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After about 12 months of daily use, my first generation Apple Pencil reached the point where it needs to be recharged every hour or two. Prior to that I never ran into a battery life problem with it. I've been limping along with it for the past 3 months and am ready to buy another one. Is a year of good use typical?
I had the same issue, took it to the Apple Store and explained the need for frequent recharges. They agreed it was not normal and replaced it.
 


One little 2.4Ghz USB plug for keyboard and pointing device. Works on Mac and Linux, and I'm confident on Windows.
I have the same unified adaptor and can confirm that it works for multiple devices on Mac, Windows and Linux. On Windows and Mac, you can download the Unifying software as well as the solar keyboard software, which tells you how well the keyboard is charged/charging. from whatever light source is available. I also like the feel of the Logitech K-750 keyboard much better than the feel of the current Apple Bluetooth keyboard that can't solar-charge.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I also like the feel of the Logitech K-750 keyboard much better than the feel of the current Apple Bluetooth keyboard that can't solar-charge.
I absolutely love the Logitech K-750 solar keyboard with its Mac layout and lovely key feel. I liked it so much, I bought a second one. There are two limitations, though, which ended up being factors for me: 1) there is no backlighting, and 2) it doesn't have Bluetooth.
 


I've actually had some trouble with the Unifying Receivers in High Sierra and Mojave (or maybe it's an iMac Pro/T2 thing). Either way, USB Overdrive won't detect my mouse unless I switch the receiver to a different port after boot, or power cycle the port that it's plugged into on a USB hub. For whatever reason there's something about having it plugged in at boot that it doesn't like.

Also, even though the receiver is only 18 inches away from my mouse, if I have other USB cables with data going through them, or charging, or if I set my metal drink cup in the line of sight, the mouse skips and stutters as if I was trying to use it on a glass table. I can mostly work around these issues, but I can't say it's an "it just works" experience.
 


I absolutely love the Logitech K-750 solar keyboard with its Mac layout and lovely key feel. I liked it so much, I bought a second one. There are two limitations, though, which ended up being factors for me: 1) there is no backlighting, and 2) it doesn't have Bluetooth.
And it doesn't have a Caps Lock LED, so you don't know that's on until you look up.
 




And it doesn't have a Caps Lock LED, so you don't know that's on until you look up.
I'm not specifically familiar with this keyboard, but if it works like other Apple keyboards, you can turn off the caps lock option in preferences. I always do this so as to not accidentally start SHOUTING.
 


I absolutely love the Logitech K-750: 1) there is no backlighting, and 2) it doesn't have Bluetooth.
And it doesn't have a Caps Lock LED, so you don't know that's on until you look up.
The wireless Logitech K800 currently $58.50 on Amazon is rechargeable via MicroUSB, and a full charge lasts me for weeks when I remember to turn it off when I shut down or am to be away for hours. By default, the backlight isn't constantly on, though there's a variety of settings to change its behavior and brightness.

I'm also a touch-typist, but I've never mind-mapped function keys, arrow keys, other computer accessory keys. When "driving" the computer connected to the TV in the home theater, backlighting is a real help. Same when using a Mac to watch YouTube videos in a computer room darkened to improve that experience

The K800 uses two replaceable NH-Mi rechargeable AA batteries easily accessed by removing one small phillips-head screw.

Its "feel" is similar to the white polycarb iMac keyboards 2003-2007. I found a seller with a large supply of those used but in good condition and bought several and use them daily. I find my finger joints aching after extended use of thin keyboards with little key travel / spring.

As to touch-typing, I used to be very fast, and proud of it. Humility increased when I lost a type-off to a college dorm-mate who learned the two finger technique while working in high school at a local newspaper. Amazing how fast he could accurately transcribe text from a book.
 



And that's a Windows keyboard, so a no-go for me. (Yes, I've tried one, and, yes, I changed settings to accommodate it, but, no, it didn't work for me and my hard-coded Mac keyboard shortcut neurons.)
A Windows keyboard would slow your productivity. But if you have, e.g., a Mini running as a home theater server, the K800 could be a good and economical choice.
 


And that's a Windows keyboard, so a no-go for me. (Yes, I've tried one, and, yes, I changed settings to accomodate it, but, no, it didn't work for me and my hard-coded Mac keyboard shortcut neurons.)
What's the issue here? The biggest difference I've noticed between Windows and Mac keyboards is that the positions of the Alt/Option and Windows/Command keys are swapped.

Have you tried configuring macOS to swap them? In system preferences (Keyboard -> Keyboard -> Modifier Keys) you can specify what the caps lock, control, option and command keys do. Swapping command and option should move the keys of a Windows keyboard to where you like them. (And depending on the keyboard, you might be able to physically swap the caps as well.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
What's the issue here?
The "issue" for my personal productivity is that the keyboards are different. The meta-keys are different sizes, along with the different layouts and labels and functions. Take a careful look for yourself at a Mac keyboard vs. a Windows keyboard and how the keys themselves differ.
Have you tried configuring macOS to swap them? In system preferences (Keyboard -> Keyboard -> Modifier Keys) you can specify what the caps lock, control, option and command keys do. Swapping command and option should move the keys of a Windows keyboard to where you like them.
I guess I wasn't clear enough in my original post. Yes, I tried that. No, it's not the same. I wish it were, because then I'd have a lot more keyboard choices.

Of course, switching between Windows and Mac systems is even worse, because then the keyboard shortcuts aren't even the same. (Linux sometimes offers a choice of Mac and Windows styles, but probably isn't exactly the same as either.)

Other people may not be as dependent on Mac keyboard shortcuts and keys as I am for full productivity, but it's a significant "issue" for me with 35 years of ingrained usage.
 


Horizontal scrolling drives me nuts. In a spreadsheet, you can suddenly find yourself somewhere else with a random movement!
Some time ago, I was asking about a replacement for MagicPrefs, which I use to disable horizontal scrolling; the developer was no longer updating the app, and I expected it might not work in the future, although it works on Mojave 10.14.6.

I had tried BetterTouchTool but could never get it to work to disable horizontal scrolling.

I have long used Smart Scroll and wondered if it could be used for this but didn’t know how to set it up. So I contacted the developer, Marc Moini, who stepped me through the process, which I include for anybody who might be interested:

1) under Scroll Wheel+ or under Multi-Touch+, click on X axis scroll to enable it​
2) on the right side of that check box, click on the pop-up menu and select Slower (instead of Faster)​
3) drag the slider all the way to the right, and the multiplier will be 0x​

This can be set up to apply to all applications or specific applications. So far, it seems to works perfectly. Thanks to Marc Moini.
 


Smart Scroll is a really good piece of software and the developer is very responsive and helpful. For me it's a recommended product.
 


After working fine for a year, my Apple Magic Mouse will no longer maintain a connection with my 2018 MacBook Pro. The cursor will start to severely lag, and I can barely use the mouse.

Power-cycling the mouse works for a while, but the problem inevitably returns. I know there are possible interference issues, and I have tried repositioning the 2018 MacBook Pro (used in clamshell mode) to no avail. My Apple wireless keyboard has had no issues.

I don't know if this is an age (of the mouse, not me) -related thing, but I am thinking I should try another wireless mouse, maybe one that does not use Bluetooth. I am not a trackball fan. Any recommendations, MacInTouch readers?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
After working fine for a year, my Apple Magic Mouse will no longer maintain a connection with my 2018 MacBook Pro. The cursor will start to severely lag, and I can barely use the mouse. ... Any recommendations, MacInTouch readers?
I can testify from long experience to all kinds of miserable problems with interference and other problems affecting Bluetooth mice (and keyboards). Some related notes:
  • This sounds very much like an interference problem, or a battery problem.
  • If the battery is good, I'd try disconnecting and removing all USB, Thunderbolt and video/display devices to see if the problem disappears.
  • I suppose you could also have problems with interference from other kinds of devices - cordless phones, smartphones, maybe even microwave ovens, LED bulbs, ham radio, neighbors' devices, etc.
  • Wired USB peripherals can be a beautiful thing, but I've been unable to find a wired mouse as good as what I personally consider to be the greatest mouse ever, the Logitech M720 Triathlon. (I've tried many others.)
  • The M720 Triathlon can use either Bluetooth or the included Logitech Unifying Receiver, a WiFi 'dongle' that's vastly superior to Bluetooth... except... there are some unresolved security issues. (It's not clear how much impact this vulnerability has for different scenarios and configurations.)
  • Because of that vulnerability, I got a Contour Designs wired mouse. Contour Designs had the best mice I ever encountered prior to the Logitech Triathlon, and the Contour Mouse is available either wired or wireless. (The wireless version may have the same security issues as the Logitech, but this is completely unclear.) It comes in different sizes to fit different hands. With shipping, I paid $67 for the wired version. I miss the free-scrolling wheel and other features of the Triathon, and the Contour mouse refuses to wake from deep sleep until it's unplugged and plugged back in again, but it otherwise works well and, most importantly, doesn't cause me wrist pain, because its springs are not overly stiff, like so many others are, including the Magic Mouse. That's critical for me and completely ruled out the Magic Mouse option. You should have a lot more choices, if that's not an issue for you.
 


I can testify from long experience to all kinds of miserable problems with interference and other problems affecting Bluetooth mice (and keyboards).
We have about 30 Apple wireless Bluetooth mice in operation at the office. Over half of them are the newer, rechargeable Magic Mouse 2, the balance the original Magic Mouse model with removable batteries. We've never experienced interference, a failure to connect, or outright device failure. They may eventually wear out, though, as the skids on the bottom get too worn or too grungy for optimum use. (Yes, I do clean them, but there are limits.) Due to the elimination of wire snagging and dragging, a good wireless mouse is infinitely preferable to the wired version [for me], although not necessarily to a trackball for those who prefer that approach.

About a third of our keyboards, and increasing, are now the Apple Magic Keyboard (rechargeable with numerical keypad). Our wired keyboards tend to start developing random single key failures after a few years of heavy use and get replaced. Commonly hit keys also see their markings fade away. Bluetooth keyboard reliability has been good, with the caveat that the relative newness of Apple's product means that neither the sample size nor the time in service allow drawing as firm a conclusion. The general case for a wireless keyboards isn't as compelling as for the mouse, although an untethered keyboard is especially convenient for a laptop.

The ability of Apple's Magic keyboards and mice to pair (and recharge) via a Lightning-to-USB cable connection to the host Mac is the killer feature compared to conventional Bluetooth setups. This is especially true in an office setting, where there are likely to be a half dozen other Bluetooth devices within range.

Bonus application: I use a surplus Apple Magic Keyboard (shorty version with no numeric keypad) with my Apple TV at home. Terrifically helpful!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
We have about 30 Apple wireless Bluetooth mice in operation at the office. Over half of them are the newer, rechargeable Magic Mouse 2, the balance the original Magic Mouse model with removable batteries. We've never experienced interference, a failure to connect, or outright device failure.
  • Do you have USB 3 storage devices connected to these computers, also? (If so, what brand/model devices?)
  • Are you using WiFi or Ethernet connections?
My limited experience with Apple Bluetooth devices has been:
  • An early Apple wireless trackpad had no visual indicators, had a bunch of problems and was incompatible and unsupported with newer Apple products! Bad!
  • A Magic Mouse and Magic Keyboard bundled with a 2017 iMac refurb work well, and I'm using the keyboard, but the mouse is unusable for me because of its anti-ergonomic design. (It also lacks features of the Logitech M720 Triathon that I use heavily.)
  • Pairing definitely works better with the Apple devices (and their proprietary support) than with third-party Bluetooth devices.
  • I prefer batteries to special charging requirements/arrangements, especially when they're so idiotic that you can't even use a mouse while charging it. (By contrast, I use a Logitech Bluetooth wireless keyboard that's plugged into a USB hub for power.)
I agree that it's nice to eliminate wires, but it's also critical to be able to control the computer at startup (e.g. Option boot), which may require a wired connection. I also really dislike having to wait for Bluetooth pairing before I can type or use a mouse, even if it's only a few seconds of delay.
 


  • Do you have USB 3 storage devices connected to these computers, also? (If so, what brand/model devices?)
  • Are you using WiFi or Ethernet connections?
My limited experience with Apple Bluetooth devices has been:
  • An early Apple wireless trackpad had no visual indicators, had a bunch of problems and was incompatible and unsupported with newer Apple products! Bad!
  • A Magic Mouse and Magic Keyboard bundled with a 2017 iMac refurb work well, and I'm using the keyboard, but the mouse is unusable for me because of its anti-ergonomic design. (It also lacks features of the Logitech M720 Triathon that I use heavily.)
  • Pairing definitely works better with the Apple devices (and their proprietary support) than with third-party Bluetooth devices.
  • I prefer batteries to special charging requirements/arrangements, especially when they're so idiotic that you can't even use a mouse while charging it. (By contrast, I use a Logitech Bluetooth wireless keyboard that's plugged into a USB hub for power.)
I agree that it's nice to eliminate wires, but it's also critical to be able to control the computer at startup (e.g. Option boot), which may require a wired connection. I also really dislike having to wait for Bluetooth pairing before I can type or use a mouse, even if it's only a few seconds of delay.
Yes, we have quite a few USB storage devices in use, but all are ad hoc rather than any kind of planned arrangement. Various makes/models, almost all 2.5" size, some directly connected, some via a dock (laptops). We do have quite a few WD My Passport external drives, but it really depends on when they were bought, or by whom. In our business (full service ad agency) external drives are like Bic pens. One person puts it down, another picks it up.

All our users have both WiFi and ethernet connections available, with the latter encouraged for obvious reasons.

Re ergonomics, we'll buy anything our people want (hint: the novelty of standing desks turns out to wear off quickly...). I've only ever had two users who weren't happy with the Apple mouse. One used a multi-button Logitech economic trackball for several years, but surprisingly has since reverted to the Apple mouse; the other liked the external Apple Magic Trackpad. But mouse ergonomics is a 100% personal thing, just like keyboard feel.

Yes, the can't-use-it-while-you-charge-it aspect of the Apple Magic Mouse 2 is obviously idiotic — right until you use one, at which point it becomes a non-issue. Seriously, our people couldn't care less. Firstly, there's an on-screen warning when the battery runs low. Then, if you actually let it run out, a quick 5-minute charge while you take a break gives another half day of use. A full overnight charge gives you up to 30 days use. Most of our people just leave their mice plugged in to recharge over the weekend.

In an office context, I prefer the rechargeable mouse to having to keep track of a bunch of rechargeable AA batteries and their little chargers, which have a tendency to turn up missing just when you need them most. A 5-minute recharge compares very favorably to that.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Due to the elimination of wire snagging and dragging, a good wireless mouse is infinitely preferable to the wired version...
In an office context, I prefer the rechargeable mouse to having to keep track of a bunch of rechargeable AA batteries and their little chargers...
So, instead of batteries, everyone has USB-Lightning cables hanging around their desks, or do they have to go off searching for one of those when their mouse dies?
 


So, instead of batteries, everyone has USB-Lightning cables hanging around their desks, or do they have to go off searching for one of those when their mouse dies?
No — People need Lightning-USB charging cables for their iPhones anyway. Each Apple keyboard and mouse comes with its own Lightning cable in the box, and since you only need one cable per workstation to handle all a user's devices, the office ends up with a substantial net surplus of those cables. They stay permanently plugged in to each user's Mac or dock, so they don't tend to wander off.
 


it's also critical to be able to control the computer at startup (e.g. Option boot), which may require a wired connection.
This is certainly a good point and I try to keep at least a few wired keyboards (and mice!) around for this task, but the most recent Apple wireless keyboards that charge with a Lightning cable seem to work as a wired keyboard when they are plugged in.

In most offices I support, they mostly stay plugged in unless someone wants to charge their iDevice using the Lightning cable.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This is certainly a good point and I try to keep at least a few wired keyboards (and mice!) around for this task, but the most recent Apple wireless keyboards that charge with a Lightning cable seem to work as a wired keyboard when they are plugged in.
That's an important note. If the device supports both USB and Bluetooth data, it's a big advantage over those that only support wireless connectivity, even if they have a USB port for power, only (which is the case for the Logitech K811 Bluetooth Mac keyboard, a discontinued favorite of mine).
 


I dislike the Apple Magic Mouse (its fit feels too small, and the scrolling feels awkward/sans feedback) and prefer the Logitech wireless mice. The issue with Logitech is you need a free USB legacy port, since they have yet to release a USB-C version.

If you have the corded keyboard (yes, do have the USB keyboard for booting keyboard commands like PRAM reset), the little USB transceiver fits nicely in the external USB ports on the keyboard’s side. Don't forget it’s there... as I have! And you should realize the Logitech transceiver can need firmware updates for security issues (at least one that I recall).

But the one annoyance about Apple Magic Mouse design is that the battery is rechargeable, non-replaceable and requires the Lightning cable to plug in the bottom (making it useless while charging). Why not make the port on the front (like a corded mouse)? Or make the Magic Mouse magically wireless charging? Why not have a mouse pad that doubles as the charger? I swear Apple isn't cutting-edge....
 


The issue with Logitech is you need a free USB legacy port, since they have yet to release a USB-C version.
I thought the Logitech mice could be attached directly via Bluetooth, even without the USB dongle. Both my MX Anywhere 2S and MX Master do (just need a little socket in the mouse to store the little USB receiver so that I don’t lose it).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I thought the Logitech mice could be attached directly via Bluetooth, even without the USB dongle. Both my MX Anywhere 2S and MX Master do...
The same for the M720 Triathlon (which has a convenient storage place for the WiFi dongle when it’s not used). This offers an alternative to the WiFi security issue.
 


I thought the Logitech mice could be attached directly via Bluetooth, even without the USB dongle. Both my MX Anywhere 2S and MX Master do (just need a little socket in the mouse to store the little USB receiver so that I don’t lose it).
Depends entirely on the model. Some are Bluetooth and some use a proprietary radio interface.
 


... But the one annoyance about Apple Magic Mouse design is that the battery is rechargeable, non-replaceable and requires the Lightning cable to plug in the bottom (making it useless while charging). Why not make the port on the front (like a corded mouse)? Or make the Magic Mouse magically wireless charging? Why not have a mouse pad that doubles as the charger? I swear Apple isn't cutting-edge....
I have an HP-branded "Spectre" wireless mouse, which is rechargeable. The port is located on the front of the mouse so it's still quite useable while recharging. Why Apple can't figure this out, or doesn't want to, is beyond me.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Depends entirely on the model. Some are Bluetooth and some use a proprietary radio interface.
And some have both, like Logitech's M720 Triathlon, which you can instantly switch among three different Bluetooth or WiFi connections (with a WiFi transcever included, which fits in a recess within the mouse for storage when not in use).
 


I have an HP-branded "Spectre" wireless mouse, which is rechargeable. The port is located on the front of the mouse so it's still quite useable while recharging. Why Apple can't figure this out, or doesn't want to, is beyond me.
I am 99% certain that Apple made this choice deliberately in order to prevent use while charging.

Why they thought this is a good idea is beyond me. The only thing I can think of is that there's some kind of design flaw that would prevent use while charging and they did this to ensure that nobody finds out. To which, if true, I would reply "then fix your brain-dead design".

The only other reason I can think of is that they were able to make the circuit board smaller and cheaper by locating the connector on the bottom. But that's, in my opinion, an even dumber reason.
 



I have an HP-branded "Spectre" wireless mouse, which is rechargeable. The port is located on the front of the mouse so it's still quite useable while recharging. Why Apple can't figure this out, or doesn't want to, is beyond me.
I am 99% certain that Apple made this choice deliberately in order to prevent use while charging.
I actually did not know about this charging arrangement. I guess I had the first generation Magic Mouse, since it had removable (rechargeable) batteries. I already chucked it and am using an older, "scroll pea" mouse that I keep on hand for a wired option while I am looking for a replacement. I have another first generation Magic Mouse at home that does not exhibit any dropped or laggy connections.

Any Magic Trackpad aficionados? I do occasional CAD work and have always preferred a mouse for this work, but I do like the gestures afforded by the Magic Mouse and Trackpad.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
We have about 30 Apple wireless Bluetooth mice in operation at the office. Over half of them are the newer, rechargeable Magic Mouse 2, the balance the original Magic Mouse model with removable batteries. We've never experienced interference...
It's nice that you never had a problem, but it's actually a big enough issue that Apple has created support documents to describe the problems:
Apple Support said:
If your Apple wireless mouse, keyboard, or trackpad isn't working as expected
...
Check for signal interference
  • Wireless networks that operate on 2.4GHz may cause interference. Move cordless phone base stations, microwave ovens, and other 2.4GHz electrical devices away from your Mac if you suspect interference.
  • Keep wireless devices within 10 meters (approximately 30 feet) of your Mac.
  • Avoid putting metal objects between your wireless device and your Mac.
Apple Support said:
Use Apple Pencil with your iPad or iPad Pro
...
If you're charging your Apple Pencil (2nd generation) with your iPad Pro and your car's keyless entry device (key fob) is nearby, signal interference might prevent you from unlocking your car with your key fob.
See also this Intel document, among many other references:
Intel said:
USB 3.0 Radio Frequency Interference on 2.4 GHz Devices
The purpose of this document is to create an awareness of radio frequency interference to wireless devices operating in the 2.4 GHz ISM band as a result of certain USB 3.0 devices and cables. This is a guide to customers of the USB 3.0 RFI mitigation options that are available.
 


I have two each of a Magic Keyboard and Magic Mouse 2 on my desk at home, where I have a 2019 MacBook Pro (for work) next to my personal 2018 MacBook Pro. No cordless phones in the house and the microwave is at least 60' away. Both keyboards and both mice constantly lose connection. It's really frustrating.

What's more frustrating is having to type my login password twice every stinkin' time, because the keyboard doesn't recognize the first few keypresses on boot. I try to remember to hit the space bar a few times right after powering up to wake up the keyboard.

The so-called Magic Mouse 2 is an ergonomic nightmare ("user hostile," as we used to say). Uncomfortable to hold, and it often does not register attempts to scroll without multiple tries. And when I try to click something, it misregisters my finger moving as an attempt to scroll (always works in this use case!), which means the pointer moves slightly on screen right before I click - which often leads to incorrect inputs.

I much prefer the wired "pea ball" mouse, except there's no way to clean the ball, and I have several in the junk drawer that became completely unresponsive.

And don't get me started on how poor my typing has gotten as Apple presses ever-closer to completely flat-plane keyboards. I spend more time correcting typos than typing any more.

Apple products are so far from Jobs' "bicycle for the mind" idea these days - they're more like a never-ending series of roadblocks.
 


It's nice that you never had a problem, but it's actually a big enough issue that Apple has created support documents to describe the problems:
See also this Intel document, among many other references:
Deja vu all over again! The Intel report was one reason I was an early adopter of the OWC Thunderbay IV enclosure and ceased using an array of USB3 drive enclosures connected via a USB3 hub. Many problems went away (along with lots of USB and AC wiring).

Section 4.3 of the Intel paper suggests that those tiny wireless receivers probably work better away from the chassis even without the USB3 problems.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
What's more frustrating is having to type my login password twice every stinkin' time, because the keyboard doesn't recognize the first few keypresses on boot. I try to remember to hit the space bar a few times right after powering up to wake up the keyboard.
For what little it's worth, hitting the Shift key is probably the best option for trying to wake these things from their stupor so that we can eventually enter passwords, as the Shift key won't enter any characters into the password field.
 


I am 99% certain that Apple made this choice deliberately in order to prevent use while charging. ...
I've long been convinced of that, too, and, like all of us, I have no way of knowing what the reason is. If anyone wants to see the Magic Mouse 2's innards, the awesomely destructive folks at iFixit have of course done a teardown:

I like David Charlap's hypothesis. Here's another one:

Because the top sensing surface dips down at both ends, the Apple Magic Mouse in either of its versions actually has no front or rear vertical edges. Without a significant redesign to add something like a "port bump" at the front, there's nowhere to put a horizontal-facing port to allow wired use.

From the iFixit photos it's also apparent that the space behind where a port bump would go is already occupied by the optical sensor assembly, which had been moved farther forward in the Magic Mouse 2 than in the original version, to maximize space for the new battery. Moving the sensor to where it used to be would force a reduction in battery size and capacity. Apple likely didn't want to do any of those things, decided that the Magic Mouse 2's rapid charge recovery ability obviated any need for wired use and so put the Lightning port on the bottom at the near end, where there was room for it.

As it happens my own Magic Mouse 2 is down to 12% charge, so out of curiosity I plugged it in for a timed 5 minutes while I cleaned up after lunch. Now it's up to 18%, which would do for several days of my use. Pretty good.
 


Any Magic Trackpad aficionados? I do occasional CAD work and have always preferred a mouse for this work, but I do like the gestures afforded by the Magic Mouse and Trackpad.
Here is a tip that might save you hours of screaming frustration!

Do not store your unused trackpad in a closet, with batteries installed, turned on, and with something on top of it that makes it be in the "clicked" state. The iMac it was paired with on the other side of the house was unusable, since it was always in the "clicked" state, and we could not figure out why.

A good habit to develop is to remove batteries from unused devices and turn off unused devices that have non-removable batteries.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
As it happens my own Magic Mouse 2 is down to 12% charge, so out of curiosity I plugged it in for a timed 5 minutes while I cleaned up after lunch. Now it's up to 18%, which would do for several days of my use. Pretty good.
I can pop a new AA battery in the Logitech Triathlon in less than a minute, and it's good for months of heavy use.
 


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