MacInTouch Amazon link...

iOS12

Channels
Apple, Security, Products
I had to reset my network settings on iOS devices following the update, in order to restore reliable 5GHz connections.
When you reset your network settings, did you do any more than "Forget This Network", as Steve Elman did?

Unfortunately, our network has a long password that I regret every time I have to try typing it in on those little iPhone keys... :-}

A possible work-around might be to turn-off "Auto-Join" for the 2GHz access point, but that had never been a problem before.

I'll give being "forgetful" a try (I seem to be good at that lately... ;-)

Thanks, all.
 



The 12.0.1 update seems to have done something horrible to both FaceTime and Skype; I can't do video calling at all via WiFi (well, I can do it, perhaps, but I don't see or hear anything much), but it works perfectly well using cellular. But that is not on every WiFi, so it must have something to do with how we interface with a particular router and its setting.
Okay, it's even weirder than I thought. The trouble is if both I and my interlocutor are using WiFi. If one of us — either of us — switches to cell, the call works.
 


Elsewhere, Ric talked about unwanted "features" of iOS that cannot be turned off. Here's another.

I upgraded my iPad Pro to iOS 12.0. If the iPad has Do Not Disturb turned on, there's a large warning in a black box splayed across the lock screen, hiding part of the wallpaper. You can swipe to remove the warning, but it comes back the next time. I stumbled across the hide-and-seek feature that if you long-press the warning, you get the option "Turn Off," but this turns off Do Not Disturb, rather than the warning.

As far as I've been able to figure out, after some consultation, there's no way to get rid of that warning permanently.

How dumb does Apple think I am?
 


As far as I've been able to figure out, after some consultation, there's no way to get rid of that warning permanently.
On "The Committed" blog, Kirk McElhearn mentioned that when you long-press the warning, besides the "Turn Off" button, there's also a small circle with an X to the right of the banner. Pressing this X turns off the warning without turning off Do Not Disturb...
but only for a half an hour or so. After that, the warning message returns.

Now I'm really confused.
 


I upgraded my iPad Pro to iOS 12.0. If the iPad has Do Not Disturb turned on, there's a large warning in a black box splayed across the lock screen, hiding part of the wallpaper. You can swipe to remove the warning, but it comes back the next time. ...
As unofficial tech support person where I work, I can't begin to tell you the number of times I've been asked to fix a phone where "all my calls go to voice mail instead of ringing", with the fix being to turn off "do not disturb" mode.

Perhaps a big warning banner that can't be disabled isn't such a bad idea after all. Obviously, the crescent-moon icon in the status bar isn't enough.
 


Perhaps a big warning banner that can't be disabled isn't such a bad idea after all. Obviously, the crescent-moon icon in the status bar isn't enough.
The uses of an iPad and an iPhone are generally very different. There are undoubtedly exceptions, but I think most of us don't rely on the iPad as the primary device to answer phone calls. I prefer to not have my iPad make a sound when it is not in use.

This may sound trivial, but I have a nice family photo as my wallpaper and I enjoy seeing a brief flash of it before my iPad unlocks. Having the banner splayed across it spoils it completely. (It is not set as my desktop for the same reason - looking at it under a sea of icons makes no sense.)

I also have some reservations about Apple forcing something upon us when it comes to a matter of convenience. I'm not convinced that "Apple knows best" for everyone.

All I'm asking for is the ability to turn it off if I want to. I'd have no problem with the default being the warning turned on.
 



I have confirmed a bug in iOS 12.1 on my iPhone Xs Max (and iPad Air 2). I use keyboard text replacements for things like Instagram and Twitter hashtags, and replies to some emails. Some of my text replacement shortcuts are quite long (a paragraph or so). I noticed that some stopped working after updating to 12.1 yesterday.

I have confirmed that if a text replacement shortcut is longer than 128 characters, it is no longer recognized for auto-replacement. These all worked fine in iOS 12.0.1 (before the update). I've reported this to Apple and have a case open.
 


I have confirmed a bug in iOS 12.1 on my iPhone Xs Max (and iPad Air 2). I use keyboard text replacements for things like Instagram and Twitter hashtags, and replies to some emails. Some of my text replacement shortcuts are quite long (a paragraph or so). I noticed that some stopped working after updating to 12.1 yesterday.

I have confirmed that if a text replacement shortcut is longer than 128 characters, it is no longer recognized for auto-replacement. These all worked fine in iOS 12.0.1 (before the update). I've reported this to Apple and have a case open.
Thanks for this! I just checked as I have several large text replacements well over 128 characters and, sure enough, they do not work. I use them for things I need to repeatedly state for my clients. I hope that is fixed soon.
 


This may help someone. Updated my iPhone 7 Plus to iOS 12.1 via Apple Configurator on High Sierra, but got an error and the iPhone was bricked. Would not start up and hung with just the Apple logo and no progress bar. I followed all the support documentation on Apple Support, hard restart, use iTunes to update, then to recover, but nothing worked. Same hang. I then chatted with Apple Support and they told me to do all the same things I just did. No fix, of course. I scheduled an appointment with the Apple Store in 4 days (ouch!).

Then, I thought more about it and figured it out myself. Since the update to iOS 12.1 from iOS 12.0.1 was done via Apple Configurator, when the iPhone was bricked, the instructions on Apple's site and from the advisor was to use iTunes to update or restore. That won't work. So I tried the recovery via Apple Configurator; it worked. I saw no mention of this on Apple Support or from the advisor. So I gave feedback to Apple on it.

Very bad integration, Apple. Was that a test case you tried? Guessing it wasn't, but it was important. It is not mentioned anywhere and the advisors don't seem to know about it. Why don't iTunes and Apple Configurator work better together? I'm a very unhappy customer dealing with such basic bugs. Clearly all use cases are not being considered and software is rushed out. Wishing even more for less features and more it-just-works.

Hope this does help someone who updates apps via Apple Configurator, but has to sync data via iTunes and gets offered functionality for backups and updating iOS that looks the same between them, but apparently isn't.
 


So I read the Forbes article by Gordon Kelly regarding iOS 12.1. It mentions WiFi connectivity issues, but doesn't mention any specific models that are affected by said issues. Here, I see specific references to the XS. I have a 6 Plus. Is there a broader issue causing WiFi problems, or is my device simply not affected? I'm trying to decide whether I should make the jump from 12.0 to 12.1, having skipped 12.0.1 entirely. Thanks!
 


So I read the Forbes article by Gordon Kelly regarding iOS 12.1. It mentions WiFi connectivity issues, but doesn't mention any specific models that are affected by said issues. Here, I see specific references to the XS. I have a 6 Plus. Is there a broader issue causing WiFi problems, or is my device simply not affected? I'm trying to decide whether I should make the jump from 12.0 to 12.1, having skipped 12.0.1 entirely. Thanks!
WiFi using my iPhone 5SE works just fine. iOS 12.1
 


A weird one ... since the IOS 12.1 update, audio on CarPlay is a pain ... audio cuts out, but the timer bar keeps moving. I've restarted my iPhone XS Max, set the car (Acura 2018 TLX) back to factory defaults and re-enabled CarPlay. Changed USB cables ... still happening. Any ideas?
 


... since the IOS 12.1 update ... audio cuts out, but the timer bar keeps moving...
No issues with my CarPlay, but I have a different make. Try an Acura forum to see if other drivers have any issues, as it's most likely a compatibility issue, not a complete CarPlay-is-broken issue. If others have the issue, definitely submit a bug to Apple. If it's just you, you can still submit a bug, but it's not likely to get looked at...
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
But will it (or any other app) let you load those backed up apps onto a new iPhone if the apps are no longer available in the App Store?
iMazing may (though I haven't specifically tested this):
iMazing said:
Manage and Download Apps (.ipa) without iTunes

iMazing's app library contains the following:
  • Apps that are on your device. Installed apps display a checkmark in the Installed column.
  • Apps that have been on the device at one time. These apps display a cloud icon in the Download column; you can click this icon to quickly download an app.
  • Apps that iMazing has downloaded. If you've already downloaded any apps with iMazing, they are stored on your computer so you can re-install them, if you need to, on the current device or on another device.
 



I finally got sick of the incessant nagging and upgraded both my iPhone and my iPad to iOS 12. Only afterward did I discover that this "upgrade" rendered both devices incapable of syncing with my mid-2012 MacBook Pro running High Sierra 10.13.6. This has left me with no viable choice but to "upgrade" my laptop to Mojave, something I was loathe to do because the mandatory concomitant transition from HFS+ to APFS would have a significant adverse impact on the performance of its aftermarket 1TB hard drive. So now, having been roped into making the switch, I'm going to buy an aftermarket 1TB SSD and transition to Mojave so that I can continue to use my other devices without limitation. While SSDs are much less expensive than they were even a couple of years ago, it was money I wasn't intending or expecting to spend as I was completely satisfied with the performance of my existing combination of hardware and software.

I began using Apple products when I first got my hands on a Mac IIx at work in 1990, and it was nothing short of a revelation. I have used Apple products at home exclusively ever since. For years I was happy to pay more for something that was truly better than the competition, but in my opinion that is no longer the case. While Apple products remain significantly more expensive, they no longer offer the unparalleled quality and ease-of-use that once distinguished them from the rest of the field. I'm sorry that it's come to this, but I've bought my last Apple product. I guess the Kool-Aid has at long last been purged from my system.
 


I finally got sick of the incessant nagging and upgraded both my iPhone and my iPad to iOS 12. Only afterward did I discover that this "upgrade" rendered both devices incapable of syncing with my mid-2012 MacBook Pro running High Sierra 10.13.6. This has left me with no viable choice but to "upgrade" my laptop to Mojave.
Since September I have been syncing an iPhone 6S, iPhone XS, and iPad Pro 10.5", all with iOS 12 installed, using iTunes 12.6.5 on a Mac Mini running High Sierra 10.13.6. What message did you receive when you attempted to sync after installing iOS 12? Have you tried installing iTunes 12.6.5, which retains App Store functionality?
 


What message did you receive when you attempted to sync after installing iOS 12? Have you tried installing iTunes 12.6.5, which retains App Store functionality?
The exact wording of the alert: "A software update is required to connect to your iOS device. Would you like to download and install this update now?"

My MacBook Pro is running iTunes 12.8.0, not 12.6.5, so that would seem to be the cause of my problem. It's not clear what the nature of the aforementioned software update is, but it certainly sounds like a macOS upgrade rather than an iTunes or other individual software component update. I did not want to chance being led down a path from which I could not deviate after discovering that I had no choice but to proceed with an unwanted update.

I am tired of having to play games (like downgrading iTunes) to get my computer and my other Apple devices to play nice with each other. It shouldn't be this difficult. Apple's ease-of-use once separated them from the rest of the pack—now, not so much. Windows and Linux are pretty darn easy to use, too, and I don't have to jump through hoops with either of them to get them to work correctly.

I've been a software engineer for nearly 40 years, and while I'm certainly capable of spending an inordinate amount of time getting my Apple consumer products to work together seamlessly, it's beyond ridiculous that I should have to do so. I have far more important things in my life to spend my time and attention on. As I said before, the drug in Apple's Kool-Aid has finally worn off—the scales have at long last fallen from my eyes.
 



The exact wording of the alert: "A software update is required to connect to your iOS device. Would you like to download and install this update now?"

My MacBook Pro is running iTunes 12.8.0, not 12.6.5, so that would seem to be the cause of my problem. It's not clear what the nature of the aforementioned software update is, but it certainly sounds like a macOS upgrade rather than an iTunes or other individual software component update. I did not want to chance being led down a path from which I could not deviate after discovering that I had no choice but to proceed with an unwanted update.
That dialog box is generated by the MobileDeviceUpdater framework. Allowing it to proceed updates the underlying framework without installing other software on the Mac. I encounter this issue while running iTunes 12.6.5, and based on previous mentions on MacInTouch here and here, I allowed the update to proceed. Afterwards my iOS devices were able to connect to iTunes without issue.

In the interest of providing complete info regarding this issue for others who may run across it, Apple's not-particularly-informative support article says:
Apple said:
Click Install to download and install the software so your Mac can update or sync your iOS device.
And I found a Stack Exchange discussion that digs into the legitimacy of the alert dialog box, and eventually determines that it is generated by an Apple binary located here:
/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/MobileDevice.framework/Resources/MobileDeviceUpdater.app/Contents/MacOS/MobileDeviceUpdater
I can appreciate your frustration, but in this case the solution is to allow the software update to proceed, and the issue will be resolved.
 


That dialog box is generated by the MobileDeviceUpdater framework. Allowing it to proceed updates the underlying framework without installing other software on the Mac. I encounter this issue while running iTunes 12.6.5, and based on previous mentions on MacInTouch here and here, I allowed the update to proceed. Afterwards my iOS devices were able to connect to iTunes without issue.

In the interest of providing complete info regarding this issue for others who may run across it, Apple's not-particularly-informative support article says:


And I found a Stack Exchange discussion that digs into the legitimacy of the alert dialog box, and eventually determines that it is generated by an Apple binary located here:


I can appreciate your frustration, but in this case the solution is to allow the software update to proceed, and the issue will be resolved.
Once bitten, twice shy. A dozen times bitten... well, you get the picture. Apple software [now means] you never know what you’re going to get.
 


That dialog box is generated by the MobileDeviceUpdater framework. Allowing it to proceed updates the underlying framework without installing other software on the Mac. I encounter this issue while running iTunes 12.6.5, and based on previous mentions on MacInTouch here and here, I allowed the update to proceed. Afterwards my iOS devices were able to connect to iTunes without issue.

In the interest of providing complete info regarding this issue for others who may run across it, Apple's not-particularly-informative support article says:

And I found a Stack Exchange discussion that digs into the legitimacy of the alert dialog box, and eventually determines that it is generated by an Apple binary located here:

I can appreciate your frustration, but in this case the solution is to allow the software update to proceed, and the issue will be resolved.
I, too, had problems syncing after updating to iOS 12. After some agonizing, I allowed the software update to proceed on my computer (running Sierra and iTunes 12.8), and when it finished, I still had iTunes 12.8 on my computer. There were newly installed files that appeared to be related to Books (the app), so my guess(?) is that Books was the reason for the update. After the update I was able to sync normally without upgrading to either High Sierra or Mojave.
 


Armed with the knowledge obtained here, I bit the bullet and allowed the mystery update to proceed.

After it completed, I connected my iPhone to my MacBook Pro via USB. Inexplicably, iTunes kept offering/insisting that I download and install the same version of iOS that was already present on the phone, the very version whose installation a few days earlier had precipitated this entire unfortunate process.

I tried to comply but found myself stuck in a loop for a while, one that it seemed I was going to be unable to break out of gracefully. When confronted with the same sequence of dialogs for about the sixth or seventh time, in frustration I hit the escape key instead of the Cancel button and was rewarded with a successful exit from that particular software merry-go-round. iTunes then allowed me to sync and back up my iPhone with no further misbehavior.

I haven't connected my iPad yet, but I have no reason to believe that it won't be a successful endeavor... if not immediately, at least eventually. Oh, Apple. The thrill is gone, it's gone away for good.
 


After it completed, I connected my iPhone to my MacBook Pro via USB. Inexplicably, iTunes kept offering/insisting that I download and install the same version of iOS that was already present on the phone, the very version whose installation a few days earlier had precipitated this entire unfortunate process.
A few days after the initial release of iOS 12.1.2 for iPhones, Apple released a new build of iOS, going from build number 16C101 to 16C104 without changing the iOS version number. That is what you ran into.

As has become a habit with Apple, Apple could've done a better job explaining to users exactly what was happening. The confusion is made worse when the "Software Update" panel in the iOS Preferences app reports that your "software is up to date," but then iTunes on a Mac offers to update your software to a newer version.

Similarly, Apple should do a better job with the "MobileDeviceUpdater" issue mentioned earlier in this thread than present an unusual, strange-looking dialog box pop-up to tell you that a "software update is required to connect to your iOS device" and asking if you'd like to install it. The dialog box does not look like other software update notifications, and users are rightfully hesitant to click on unexpected "Install" buttons in this age of malware.

Apple used to be a company that had superlative documentation and abided (for the most part) by its own interface standards. That company seems to have disappeared.
 


I am on Sierra and just updated my iPhone to iOS 12.1.2. Well, the short story is that my iPhone will not show up on iTunes but does show up in Photos. Since I do not really use the phone for music and such, it is not a problem. However. it is a small issue to eliminate the iPhone from something that it uses from time to time. Glad I still have my iPod.
 


Amazon disclaimer:
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Latest posts