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This is sick: I can toggle invisible file display off and on (in macOS 10.12.6) via the secret Command-Option-Period keyboard shortcut. But, .DS_Store files are always hidden by the Finder, no matter what. Apple wants you to believe that they don't exist!
Fortunately, I use Path Finder 7, because Apple just won't FTFF, and Path Finder does display those files, as it should (when set to display invisible files).
And there's always the command line, when Apple's graphical user interface "designers" fail:
Bash:
ls -la
I don't think Apple was being secretive here. Before Sierra (and still), you can set the Finder to show all hidden files via the defaults command.

Google says that people wanted to know, "but how do I show the hidden files except the .DS_Store files?". These are probably people who need to have hidden files visible all the time and don't want their Desktop and every other folder showing the .DS_Store files. The Sierra command met that requirement.
 


  • Don't know the cause.
  • Possible alternative to Restart... is to relaunch Finder,  > Force Quit... > Finder > Relaunch
  • This interrupts any Finder operation - copy, delete, move, etc.
  • your milage may vary
Thanks James, that worked great! I forgot to mention this was in Sierra 10.12.6. I never had this issue in El Capitan or Snow Leopard.
 


... I rebooted the computer again, and everything was back to normal. Any theories about what happened?
Sometimes rebooting fails with High Sierra on my 2010 Mac Mini. After noting a general accumulation of oddities yesterday with High Sierra, Apple Mail and Firefox, I rebooted to clean things up, only to have the reboot fail with a kernel panic. Rebooting that time worked and the system has been behaving properly since then. I recall seeing that before, and also seeing High Sierra behave oddly other times after rebooting, then come back after another reboot. My guess would be bugs somewhere in High Sierra, but they could be somewhere else.
 


Handy [Finder] keystroke shortcut to reveal invisible files/folders:
Command-Shift-Period​
Works [in file open/save dialogs, too]. Repeat to hide them again.
I wasn't aware of this keyboard shortcut — thanks!

I just tried it on my desktop, which contains two stacks. Each time I typed Command-Shift-Period to display hidden files, the item count in both stacks went up, though the actual number of visible and hidden items was much smaller — perhaps it's because of .DS_Store files that remain invisible. I haven't tested to see if this survives a Finder re-launch or reboot, but I just reported it to Apple as a bug.
 


Since updating recently to High Sierra 10.13.6 (on an iMac 27" late 2013), there is a long delay before the icon for a new file appears on the desktop. It appears immediately in a Finder window and can be opened, trashed or the name can be changed. However, there is a delay, sometimes up to about a minute, before the file appears on the desktop. The delay occurs when using Save to desktop. If I drag a Web location from Firefox to the destop, the icon is immediately displayed and usable. I ran Disk First Aid and several cache cleaner maintenance items but without success.
 


Since updating recently to High Sierra 10.13.6 (on an iMac 27" late 2013), there is a long delay before the icon for a new file appears on the desktop. It appears immediately in a Finder window and can be opened, trashed or the name can be changed. However, there is a delay, sometimes up to about a minute, before the file appears on the desktop. The delay occurs when using Save to desktop. If I drag a Web location from Firefox to the destop, the icon is immediately displayed and usable. I ran Disk First Aid and several cache cleaner maintenance items but without success.
As a data point I'm getting this on the latest macOS 10.14. I recently upgraded my personal, workhorse MacBook Pro (2016 model) to Mojave a couple of weeks ago and this exact thing happens. It's a little frustrating because I often drag an image from Firefox to the Desktop to use and immediately drag it to the Graphic Converter application icon in the Dock. Previously these actions were almost instantaneous but now it can take up to 30 seconds for it to just appear on the Desktop. And as you point out, it, weirdly, is immediately available in a Finder window or even a file open dialogue window - just not on the Desktop. I'm working around it for now but it is annoying.
 


Previously these actions were almost instantaneous but now it can take up to 30 seconds for it to just appear on the Desktop. And as you point out, it, weirdly, is immediately available in a Finder window or even a file open dialogue window - just not on the Desktop.
FWIW, I see this behavior in Sierra (10.12.6), too. I decided a while ago that it was just another annoying Finder bug that is unlikely to be fixed.
 


Since updating recently to High Sierra 10.13.6 (on an iMac 27" late 2013), there is a long delay before the icon for a new file appears on the desktop. It appears immediately in a Finder window and can be opened, trashed or the name can be changed. However, there is a delay, sometimes up to about a minute, before the file appears on the desktop. The delay occurs when using Save to desktop. If I drag a Web location from Firefox to the destop, the icon is immediately displayed and usable. I ran Disk First Aid and several cache cleaner maintenance items but without success.
I've noticed a similar delay: adding or removing a file from the Desktop takes about 7 seconds to register in the Finder, but in any other folder is instantaneous. It takes the same time to appear in a ~/Desktop Finder window as it does on the actual desktop.

A quick test is to touch a test file in a Terminal window, then rm to delete.

I do not have Desktop & Documents Folders synced to the iCloud Drive. Saving to the Documents folders is fast.
 


Since updating recently to High Sierra 10.13.6 (on an iMac 27" late 2013), there is a long delay before the icon for a new file appears on the desktop. It appears immediately in a Finder window and can be opened, trashed or the name can be changed. However, there is a delay, sometimes up to about a minute, before the file appears on the desktop. The delay occurs when using Save to desktop.
I experienced this issue and I wrestled with it for a long time, trying everything I could think of. At some point I solved it and the problem did not return (now on Mojave). Regrettably, I forgot what I did then. I do remember, though, that I found the direction to where to find the cause in this MacRumors thread: Desktop slow to refresh.
 


I experienced this issue and I wrestled with it for a long time, trying everything I could think of. At some point I solved it and the problem did not return (now on Mojave). Regrettably, I forgot what I did then. I do remember, though, that I found the direction to where to find the cause in this MacRumors thread: Desktop slow to refresh.
I have seen these slight delays before an icon is created on the desktop from time to time, but it is not occurring on my 2017 MacBook Pro at this time, so am unsure as to why it is occurring on a random basis.
 


I have seen these slight delays before an icon is created on the desktop from time to time,
Well, in my case the delays were certainly not 'slight'. It often took up to 60 seconds before icons appeared on the desktop, seriously interfering with my intended actions.
 


That delay has been happening to me for a while, not just with recent updates. Drag a file to the desktop, drag a URL to make a webloc file, take a screenshot - pretty much anything to do with the Desktop has become very slow. Much as I like Path Finder and wish its developer well, it's beyond time for Apple to buy it and make it into a new version of Finder. This is on a MacBook Pro 14,2 with 16GB RAM and currently running macOS 10.14.5.
 



I experienced this issue and I wrestled with it for a long time, trying everything I could think of. At some point I solved it and the problem did not return (now on Mojave). Regrettably, I forgot what I did then. I do remember, though, that I found the direction to where to find the cause in this MacRumors thread: Desktop slow to refresh.
Problem solved for me, The MacRumors thread cited has a recent post that seems to identify the problem in High Sierra and gives a fix.
To fix this behavior, you should disable Finder Extensions in System Preferences.
In my case, it was the extension for the Funter app. For some people, it is a Google extension. You can turn them off and on to test—no restart is required.

It seems this is a system bug that is fixed in Mojave 10.14.
 


I experienced this issue and I wrestled with it for a long time, trying everything I could think of. At some point I solved it and the problem did not return (now on Mojave). Regrettably, I forgot what I did then. I do remember, though, that I found the direction to where to find the cause in this MacRumors thread: Desktop slow to refresh.
Ah, ha! On my machine the culprit is Beyond Compare. I sent a problem report to the vendor.
 


Ah, ha! On my machine the culprit is Beyond Compare. I sent a problem report to the vendor.
All-in-all, to me, this points other that OSes and applications are getting way too complicated and have the potential to create many problems under various and unusual circumstances. As many most likely have seen sometimes, a bug is sold as a feature!
 


I experienced this issue and I wrestled with it for a long time, trying everything I could think of. At some point I solved it and the problem did not return (now on Mojave). Regrettably, I forgot what I did then. I do remember, though, that I found the direction to where to find the cause in this MacRumors thread: Desktop slow to refresh.
This problem started on my iMac (2017, 27", 5K) when I upgraded from Sierra to Mojave. (I skipped High Sierra.) I did some searching for a solution to no avail, but I cleared some icons off my desktop (still leaving about 20), and it seemed to go away by itself. I recently went out of town for two weeks and shut down the iMac. When I restarted, the problem returned, though not as bad as before.

The MacRumors thread indicates it is a problem with a desktop sync, but I do not have my desktop sync'ed with a cloud service, only some folders such as Box. I'll read through the thread more thoroughly and see if there is anything relevant to my situation.
 


The MacRumors thread indicates it is a problem with a desktop sync, but I do not have my desktop sync'ed with a cloud service, only some folders such as Box. I'll read through the thread more thoroughly and see if there is anything relevant to my situation.
Per the MacRumors thread:
  1. Open Activity Monitor and enter "Finder" in the search box.
  2. Go to the System Preferences > Extensions pane.
  3. Select Finder.
  4. See if there are any Finder extensions selected. Try to match selected extensions to running processes.
  5. De-select one of the Finder extensions. Wait for the corresponding processes to end.
  6. Test to see if that fixes the Desktop problem.
  7. If not, repeat for other Finder extensions.
Note that de-selecting the extension in the preference pane might not kill the process. For example, Dropbox Finder Integration persists until you disable Finder integration in Dropbox's own preferences.
 


Per the MacRumors thread:
  1. Open Activity Monitor and enter "Finder" in the search box.
  2. Go to the System Preferences > Extensions pane.
  3. Select Finder.
  4. See if there are any Finder extensions selected. Try to match selected extensions to running processes.
  5. De-select one of the Finder extensions. Wait for the corresponding processes to end.
  6. Test to see if that fixes the Desktop problem.
  7. If not, repeat for other Finder extensions.
Note that de-selecting the extension in the preference pane might not kill the process. For example, Dropbox Finder Integration persists until you disable Finder integration in Dropbox's own preferences.
Thank you! I had previously noticed (when checking Activity Monitor for something else) that one service I use, odrive, keeps a number of processes going. Following your instructions, I found seven of them. I terminated those processes and did some saves to the desktop. The delay was gone. I was already planning to discontinue odrive; now I will do so soon.

I also see processes from OneDrive and Box, but if the delay stays minimal, I'll leave those as is.
 


In my case, it was the extension for the Funter app. For some people, it is a Google extension. You can turn them off and on to test—no restart is required.
Thanks for the tip. At various times, I've had Dropbox, Box, OneDrive, and/or Google Drive File Stream extensions active on my main machine. Although none of them have been syncing my Desktop, and I don't use iCloud Drive, I'll keep a closer eye on this in the future. At the moment, the only Finder Extension that is active on my machine is Dropbox.

On a related subject, I recently uninstalled Box from my main system. One of my former clients used it for collaboration, and I think Box is a very strong tool, perhaps the best all-around file sharing tool among the major business-class providers. On the other hand, I noticed that every time I opened Activity Monitor, Box sync was using 3-5% CPU, no matter what I was doing and despite having only a small number of files being synced. Since I don't use Box much at the moment, I uninstalled it to reduce the system load. With Dropbox releasing a client that includes a Chromium framework and new features that go far beyond simple file sharing and syncing, I wonder how the background load and performance characteristics of the new Dropbox client will change. Dropbox is a real workhorse for me, so any major performance changes will have a big impact on my computing life.
 


I've noted, with a 2018 Mac Mini and macOS Mojave 10.4.5.
that when I try to create a webloc file on the desktop by dragging (the page icon) from the URL bar and "dropping it" onto the desktop, the file takes a few seconds to appear.

Using macOS Sierra on my previous 2012 Mac Mini, the file creation was nearly instantaneous.

I've also noted when using Command-Shift-4 to create a screenshot on the desktop, it again just takes longer than it used to (and there's a small "preview" of the image before the Finder actually creates the file). I recall reading of a terminal command that eliminates "the preview", but can't remember where I read it, nor the command.

I'd prefer no previews and faster file creation....
 


...On the other hand, I noticed that every time I opened Activity Monitor, Box sync was using 3-5% CPU, no matter what I was doing and despite having only a small number of files being synced...
On my iMac, Box is using 2% CPU as a total of two processes, Box Sync Monitor and Box Sync. That seems to be constant.

I notice that DragThing is using 3-5%, even when the iMac is idle. However, it's not long for this world, as it (sadly) will not be updated to 64-bit.
 


I've also noted when using Command-Shift-4 to create a screenshot on the desktop, it again just takes longer than it used to (and there's a small "preview" of the image before the Finder actually creates the file). I recall reading of a terminal command that eliminates "the preview", but can't remember where I read it, nor the command.
I'd prefer no previews and faster file creation....
You don't need a terminal command. From my “macOS 10.14 Mojave Post-Install Frequently Asked Questions” article over on MacStrategy:
Q. The new screenshot features are good but the lingering preview thumbnail in the corner is annoying. Can you stop this from showing?
A. Yes. Press Command-Shift-5 to open the new screenshot utility. From the icons at the bottom click on Options and untick "Show Floating Thumbnail" from the pop-up menu.
 


I recently installed Mojave over Yosemite on my 2015 MacBook Pro. It all went smoothly except for one issue I have not been able to understand.

Opening the Pictures folder of my main user account shortly after installation, I got a Finder hang along with a huge increase in memory usage and intense CPU activity. I allowed this to continue for several minutes until I reluctantly restarted the machine.

I performed all the usual troubleshooting rituals — rebooting in Safe Mode, running fsck on the drive when booted from an external clone, running EtreCheck Pro, and doing a massive cleanup of ancient kexts that were no longer loading anyway, deleting the contents of the Pictures folder and then restoring the subfolders one by one, reinstalling Mojave from the recovery partition, running both Cocktail and Onyx, turning off Spotlight and reindexing, deleting all the DS_Store files for the Pictures folder and subfolders, and trying different view settings. FWIW, I do not use iCloud Drive, don't sync any photos among devices, and have even turned off "Find My Mac", which was a troubleshooting tip I heard.

The net result of all this is that when I open the Pictures folder now, I get the spinning beachball for only 10 seconds or so. This interval is fairly constant. I can live with it. The folder is some 76 gigs in size and includes about 12,000 items. I have my Capture One sessions folders in it, an Aperture library, and my Photos library.

This partial "victory" was achieved as a series of seeming iterative improvements. I am always suspicious of partial victories, such as this, when I really haven't identified the cause. The Finder has never crashed, only hung.

Initially, there seemed to be lots of complaints about Finder crashing and hangs with Mojave. I see almost nothing current about it now. I wonder if there is a trick I am missing in troubleshooting this.
 


I recently installed Mojave over Yosemite on my 2015 MacBook Pro. It all went smoothly except for one issue I have not been able to understand.
Opening the Pictures folder of my main user account shortly after installation, I got a Finder hang along with a huge increase in memory usage and intense CPU activity. I allowed this to continue for several minutes until I reluctantly restarted the machine.
I performed all the usual troubleshooting rituals — rebooting in Safe Mode, running fsck on the drive when booted from an external clone, running EtreCheck Pro, and doing a massive cleanup of ancient kexts that were no longer loading anyway, deleting the contents of the Pictures folder and then restoring the subfolders one by one, reinstalling Mojave from the recovery partition, running both Cocktail and Onyx, turning off Spotlight and reindexing, deleting all the DS_Store files for the Pictures folder and subfolders, and trying different view settings. FWIW, I do not use iCloud Drive, don't sync any photos among devices, and have even turned off "Find My Mac", which was a troubleshooting tip I heard.
The net result of all this is that when I open the Pictures folder now, I get the spinning beachball for only 10 seconds or so. This interval is fairly constant. I can live with it. The folder is some 76 gigs in size and includes about 12,000 items. I have my Capture One sessions folders in it, an Aperture library, and my Photos library.

This partial "victory" was achieved as a series of seeming iterative improvements. I am always suspicious of partial victories, such as this, when I really haven't identified the cause. The Finder has never crashed, only hung.

Initially, there seemed to be lots of complaints about Finder crashing and hangs with Mojave. I see almost nothing current about it now. I wonder if there is a trick I am missing in troubleshooting this.
First, some questions:
  1. How many items are directly in the Pictures folder (vs. contained in subfolders)?
  2. Are there any aliases (directly) in the Pictures folder?
  3. Which Finder view are you using?
  4. Is "Calculate all sizes" selected in the folder's View Options?
  5. Or "Show icon preview"?
  6. What does Activity Monitor (All Processes) show as consuming the CPU during the hang?
  7. Are you using any third-party anti-virus software?
  8. Have you tried deleting the .DS_Store file from the parent folder of Pictures?
  9. Is the Pictures folder in an APFS volume?
  10. Does anything relevant appear in the Console during the hang? Yes, the Console was rendered useless by Sierra, but you should try anyway.
If your 12,000 items are in subfolders, then there are few legitimate reasons for the Finder to hang. One is the Calculate all Sizes option, but APFS was supposed to make that faster. This option is de-selected by default.

If there are thousands of items in the Pictures folder, then there are more possibilities. One is the Finder needing to build a cache for icon previews.

The .DS_Store question is because the store for a folder is actually in the parent folder. ~/Pictures/.DS_Store is settings for subfolders of Pictures.

Also, check the permissions on .DS_Store to make sure it is writable by you. Otherwise the Finder won't be able to save it.
 



I recently installed Mojave over Yosemite on my 2015 MacBook Pro. It all went smoothly except for one issue I have not been able to understand. Opening the Pictures folder of my main user account shortly after installation, I got a Finder hang along with a huge increase in memory usage and intense CPU activity. ...
It might also be the Apple Photos application making its database. I don't think it was available in Yosemite. I seem to remember it hogging the computer the first time I logged in.
 


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