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This is apparently a pretty common practice now, I’ve seen this mentioned elsewhere. I think the caller either expects you to just call back or might call you back later. Too much time to spend leaving a message. I’ve had people send me a text telling me they had called (but didn’t leave a VM!).
That's really sad, because it is becoming increasingly common (thanks to the telemarketing industry, robo-calls and scammers) to never answer calls from unknown numbers.

If I get a call and iOS doesn't resolve the caller ID to something in my contacts list, I always reject the call. If they don't leave voice mail, I assume it was a telemarketer or scammer and ignore it.
 


A new-to-me problem:

iPhone 7, IOS 13.1.3, WiFi on, Cell Data usually off (because of a limited data plan).

The iPhone used to re-join my home WiFI when I arrived home from being wherever. Now, starting with one of the versions of IOS 13, it doesn't, and I have to go to settings and make it join my network.

I've checked the WiFi settings and they are correct. The program, WiFi Explorer, doesn't show any problems with the signal, channel, etc.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
An update on iOS 13 issues:

I'm currently running iOS 13.1.3 on two iPhones, both purchased in 2019 and both Apple refurbs, an iPhone SE and an iPhone X.

After testing iOS 13 on an iPhone 7, I cloned the system to an iPhone X 12 days ago. It had some problems (freezes and oddities, such as a screen rotation glitch) but is basically running OK now with normal battery life.

A few days after that, I backed up my very stable, primary iPhone SE and installed iOS 13 over iOS 12.4.1. This iPhone subsequently has much worse battery life than it had under iOS 12. I've jumped through all kinds of hoops and even taken such extreme measures as deleting a sports app I've long used on all my iPhones and even deleted Apple Music, which was flagged as sucking up battery power one day, though I have not played any music at all on this phone.

Battery life continues to be bad.

I thought maybe the battery drain was caused by Apple "curating" my rather large collection of photos, but the iPhone says it has finished that task, and I've left it plugged into power for long hours over a number of days.

I have no idea what in the world Apple is doing, but a formerly good, solid, stable iPhone is now a battery hog after updating from iOS 12.4.1 to iOS 13.1.3 for no discernable reason. Other people with iPhone SE's may want to hold off the iOS 13 update. I'd also be interested in hearing any related experiences or tips.
 


A new-to-me problem:
iPhone 7, IOS 13.1.3, WiFi on, Cell Data usually off (because of a limited data plan).
The iPhone used to re-join my home WiFI when I arrived home from being wherever. Now, starting with one of the versions of IOS 13, it doesn't, and I have to go to settings and make it join my network.
I've checked the WiFi settings and they are correct. The program, WiFi Explorer, doesn't show any problems with the signal, channel, etc.
Have you tried "Forgetting" your home network? When I have run into this problem, I have found that this often (sometimes?) will fix the problem. While I don't completely understand what is going on, I believe that doing this "reinitializes" the connection. It is easy enough to do, and, if it doesn't work, nothing is lost. Alternatively, you could clear all of your network settings (Settings > General > Reset > Reset Network Settings), but this would, of course, clear out any other settings you may wish to retain.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I have no idea what in the world Apple is doing, but a formerly good, solid, stable iPhone is now a battery hog after updating from iOS 12.4.1 to iOS 13.1.3 for no discernable reason. Other people with iPhone SE's may want to hold off the iOS 13 update. I'd also be interested in hearing any related experiences or tips.
I subsequently discovered that Apple had silently, behind my back and against my wishes, enabled a whole bunch of stuff on iCloud, including (yet again) Game Center. I've now turned that stuff off yet again.

Meanwhile, the Settings > Battery graphs have been showing no activity even as battery levels drop.
 


Have you tried "Forgetting" your home network? When I have run into this problem, I have found that this often (sometimes?) will fix the problem. While I don't completely understand what is going on, I believe that doing this "reinitializes" the connection. It is easy enough to do, and, if it doesn't work, nothing is lost. Alternatively, you could clear all of your network settings (Settings > General > Reset > Reset Network Settings), but this would, of course, clear out any other settings you may wish to retain.
"Forgetting" the network and re-entering the password, seems to have fixed it. I've just tried it. Thank you very much. I will see if it lasts.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... Meanwhile, the Settings > Battery graphs have been showing no activity even as battery levels drop.
OK, this iOS 13 battery drain issue is seriously obnoxious. As I noted, a previously stable, new iPhone SE on iOS 12 with 100% battery capacity now drains the battery rapidly under iOS 13.1.3 while not even being used.

For example: the phone was completely charged up, then all apps were quit, the screen was turned off, and the phone wasn't used. Many, many services have been turned off to save battery power, and it was set to Low Power Mode. In less than 8 hours, the battery drained 50%.

Meanwhile, an iPhone X, also running iOS 13.1.3, that was used sporadically for web browsing, email and photography lost less than 20% of its battery charge in 12 hours.
 


OK, this iOS 13 battery drain issue is seriously obnoxious. As I noted, a previously stable, new iPhone SE on iOS 12 with 100% battery capacity now drains the battery rapidly under iOS 13.1.3 while not even being used. For example: the phone was completely charged up, then all apps were quit, the screen was turned off, and the phone wasn't used. Many, many services have been turned off to save battery power, and it was set to Low Power Mode. In less than 8 hours, the battery drained 50%. Meanwhile, an iPhone X, also running iOS 13.1.3, that was used sporadically for web browsing, email and photography lost less than 20% of its battery charge in 12 hours.
My iPhone SE (ordered on release day) has been running iOS 13 since the first public beta with no battery issues. But then my Mac Pro has just been tripping when it's booted into Catalina...?

Try a factory wipe and restore? Did they forget to "refurb" your battery?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
My iPhone SE (ordered on release day) has been running iOS 13 since the first public beta with no battery issues.
Interesting. What's your battery capacity at this point (i.e. in percent)?
Try a factory wipe and restore? Did they forget to "refurb" your battery?
Of course that's (yet another time-consuming) option, but I'm trying to work through the problem methodically and haven't reached that step yet. The latest test was an attempt to run down the battery all the way to "recalibrate" it. At 50% I started running Geekbench and played some YouTube videos and turned up screen brightness to maximum for good measure. Shortly after I started that, and before the battery had drained much more, the iPhone hard-crashed into a reboot. Wow. At least it hadn't been that bad before, even on iOS 13. When it got itself rebooted, and I'd entered the passcode, it came up at 10% battery (with a warning). OK, the calibration/power management is obviously screwed up, jumping from about 40% to a hard crash and 10% remaining. So I decided to run the battery all the way down, again running Geekbench and YouTube. Then waiting. And waiting. And waiting. And... it stayed at "10%" until I ran out of patience and had to put it back on the charger to run a different app.

In the Settings > Battery graphs, I can see the battery decline from full charge to the point where it crashed and suddently dropped from 40% to 10% on reboot then stayed at 10% for an extended period, as I tried to drain the remainder. And, weirdly, it shows high activity while subsequently on the charger with hardly anything running.

Again, everything was fine until updating from iOS 12 to iOS 13, when it suddenly wasn't, and this unwanted "adventure" continues.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Again, everything was fine until updating from iOS 12 to iOS 13, when it suddenly wasn't, and this unwanted "adventure" continues.
Some online searches suggest a possible problem with iOS 13.1 when using watchOS 5, which is what I currently have, so the iOS 13 battery drain bug may be related to that. Testing continues.
 


Interesting. What's your battery capacity at this point (i.e. in percent)?
Try a factory wipe and restore? Did they forget to "refurb" your battery?
Of course that's (yet another time-consuming) option, but I'm trying to work through the problem methodically and haven't reached that step yet. The latest test was an attempt to run down the battery all the way to "recalibrate" it. At 50% I started running Geekbench and played some YouTube videos and turned up screen brightness to maximum for good measure. Shortly after I started that, and before the battery had drained much more, the iPhone hard-crashed into a reboot. Wow. At least it hadn't been that bad before, even on iOS 13. When it got itself rebooted, and I'd entered the passcode, it came up at 10% battery (with a warning). OK, the calibration/power management is obviously screwed up, jumping from about 40% to a hard crash and 10% remaining. So I decided to run the battery all the way down, again running Geekbench and YouTube. Then waiting. And waiting. And waiting. And... it stayed at "10%" until I ran out of patience and had to put it back on the charger to run a different app.

In the Settings > Battery graphs, I can see the battery decline from full charge to the point where it crashed and suddently dropped from 40% to 10% on reboot then stayed at 10% for an extended period, as I tried to drain the remainder. And, weirdly, it shows high activity while subsequently on the charger with hardly anything running.

Again, everything was fine until updating from iOS 12 to iOS 13, when it suddenly wasn't, and this unwanted "adventure" continues.
Capacity is at 95%. I can't remember the last time I had an actual iOS crash. I don't have an Apple Watch. My last charge was Wed., 2:34 PM. I am at 53% charge now (Sat., 9:06 AM).

FWIW, I am a light user. I don't really use the phone for much but phoning, and some texting. I don't keep music on it, just use it to control Sonos. Calendar and Contacts are syncing to my local server w/ CalDAV. On rare occasions I use it for directions.
 



Even worse, the spam call appears in notifications that call the spammer back when you touch the notification....
Assuming, of course, that the spammer's caller ID is actually valid. Although it occasionally is, usually those numbers are forged. If you call it, you tend to get either system errors (illegal phone number) or some innocent bystander who happens to have the forged phone number.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Forbes covers some issues with iOS 13 and new iPhones:
Gordon Kelly said:
Apple iOS 13.1.3 Is Causing Serious New iPhone Failures
Thanks to some great detective work by wccftech, we know that a serious problem in iOS 13.1.3 is causing the new Ultra Wideband U1 chip in the iPhone 11 series to fail. Moreover, some units cannot be repaired and owners are reporting that Apple had to replace their phones.
Gordon Kelly said:
Apple iOS 13 Has A Potentially Dangerous Call Problem For iPhone Users
In the last week, I’ve been contacted by several users about a bug in iOS 13 where activating a phone call via ‘Hey Siri’ forces it through the speakerphone - even if you have headphones connected. And the big-picture problem with this bug is it is not only frustrating but also potentially dangerous.

“I mainly use hey Siri in my car and it plays over my stereo Bluetooth for safety,” explains one user on Apple’s Communities Forum. “Now [a call] goes to speaker and I have to mess with it while driving which is VERY dangerous.” - source
#applequality
 


... After testing iOS 13 on an iPhone 7, I cloned the system to an iPhone X 12 days ago....
How are you cloning iOS versions from one phone to another? I need to clone an older iPhone 5S to an iPhone SE. I would presume I can save the iPhone 5S using iMazing and then restore from the iPhone 5S backup to the iPhone SE.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
How are you cloning iOS versions from one phone to another? I need to clone an older iPhone 5S to an iPhone SE. I would presume I can save the iPhone 5S using iMazing and then restore from the iPhone 5S backup to the iPhone SE.
That's exactly what I've been doing. But note:
  • iMazing depends on Apple software, which has some limitations.
  • iMazing will normally wipe your iPhone clean and install the latest possible iOS release from Apple's servers in this scenario.
  • Apps may/will be (re)downloaded from the cloud.
  • You won't be able to restore the iPhone SE to its previous software configuration after the newer iOS is installed (and you have no choice about any of that).
  • You have to re-add Apple Pay cards and re-do Touch ID fingerprints, passcode, etc.
  • You'll have to jump through multiple Apple ID authentication hoops that are even more demanding if you have 2FA enabled, which require that you also have physical access to other Apple devices authenticated to your Apple ID.
  • Apple will silently change your preferences to do things like enable Game Center and iCloud connections.
  • The update (e.g. to iOS 13) will also add a lot of new preference settings (e.g. for Siri).
  • So... you'll need to review all preferences after the update.
  • This all takes a lot of time, bandwidth, battery power, connectivity, hoop jumping, and... patience.
  • Afterwards, you can expect poor battery life for a long time (e.g. days), while Apple does behind-the-scenes processing (e.g. "curating" your photos). Some of this happens only when the iPhone is on a charger. None of it is displayed in Settings > Battery.
Please let us know how things go for you in the process!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Lacking better Apple documentation, here are helpful tips from TidBITS about the new USB support in iOS 13/iPadOS:
Josh Centers said:
USB Storage with iOS 13: The FAQ
Of all the email I’ve received about iOS 13 from readers of Take Control of iOS 13 and iPadOS 13, questions about using external USB drives with the Files app have been the most frequent. Here are answers to common questions I’ve received, and to other questions I expect many users to have.
 


Even worse, the spam call appears in notifications that call the spammer back when you touch the notification....
I use Hiya and I typically will go into Recents and then click on the get info icon on the right end of the listing. Then I hold down on the number in the get info title and copy the number. I then go to Hiya Pro to look up the number and decide whether to add to my block database.

You do have to be careful not to call the number in question accidentally. Hiya often reports a person associated with a land line. I feel sorry for the person whose telephone number is stolen. Hiya generally works well for me. I am using IOS 13.2 [beta], which has worked well for me on my iPhone 7.
 


Am I the only person who has noticed that my iPhone on iOS 13 no longer syncs my call history and contact list with my car stereo?

I have an iPhone 8 and a 2017 Toyota Tacoma with the Entune 3.0 stereo system. It is completely hands-free and syncs with my phone via bluetooth. I do not use Carplay as I find I don't need it. My iPhone's contact list and call history used to also sync with it, but now with iOS 13 it no longer does. It shows the call history of calls I've made and received while driving and synced to the stereo, but there are gaps where calls I've made while not driving should be.

I can scroll back in the history and see where the cut-off is when I updated to iOS 13, and I can see where it used to sync all calls. Likewise with the contact list. There are a few contacts I've added on my phone since iOS 13 which do not show on the stereo; however, all other contacts which were added before iOS 13 still show. I have never added any contacts via my stereo interface, so they were clearly synced from the phone.

Is this a shortcoming in iOS 13 or an unnoticed bug which has yet to be fixed?
 


Again, everything was fine until updating from iOS 12 to iOS 13, when it suddenly wasn't, and this unwanted "adventure" continues.
My experience is with an iPhone 6s, which had reasonable battery life prior to the iOS 13 update. Since then, I've had to recharge it twice in one day just to keep it running, it won't fully catch up to 100% again, and has been running hot. The app with the highest use is Phone, and I'm not using it that much. Again, it worked well in iOS 12, so nice job, Apple.
 


If this was referenced previously, I apologize, but as one who doesn't want to update to iOS 13.x for a while (just reading about the changes/problems is enough), is there any way to prevent the download of the installer?
Before plugging in to charge, make sure it is either in airplane mode or WiFi turned off. I started doing this when iOS 11 was being forced upon us before it was ready, and have continued to use this to control updates since. (I finally updated to iOS 11 a couple of weeks before 12 was released, and updated to iOS 12 a couple of weeks before 13 was released.) You will still get occasional popup reminders, but the update won't download.
 


A quick note that iMazing can administer an iOS 13.x device from a non-Catalina Mac. I haven't found a way to stop this nag dialog, but at least I can still move files and media on and off my devices while continuing to use Mojave 10.14.6 on my Macs.
 


I have managed to get through 2 days without iOS 13 being downloaded onto my devices. I’m hoping the forced downloads are over. Now I just have a permanent nag about it, as well as one about 2FA.
 


I have an iPhone 6s running iOS 12. I am planning to give it away. In reading the many articles detailing the steps to take to clean the phone, the last one is “Erase All Content and Settings”. The phone will then reset, power off and reboot. Will this install iOS 13 or leave iOS 12 on the phone? To keep iOS 12, do I have to skip this step?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I have an iPhone 6s running iOS 12. I am planning to give it away. In reading the many articles detailing the steps to take to clean the phone, the last one is “Erase All Content and Settings”. The phone will then reset, power off and reboot. Will this install iOS 13 or leave iOS 12 on the phone? To keep iOS 12, do I have to skip this step?
I believe that is correct and that "erase all content" will force re-installation of iOS, which means iOS 13, since Apple won't let you install iOS 12 now. You could take a look at iMazing, which may give you an option to erase critical content without reinstalling iOS, but that's tricky stuff, the way Apple controls iPhones.
 


In reading the many articles detailing the steps to take to clean the phone, the last one is “Erase All Content and Settings”. The phone will then reset, power off and reboot. Will this install iOS 13 or leave iOS 12 on the phone?
That option only erases all the user files and deletes all settings (resetting all settings to factory default). It does not touch or change the operating system files.

As I’ve mentioned elsewhere on the forums, the only way the operating system on iOS is updated is through the Software Update mechanism (over-the-air) in Settings (this may happen automatically if you have Automatic Updates enabled there). Or through iTunes if you grant permission to an update prompt or manually update it when tethered to iTunes.

Erasing an iOS device or restoring from backup does not change the operating system files. The exception is if you try to restore a backup made on a later iOS version onto a device with an earlier iOS version installed. The restore process will inform you that the backup can’t be restored until the system has been updated first and prompt you to do so. If you grant permission, then the device will be updated to the latest iOS before continuing with the restore.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... Erasing an iOS device or restoring from backup does not change the operating system files....
This is contrary to my experience, but most of my recent experience has involved iMazing (which uses Apple software). Following this advice:
iMazing said:
Restore an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch from an iTunes backup
Tip: If you are restoring a backup to a device which has already some data on it, we advise to check the option Erase target device(s). This will prevent potential conflicts with the Apple ID already configured on your target device.
I chose to Erase the iPhone I was restoring to, and this insisted that I disable Find My iPhone then appeared to erase the iPhone and reinstall the latest iOS version that Apple offers.

Perhaps I missed something somewhere, but I think it's extremely easy to get an iOS update that you may not want, whether by subtle accident or because Apple forces it onto the device. Here are some related notes from Apple:
Apple Support said:
Restoring an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch backup from iCloud or from a computer when a later version of iOS or iPadOS is required

... If you're restoring an iCloud backup that requires a newer version of iOS or iPadOS, you might prompted to update your software. If you choose to download and install the update, your device will automatically update your software and then restore your backup.

If you're restoring your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch backup from a computer that requires your device to have a newer version of iOS or iPadOS, you might see an error that your backup can't be restored because the software on your device is too old.
 


... As I’ve mentioned elsewhere on the forums, the only way the operating system on iOS is updated is through the Software Update mechanism (over-the-air) in Settings (this may happen automatically if you have Automatic Updates enabled there). Or through iTunes if you grant permission to an update prompt or manually update it when tethered to iTunes....
Just a note: In Catalina, it's the Finder, rather than iTunes, that handles tethered iOS/iPadOS devices.
 


I chose to Erase the iPhone I was restoring to, and this insisted that I disable Find My iPhone then appeared to erase the iPhone and reinstall the latest iOS version that Apple offers.
I’ve never used iMazing, but based on the article you linked, choosing the Erase option while restoring combines two different operations in sequence that do not happen that way when using the Apple-provided mechanisms (iTunes or iOS Settings). Again, I have no experience with iMazing, but if you got an iOS update in the procedure you described, I imagine it happened during the Restore step because of restoring a backup done on a newer iOS version and not during the Erase step.

Using the Apple-provided mechanisms, doing that kind of restore (as I described and as detailed in the Apple Support article you linked) will prompt you to confirm the iOS upgrade before proceeding with the restore process, with the option to cancel. I don’t know if iMazing provides you with that same information and cancel options.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple user "experience" designers at work:
Gizmodo said:
iPhone Users Are Accidentally Deleting Their Emails Thanks to Apple's Boneheaded UI Update
It’s honestly impressive how much a small change can derail our routine, especially when we’re used to muscle memory taking the wheel for those million and one itty bitty tasks each day no one has time to think about.

Like, say, replying to an email. It’s important, sure, but practically second nature at this point. So, perhaps to keep us all on our toes, make sure its users haven’t been zombified by the glare of their phones yet, Apple decided it’d be a good idea to switch things up with the iPhone email app’s design with this latest OS. Now I’m no designer, but I would think that putting the trash button anywhere near where people are already used to clicking would be one of the first things they teach you not to do....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This story is a little more dramatic than my experience, but my experience with iOS 13 is also not good.
Daily Mail said:
An update on my experiences with iOS 13:
  • An iPhone SE and an iPhone X have responded very differently, though they have almost identical software configurations. The main difference: the iPhone SE has Bluetooth enabled and is paired to an Apple Watch. The iPhone X has Bluetooth disabled and no Apple Watch pairing. I don't think this difference is causing the differences in battery drain. Both iPhones have 100% battery capacity and are running the latest iOS (13.1.3).
  • In identical locations (including trips at the same times to different locations), results are radically different from one day to another on the iPhone SE with no changes to any software or configuration settings and after many days of time for iOS 13 to finish any initial background processing. On one day the battery may drain at double (or more) the rate vs. a different day. This variability does not occur on the iPhone X.
  • Settings > Battery data never shows any explanation for the battery drain. In fact, the reports are bizarre: No activity is shown while high battery drain is occurring on the iPhone SE (which is not being used, and at the same time, the iPhone X is being used for a variety of tasks yet shows none of the mysterious variability nor any excesses in battery drain.
  • One hypothesis is that Apple may have changed modem firmware in the iOS 13 update, but I can't check or test this.
  • Another possibility is some sort of problem with the carrier, but I would expect to see alerts about low cell signal in the Battery settings, and these are not correlated at all with the battery drain. However, an iPhone 7 on the same carrier as the iPhone X was free from the battery drain problem in a limited test (for a number of days).
 


So I read that IOS 13.2 was available. Checked on my iPhone and, yes, the update was available. Then I plugged the phone into my Mac so I could use iTunes to do a backup and then do the upgrade. However, iTunes says that my iPhone, currently at IOS 13.1.3, is up to date!?! (iTunes 12.8.2.3, macOS 10.12.6, 2014 Mac Mini)

Update: It's now 30 minutes later and iTunes sees the update.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Ooopsie!
Mikey Campbell said:
Apple's iOS 13.2 release bricks HomePod for some users

... Considering the implications of a thoroughly bricked device, and Apple's apparent inability to resolve the issue, it is recommended that HomePod users take a wait and see approach to iOS 13.2. To disable HomePod's default automatic software downloads, tap on the house icon in the top-left corner of the Home app, navigate to Software Update and turn off "Install Updates Automatically."

Update: Apple has since retracted the iOS 13.2 update for HomePod.
#applequality
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Hoping for the best, I've installed it on an iPhone SE to see if it improves the absolutely bizarre battery management on that phone since its update to iOS 13.
Over a number of hours, battery drain is actually worse following the iOS 13.2 update....

Update:
After leaving the updated iPhone SE on the charger overnight then taking it off the charger, battery drain looks more normal over an hour or two. Time will tell....
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Over a number of hours, battery drain is actually worse following the iOS 13.2 update....
Update:
After leaving the updated iPhone SE on the charger overnight then taking it off the charger, battery drain looks more normal over an hour or two. Time will tell....
Another update: battery drain suddenly increased, though I have no apps running on the iPhone SE, and it's set to Low Power mode. Hmmm, but it's not currently sitting right next to the Apple Watch. I wonder if it's straining itself for a Bluetooth connection to the watch on its charger on the floor above? (Maybe, maybe not?)

I'll continue this investigation over time (already many days of time, with more ahead...).
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
If only you had one or more additional iPhone SE's in the test mix to much more quickly discern if yours is an isolated freak of nature!
If only Apple still sold them! :-)

I do have various other (time-consuming) options for testing, but it would be helpful to be able to narrow down the general problem area, and Apple's Battery data has not even been helpful for doing that, as it never shows any reason for greater or lesser battery drain in its statistics, only the actual drain vs. time.

We did have one report from an iPhone SE user who did not experience the iOS 13 battery drain issue, but I'd welcome additional reports from anyone who can compare results on a single iPhone SE used with the same software, in the same location(s) and performing the same activities across different iOS versions.

(If these issues turn out to be unrelated to iOS 13 per se, we can move this sub-discussion to the iPhone/iPad batteries, charging, etc. topic.)
 


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