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Network > Advanced > Hardware automatically sets itself to 100baseT. When I change this manually to 1000baseT, I get the message "Cable Unplugged. Either the cable for Ethernet is not plugged in or the device at the other end is not responding."
...
Could easily be bad solder in the connector throttling down the speed to 100Mbits (like what happens when you use a crappy 4-wire cable in an Ethernet 1000 environment or when one of the 8 wires gets loose...)
 


I guess this is personal preference. My next iMac is going to be with the SSD. The rest of the machine will be the base configuration. I will probably put all my pictures on an external drive. Just a FYI, my current 2012 iMac was a Fusion Drive. I split the Fusion, took it apart and installed a Crucial SSD. It really is pretty snappy....
 


Could easily be bad solder in the connector throttling down the speed to 100Mbits (like what happens when you use a crappy 4-wire cable in an Ethernet 1000 environment or when one of the 8 wires gets loose...)
It was clearly not the cable but all indications point to a hardware problem, which might indeed be a poor connection on the motherboard. Multiple cables worked with an assortment of other machines but none of them worked with my iMac.
My next iMac is going to be with the SSD.
Agreed, my iMac is SSD only. Right now I've got an assortment of USB 3 external drives and will probably consider an SSD external in the near future.
 


... My internet speed using Ethernet is slower than using WiFi. After extensive research and analysis I've isolated the problem to the Ethernet interface being throttled with a Link Speed of 100Mbit/s. This information is displayed running Network Utility....
Good news: Replacing the motherboard solved the problem, so it was clearly a hardware issue.

Kudos to Apple Support. They ordered the part on Monday, as it was not in stock, and expected delivery on Wednesday. They had the iMac on Tuesday. Today, Thursday, they called first thing in the morning before the store opened to say my iMac was ready to pick up. Much better than the 3–5 day turnaround which they state in authorizing the repair.

Interestingly, almost all the Genius Bar Mac techs were aware of this issue. It was obviously a very unique situation.

On a related note, I used my Time Machine backup to restore everything, and, although it took about 1 ½ hours (USB 3.0), everything seems have been restored. A few updates and Security & Privacy settings needed to be resolved, but so far, no problems. I'm not sure if it was easier or faster than restoring with my CCC clone, but this isn't something one wants to test on a regular basis.
 


I would double check the port itself and see if one of the pins isn't up in alignment vs. the others. I've seen that happen and, while lower speeds accept that, gigabit won't.
Given all the tests reported, the problem probably was something related to this. 10M and 100M Ethernet only uses two wire-pairs (4 wires), while Gigabit requires all four pairs (8 wires). If one of the 4 wires not used by 10/100 isn't making electrical contact, that would easily produce the symptoms described.

It could be damaged contacts in the jack, a damaged jack, a bad solder joint attaching the jack to the motherboard or a damaged circuit trace on the motherboard. In all cases, this is the sort of thing that Apple will fix by swapping the motherboard.

A repair shop with the requisite soldering tools and skills might try to replace the jack, but for Apple, that kind of work (if it's done at all) will be done after the fact as a part of refurbishing the board, after which it may be used to repair someone else's computer.
 


My mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra has been sporadically running one of the internal cooling fans (hard disk drive) very quickly for short bursts of time, creating an audible "whoosh" sound. This is often followed by (according to iStat) zero rotation afterwards - time periods vary. iStat also indicates no input from the 'Hard Drive Proximity' temperature sensor, which may account for the wild speed swings. Most of the time this hard disk drive fan seems to operate normally with speeds around 1100 rpm, give or take.

Once, a few weeks ago I found my iMac had shut down on its own for no apparent reason. When I rebooted it, the working temperature indicators showed that it was much hotter than usual inside my machine, which was quickly confirmed when I put my hand on the back of it. This was worrying.

The Apple hardware test reveals no problems. I am concerned about how serious this is. Is my iMac about to stop working, or is this an issue I can manage, if I keep my eye on the internal temperatures? This has been a stalwart computer all this time, I'm otherwise very happy with it, but I can't see investing serious $$$ in an internal repair.

Can anyone offer any insight or suggestions? Thanks in advance for your time.
 


My mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra has been sporadically running one of the internal cooling fans (hard disk drive) very quickly for short bursts of time, creating an audible "whoosh" sound. This is often followed by (according to iStat) zero rotation afterwards - time periods vary. iStat also indicates no input from the 'Hard Drive Proximity' temperature sensor, which may account for the wild speed swings. Most of the time this hard disk drive fan seems to operate normally with speeds around 1100 rpm, give or take. Once, a few weeks ago I found my iMac had shut down on its own for no apparent reason. When I rebooted it, the working temperature indicators showed that it was much hotter than usual inside my machine, which was quickly confirmed when I put my hand on the back of it. This was worrying. The Apple hardware test reveals no problems. I am concerned about how serious this is. Is my iMac about to stop working, or is this an issue I can manage, if I keep my eye on the internal temperatures? This has been a stalwart computer all this time, I'm otherwise very happy with it, but I can't see investing serious $$$ in an internal repair. Can anyone offer any insight or suggestions? Thanks in advance for your time.
If you have never had the internal drive replaced, then it sounds like the internal drive may be starting to fail. Also could be the graphics board. I use MacFans (free download) to monitor temperature and it has the ability to customize setup of fan speeds. I have used it many times when the graphic board is acting up. By increasing default fan speed, it can help keep the heat down and lessen issues with freeze-ups and shut downs. If it is the hard drive, then I would replace it with an SSD, which will work much better with High Sierra.
 


My mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra has been sporadically running one of the internal cooling fans (hard disk drive) very quickly for short bursts of time, creating an audible "whoosh" sound. ...
Jeff, this doesn't correct your issue, which sounds like a failing temperature sensor, but it does get around it. You can install a third party fan control utility, such as Macs Fan Control, which can be set to open on startup, and then use it to prevent overheating. I use it on an old iMac that I installed an OWC SSD in, and my clumsy fumbling damaged the temperature sensor on the internal drive.
 



My mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra has been sporadically running one of the internal cooling fans (hard disk drive) very quickly for short bursts of time, creating an audible "whoosh" sound. ...
A 2011 iMac is not the easiest, nor the hardest, Mac to repair. How serious is around $250? This is what it might cost you in parts to replace the internal drive with a 500GB SSD and the hard drive temperature sensor and perhaps the fan as well.
 


Thanks everyone. Yes, the internal hard drive is the original one. I am hesitant to open up my iMac - my eyesight isn't so good anymore, and I'm not the handiest guy in the toolshed. I appreciate the advicem and I'll try a fan control software fix before attempting to open this thing up.
 


My mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra has been sporadically running one of the internal cooling fans (hard disk drive) very quickly for short bursts of time, creating an audible "whoosh" sound. This is often followed by (according to iStat) zero rotation afterwards - time periods vary. iStat also indicates no input from the 'Hard Drive Proximity' temperature sensor, which may account for the wild speed swings. Most of the time this hard disk drive fan seems to operate normally with speeds around 1100 rpm, give or take.

Once, a few weeks ago I found my iMac had shut down on its own for no apparent reason. When I rebooted it, the working temperature indicators showed that it was much hotter than usual inside my machine, which was quickly confirmed when I put my hand on the back of it. This was worrying.

The Apple hardware test reveals no problems. I am concerned about how serious this is. Is my iMac about to stop working, or is this an issue I can manage, if I keep my eye on the internal temperatures? This has been a stalwart computer all this time, I'm otherwise very happy with it, but I can't see investing serious $$$ in an internal repair.

Can anyone offer any insight or suggestions? Thanks in advance for your time.
Don't overlook the possibility that either a fan has failed, or there is a bunch of lint or fuzz in the machine that is causing it to run hotter than usual.
 



Thanks, but resetting the SMC is the first thing I tried weeks ago. And the second... and again later, just in case. No difference.

I did install the "Macs Fan Control" utility mentioned above, and not only did it not work, it caused my hard drive fan to totally freak out for about 2 minutes until my iMac shut itself down.

I had set it to maintain 1100 RPM, and it went from 0 to 5500 (or higher) and back again doing everything but maintaining anything close to 1100 rpm. It's trashed now, no use to me.

The fans haven't failed as far as I can tell with iStat - this one particular hard drive fan is just out of control... I suspect the Hard Drive Proximity Sensor has failed, because iStat indicates no reading from it. Could be dusty inside... hard to tell from here. I guess I'd better review how to open this baby up - not my idea of a good time though. Thanks again, everyone!
 


My mid-2011 iMac running High Sierra has been sporadically running one of the internal cooling fans...
This may be beyond what you are willing to do (since it is a difficult repair to do), but you could replace the heat sink and replace the thermal paste. If the thermal paste is in the process failing or has failed, you will see symptoms as you have described.
iFixit said:
An alternative solution is to buy a new iMac and see if the symptoms go away. :)
 


This may be beyond what you are willing to do (since it is a difficult repair to do), but you could replace the heat sink and replace the thermal paste. If the thermal paste is in the process failing or has failed, you will see symptoms as you have described.
If you are willing/able to open the case, you may also find heat sinks and fans clogged with dust. Compressed air and/or an ESD-safe vacuum cleaner can help a lot here.

The problem is that the act of opening and closing the case (and possibly also pulling the motherboard in order to get at important parts located on the back) without causing damage is, by itself, very difficult. If you're willing to do that, you should probably perform a major upgrade (replace thermal paste, replace/upgrade storage, max out RAM, etc.) while you're at it, so you don't have to go through the process a second time in the future.
 


Thanks again, all. I'll nurse this venerable beast along until Apple updates their current iMac line and I've saved up enough shekels to purchase one... and as an Austin musician, shekels are in ever-diminishing supply these days. The new Mac Mini looks like a workable fall-back, too.
 


Thanks again, all. I'll nurse this venerable beast along until Apple updates their current iMac line and I've saved up enough shekels to purchase one... and as an Austin musician, shekels are in ever-diminishing supply these days. The new Mac Mini looks like a workable fall-back, too.
In my town there is a "Simply Mac" store, which is pretty much an Apple Store for smaller cities. There is also an independent Apple-authorized service business. I use them for doing things like what you are trying to do. For example, I had this company install in a variety of older iMacs an SSD I provided already cloned (so the service guy did not have to do anything with software). I also provided the bracket for the 2 1/2-inch SSD to fit in a 3 1/2-inch slot. This service also included cleaning the inside dirt. Cost was $40 for 1/2 hour or so of work for each iMac. Cost would vary, but an independent store could be quite reasonable.

I also did the same thing with a couple of older MacBook Pros. The cost was higher, but the same procedure of supplying a fully functional SSD and the bracket made the hardware change economical. I have the capability of doing these items myself, but the simplicity of having someone else do this for a reasonable fee is compelling.
 


In my town there is a "Simply Mac" store, which is pretty much an Apple Store for smaller cities. There is also an independent Apple-authorized service business. I use them for doing things like what you are trying to do. For example, I had this company install in a variety of older iMacs an SSD I provided already cloned (so the service guy did not have to do anything with software). I also provided the bracket for the 2 1/2-inch SSD to fit in a 3 1/2-inch slot. This service also included cleaning the inside dirt. Cost was $40 for 1/2 hour or so of work for each iMac. Cost would vary, but an independent store could be quite reasonable.
"Simply Mac" stores must vary quite a bit in quality. I will no longer go to the one near me (in a university town) based on a recent experience. I had an appointment that was not honored -- I waited in line with all of the people getting their iPhone batteries replaced. When I got to the front of the line and discussed the laptop issue I was having, the store manager guaranteed that the Apple Hardware Test would identify the reason for the display issues I had. I expressed doubt and he repeated the guarantee. I left the laptop with them. The manager said they would respond within 10 business days. At 12 days, I called and they said that they hadn't looked at the laptop yet, but they would run AHT immediately and promised that they would call me back within 2 hours. They didn't. I went in the next day and they said that AHT didn't find anything, which is what I suspected would happen and had mentioned at the first appointment as the most likely outcome. I picked up the laptop and left.

Based on the experiences that the people in front of me were having, I don't think that my bad service experience at the store was an outlier. I'm sure there are lovely Simply Mac stores, but this one certainly isn't. I realize that my issue is not the same as blowing out dust in an iMac, but I wouldn't trust the local Simply Mac to do even that.
 


I hear via podcast that the iMac Pro is absolutely quiet when running. Is the iMac 5k "reasonably" quiet? Does the 2018 MacBook Pro fan spin up when hooked up to an external display? Advice & anecdotal evidence welcome.
I was shocked when I first got my iMac 5k at how quiet it was. There was a part of me that wondered if it even had fans. The first time I even noticed the fans kick on was weeks after I got it (while it was upgrading to Mojave), and I’m pretty sure I only noticed them because the house was dead quiet and there was no street noise, both of which are a rarity for me. Even then they weren’t particularly loud - certainly much quieter than the 2011 Mac Mini the iMac replaced. Even on the rare times I do notice the fans, they are on for a relatively short period of time.

I’m not encoding video or anything fancy like that - mostly word processing work, spreadsheets, and some light duty image editing. The only thing that seems to cause the fans to fire up is anything that causes a lot of hard drive activity.
 


When editing 4k video in Adobe Premiere CC the fans will start up, but they are not very loud with my iMac Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2015 (4 GHz Intel Core i7, 32 GB 1867 MHz DDR3). That is about the only time I hear the fans run.
 


When editing 4k video in Adobe Premiere CC the fans will start up, but they are not very loud with my iMac Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2015 (4 GHz Intel Core i7, 32 GB 1867 MHz DDR3). That is about the only time I hear the fans run.
I have the same machine and I don’t ever recall having heard any fan noise whatsoever. Before that I had a 24” iMac, and again, never heard so much as a peep from it either.
 


Confirming the experience of others on the noise level of non-Pro iMacs, I have a first-generation 5K iMac at home, and there are a half-dozen 22" and 27" iMacs of the current and previous generation at work.

My home iMac is in about as quiet a residential room as is possible--at the back of the house in a quiet residential neighborhood with no traffic. Sitting at the computer, under most circumstances, the fans are not audible; running a game or CPU-intensive operation will result in a modest but not unpleasant "whoosh" sound.

It's so quiet that my problem is actually the external storage. I used to use a 3.5" backup drive, but it was way too loud, even without a fan, so I now use 2.5" drives in an OWC enclosure, which I put on top of a thick piece of styrofoam inside a cabinet to reduce fan and vibration noise, and it's still louder than the computer fans when not under load.

The current-gen iMacs at work (all with SSDs), of both sizes, are not any louder. Even if I'm the only one in the building at night, I can't tell whether they're on or not without hitting a key on the keyboard.
 


It's so quiet that my problem is actually the external storage. I used to use a 3.5" backup drive, but it was way too loud, even without a fan, so I now use 2.5" drives in an OWC enclosure, which I put on top of a thick piece of styrofoam inside a cabinet to reduce fan and vibration noise, and it's still louder than the computer fans when not under load.
Echoing this, I have a Late 2015 21.5" 4K iMac hooked up to a OWC Mercury Elite Pro RAID (purchased in 2016), and the latter is considerably noisier than the former. I don't notice the fan noise on the iMac unless it's under an unusually heavy load (I don't play games on it, but I do run molecular modelling/graphics applications). I considered moving the RAID into a closet, but i've got used to the noise now.
 


I have an iMac with a dying video card. I'd love to continue to use it as part of my home network as a "headless" Mac. Is there any way to run it without engaging the monitor (and thus engaging the failing video card)?

Every solution I've seen online has only touched on ways to turn the brightness down in some way (perhaps a sign that I can't do what I'd like to).
 



I have an iMac with a dying video card. I'd love to continue to use it as part of my home network as a "headless" Mac. Is there any way to run it without engaging the monitor (and thus engaging the failing video card)? Every solution I've seen online has only touched on ways to turn the brightness down in some way (perhaps a sign that I can't do what I'd like to).
In my area of the country, Florida, there are Mac repair shops that can reflow the solder on these boards to make them functional again (cost is usually under $250 and applies to not only iMacs but also MacBooks, too). Unfortunately, with a bad graphics board, the computer will have an issue running without crashing issues.

One reason for this happening is the type of solder the government allows us to use (military is excluded). When solder was made with lead, the problem was significantly less - now that lead is banned in solders, tin is used. One of its downsides is that solder made with tin, after several years of temperature cycling, starts to develop micro-cracks, which causes the graphics boards to fail, since they run hot.

One way to extend the life is to install an app (like Mac Fans Control) to allow the fans in the Mac computer to run faster than built-in controls that Apple uses. Faster fan speed lowers temperature of graphics board, making it last longer. Not a complete solution, but it will sometimes help for awhile.
 


Thank you. I'll try the fans app to extend life. My assumption is that once the video card fails, the iMac won't boot up and I won't even be able to remote in. So extending life may be my best option.
 


One reason for this happening is the type of solder the government allows us to use (military is excluded). When solder was made with lead, the problem was significantly less - now that lead is banned in solders, tin is used.
It hasn't been banned everywhere. In 2006, the EU, China and California banned lead solder from electronics. It is allowed elsewhere.

Manufacturers stopped using it globally because they don't want to have separate assembly lines for products sold to Europe, China and California vs. the rest of the world.

BTW, tin has always been a key component of solder. Leaded solder is an alloy of lead and tin. Lead-free solder typically replaces the lead with silver, copper or indium. And yes, these alloys don't work as well as lead-tin.

(Source: Wikipedia)
 



My primary computer is a 2017 iMac 27” with Fusion drive (120GB SSD and 2TB hard disk drive). macOS version is 10.13.6.

The other day I ran DriveDX and TechTool Pro 11 diagnostics on the machine, and each reported that the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard disk drive was “failing” based on reallocated sectors. TechTool Pro 11 reported the drive shows 5 reallocated sectors while DriveDx reported 8 reallocated sectors. Repeat testing with DriveDx and TechTool gave the same reallocated sector counts. Disk First Aid, on the other hand, reports the disk is OK.

I called Apple Support, expecting to be setting up a drive replacement under AppleCare, but the Apple tech suggested running the diagnostics reached through holding down the ‘D’ key while starting up. That reported no issues with the computer. She said Apple does not recommend “third-party” applications for this purpose and that the Apple diagnostic test is reliable.

What should I believe? I’m running a regular SuperDuper backup on the drive.)

Thanks
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The other day I ran DriveDX and TechTool Pro 11 diagnostics on the machine, and each reported that the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard disk drive was “failing” based on reallocated sectors. TechTool Pro 11 reported the drive shows 5 reallocated sectors while DriveDx reported 8 reallocated sectors. Repeat testing with DriveDx and TechTool gave the same reallocated sector counts. Disk First Aid, on the other hand, reports the disk is OK.
I called Apple Support, expecting to be setting up a drive replacement under AppleCare, but the Apple tech suggested running the diagnostics reached through holding down the ‘D’ key while starting up. That reported no issues with the computer. She said Apple does not recommend “third-party” applications for this purpose and that the Apple diagnostic test is reliable.
Those are red flags to me, and I would not trust the drive. Here's what I would do:
  1. Get a good USB SSD (like this or this) large enough to hold all your files, plus some free space. Format it for macOS.
  2. Use Carbon Copy Cloner to clone your internal drive to the external SSD
  3. Repeat the Carbon Copy Cloner clone, choosing Advanced Settings > Find and Replace Corrupted Files.
  4. Hopefully, that will proceed OK, and if it does:
  5. Set your startup drive to the external SSD.
  6. Make a backup clone on another drive.
Next, I would get SoftRAID (30-day free trial available), and use its Certify feature, which will destroy all data, to thoroughly test the internal hard drive.

At this point, you can decide what to do next, based on results and Apple stonewalling, but I personally would never trust that internal drive again and would want it replaced or the computer replaced.

As an example of how SMART data should look, I just checked an old 500GB Hitachi hard drive I have handy, and DriveDX reports zero reallocated sectors, as I would expect.
 


...I called Apple Support, expecting to be setting up a drive replacement under AppleCare, but the Apple tech suggested running the diagnostics reached through holding down the ‘D’ key while starting up. That reported no issues with the computer. She said Apple does not recommend “third-party” applications for this purpose and that the Apple diagnostic test is reliable....
If I remember correctly, Apple's diagnostics software only reports the drive as failing once it's actually failed. Of course, at that point Apple support will tell you that there is no way to recover your data and that you're just burning your money if you send it to a company that specializes in doing that.
 


Those are red flags to me, and I would not trust the drive. Here's what I would do:
  1. Get a good USB SSD (like this or this) large enough to hold all your files, plus some free space. Format it for macOS.
  2. Use Carbon Copy Cloner to clone your internal drive to the external SSD
  3. Repeat the Carbon Copy Cloner clone, choosing Advanced Settings > Find and Replace Corrupted Files.
  4. Hopefully, that will proceed OK, and if it does:
  5. Set your startup drive to the external SSD.
  6. Make a backup clone on another drive.
Next, I would get SoftRAID (30-day free trial available), and use its Certify feature, which will destroy all data, to thoroughly test the internal hard drive.

At this point, you can decide what to do next, based on results and Apple stonewalling, but I personally would never trust that internal drive again and would want it replaced or the computer replaced.

As an example of how SMART data should look, I just checked an old 500GB Hitachi hard drive I have handy, and DriveDX reports zero reallocated sectors, as I would expect.
The part about using CCC or SuperDuper to clone to an external SSD is good advice even if the main iMac fusion drive is ok.
 


Those are red flags to me, and I would not trust the drive. Here's what I would do...
Thanks, Ric, That situation is exactly what I was worried about. As soon as the SSD is delivered, I'll follow that procedure. The next step should be interesting, when I present the computer to the Apple Store where I picked it up. I'm anticipating they will want a 'hard fail' report from the Apple diagnostic before a replacement is authorized. I'll report back on what happens.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Thanks, Ric, That situation is exactly what I was worried about. As soon as the SSD is delivered, I'll follow that procedure. The next step should be interesting, when I present the computer to the Apple Store where I picked it up. I'm anticipating they will want a 'hard fail' report from the Apple diagnostic before a replacement is authorized. I'll report back on what happens.
A caveat: bizarrely, running a drive certification may not show drive problems, but, conversely, correct them (only temporarily). I had this happen recently, to my shock, with a completely dysfunctional hard drive. After a certification revived it, I finally wiped all data off the drive and trashed it.

In your case, the question is how to demonstrate drive failure and avoid masking a real problem. Rather than running SoftRAID Certify or any kind of diskutil erase operation, you might want to just "exercise" the drive very, very hard. Perhaps you could do it something like this:
  1. Detach the "fusion" SSD from the hard drive (to protect the SSD from excessive wear/damage).
  2. Partition the hard drive into two equal HFS+ partitions (volumes).
  3. Encrypt the volumes with FileVault to protect any sensitive data (in case of irrecoverable failure).
  4. Set up a bootable system on Partition 1 that includes Carbon Copy Cloner.
  5. Fill that partition with files (perhaps large video/audio files, duplicating folders as needed to fill up space).
  6. Run Carbon Copy Cloner with Advanced Settings > Find and Replace Corrupted Files and run it over and over and over, full-speed, for as long as you can. (You might also switch between backing up Partition 1 to Partion 2 and backing up Partition 2 to Partition 1.)
  7. Consider creating additional demands simultaneously on the system, e.g. running benchmarks or simultaneously doing I/O (e.g. running SuperDuper) to other external devices.
Keep track of remapped blocks and drive status as you go, using DriveDX or a similar SMART data tracker.

And definitely let us know what happens!
 


A caveat: bizarrely, running a drive certification may not show drive problems, but, conversely, correct them (only temporarily). I had this happen recently, to my shock, with a completely dysfunctional hard drive. After a certification revived it, I finally wiped all data off the drive and trashed it. In your case, the question is how to demonstrate drive failure and avoid masking a real problem. Rather than running SoftRAID Certify or any kind of diskutil erase operation, you might want to just "exercise" the drive very, very hard. Perhaps you could do it something like this:
  1. Detach the "fusion" SSD from the hard drive (to protect the SSD from excessive wear/damage).
  2. Partition the hard drive into two equal HFS+ partitions (volumes).
  3. Encrypt the volumes with FileVault to protect any sensitive data (in case of irrecoverable failure).
  4. Set up a bootable system on Partition 1 that includes Carbon Copy Cloner.
  5. Fill that partition with files (perhaps large video/audio files, duplicating folders as needed to fill up space).
  6. Run Carbon Copy Cloner with Advanced Settings > Find and Replace Corrupted Files and run it over and over and over, full-speed, for as long as you can. (You might also switch between backing up Partition 1 to Partion 2 and backing up Partition 2 to Partition 1.)
  7. Consider creating additional demands simultaneously on the system, e.g. running benchmarks or simultaneously doing I/O (e.g. running SuperDuper) to other external devices.
Keep track of remapped blocks and drive status as you go, using DriveDX or a similar SMART data tracker.

And definitely let us know what happens!
Ric, your procedure sound very similar to what Steve Gibson’s SpinRite utility does in its more intensive modes. Unfortunately, Gibson’s progress on building a new version that can boot on a UEFI system, like a Mac, seems not to have progressed in the past couple of years.

It looks like any such effort will soon become fruitless due to the strict implementations of Secure Boot and the T2 chip that prevent booting from external sources. More evidence of Apple (and Microsoft) trying to prevent us from managing and fixing our computers ourselves.

<snark>All hail mandated obsolescence!</snark>
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Ric, your procedure sound very similar to what Steve Gibson’s SpinRite utility does in its more intensive modes. Unfortunately, Gibson’s progress on building a new version that can boot on a UEFI system, like a Mac, seems not to have progressed...
Hasn't it been more like decades that he's been promising a vaporware Mac version? Thanks for the reference, though, which reminds me about DiskTester from the diglloydTools collection (though I haven't used it, personally).
It looks like any such effort will soon become fruitless due to the strict implementations of Secure Boot and the T2 chip that prevent booting from external sources.
For what it's worth, I can still boot from an external drive on a 2018 MacBook Pro with T2 security, as long as I first go into Recovery Mode to then enable external booting in the Startup Security Utility. (Unfortunately, I still can't boot Linux on that computer.)

If Apple removes any option to boot from an external drive, well, then macOS would be like iOS. Hmmm....
 


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