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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I just updated the iPhone X from iOS 13.1.3 to iOS 13.2 and was unexpectedly greeted by a disconcerting series of screens that appear when starting up a brand-new iPhone.

Fortunately, after navigating "Hello", and Siri stuff, etc., it appears that I still have all my apps and data intact. Whew.
 


KWC

We did have one report from an iPhone SE user who did not experience the iOS 13 battery drain issue
Ric, my iPhone SE was purchased new in September 2016 and still has the original battery. Battery Health indicates the maximum capacity is 94% of when new. This SE is always on and with me 24/7, recharged each night. Both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are enabled all the time, with an Apple Watch S4 and a third-party medical device paired to the phone via Bluetooth. Otherwise the SE is lightly used for calls, health monitoring, checking weather forecasts, etc., in normal mode (i.e., not low power).

Running IOS 12, the battery level would typically drop to 80%-85% over the course of the day. After installing IOS 13.1 (and re-disabling a number of app Location and iCloud settings), I initially saw the battery percentage decrease to 70% for a few days (expected), but then it returned to the pattern I previously experienced under IOS 12. I have not seen any adverse effect on battery levels so far due to the IOS 13.2 update.

FWIW, my son's iPhone SE was purchased 18 months after mine, and he reports his experiences with battery levels to be similar to mine. Unfortunately, since we have not encountered the problems that you clearly have, neither of us have made any detailed comparisons of the effects of IOS versions and setting configurations on battery levels. Consequently, I have no solution(s) to offer.
 


I just updated the iPhone X from iOS 13.1.3 to iOS 13.2 and was unexpectedly greeted by a disconcerting series of screens that appear when starting up a brand-new iPhone.
Fortunately, after navigating "Hello", and Siri stuff, etc., it appears that I still have all my apps and data intact. Whew.
I was surprised by the initial, "Hello" screen as well, but the very next one indicated that I had successfully updated the phone (an XS) to 13.2 — which is the kind of notification iOS has been lacking all long. Being a trust but verify kind of guy from long and painful experience, I'd immediately go to About... to verify that the update had occurred.
 


Apparently, iOS (oops, iPadOS) 13.2 will not install on a 6th generation iPad using High Sierra 10.13.6 and iTunes 12.6.5.3 (the version released by Apple to accommodate app management).

I spent well over 2 hours on the phone with Apple trying to update the iPad using this configuration. They had no clue what to do but were very polite. Each time I tried to update, iTunes would fully download the file "iPad_64bit_TouchID_ASTC_13.2_17B84_Restore.ipsw" and immediately present a note that "The iPad [] could not be updated because the firmware file is not compatible."

Apple had no suggestions whatsoever to resolve this issue. The curious thing is that iPadOS updates via WiFi failed twice before I tried the iTunes route.

Since the complete Apple update system is hashed, checksummed and cryptographically verified, I have a hard time believing that the ipsw is corrupt after downloading as Apple suggested. However, it may be corrupt on their server, improperly signed, or they just might have forgot about iTunes 12.6.5.3 for devices running iOS or iPadOS 13.x.

In any case, this adventure just results in more extreme frustration with Apple's schizophrenic quality issues, and I can't update my wife's iPad. My fear is that the iPad experiences a crash, and I will not be able to restore it without the help of an Apple Genius. Yes, that's a quite pointed bit of sarcasm since Apple only touches any of my devices as a last resort, and that's usually only when a hardware failure has occurred.

Does anyone else have any experience with iOS or iPadOS 13.x under High Sierra using iTunes 12.6.5.3?
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Hmmm, but it's not currently sitting right next to the Apple Watch. I wonder if it's straining itself for a Bluetooth connection to the watch on its charger on the floor above? (Maybe, maybe not?)
Nope, that wasn’t it - fast drain continues with watch and iPhone in close proximity.
 


Can anyone comment on updating an iPad Pro 9.7” to iPadOS 13.2? The new multitasking features are attractive, but with so many new versions in the last couple of weeks, I'm more than a bit apprehensive. I'm still on IOS 12.4.1, which has been admirably stable.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Can anyone comment on updating an iPad Pro 9.7” to iPadOS 13.2? The new multitasking features are attractive, but with so many new versions in the last couple of weeks, I'm more than a bit apprehensive. I'm still on IOS 12.4.1, which has been admirably stable.
If you use the iPad Pro on the Internet, I would recommend updating to get all the security patches, which look serious to me and seem to be getting a lot of effort from Apple.

 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I just updated the iPhone X from iOS 13.1.3 to iOS 13.2 and was unexpectedly greeted by a disconcerting series of screens that appear when starting up a brand-new iPhone.
Equally annoying, Apple is yet again harassing me to use "memoji" and similar garbage, even though I previously declined, but this Apple will never let you say "no" (a quintessential example of this increasingly abusive behavior).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Just a quick update on fast battery drain with iOS 13 and an iPhone SE:
  • The rapid drain continues today, despite plenty of hours on the charger to do any housekeeping work after the iOS 13.2 update and having the Apple Watch and iPhone in close proximity.
  • This occurs with no apps running at all.
  • The iPhone SE is in Low Power Mode.
  • The iPhone SE was new this year and has 100% battery capacity.
  • Settings > Battery is unhelpful for identifying the issue. It shows no activity on the activity graph and the highest battery usage (24 hours) is shown as "App Store, Background Activity" at 23%.
  • An iPhone X has has no problem with excess battery drain using the same iOS versions.
As another test, I tried to switch SIM cards and carriers yesterday but ran into a problem where the iPhone SE could make calls but not receive calls after the switch, so I had to switch back.

I have a few more things I can try (all, yet again, quite time-consuming).
 


Can anyone comment on updating an iPad Pro 9.7” to iPadOS 13.2? The new multitasking features are attractive, but with so many new versions in the last couple of weeks, I'm more than a bit apprehensive. I'm still on IOS 12.4.1, which has been admirably stable.
Yesterday, I updated my 9.7" iPad Pro to iPadOS 13.2 and have seen no sign of a problem – so far!
 


Just a quick update on fast battery drain with iOS 13 and an iPhone SE:
  • The rapid drain continues today, despite plenty of hours on the charger to do any housekeeping work after the iOS 13.2 update and having the Apple Watch and iPhone in close proximity.
  • This occurs with no apps running at all.
  • The iPhone SE is in Low Power Mode.
  • The iPhone SE was new this year and has 100% battery capacity.
  • Settings > Battery is unhelpful for identifying the issue. It shows no activity on the activity graph and the highest battery usage (24 hours) is shown as "App Store, Background Activity" at 23%.
  • An iPhone X has has no problem with excess battery drain using the same iOS versions.
As another test, I tried to switch SIM cards and carriers yesterday but ran into a problem where the iPhone SE could make calls but not receive calls after the switch, so I had to switch back. I have a few more things I can try (all, yet again, quite time-consuming).
I have an iPhone 7 which has started having battery problems since iOS 13 was installed. It's running 13.2 and still has problems. It will burn though the battery in a few hours (with nothing running). It was left off the charger last night and when I picked it up this morning it said the battery was at 45% but then immediately crashed. When it restarted, it said it had 8% battery and crashed again. I put it back on the charger, and it has recharged. Battery health says it is 100%. Software...

I have an iPhone XS Max running iOS 13.2 with no problems.

The iPhone 7 is getting traded in tomorrow for an iPhone 11. This is the phone we use as a "house line", so it stays on the charger most of the time. Weird.
 


Hi, Ric - earlier you mentioned that you had upgraded an iPhone 7 to iOS 13.1 and it seemed to be OK... is it still "good"? On 13.2 yet?

I'm still hanging in on iOS 12.4.1....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Just a quick update on fast battery drain with iOS 13 and an iPhone SE...
Battery drain has been really bad today, so I'm taking drastic action and resetting the iPhone SE completely.
  1. I have an iCloud backup from yesterday.
  2. Make a backup with iMazing.
  3. Make a backup with iTunes 12.8.2.3.
  4. Choose to Reset All despite scary warnings about deleting all my data and app data - not very comforting with a bunch of health data on the device.
  5. I still have the iPhone connected to the Mac.
  6. iPhone goes through Activation procedure.
  7. Reset completes.
  8. iPhone is weirdly dim, so it's hard to read the screen. No controls to brighten it. What the ....?
  9. iPhone wants to get help from another iPhone to get set up. Well, I want to use both phones separately, but I don't want to retype network settings, etc., so, let's try this.
  10. Settings transferred. Screen still extremely dim, though the iPhone is plugged into my MacBook Pro. Still no control over brightness. This s**ks.
  11. I have to re-do Touch ID fingerprint set-up.
  12. Working through restore options while trying to get brightness, a slip triggers an unknown action I don't want. What the ....?
  13. Power off in desperate attempt to step back for another try.
  14. It seems to be starting all over again after the restart. The screen is still dim as h***.
  15. This really s**ks.
  16. Let's try restoring from iTunes instead.
  17. iTunes seems confused then eventually shows "Welcome to Your New iPhone" and offers me the option of restoring the backup I just made. Yes, please.
  18. Restore starts, after a while 2 minutes are remaining; wait, a little later it's now 3 minutes - what the ....?
  19. A whole lot longer than 3 minutes goes by, and it says "Time remaining: about 5 seconds."
  20. A lot longer than 5 seconds goes by and iTunes dumps me back into its store advertising music purchases. What the ....?
  21. The iPhone reboots.
  22. "Press Home to Upgrade". Huh?
  23. Enter Passcode.
  24. iTunes posts an error that it needs a passcode. Huh? Push the Try Again button. I'm still looking at the stupid iTunes advertising junk.
  25. A subtle message on top of all the advertising says "Waiting to sync".
  26. The message disappears.
  27. "Hello" on the iPhone.
  28. "Restore Completed" on the iPhone, except "Apps and data will continue downloading in the background." So I guess that long backup and restore didn't count, huh?
  29. Now I have to enter my Apple ID password (for the nth time in this delightful adventure). It's a long complex one. I get it wrong on the tiny virtual keyboard where it doesn't show the text you're typing in the password box.
  30. Second, super-careful try works.
  31. Now it wants to go through all my settings again. So I guess that long backup and restore and typing my Apple ID repeatedly didn't count?
  32. Now I have to set up Apple Pay all over again. (ditto) And re-agree to long piles of fine print terms and conditions.
  33. After all that, it sends a bunch of credit card alerts and begins to download all my apps all over again. So I guess that long backup and restore and typing my Apple ID repeatedly didn't count here, either?
  34. I get all kinds of alerts on various devices about FaceTime and iCloud and Apple ID Verification... again?!?
  35. I'm more than an hour into this delightful adventure so far, and my iPhone isn't back to normal/working yet....
  36. Now I'm getting Watch alerts on the iPhone...
  37. Thankfully, the phone is no longer dimmed so dark I can hardly see it, and I can actually control the brightness now.
  38. The phone can make calls out (it's still downloading apps though).
  39. Multiple Apple ID/iMessage alerts pop up on my other phone.
  40. I can receive calls on this iPhone (it's still downloading apps though).
  41. Health data appears to be recovered. Whew.
  42. I look up the password for an Apple account in a password manager, complicated by Apple's changes to its domain names over the years, and enter it.
  43. I have to authenticate on a different device. I guess entering my Apple ID repeatedly, and my passcode repeatedly, and fingerprints and face and all didn't count?
  44. More alerts on other devices.
  45. I have to enter verification codes.
  46. The iPhone SE has charged up to 98% after all this time connected to a Mac. The iPhone X is at 97% after all this time not connected to any power source.
  47. The iPhone SE is still downloading software, some of which is critical.
  48. Email is working, apparently. A bunch of bank card alerts there.
  49. Unsurprisingly, screen shots I took after the backup are gone now.
  50. Old photos are there (and I don't use iCloud Photos), so maybe that backup was worthwhile after all.
  51. I guess I'll let all the software download before I disconnect from power so I can get a more realistic picture of battery drain afterwards.
  52. The Apple Watch still seems to be paired, and the iPhone flags the watchOS 6.1 update, but I can't see a way to apply it. Maybe I have to put the watch (currently at 86% battery) on the charger to see the hidden update option?
  53. Yep, that seems to do the trick. Now I have to enter the Watch passcode. I do that.
  54. Now I have to immediately enter the Watch passcode again. What the ....?
  55. The iPhone's Watch app uses faint gray text on a black background amidst all the other stuff to document the status of this critical operation.
  56. Now there's a linear progress line (in orange) that keeps showing radically different time-remaining numbers - it's taking a really, really long time to get this Watch update completed.
  57. The watchOS 6.1 update finally completed after a long time. Everything's charged to 100%. Let's see how iPhone SE battery life is now....
  58. Battery life looks better in the first six hours – let's see if this lasts.
  59. I went to use a third-party Apple Watch app later, and the app wasn't there. I had to go back into the Watch app on the iPhone and add it again. (There were no alerts of any kind that updating from watchOS 6.0.1 to watchOS 6.1 would delete apps.)
(I'm holding back some thoughts about Apple's "experience designers" at this point....)

#applequality
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Hi, Ric - earlier you mentioned that you had upgraded an iPhone 7 to iOS 13.1 and it seemed to be OK... is it still "good"? On 13.2 yet?
I haven't switched to the iPhone 7, because I much prefer the size of the iPhone SE, so no feedback on that at this point. (That may be another test, though, if the iPhone SE still can't manage battery drain after this major erase-and-restore project.)
 


Battery drain has been really bad today, so I'm taking drastic action and resetting the iPhone SE completely.
I have an iCloud backup from yesterday...
I have consistently found that moving to a new iPhone and trying to restore from a backup to be a painful, overly lengthy experience that I dread. I have done this a number of times over the years for family members, and I generally have to do it in closed, private room, so that I can "vent" and not offend anyone with my expletives.

This has so far only involved using iTunes versions capable of transferring and managing apps (although there have been a few apps that apparently had to download from the cloud). It is an unbelievably convoluted process from a company whose gear supposedly "just works".
 


Battery drain has been really bad today, so I'm taking drastic action and resetting the iPhone SE completely.

1. I have an iCloud backup from yesterday.

57. The watchOS 6.1 update finally completed after a long time.
You know, we used to make lists just like this comparing performing a similar task on a PC vs. a Mac…
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Battery drain has been really bad today, so I'm taking drastic action and resetting the iPhone SE completely...
After the painful erase and reinstall rebuild, iPhone SE battery management has been better for six hours off the charger - like things were before I installed iOS 13 (now on iOS 13.2).

I'll see how things go over the next few days...
 


I'll try to demystify a few of the actions during the restore process where it wasn't clear why iOS was doing or asking that:
11. I have to re-do Touch ID fingerprint set-up.
...
32. Now I have to set up Apple Pay all over again. (ditto) And re-agree to long piles of fine print terms and conditions.
Backups do not store any information that utilizes the Secure Enclave, including Touch/Face ID and Apple Pay.
18. Restore starts.
...
21. The iPhone reboots.
22. "Press Home to Upgrade". Huh?
This happens when you restore a backup from an older iOS version to a device with a newer iOS version. It has to go through the upgrade process to make sure all your data and settings from the old iOS have been updated to work with what is expected on the new iOS version (basically just like when you do an update on your phone). I'm not sure if you inadvertently did an iOS update when you did your first restore attempt with iMazing? Or, if it really was the exact same iOS version for both the backup and then restore, maybe it just showed you that message, but did no further upgrade actions to the data when you proceeded?
23. Enter Passcode.
24. iTunes posts an error that it needs a passcode. Huh? Push the Try Again button.
iTunes is telling you to enter your passcode on your iOS device, so that your iOS device will Trust your computer and allow a data connection over the lightning connector. This is part of Apple's defense against malicious data connection attacks from, say, malicious charging stations or law enforcement data cracking tools. Because you just completed a restore on your system, your iOS device currently does not have any devices in its Trusted list.
28. "Restore Completed" on the iPhone, except "Apps and data will continue downloading in the background." So I guess that long backup and restore didn't count, huh?
We've discussed this before, but iOS backups do not backup apps. It does, however, backup a list of apps (and their versions) installed, so that upon restore, those apps are redownloaded from the App Store or transferred from iTunes (if you have an iTunes version that manages apps). Or you can manually add apps that aren't available on the App Store.
34. I get all kinds of alerts on various devices about FaceTime and iCloud and Apple ID Verification... again?!?
...
39. Multiple
Apple ID/iMessage alerts pop up on my other phone.
Yes, you're technically signing back into these services on a new device, so Apple sends alerts to your other devices about the new sign-in as a security measure. You'll be grateful for these alerts when someday somebody signs into your account from Malaysia, as happened to my father recently.
42. I look up the password for an Apple account in a password manager, complicated by Apple's changes to its domain names over the years, and enter it.
43. I have to authenticate on a different device. I guess entering my Apple ID repeatedly, and my fingerprints and all didn't count?
44. More alerts on other devices.
This is part of adding your new device to your iCloud Keychain. You have to approve its addition on one of your other trusted devices, so its keys can be added to access that encrypted iCloud data. I believe this also affects services like iMessage and Voice Memos in iCloud.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This happens when you restore a backup from an older iOS version to a device with a newer iOS version.
The iPhone was already at iOS 13.2. I backed it up and restored it... to iOS 13.2.
iTunes is telling you to enter your passcode on your iOS device, so that your iOS device will Trust your computer and allow a data connection over the lightning connector.
Right. But I'd already entered the passcode once. I had to enter it again, because iOS didn't see it the first time.
You'll be grateful for these alerts when someday somebody signs into your account from Malaysia, as happened to my father recently.
So someone in Malaysia had your father's Apple ID password? I wonder how they obtained it.
 


... After the painful erase and reinstall rebuild, iPhone SE battery management has been better for six hours off the charger - like things were before I installed iOS 13 (now on iOS 13.2). I'll see how things go over the next few days...
(Sorry for this long post, but I haven't checked MacInTouch for a while and am just noticing this thread.)

I've also been in iPhone SE battery hell for the past couple of weeks. I didn't initially chalk it up to the iOS 13 update, but now that you mention it, I think that's when it started.

However, the particular symptoms on my phone led to me to suspect the accuracy of the battery level readout, rather than actual battery drain. The evidence for this was:
  • The level would sometimes plunge so rapidly (e.g., down 30 percentage points in 2 minutes of doing nothing but looking at the home screen) that I didn't think any phone components could physically consume energy that fast.
  • After these rapid plunges, the readout would then stay stuck at exactly the same percentage for quite a long time before the next plunge -- even though the usage wasn't any different.
  • A couple of times, the readout got down to 1% yet the phone kept functioning normally for quite a while before shutting down. One time it streamed most of a 90-minute movie with brightness up full, all while supposedly at 1% battery.
So I did the "battery calibration" procedure a couple of times (let it run until it shuts down, then leave on charger for a couple of hours after reaching 100%). When that didn't help, I did various levels of reset, including a couple of DFU restores from backups. When that didn't help, I started to suspect a bad battery.

So I went to the Apple Store, where an impossibly young-looking Genius listened patiently to my tale of woe, ran some diagnostics, and told me that a new battery was unlikely to help, since my battery is only a year old and is at 99% of original capacity.

(Slight digression re "battery health" stats: I noticed that the Apple Store battery diagnostics gave exactly the same information that I can already see in the Settings app. I told the Genius that I don't trust that information, because a year ago my original battery was toast, even though Settings was saying it was at 89% and "currently supporting normal peak performance". At that time I was getting not only the apparent fast drain but also unexpected shutdowns (which I'm not getting this time around). A new battery fixed everything and all was well for the next year... until a couple of weeks ago.)

The Genius suggested I wipe the phone and set up as new rather than restore from a backup. Her theory was that there could be something lurking in my app or system data that was causing the problem. I'd been reluctant to do this for reasons well-documented by Ric (it's very time-consuming and painful), but I went ahead a couple of nights ago.

Tentative observations since then: It seems to be a little better. The first few hours seem normal and the apparent rapid draining doesn't start until it gets down to maybe 75% or so. The downward plunges are still there to some extent but aren't nearly as abrupt or drastic as before. I haven't been in a position to let it drain all the way until shutoff, but I hope to be able to try that this weekend.

I should add that I haven't yet reinstalled many of the apps that were on the phone before this latest wipe, so I guess it's possible one of them was going rogue with the battery.

And I was about say I'm still on iOS 13.1.x, but I just checked and it seems that the phone updated itself to 13.2 without asking me, probably last night. One more unwanted default setting that I have to remember to change when setting up a phone as new, along with tediously turning off all the bleeps and bloops in Notifications. (Luckily I turned off auto-update on my HomePod just in time to avoid the latest bricking update.)

One more small data point ... my daughter also has an iPhone SE and has had no trouble since updating to iOS 13.

Like Ric, I don't want a bigger, heavier phone so hope to keep this iPhone SE alive as long as possible now that hopes are fading for a refresh of this form factor. Every time I'm in an Apple Store and I mention this, the staff person always says "Yeah, we hear that a lot." It's hard to believe that isn't a big enough market to make it worth Apple's while. It wasn't so many years ago when Apple fans all made fun of how huge other phones were.
 


A couple of notes on this thread:

I have an iPad Pro 10.5". Have seen no issues, only benefits from upgrading to iOS 13 since the 3rd beta.

The same can't be said of iPhone 7. I'm seeing faster battery burn; overnight, unplugged, it went from full to 30%. Battery reports that Siri and Apple Music were responsible for nearly all the battery drain. Siri shouldn't have been running, nor Apple Music, as I'd killed everything.

Beyond that report, I'm wondering if there's a bug in the power management regarding CPU clock control. I recall at WWDC someone (I think) talked about how the CPU is sped up during application launch or switch to make the device apparently faster, and the power management on the older phones is not throttling back appropriately during idle periods.

Alas, I've other things to do than debug Apple's software. Just throw it in low power mode to conserve battery. I do find some features useful, particularly the CarPlay improvements I use on a daily basis – enough so that I'm not going back, so I'll just live with it and hope it gets better.
 



I have iOS 13.2 running my iPhone 7 [and used] previous beta versions. I have not had issues with the battery life. I do have my phone plugged in when I am home and in the car. At home, I am using an AT&T microcell box, and thus the signal strength at home is great.

I will postulate that the greatest variability in power usage in an iPhone is the CPU and in the radios. It seems that from one model of iPhone to another, improvements in the CPU efficiency are significant and have a positive impact on battery life outside of battery size. From the same iPhone models running the same apps, one would not expect a significant variation between phone,s assuming the batteries have the same capacity. But maybe not.

In my case, I think the radios cause the largest variation in battery life. Living in Montana,. we do not have dense cell phone coverage, and thus cell phone radios are often straining to reach a suitable signal or no signal at all. Also, it seems to me that the radios vary within a given iPhone model. When I say radios, I mean the entire radio system, including the modem and the antennas. I know something about antenna design for lower frequencies. For a cell phone, it seems to me the antenna(s) have to be a compromise, considering the great variations in frequency. So radio battery consumption should vary based on which bands are being used and how efficient the antenna(s) are for the particular band.

I find my radio signals vary in different ways. For example, I often drive from Missoula to Butte, a distance of 120 miles. If I drive east, I have more cell service drop-outs than if I drive west. I suspect that the difference is that my cell phone is on the dashboard, and in one direction, the signal reaches my phone through windshield but in the other direction, the signal has to reach through the rear of the car. I do think that my iPhone 7generaly gets more bars than my wife's iPhone 5s but not always. And location is so critical. I have two bars in the corner of my office but three bars walking 10 feet from the corner of my office.

It is definitely true that your cell phone battery runs down faster when there are no or lousy signals. I agree that Apple does not give you much data regarding real-time battery usage. It seems the variability of battery usage is so great, it could be hard to make repetitive experiments that mean anything. I wonder what happens to the radios when a cell towner gets busy. Does that increase radio power consumption?
 



[That there are no issues] can't be said of iPhone 7. I'm seeing faster battery burn; overnight, unplugged, it went from full to 30%. Battery reports that Siri and Apple Music were responsible for nearly all the battery drain. Siri shouldn't have been running, nor Apple Music, as I'd killed everything.
For what it’s worth, I replaced my iPhone 7 with an iPhone 11 Pro, but chose to keep the iPhone 7 for work-related tasks (my employer requires mobile-device management (MDM) software if connecting to their network, so I have avoided that in the past). It no longer has an active cellular account, but is always on wifi, with Mail (an Exchange account), Slack and a handful of other applications running. I don’t keep it plugged in, because I’m concerned about battery life if I do that. I erased the phone and installed it with a fresh iOS 13 install, which is now up to 13.2. It gets mild use during the day.

It’s currently at 29% battery life, 64 hours after last being charged. The last low power shutdown log shows it lasted for 119 standby hours / 6 active hours.

So the battery drain isn’t purely an “old devices” issue; either there’s something else, or it’s just related.

In my experience in the past, rapid battery drain not attributed to an application by the battery settings has often been due to crashes from either an application with automatically-launching / always-on background tasks or similar crashes from a system process. It might be worth looking at your device logs (under Settings / Privacy / Analytics & Improvements / Analytics Data) to see if there are a lot of failure logs. Failure logs usually start with some version of the application’s name, so look for a lot of logs starting with the same string. Apple does a lot of logging, so some of those will be false positives, but you may find something.

There are also power logs in that directory which attribute battery use to applications, though they seem incomplete; perhaps they’re only sampled occasionally.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
After the painful erase and reinstall rebuild, iPhone SE battery management has been better for six hours off the charger - like things were before I installed iOS 13 (now on iOS 13.2).
In my case, I think the radios cause the largest variation in battery life.
I have suspected that radios / modems / cell strength, and related firmware, might be involved here (and I did all the updates I could find to do, along with power off/on, etc., etc., trying to make sure I had the latest carrier settings). But I see that a modem firmware upate occurred at some point during my updates to iOS 13.2 and the arduous erase/rebuild procedure (from Settings > General > About):

Oct. 26iOS 13.1.3Modem Firmware 9.00.01
Oct. 31iOS 13.2Modem Firmware 9.11.01
(after erase and rebuild)

So far, battery life has been better since the rebuild, though I'll need to judge over more days of use, and I wonder if this is related to the modem firmware update.

(On the other hand, I'm still experiencing odd, brief dropouts in phone conversations, which I have also been trying unsuccessfully for weeks and weeks to isolate and resolve.)
 


I'll try to demystify a few of the actions during the restore process where it wasn't clear why iOS was doing or asking that:
Thanks for the demystification. It helps to understand what is going on, but it's still a miserable user experience. I recently updated a couple of Sierra machines to Mojave, and I still haven't recovered from the frustration of being flooded with Apple ID password requests and application Privacy/Security prompts.
 


(On the other hand, I'm still experiencing odd, brief dropouts in phone conversations, which I have also been trying unsuccessfully for weeks and weeks to isolate and resolve.)
My contacts in a Fortune 500 company tell me that there is a great deal of anger with Apple about IOS 13, and they are considering alternatives. They had lots of phones simply stop working earlier this month. They have thousands of iPhones which can no longer access dozens of the company's software tools with a single login.

Apple changed security without ever talking to their biggest customers. The enterprise version of iTunes no longer functions, and the company can not push out a standard version of phone settings. Each phone has to have its settings changed individually... and of course many settings were quietly changed by Apple.

An executive at another organization told me about his iPhone Xs experience: he loves it for about 3 months, and then it freezes up several times a day. The Apple Store knows they cannot fix it, and they just give him a new one. Apparently it is not designed for a power user, and one of the chips overheats and gets damaged. He is on his third one now. Perhaps Jony Ive and the others who left this summer did earn their pay. In January, Apple will release its shareholder proxy, which means that shareholders can vote against board members who insist on keeping Tim Cook as CEO. Removing them is unlikely, but board members do pay close attention to the number of 'no' votes, if any reader is still a shareholder by then.
 


Can anyone comment on updating an iPad Pro 9.7” to iPadOS 13.2? The new multitasking features are attractive, but with so many new versions in the last couple of weeks, I'm more than a bit apprehensive. I'm still on IOS 12.4.1, which has been admirably stable.
I've been running all the non-beta incarnations of iPadOS 13 as they came out on my 9.7” iPad Pro, and I haven’t had any serious problems. My iPad is pretty much my daily driver (I don’t do anything these days that‘s particularly taxing). I haven't had any issues with apps crashing or anything problematic with battery life. The only issue I’ve experienced is discoverability of several of the new features, but once I figured out how most of them worked, I’ve been loving the update.
 


Marco Arment was quite blunt about iOS 13.2.
Marco Arment said:
Major new bugs introduced in iOS 13.2:
- background downloads often hang forever and never run
- apps get killed in the background so aggressively that iOS effectively doesn’t offer multitasking anymore
…continuing the iOS 13 pattern of breaking long-held basic functionality.

I’m sure Apple has good excuses about why their software quality is so s****y again.

I hear the same thing over and over from people inside: they aren’t given enough time to fix bugs.

Your software quality is broken, Apple. Deeply, systemically broken. Get your s*** together.
#applequality
 


l've noticed strange Safari performance (hopefully a bug, not a "new feature") with iPadOS 13.2 on the original iPad Pro.

I use the Safari Favorites pane to jump to favorite web sites. In Portrait mode, the Favorites display as an approximate 1/3 page window instead of a full window, with icons cut off at the bottom. In the past, it would show as a full window length pane. (This bizarre bug occurs when there is a web page displayed in the background and I bring up the Favorites pane by clicking on the address bar; it works properly if there is no web page in the background.) The "show more" button doesn't change it

I now have to click, scroll, and click to launch a "Favorite" URL. Visually, it looks really bad. Additionally, I've seen the display of background web pages become broken up and the graphics distorted below the truncated edge of the Favorites pane in portrait mode.

I can't believe that no one noticed this bug in the beta versions. Every time I see that, I think, "did Apple really release this?!"

By the way, in landscape mode, the same 1/3 page Favorites pane/window is visible, but at least that makes visual sense.

Anyone else noticing this? Perhaps I have too many "Favorites".

While I'm ranting, the change from a capitalized "Go" or "Enter" or "Find" keyboard button to an uncapitalized "go", "enter", and "find" looks unpolished and amateurish in my opinion. Some committee of design people sat around and decided this needed to change?
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
More fun with Apple's new software:
Redmond Pie said:
iOS 13 And Catalina Apple Notes App Not Syncing Via iCloud Between Devices
Having problems with notes saved to the Apple Notes app not syncing when a Mac is involved? Specifically, a Mac running macOS 10.15 through 10.15.1 or an iPhone or iPad running iOS 13 or iPadOS 13? You aren’t alone.

We’ve been hearing reports of people finding that those running iOS or iPadOS devices with the latest versions of their software are unable to make their notes sync with a Mac, again running the latest version.

... Similar issues to this have been happening with the Reminders app, again via iCloud syncing.
#applequality
 


Battery drain has been really bad today, so I'm taking drastic action and resetting the iPhone SE completely.
...
(I'm holding back some thoughts about Apple's "experience designers" at this point....)
I don't doubt at all, reading these horror stories about trying to reset and reconfigure an iPhone, but... yesterday I traded in my iPhone 7 for a new iPhone 11 at my local Apple Store. After the financial process was completed, it took about 20 minutes to configure the new iPhone (including my logon PIN, my T-Mobile account, my Wi-Fi settings and my Mail accounts). The phone started downloading apps (which requires Wi-Fi), but I just walked home and the process paused. When I got home, it picked up again and all the apps were restored in about 30 minutes. The only thing I had to do was train the face recognition. The Apple guy said that the only problem with this process is when customers come in without a current backup (some phones hadn't been backed up in three years), and it takes hours to get a backup and then build the new phone. I had a current iCloud backup from that morning; this phone has my wife listed as the user, and I had her ID and password available (thanks, 1Password!). Moving to a new phone appears to be a lot easier than rebuilding an existing phone, but I'm not sure why.

One interesting note: Apple gave me $150 credit for the (base model) iPhone 7, and the Apple guy said the phone was going to a different company that would harvest the parts. Seems like it could be sold on the used market for more than $150....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Moving to a new phone appears to be a lot easier than rebuilding an existing phone, but I'm not sure why.
That has been my experience, as well. Of course, Apple is very highly motivated to sell more new phones, so perhaps that’s a factor in the difference...
 


I have consistently found that moving to a new iPhone and trying to restore from a backup to be a painful, overly lengthy experience that I dread. I have done this a number of times over the years for family members, and I generally have to do it in closed, private room, so that I can "vent" and not offend anyone with my expletives. This has so far only involved using iTunes versions capable of transferring and managing apps (although there have been a few apps that apparently had to download from the cloud). It is an unbelievably convoluted process from a company whose gear supposedly "just works".
My experience is completely the opposite of yours. It takes a while, but whether restoring from an encrypted iTunes backup or an iCloud backup, it’s pretty much just start and wait. I double-check the internet accounts and make sure the right services are still active and the correct ones set for default, but I have no issues to report. What is your process, and what are the issues you run into?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
So far, battery life has been better since the rebuild, though I'll need to judge over more days of use, and I wonder if this is related to the modem firmware update.
Two days after the radical reset and rebuild*, it looks like the iPhone SE battery performance is back to normal - i.e. the same performance it had prior to the update from iOS 12 to iOS 13. (I have no idea what changed in the reset/rebuild.)

In Low Power Mode, with no apps running and most cloud services disabled, not making any phone calls, nor actually doing anything with the device, but connected to a minimal-use Apple Watch (watchOS 6.1), a day's power-on time after overnight recharging leaves about 50% battery charge remaining.

An iPhone X, also on iOS 13.2 but with about two extra hours of charging, ended up with a similar battery charge level after being used off and on for photography, web and MacInTouch work, email, and one extended phone call.


*After the radical reset/rebuild, I also ran down the iPhone SE (in full power mode) to about 20% (I got tired of waiting for it to run out completely) and then charged it back up again, hoping to reset any problematic power management data.
 


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