which may not happen immediately but only later on, and may necessitate force-quitting the app. I haven't experimented with this in Path Finder 8, nor have I spent much time trying to dig into any related details or settings.
 


Path Finder 8 has very few visual differences from Path Finder 7. The issue (according to the developer) is that the codebase is old and needs to be rewritten. So, for Path Finder 8 he moved many features to a new module-based system. He's taking this opportunity to also remove features that were "hacks", like getting the list of Finder favorites. But he says a big chunk (approximately 60%) wasn't touched by this release.

So, most users aren't going to be able to see much in the way of improvements and some users will actually see a slight downgrade. In addition, he unfortunately didn't separate out the configuration of Path Finder 8 from Path Finder 7, so running 8 will cause 7 to behave oddly in some circumstances (it doesn't understand the changes made to the configuration by 8).

Having said all of that, I don't think the developer has much choice. Development slowed down a lot over the last few years, supposedly due to the age of the codebase and trying to keep hacks working. And they need income to keep flowing while the code gets rewritten. Comments from the developer are that once the codebase gets modernized he can start implementing the new features users have been asking for.
 


I just purchased Path Finder [8], mainly to support the developer, since I use this app. The activation system is very nice; it appears you may run Path Finder on 3 Macs with just one license. The modular configuration system popped up. I don't have time to look at it right now, but it looks nice.
 


Well, as with any new version which ditches old underlying code, there are bugs [with Path Finder 8]. So far, I've reported a few small glitches, but cosmetically and functionally, there are very few differences from the old version. There is one nagging bug, though, which eats at me, because I do a lot of AppleScript. The preview module cannot display scpt or scptd files properly, showing them only as raw characters. If you select an AppleScript file, all you will see in the preview is crap, but if you tap spacebar for QuickLook, it displays perfectly. So why complain? Well, when you do this, Path Finder 8's memory footprint quadruples to 800MB to 1GB, just to display a 20k text file. So if you can avoid this, your computer will thank you.

But, given the other useful features of PF — handy terminal window, searching and sorting, compressing files from multiple locations and emailing, verifying files, folder sync, etc, you really can't go wrong with a $20 upgrade price.

One other really handy thing you can do with PF7/8 that you can't do with the Finder anymore is copying from PDF files. With PF, viewing a PDF file in the Preview window will also let you select text and copy it into another doc. Very handy at times.
 


I'm also a Path Finder user/license holder. I hold licenses for v4, v5, v7. No, the v7 license won't work for v6. No matter, the v6 demo does. I can confirm v6 does not work on contemporary macOS. On the other hand, venerable v5 works a treat.

I don't do advanced work in Path Finder but use it to be able to access hidden files without toggling the main Finder using the Go to Folder function from Finder. I also use the info panel there. I think v5 uses older (and not yet fully deprecated) core functions. For casual users, Path Finder v5 (which you may already own) works great. Plus there's no per computer restriction, so I'm able to install Path Finder on any Mac that I'm working on, and it doesn't need any weird re-authorisation or web access if I move a hard drive around (which I do often).

I'm not crazy about the v7 licensing system. It's a bit too intrusive for my taste (yes, I've uninstalled all of Adobe's CC software, reluctantly using expensive paid-for CS6 suites on a couple of computers). Path Finder somewhere along the way went astray. The early versions were a godsend.

Quite popular in our company is Forklift. The new version 3 is a much better looking application than the old 1.7, if you tried that and didn't like it much (a bit clunky, like a prototype). Forklift might also serve well an alternate Finder (you can view hidden files and dual-pane to your heart's content).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I'm not crazy about the v7 licensing system. It's a bit too intrusive for my taste...
I'm not sure I understand this... I fairly often switch drives, boot volumes, etc., and I haven't encountered any licensing issues with Path Finder 7, which I've been using since 2016 on multiple computers.
 


I have a MacBook Pro with a 1 TB SSD of which about 640 GB were in use, with about 500 GB of that in virtual machines. Today I deleted five Parallels Desktop virtual machines that together used about 300 GB of space. Then I emptied the trash and expected to have most of that space become available.

Instead, the space taken up by "System" in About this Mac > Storage jumped up to almost 600 GB! And when I do a Get Info on the internal drive, I expected to see around 300 GB in use out of 1 TB available on my internal SSD. Instead it also shows about 640 GB in use when it should be less than half that.

I reclaimed all the space that Parallels said it could free up, but that only amounted to 24 GB.
How do I get back that 300 GB of space?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Today I deleted five Parallels Desktop virtual machines that together used about 300 GB of space. Then I emptied the trash and expected to have most of that space become available. Instead, the space taken up by "System" in About this Mac > Storage jumped up to almost 600 GB...
What macOS version are you using? That's a critical question here. And, if you're using High Sierra, are you also using drives formatted as APFS?
 



William, I don't know if you've used DaisyDisk before, but it's a great way to find where your space is used and where huge files (including hidden cache and hibernate images) are hiding.

Ric, I'm testing Path Finder 7 again after your input. Part of the issue is the serial key is a bit strange, i.e. it's in this format (I've changed lots of the individual characters, this is not a live serial key):

Code:
PF7:GAWAE-FBXXM-K7X7N-GLNWP-SLC33-94967-CSEKA-6PLYC...
I always tried to paste:
Code:
GAWAE-FBXXM-K7X7N-GLNWP-SLC33-94967-CSEKA-6PLYC...
...when in fact you need to include the PF7 before the colon. I got caught again on this last night.

I did notice that Paul Chernoff said PF8 is limited to three Macs. If that's the case, I'll have to pass on any upgrade. I've noticed that software which requires deactivation and reactivation—or limits activations—is just too needy for someone who has as much IT work on his plate as I do. (The activations are used up quickly and the software then goes unused for many years.)

It's not that I'm using the software unlicensed, it's just that I have lots of computers that I work on personally and I move my drives around with different macOS versions. Henceforth, I avoid any software which will need a lot of babysitting in terms of licensing.

Could you tell us more about the situation with PF8, Paul. Is the three-computer limit a hard limit of three activations, or it is just a licensing limit (not in use on more than three computers at the same time)?
 


With regard to Path Finder, I've been 'trialing' it. One annoying problem I have found is when copying file folders locally or to a network drive (High Sierra 10.13.4., APFS, NAS using AFP or SAMBA). The Finder will copy a folder nearly immediately. Path Finder counts every file underneath the path for the folder and then begins copying. The Finder's copy is done before Path Finder even starts copying the folder. For example - I installed a new app via drag and drop yesterday. Path Finder was still counting files at 1 minute into the copy; I aborted and copied with the Finder. It was complete in seconds. I've noticed this issue on more than one copy exercise. Anyone else seen or account for the behavior?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
With regard to Path Finder, I've been 'trialing' it. One annoying problem I have found is when copying file folders locally or to a network drive (High Sierra 10.13.4., APFS, NAS using AFP or SAMBA). The Finder will copy a folder nearly immediately. Path Finder counts every file underneath the path for the folder and then begins copying. The Finder's copy is done before Path Finder even starts copying the folder. ...
I have never seen any behavior like that from Path Finder (though I'm using HFS+, not APFS, and running macOS Sierra).

As a test, I just copied a 2+GB folder holding 8400+ files, and it took scant seconds. (In fact, I believe Path Finder copying is faster and less blocked than Finder copying.)

Did you perhaps choose "Verify copied files" in preferences?
 



I have Daisy Disk and it shows the system space with 382.6 GB of hidden space; rescanning as administrator does not show anymore detail. The space is still considered as used by the system.
 


Has anyone had an issue with High Sierra - since the latest update - where the space from items thrown in the trash is not reflected on the startup drive? I have tossed 100 GBs or more of stuff. It's reflected in a drive if I back it up, but not on the original drive - this is a 1TB drive with almost half the space empty. In neither the "Get Info" window nor in Carbon Copy Cloner's window nor in the information bar below any Finder window does it reflect when I toss large amounts of data.

In a nutshell: I have about 400GB of files on the drive. When I back it up via Carbon Copy Cloner, it will create a 400TB clone that boots. And yet, on this machine, on the boot drive, it consistently reads that I am using a little over 500 GBs. I have tried running Disk Utility from another drive. I have tried booting into save mode, I have reset the PRAM and a few other things. I'm on the phone with Apple, but they have been fairly useless with this.
 


... I did notice that Paul Chernoff said PF8 is limited to three Macs. If that's the case, I'll have to pass on any upgrade. I've noticed that software which requires deactivation and reactivation—or limits activations—is just too needy for someone who has as much IT work on his plate as I do. (The activations are used up quickly and the software then goes unused for many years.) ...
Deactivating a different install is trivial. Activations and deactivations are done inside the app. What I don't know is if there's a limit to how many times you can activate/deactivate different Macs. My Path Finder license is limited to three Macs.
 


Has anyone had an issue with High Sierra - since the latest update - where the space from items thrown in the trash is not reflected on the startup drive? I have tossed 100 GBs or more of stuff. It's reflected in a drive if I back it up, but not on the original drive - this is a 1TB drive with almost half the space empty. In neither the "Get Info" window nor in Carbon Copy Cloner's window nor in the information bar below any Finder window does it reflect when I toss large amounts of data.
In a nutshell: I have about 400GB of files on the drive. When I back it up via Carbon Copy Cloner, it will create a 400TB clone that boots. And yet, on this machine, on the boot drive, it consistently reads that I am using a little over 500 GBs. I have tried running Disk Utility from another drive. I have tried booting into save mode, I have reset the PRAM and a few other things. I'm on the phone with Apple, but they have been fairly useless with this.
Quick update: I spoke with a higher level tech person at Apple and even let him screen-share, something I have never done. I have done enough of my own troubleshooting over the decades to not need that. Anyway, he finally understood what I was talking about but was unable to explain it. He tried pointing to my file directory habits, the way I kept iOS backups stored locally, my not using the cloud, how many applications I have, even claiming it might be the fault of Carbon Copy Cloner for not making accurate clones. He didn't want to discuss that further, though, because "I don't support that." He also called it "Carbonite" once, and I did not correct him, but I'll let that slide.

What he could not explain, though, was when I erased a 50GB file from my SSD and then cloned it. The deletion was recorded on the clone, but the hard drive's available space did not change.

It sounded like his only solution - as always with Apple - ended up being a wipe and reinstall. Now, I have been loathe to do this for years, mainly due to losing a day of my life, as well as going through the song and dance with product registrations and updates, the worst, as always, being Microsoft. At this point, though, having bitten the bullet and paying for Office 365 for the past year and not using Office 2011 for all that time, maybe it's time to let that go.

One or two iPhones ago, after 8 years of phone migrations, I began to run into some funky behavior and, at the behest of a "genius," did a complete wipe and re-install, setting up my phone one app at a time again. The problems went away. I don't really think it's the case, but it is possible that this idiocy is the result of many, many migrations over the years. I don't really believe that, as my Mac Pro 5,1, is even longer in the tooth and has gone through many more migrations with no ill effects, but I'm getting more inclined to just nuke this. Clone it a couple of times. Possibly try a reinstall and migration first and see how that does. If that doesn't work, it might be time to just set it up from scratch, applications, settings, plugins and all. Take a day of my life. Eat pizza and curse all day. I don't know what else to do.

I am running ClamXAV at the moment, just for the hell of it.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... It sounded like his only solution - as always with Apple - ended up being a wipe and reinstall....
Is your drive formatted as APFS? That might "explain" the problems, in conjunction with APFS's tricky "features" and the foibles of the Finder.

If that's the case, then doing a "nuke and pave" wouldn't help; it would just waste your time.

If APFS is involved here, then it might be worth cloning to an HFS+ volume and testing to see if you see the same behavior with APFS eliminated from the environment.

See above for earlier discussion on the topic.
 


Is your drive formatted as APFS? That might "explain" the problems, in conjunction with APFS's tricky "features" and the foibles of the Finder.

If that's the case, then doing a "nuke and pave" wouldn't help; it would just waste your time.

If APFS is involved here, then it might be worth cloning to an HFS+ volume and testing to see if you see the same behavior with APFS eliminated from the environment.

See above for earlier discussion on the topic.
The accurate backups are HFS+. The startup drive is APFS. I did a test yesterday and cloned it to a Samsung T3, formatted as APFS, and the amount of data was accurate. My lingering suspicion all day was APFS, but a little less so after that test.

I have to go get my human body checked now and will meditate on this while getting irradiated. I'd appreciate any other ideas, feedback or experience from anybody, though.

Quick edit: I just checked that discussion. Yes, first thing I did was run Grand Perspective, which I have used for years. I'll Daisy Disk when I get back.

Another thing this Apple guy tried to claim is that, by throwing stuff out from my external drives, I may have confused the directory structure. I did not engage in that discussion, especially after he saw my mounted drives and said "that's a lot of drives." I explained to him that they were all in one powered enclosure and that, in fact, that powered enclosure was connected to a Sonnet Echo dock. This was all lost on him.

This issue just popped up, though, which makes me think it's not APFS. Anyway, I'll check out Daisy Disk.

Thanks
 



This Apple guy sounds like a fool.... There are other issues discussed here previously involving "hard links", Apple photo libraries and Time Machine.
Thanks. I'll check those links after I return. Just bought and ran Daisy Disk and it's showing 100 GBs of "hidden space." I'll have to check all this later. Got to run out. As always, my best shot of finding an answer is the collective brain of MacInTouch.
 



Can I suggest the free Omni DiskSweeper? Its interface is simple and fast, and I've found it very helpful. I wish I could use it instead of df on my server! I'm running 10.3 and it works fine; they have versions going back to 10.4 “Tiger.”
 


Has anyone had an issue with High Sierra - since the latest update - where the space from items thrown in the trash is not reflected on the startup drive? I have tossed 100 GBs or more of stuff. It's reflected in a drive if I back it up, but not on the original drive - this is a 1TB drive with almost half the space empty. In neither the "Get Info" window nor in Carbon Copy Cloner's window nor in the information bar below any Finder window does it reflect when I toss large amounts of data.
Are these large files created at least an hour ago? If Time Machine has taken an APFS snapshot, the space won’t be freed until the snapshot containing the file is removed, which usually happens after 24 hours. In older Mac OS versions, these local snapshots only existed on laptops (if I recall correctly), but with High Sierra, if your hard drive is APFS-formatted, Time Machine will create them even on a desktop.

You can view the snapshots using the Terminal command

tmutil listlocalsnapshots /

and remove them using something like

tmutil thinlocalsnapshots / 999999999999

where the large number is to convince Time Machine it needs to free up that much space (in bytes, I'm guessing; the manual pages wasn’t clear and trying the obvious 1T for a terabyte didn’t have the desired effect). That didn't seem to get rid of the last snapshot for me, though, so you might need to use the APFS commands instead for it; you can list snapshots using

diskutil apfs listSnapshots /

and remove them using a command like

diskutil apfs deleteSnapshot / -xid 13138990

where the “xid” is output from the listSnapshots command.

The snapshots are supposed to be automatically removed if the space is needed, but I'm not sure under what conditions that happens, nor whether it's possible to get out-of-space errors before the deletion is complete.

An Apple-supplied GUI for this would be nice; I don’t see any reason why it couldn’t be either in the System Preferences for Time Machine or an option in the main Time Machine window.

I'm pretty sure there was a way to disable the creation of local snapshots in the past, but I don't see one in tmutil any more.
 


Are these large files created at least an hour ago? If Time Machine has taken an APFS snapshot, the space won’t be freed until the snapshot containing the file is removed, which usually happens after 24 hours. In older Mac OS versions, these local snapshots only existed on laptops (if I recall correctly), but with High Sierra, if your hard drive is APFS-formatted, Time Machine will create them even on a desktop.

You can view the snapshots using the Terminal command

tmutil listlocalsnapshots /

and remove them using something like

tmutil thinlocalsnapshots / 999999999999

where the large number is to convince Time Machine it needs to free up that much space (in bytes, I'm guessing; the manual pages wasn’t clear and trying the obvious 1T for a terabyte didn’t have the desired effect). That didn't seem to get rid of the last snapshot for me, though, so you might need to use the APFS commands instead for it; you can list snapshots using

diskutil apfs listSnapshots /

and remove them using a command like

diskutil apfs deleteSnapshot / -xid 13138990

where the “xid” is output from the listSnapshots command.

The snapshots are supposed to be automatically removed if the space is needed, but I'm not sure under what conditions that happens, nor whether it's possible to get out-of-space errors before the deletion is complete.

An Apple-supplied GUI for this would be nice; I don’t see any reason why it couldn’t be either in the System Preferences for Time Machine or an option in the main Time Machine window.

I'm pretty sure there was a way to disable the creation of local snapshots in the past, but I don't see one in tmutil any more.
Hi, Anton. I stopped using Time Machine on this computer a while back. It came in handy occasionally and I ran it as a redundant backup - after my other backups. It kept getting corrupted and, eventually, I got tired of restarting it over and over, then having it look for the Time Capsule. Anyway, if I'm not running it, I assume it's not making the snapshots. Also, as far as I can tell, no large files are being created, as my Carbon Copy Cloner backups are remaining smaller. I'd think it's a file system issue, but I have "repaired" it a few times already.
 


It sounds like it could be snapshots. If that's the case, then I would not take any action unless you actually need the free space. Letting the snapshots expire on their own gives you a safety net - the ability to undelete a file if you deleted it by mistake.

With respect to why there's no GUI tool to purge snapshots, I wonder how it's actually being implemented internally. If the system automatically purges snapshots (along with other "purgeable" storage) when needed to create free space, then there may not be any need to manually purge them. If this doesn't happen (e.g. only purging them on a schedule and not when free space runs low), then that would sound like a deficiency.
 


Are these large files created at least an hour ago? If Time Machine has taken an APFS snapshot, the space won’t be freed until the snapshot containing the file is removed, which usually happens after 24 hours. In older Mac OS versions, these local snapshots only existed on laptops (if I recall correctly), but with High Sierra, if your hard drive is APFS-formatted, Time Machine will create them even on a desktop.

You can view the snapshots using the Terminal command

tmutil listlocalsnapshots /

and remove them using something like

tmutil thinlocalsnapshots / 999999999999

where the large number is to convince Time Machine it needs to free up that much space (in bytes, I'm guessing; the manual pages wasn’t clear and trying the obvious 1T for a terabyte didn’t have the desired effect). That didn't seem to get rid of the last snapshot for me, though, so you might need to use the APFS commands instead for it; you can list snapshots using

diskutil apfs listSnapshots /

and remove them using a command like

diskutil apfs deleteSnapshot / -xid 13138990

where the “xid” is output from the listSnapshots command.

The snapshots are supposed to be automatically removed if the space is needed, but I'm not sure under what conditions that happens, nor whether it's possible to get out-of-space errors before the deletion is complete.

An Apple-supplied GUI for this would be nice; I don’t see any reason why it couldn’t be either in the System Preferences for Time Machine or an option in the main Time Machine window.

I'm pretty sure there was a way to disable the creation of local snapshots in the past, but I don't see one in tmutil any more.
Thanks - very useful insights here. I listed my snapshots (12 in all, unsure of file sizes), but trying to remove individually, I got the error "-69863: Insufficient privileges"

sudo didn't help, and I am the admin for my laptop (MacBook Pro, High Sierra 10.13.6).
 


Update: Well, I gambled and - so far (knock wood) - may have won. I wiped the drive and reinstalled from the recovery partition, then did a straight up migration - using Migration Assistant - from the clone I had just created. This clone, by the way, as I have said, reflected the true size of data I had - about 400 TB used.

Upon finishing and rebooting, etc., the SSD original startup drive (the problem drive) is now reporting about 600 GB available. Not only that, but for a double bonus, Adobe CS 6 and Office 2011 seem to be still registered, which does not happen with every migration. Since I don't use them anymore, I'm tempted to just delete them, but I'll see. Signed in with Adobe CC and Office 365, did the Dropbox, Boxcryptor and VPN shuffles, and I'll probably run into a few other things, but it's been remarkably smooth so far, in terms of psychic pain. I was preparing to give up my night for this.

I'll keep a close eye over the coming days and weeks. If there's any creeping data abnormalities, etc., I may go to the more drastic option, which would be to wipe it and reinstall just what I need, keeping it clean and mean, and then moving my files over by hand, the old fashioned way. We shall see. So far, though, so good.
 


Another update. It's only an hour or so later, and I'm hoping everything has synced - and I could be watching this pot too closely - but available space has decreased by about 4 GB without my having done anything.

Again, not configured for Time Machine, so I don't think it's taking snapshots. I keep checking Activity Monitor, but I don't see anything nefarious-looking at the moment. I guess I'll just keep watching it and see. Could there be some kind of memory leak happening with the Finder?
 


One more update. It may have stabilized. A few hours later, the apps have all caught up, I have restarted a few times, and it seems like it's only lost a few GB since the install.

Net result of the day is I gained back 105 gigabytes of space that I could not account for, see, or recover in any other way. I'll keep watching. Now, I have to get some work done.
 


... Again, not configured for Time Machine, so I don't think it's taking snapshots....
"Not configured" means Time Machine is turned off (automatics off) or just that there is no current target disk attached?

I'm not 100% sure about Carbon Copy Cloner, but it is also probably using snapshots. If you 'clone' from APFS to HFS+, you won't get a 100% exact clone, because HFS+ can't do what APFS does. One of those things is snapshots. All your 'current' files will (should) copy over, but can't represent the APFS 'copy on write' sharing in HFS+, so the 'copy' process should ignore snapshots.

One CCC FAQ on data size differences (because of exclusions and other factors:
Bombich Software said:
Another FAQ on CCC usage of snapshots
Bombich Software said:
Another CCC FAQ notes that APFS snapshot doesn't 'solve' the backup problem (only primarily saves space on the original data volume). However, it is useful in the backup process to get a coherent picture of the file system. If there are apps with files open or changing during a relatively long backup process, it is better to get a fixed-in-time set of files.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
"Not configured" means Time Machine is turned off (automatics off) or just that there is no current target disk attached?
The tmutil terminal command may be helpful here, and there are third-party apps that may also help - for example, Disk Sensei has a switch to enable/disable local Time Machine backups (under Tools > Optimize).
Bash:
man tmutil

tmutil listbackups

sudo tmutil disable
sudo tmutil enable

sudo tmutil disablelocal
sudo tmutil enablelocal
 


"Not configured" means Time Machine is turned off (automatics off) or just that there is no current target disk attached?

I'm not 100% sure about Carbon Copy Cloner, but it is also probably using snapshots. If you 'clone' from APFS to HFS+, you won't get a 100% exact clone, because HFS+ can't do what APFS does. One of those things is snapshots. All your 'current' files will (should) copy over, but can't represent the APFS 'copy on write' sharing in HFS+, so the 'copy' process should ignore snapshots.

One CCC FAQ on data size differences (because of exclusions and other factors:

Another FAQ on CCC usage of snapshots

Another CCC FAQ notes that APFS snapshot doesn't 'solve' the backup problem (only primarily saves space on the original data volume). However, it is useful in the backup process to get a coherent picture of the file system. If there are apps with files open or changing during a relatively long backup process, it is better to get a fixed-in-time set of files.
Thanks, Lyman. I'll look at those links later. "Not configured" is Apple's terminology, and it will appear when you click the Time Machine icon in the menubar if you have not set up a Time Machine drive or disk. I'm not sure if it can be "turned off", but, if you have not selected a disk, it's essentially not working. Now, whether or not it's still taking snapshots is something I do not know. I'll look into the CCC snapshots, as well.

Like I said, it seems to have stabilized for now and the "remaining space" has not changed much in either direction. I was half thinking that the initial few GB usage may have been Spotlight's initial indexing, but I don't know how much space that database takes up.

Either way, I appreciate the feedback and the links and will report back if I figure out anything else.

Thanks.
 


You want to hear something really amazing?

I got a new machine. Migrated from an external hard drive. Set it up yesterday. All was fine.

Decided to clear some disk space today and tossed about 100 GB worth of stuff - this is a different machine, mind you, then the one I describe above - and guess what? Nothing changes on the "available space" readout at the bottom of any Finder window. I restarted. I did what I did previously.

I'm now about to toss out stuff from the migration source disk and then do it again. In the meantime, I'm reinstalling the OS. Not really thrilled with this waste of time. I have never run into this kind of behavior in a Mac OS Finder - going back to System 6, in the dark ages. Am I the only one here who has dealt with this?
 


Decided to clear some disk space today and tossed about 100 GB worth of stuff - this is a different machine, mind you, then the one I describe above - and guess what? Nothing changes on the "available space" readout at the bottom of any Finder window. I restarted. I did what I did previously.
It was suggested earlier: This could be the result of local snapshots that are made on APFS volumes. When you delete files, they will remain available in the snapshots till removed. The system should purge the space occupied by the snapshots, oldest first, when that space is needed.

You can simply check the existance of snapshots. In Terminal enter
Bash:
tmutil listlocalsnapshotdates
That will give you a list of dates of the snapshots on all local disks.

A better explanation about snapshots on APFS is given here:
Lifewire said:
Though Time Machine is used to view the snapshots and to return to a previous state, the snapshots are taken always on APFS volumes, without user intervention and whether or not Time Machine is set up.
 


Ronald, I was aware of that earlier suggestion. It didn't seem plausible here unless the snapshots came over via Migration Assistant. How else would there have been time to create 100 gigabytes worth of snapshots? And, more to the point, why does my "available space" at the bottom of every Finder window not reflect any changes when I toss significant amounts of data?
 


Making a snapshot does not take much time and it takes very little space. Files are not copied, only extra access points to the files are created. When you delete files after a snapshot was created, only the representations of the files that you see in the Finder are deleted. The files themselves will remain on the volume as part of the snapshot. Only when the system reclaims that space when it is needed, the snapshot is deleted also.
 




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