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Carbon Copy Cloner is a very effective GUI for rsync.
Carbon Copy Cloner works great. But it also doesn’t let you pick and chose files. I had problems with Path Finder and this very same setup years ago.

Update data point:
I can seem to copy one large file at a time, 50GB. However, if I copy two files, the copy appears to copy one whole file, but then the spinning beach balls occur before that file is usable and then never copies the second file.... well copy status bar never progresses.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Carbon Copy Cloner works great. But it also doesn’t let you pick and chose files.
Actually, it does. Below the Source section is a filter pop-up menu, and you can choose Copy Some Files in that pop-up menu to select what you want.
I can seem to copy one large file at a time, 50GB. However, if I copy two files, the copy appears to copy one whole file, but then the spinning beach balls occur before that file is usable and then never copies the second file..
It's probably worth running Activity Monitor and looking to see if something (e.g. the Finder) is running out of memory or other resources while this is going on.
 


Carbon Copy Cloner works great. But it also doesn’t let you pick and chose files. I had problems with Path Finder and this very same setup years ago.
I like Path Finder when I can get it to do what I want, but often I can't. Is there any chance the Take Control… crew could bring out a book on Path Finder for simple souls? (Hint: Joe Kissel, I hope you're reading this.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I like Path Finder when I can get it to do what I want, but often I can't....
I'm not sure what you're trying to do or what Path Finder version you're using, but I use Path Finder 7 pretty much the same way I'd use the Finder (if I didn't have this alternative), and it seems to function fine - copy, move, delete, open, sort, Get Info, etc.
 


I'm not sure what you're trying to do or what Path Finder version you're using, but I use Path Finder 7 pretty much the same way I'd use the Finder (if I didn't have this alternative), and it seems to function fine - copy, move, delete, open, sort, Get Info, etc.
Does version 7 still work with Mojave without problems?
 



I'm not sure what you're trying to do or what Path Finder version you're using, but I use Path Finder 7 pretty much the same way I'd use the Finder (if I didn't have this alternative), and it seems to function fine - copy, move, delete, open, sort, Get Info, etc.
Yes, I can do copy, move, etc, but that's not the point.

I'm on version 8, and here's just one example of my discombobulation: in v7, the left and right panes had upper and lower panes, so when you clicked on a file or folder in the upper pane, its File Info stuff appeared in the lower pane.

In v8 on my iMac, I have no lower panes, and I've spent what seems like hours (but probably tens of minutes) trying to resurrect them, with no success. I have looked at Path Finder Help and tried preferences and all the menus and still got nowhere. I'm sure there's a simple answer — but why isn't it immediately apparent to me? I even have less frustration with iTunes.

Path Finder is great, but for someone with my mindset, it's often frustrating, hence the need (for me) for an Idiot's Guide.
 



Desolated by the warning of the possible demise of DragThing, I have, for the first time, been looking into some macOS features I've never used before, to see if I can build a comfortable working environment without DragThing.

For... how many years? forever... I've had DragThing on the left side of my screen. I don't use a lot of features. I use it is as a kind of "tabbed multi-dock" with ten tabbed categories named and in the order I want them (Imaging, Internet, etc.) and, within each tab, a strip of fifteen applications, chosen and in the order I want them (Internet contains Interarchy, non-Safari browsers, Skype, Zoom, etc.)

I'm struggling to find acceptably similar functionality within the Finder/Dock/Launchpad and want some help.

1) I thought maybe I could live with dock at the left; ten "stacks" named Imaging, Internet, etc. with the same contents as my DragThing tabs; and stacks that fan. The deal-breaker is that the "fan" display option only is available when the Dock is at screen bottom. This seems crazy, but it's got me stumped. Can anyone confirm that the "fan" option is only available in the dock bottom location? Why, why? (Also, when the Dock is at screen bottom, when I "fan" a stack that's close to the right edge, the fan actually curves offscreen and hides some contents. Why doesn't it just straighten out or curve right?)

2) I find no way to put the contents of a stack in a chosen arbitrary order. You can choose different sorting systems, but not simply drag them into a desired order. And you can't even sort by label.

3) The new desktop "stacks" in Mojave seem to work in an utterly different way--no "fan" option at all, for examples--but it doesn't matter, because if I or close a big stack, the pizza wheel spins for twenty seconds. Admittedly, I have a lot of files on my desktop, but if I didn't, I wouldn't need to organize them into "stacks" in the first place.

4) I find no way to control the size of icons when a dock stack opens in "grid" mode. They are ridiculously large. Why aren't they the same size as the icons in the Dock itself... or controllable in some way?

5) I thought maybe it was time to explore the "Launchpad," but at the moment this seems to have the same problem of crazy-big icons, and no standard menu bar and no way to access "preferences" that I can discover, either in Launchpad itself or in System Preferences

I'd rant here, but honestly I'm just trying to find a reasonable personal solution.
 


I, too, used DragThing for at least a decade, and was saddened by its demise. My replacement now resides in the top menu bar: CustomMenu 3. It was easy to make the transition, and serves my needs well, including customization and re-ordering items. your milage may vary
 


I'm another who used DragThing for as far back as I can remember. Now I use Overflow 3 from Stunt Software. I have it set so I just have to press the F6 function key, and Overflow pops onto the screen, with a list of categories on the left side and icons within each category on the right. Works very smoothly. I am quite content. (I have no connection to Stunt Software.)

 


... For... how many years? forever... I've had DragThing on the left side of my screen. I don't use a lot of features. I use it is as a kind of "tabbed multi-dock" with ten tabbed categories named and in the order I want them (Imaging, Internet, etc.) and, within each tab, a strip of fifteen applications, chosen and in the order I want them (Internet contains Interarchy, non-Safari browsers, Skype, Zoom, etc.)

I'm struggling to find acceptably similar functionality within the Finder/Dock/Launchpad and want some help....
Dan, I don't have much to encourage you. I can confirm that the “fan” behaviour doesn't work with the Dock on the right. For myself, I have a single folder in the Dock with a distinctive icon. Then that contains my favorite files and some subfolders. In my case, I prefer a simple list of each folder / sub-folder, rather than a fan. As you found, there's no way to sort arbitrarily (other than prefixing each subfolder name with a number, which is not the least bit elegant). The Dock meets my simple needs; I had to convert out of DragThing years ago, can't remember why.
 


I was a DragThing user for many years but recently decided it was time to move away. While I didn't have nearly as much dependence as Dan did, I had a bunch of things in there that I used regularly. My alternative is a combination of LaunchBar (which I mostly use as a launcher) and uBar (where I keep a few items permanently available).
 


Station, a multi-level Dock, is the most DragThing-like replacement I have found. The author has posted about it here before and has been very responsive to suggestions, too.

In DragThing one could create tabs for categories. In Station I've created folders with category names and added custom folder icons to represent each category. Dragging desired apps to these Station folders simulates DragThing tabs fairly well.

One large omission is supporting function keys to launch items and open folders, and I hope the author will eventually add that. In the meantime, can anyone recommend a program to do that? Keyboard Maestro may be one option.

DragThing may still be rebooted, as the author has "not yet made a final decision" according to his site, although it sounds unlikely.
 



A somewhat related question: back in the days before OS X, I used QuicKeys extensively. Among other things, I used it to launch applications with key commands. I have played a bit with using Automator to handle app launch, but those services are never available/active when I first boot up my Mac. I have to click on the Finder menu, and select services, at which point my app launch items are present and subsequently launch as they should. I don’t know enough about Services or these Automator actions to know why the Finder being active right after startup isn’t enough to make these services available without taking that first trip to the Finder menu.

Does anyone here know? This same situation came up a while back in Apple Discussions, and no one had an answer beyond doing the menu click (which came from me).
 


Kathryn, I have found a free app in the Mac App Store, "HotKey App", which is excellent for assigning keyboard shortcuts to open anything, be it an app, a file, or a folder. This is a wonderful replacement for that particular QuicKeys feature.
 


A somewhat related question: back in the days before OS X, I used QuicKeys extensively. Among other things, I used it to launch applications with key commands....
I use a freeware app called Spark (not the email client of the same name) to do what you're talking about, Kathryn. I assign my most-used apps to certain function keys. This is useful not only for opening them but also for switching between them, as once they're mapped in this way, pressing the appropriate key will also bring an already-open app forward.
 


Thanks Scott and Mike for the suggestions. It's nice to have an option beyond DragThing for launching apps with function keys. Both programs look nice, but HotKey App appears to be discontinued, as the author's website is offline.
 


... HotKey App appears to be discontinued, as the author's website is offline.
Although I also witnessed a failure to pull up the developer's webpage for HotKey, the app is definitely available on the Mac App Store. It also has a release date of 12/20/2017, which is relatively recent, so whether it is abandonware or not is unknown. According to my experience, it is fully compatible with the current version of macOS.
 


A hard drive showed signs of failing, and Disk Utility wouldn't fix it, so I copied everything to another drive, reformatted the original drive, and copied the data back. That fixed whatever the problem was, so I've trashed the copied data from the second drive.

Now, when emptying the Trash, there are numerous alerts that a few files can't be deleted; some are in use, others have an error code (-50). Using all the tricks I know to force empty the Trash I'm left with a nest of folders finally containing a folder named "␀Ꮓ␀ᐛ!$␀2쏆blINEi". I assume the folder name is the problem, but Finder won't let me re-name it. I get an error: "The name 'folder' can't be used. Try using fewer characters, or with no punctuation marks."

I wonder how I can get rid of this folder and how I can rename it on my original hard drive, in case it was the root of my problem?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
A hard drive showed signs of failing, and Disk Utility wouldn't fix it, so I copied everything to another drive, reformatted the original drive, and copied the data back. That fixed whatever the problem was, so I've trashed the copied data from the second drive.
Perhaps not, if it's a hardware problem. I recommend immediately switching to a new known-good drive, cloning from your problematic drive with Carbon Copy Cloner, and avoiding the problematic drive, but examine SMART data on the problematic drive (e.g. with SMART Utility, DriveDX, or a similar app).
Now, when emptying the Trash, there are numerous alerts that a few files can't be deleted; some are in use, others have an error code (-50). Using all the tricks I know to force empty the Trash I'm left with a nest of folders finally containing a folder named "␀Ꮓ␀ᐛ!$␀2쏆blINEi"....
What tricks did you try? If you haven't tried these, I suggest trying:
  1. Secure Empty Trash
  2. CacheCleaner > Trash (force empty/delete)
  3. Onyx > Cleaning > Trash > Secure Delete
  4. Make a complete backup, and take the backup disk offline/power off. Then execute this command exactly as shown, replying y or n as appropriate...
    Bash:
    sudo rm -riv ~/.Trash
    examine files in directory /Users/username/.Trash? y
    remove /Users/username/.Trash/␀Ꮓ␀ᐛ!$␀2쏆blINEi? y
    /Users/username/.Trash/␀Ꮓ␀ᐛ!$␀2쏆blINEi
    remove /Users/username/.Trash? n

Oh, hey, it looks like you had this exact same problem before...
Help Please: Files that can't be deleted

May. 28, 2016

item.228875
David Gordon
I'm clearing out some old backups and hard drives and find I can't delete one last folder "Backups.backupdb" from the Trash. I get an "unexpected error (-50)" and other warnings that items are in use - which can't be true. My problem may be a folder which has somehow become named "␀Ꮓ␀ᐛ!$␀" (without the quotes). I can't rename this (Zero byte) folder, and when I tried to move it out of the Trash it copied onto my Desktop from where I still can't delete it!
I've tried the nuclear option of sudo rm -rf (careful now!) which returns "-bash: 쏆blINEi: command not found".
Any ideas on how I can get rid of this folder?
 


Oh, hey, it looks like you had this exact same problem before...
Ah, how embarrassing!

I better do a more extensive search in future. And come back and report how the problem was solved...

In my defence, the older problem was caused by trying to delete a file from a Time Machine backup. This is slightly different in that it’s a file direct from a backup hard drive created using ChronoSync.

I've now tried OynX with no joy.

The problem file is in the Trash of a mounted hard drive and as expected the Trash files disappear on unmounting the drive and reappear when the drive is back online. So I've modified Ric's advice and used sudo rm -riv and found my way to the hard drive's /.Trashes where I'm inspecting and deleting files such as .Trashes/501/Server Backup/Folder/ and down to the offending file. I've removed everything using Terminal and yet the Trash on the Desktop still contains the folders and file.

I'm assuming 501 is the user ID and that it’s usual to see it in a volume's Trash?

I think I may have solved the Time Machine hard drive problem by simply reformatting the drive. That's also an option here. But I don't know how I managed to get rid of the copy of the offending file I placed on my Desktop.

And eventually I'm going to want to deal with the original file and its bizarre name on the production hard drive where this backup copied it from.
 


Now, when emptying the Trash, there are numerous alerts that a few files can't be deleted; some are in use, others have an error code (-50). Using all the tricks I know to force empty the Trash I'm left with a nest of folders finally containing a folder named "␀Ꮓ␀ᐛ!$␀2쏆blINEi". I assume the folder name is the problem, but Finder won't let me re-name it. I get an error: "The name 'folder' can't be used. Try using fewer characters, or with no punctuation marks."
David, I have used a utility called "Trash It" that seems to be able to get rid of problem files. Not sure how well it works on external drives, but I suspect it might. It is donationware, so it is easy enough to try.
 


Two more High Sierra issues:
  • Renaming a file to remove an extension does nothing. Neither does adding a hidden extension. It is supposed to change the Hide Extension flag.
  • The Finder does not remember icon position in the Applications or Utilities folders. That is, you can change the icon position, but your configuration will be lost when the Finder is next restarted.
 


Two more High Sierra issues:
  • Renaming a file to remove an extension does nothing. Neither does adding a hidden extension. It is supposed to change the Hide Extension flag.
  • The Finder does not remember icon position in the Applications or Utilities folders. That is, you can change the icon position, but your configuration will be lost when the Finder is next restarted.
Scratch the last one off the list. It appears that it is not intrinsic to High Sierra but is a result of setting up a new computer via migration from an older computer. The system folder's DS_Store files are owned by root and do not allow write access to the admin group.

Compare to a machine which started as Sierra, with no migration: the DS_Store files allow the admin group to update them.
 


The system folder's DS_Store files are owned by root and do not allow write access to the admin group. Compare to a machine which started as Sierra, with no migration: the DS_Store files allow the admin group to update them.
Can you change the permissions on .DS_Store so they are writeably by the admin group again? That will probably allow positions to be remembered (at least when changed by an admin user).

The only issue of concern I can think of is that a permission-repair operation may put them back to root again. Repair Permissions is no longer part of the Disk Utility GUI, but it wouldn't surprise me if the OS does this on its own (possibly as a part of routine system software updates).

Does anyone know what a clean (erase-and-install) installation of High Sierra looks like? Does it also have these .DS_Store files owned by root? If not, then it would stand to reason that there's a bug in the migration tool, in which case repairing permissions might actually solve the problem. (You may need a third-party tool to do this, however).
 


Can you change the permissions on .DS_Store so they are writeably by the admin group again? That will probably allow positions to be remembered (at least when changed by an admin user).

The only issue of concern I can think of is that a permission-repair operation may put them back to root again. Repair Permissions is no longer part of the Disk Utility GUI, but it wouldn't surprise me if the OS does this on its own (possibly as a part of routine system software updates).

Does anyone know what a clean (erase-and-install) installation of High Sierra looks like? Does it also have these .DS_Store files owned by root? If not, then it would stand to reason that there's a bug in the migration tool, in which case repairing permissions might actually solve the problem. (You may need a third-party tool to do this, however).
I plan to try this, after a full backup:
Code:
sudo find -x / -name .DS_Store -user root -exec chmod -v g+w {} \;
But I might still have the same problem in the root folder. DS_Store files apply to subfolders, not the containing folder. So, I don't think /.DS_Store applies to the / folder itself, and I can't find where the root's Finder settings are stored.
 


Does anyone know what a clean (erase-and-install) installation of High Sierra looks like? Does it also have these .DS_Store files owned by root?
I did a clean install of High Sierra for testing. The Sierra drive has been upgraded in place several times. Note: I did a mass delete of all .DS_store files several months ago on the Sierra drive.

Sierra...
Code:
$ ls -l ./Applications/.DS_Store 
-rw-r--r--@ 1 me  501  30724 Feb 26 12:37 ./Applications/.DS_Store
High Sierra...
Code:
$ ls -l ./Applications/.DS_Store 
-rw-rw-r--  1 root  admin  34820 Feb 27 18:05 ./Applications/.DS_Store
Definitely different.
 


I did a clean install of High Sierra for testing. The Sierra drive has been upgraded in place several times. Note: I did a mass delete of all .DS_store files several months ago on the Sierra drive....
If you did a mass delete of all .DS_Store files on the Sierra drive, then every new .DS_Store file would have been created with you as the owner.
 


If you did a mass delete of all .DS_Store files on the Sierra drive, then every new .DS_Store file would have been created with you as the owner.
Unless you don't have write access to the folder, in which case the settings will not stick and will revert to factory defaults whenever the Finder flushes its cache (including but not necessarily limited to logout time).
 


I did a clean install of High Sierra for testing. The Sierra drive has been upgraded in place several times. Note: I did a mass delete of all .DS_store files several months ago on the Sierra drive.

Sierra...
Code:
$ ls -l ./Applications/.DS_Store
-rw-r--r--@ 1 me  501  30724 Feb 26 12:37 ./Applications/.DS_Store
High Sierra...
Code:
$ ls -l ./Applications/.DS_Store
-rw-rw-r--  1 root  admin  34820 Feb 27 18:05 ./Applications/.DS_Store
Definitely different.
My Mojave 10.14.3 Applications folder has no .DS_Store at all, even though I've customized the list view to my preferences. (I checked both via the Finder key command to make invisible files visible, and also via the Terminal command. The Terminal command found "No such file or directory".)
 


My Mojave 10.14.3 Applications folder has no .DS_Store at all, even though I've customized the list view to my preferences. (I checked both via the Finder key command to make invisible files visible, and also via the Terminal command. The Terminal command found "No such file or directory".)
I don't know about Mojave, but I believe that the the .DS_Store in Applications would hold settings for subfolders of Applications. Try changing the view options on an Applications subfolder and see what happens.
 


I don't know about Mojave, but I believe that the the .DS_Store in Applications would hold settings for subfolders of Applications. Try changing the view options on an Applications subfolder and see what happens.
My Mojave gives:
Bash:
ls -l /Applications/.DS_Store

-rw-rw-r--  1 root  admin  49156 Feb  9 17:04 /Applications/.DS_Store
Note that I used
ls -l /Applications
and not
ls -l ./Applications
 


My Mojave gives:
Bash:
ls -l /Applications/.DS_Store

-rw-rw-r--  1 root  admin  49156 Feb  9 17:04 /Applications/.DS_Store
Note that I used
ls -l /Applications
and not
ls -l ./Applications
I'm not 100% sure about this, but as I said, I believe that the .DS_Store for a folder is contained in the parent folder.

I did some testing on a High Sierra machine with working .DS_Store files. If I changed the Applications folder's view settings, it changed the modification time on /.DS_Store. If I changed the view settings of a folder such as /Applications/Utilities, it changed the modification time on /Applications/.DS_Store.
 


I just installed a fresh copy of Mavericks in a virtual machine. The DS_Store files there look exactly how we expect: the system-created files are root but with the group having write access; user-created files have the user as the owner. The Finder is running as the user.

On the problem iMac, every DS_Store that was created on the date of the first-boot migration looks like this:
Code:
-rw-r--r--@ 1 root      admin   8196 Jun 17  2018 Games/.DS_Store
... even for folders that I created on the old iMac, prior to the migration. You'd think that they would have had the user as the owner.

This strongly implies that it is the migration itself that created the problem.

I wonder if there's a way to test a first-install migration in VMware Fusion, migrating from another VMware Fusion drive? Maybe just attach a new drive, install High Sierra on it, and tell it to migrate from the first drive?
 


I don't know about Mojave, but I believe that the the .DS_Store in Applications would hold settings for subfolders of Applications. Try changing the view options on an Applications subfolder and see what happens.
I tested your suggestion and changed the view options in Utilities and another subfolder of Applications, but still no .DS_Store file. Using the keyboard command to show invisible files in the Finder (Command-Shift-.) revealed other invisible files but no .DS_Store files. In Terminal, the following commands did reveal the .DS_Store file in Applications:

$ cd /Applications
$ ls -l .DS_Store
-rw-r--r--@ 1 root admin 22532 Dec 3 11:16 .DS_Store


Upon further checking (and still with Finder preferences set to show invisible items) I noticed there were no .DS_Store files visible anywhere in any folder or directory on my Mac Pro (Late 2013) running Mojave 10.14.3. I knew that couldn't be right. So I used EasyFind to search for .DS_Store files, and it located and listed 547. I used the "Reveal in Finder" option on various random .DS_Store files in the list and, while the corresponding folders were opened, no .DS_Store files were viewable. Any other "invisible" items were viewable but not .DS_Store files.

Apparently Apple is using some preference or Unix file somewhere to specifically not allow the Finder to show .DS_Store files, even when all other invisible files are made visible - at least on my computer and OS, but both are pretty vanilla in the larger scheme of modifications possible.
 


I tested your suggestion and changed the view options in Utilities and another subfolder of Applications, but still no .DS_Store file. Using the keyboard command to show invisible files in the Finder (Command-Shift-.) revealed other invisible files but no .DS_Store files. In Terminal, the following commands did reveal the .DS_Store file in Applications:
$ cd /Applications
$ ls -l .DS_Store
-rw-r--r--@ 1 root admin 22532 Dec 3 11:16 .DS_Store

Upon further checking (and still with Finder preferences set to show invisible items) I noticed there were no .DS_Store files visible anywhere in any folder or directory on my Mac Pro (Late 2013) running Mojave 10.14.3. I knew that couldn't be right. So I used EasyFind to search for .DS_Store files, and it located and listed 547. I used the "Reveal in Finder" option on various random .DS_Store files in the list and, while the corresponding folders were opened, no .DS_Store files were viewable. Any other "invisible" items were viewable but not .DS_Store files.
Apparently Apple is using some preference or Unix file somewhere to specifically not allow the Finder to show .DS_Store files, even when all other invisible files are made visible - at least on my computer and OS, but both are pretty vanilla in the larger scheme of modifications possible.
The utility Cocktail has an option to remove .DS_Store files.
 


In Terminal, the following commands did reveal the .DS_Store file in Applications:
$ cd /Applications
$ ls -l .DS_Store
-rw-r--r--@ 1 root admin 22532 Dec 3 11:16 .DS_Store
.
You've got the same problem I do: your file is only writable by root. I have confirmed that this is due to the macOS data migration. Methodology:
  1. I have a vanilla High Sierra machine in VMware Fusion.
  2. In this machine, I set up some Finder view options for various user and system folders, including Applications and some user-created folders within Applications. This is Macintosh HD.
  3. Copied the High Sierra installer to this machine.
  4. Added a second hard drive. Call this "New HD".
  5. Used the installer to install High Sierra onto New HD.
  6. On first boot of the newly installed High Sierra, told it to migrate data from Macintosh HD.
The result is that for folders not under the home folder, permissions such as this:
Code:
-rw-rw-r--  1 root      admin  16388 Mar  7 21:02 Applications/.DS_Store
-rw-r--r--@ 1 mschmitt  admin   8196 Mar  7 21:09 Applications/My Applications/.DS_Store
were changed to this:
Code:
-rw-r--r--@ 1 root  admin  6148 Mar  8 05:22 /Applications/.DS_Store
-rw-r--r--@ 1 root  admin  6148 Mar  8 05:22 /Applications/My Applications/.DS_Store
and thus this migrated machine won't allow the user to retain Finder view settings.
 


I have an old MacBook Pro which needs replacing. It seems to be using most of the 512GB hard drive, so best order the new one with a 1TB SSD.

'About This Mac' says there is 80 GB available and that 206 GB is being used by "System" (rounding the figures here). But Finder reports my usage as 327 GB, but still with only 80 GB free, which doesn't add up to 512.

So I have searched here and tried the solutions talked about but still have 206 GB of hidden files in the System. I've turned Spotlight off and on. I've backed up using Time Machine (which I don't usually do), all in the hope some hidden caches or files will now be deleted and free up my free space.

Obviously, only a cynic would believe Apple have fiddled the figures to force me into buying an unnecessarily large hard drive upgrade. But how can I be sure a 512GB SSD will fit my needs?
 


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