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Saturday evening I updated my iPhone SE to iOS 13.2. I'd read the troubles posted on this thread, but my iPad update (to 13.1.3) a week or so ago went OK, and I have some time right now to deal with problems, so I took a chance on being one of the lucky ones. Not feeling so lucky now. However, after a couple of restarts the phone is usable, even if battery life isn't what it was.

I note that the firmware update Ric found was part of the installation, so that isn't the issue. Also, the idea that battery drain isn't being reported accurately seems possible, in that recharging goes faster now. The sudden drops are puzzling. The battery indicator doesn't seem to drop at all while I'm looking at the screen, but if I put the phone in my pocket for a few minutes, it's dropped when I take it out again. It also dropped about 10% overnight while shut down.

But here's what makes me wish I hadn't done this 'upgrade': I remembered that the phone has a few pictures I never uploaded to my iMac, and I don't use iCloud for photos. When I plugged the phone into the iMac, the Photos app launched as usual, but a dialog box came up. It says: "A software update is required to connect to Harold's iPhone. Would you like to download and install this update now?" The options: Install; Not Now; Learn More. But Learn More just says your iPhone has an OS your Mac doesn't support; it doesn't say what the update is. Catalina happens to be the only pending update for my 6-month old iMac running Mojave 10.14.6. I'm not prepared for Catalina, so now my phone is divorced from any connection to the Mac. This is a trap I hadn't thought of. Until 6 months ago I had an iMac stuck on El Capitan. More recent iOS updates never mattered to that connection. While I've been getting all sorts of warnings from Apple (ever since I got the new iMac) about loss of 32-bit apps, I don't recall any warning about loss of ability to connect with iOS devices.

As it happens, I set Dropbox to back up my photos, and it scooped up the ones from the iPhone. But retrieving photos from Dropbox seems like an unnecessary step.
 


Just a quick update on fast battery drain with iOS 13 and an iPhone SE:
  • The rapid drain continues today, despite plenty of hours on the charger to do any housekeeping work after the iOS 13.2 update and having the Apple Watch and iPhone in close proximity.
  • This occurs with no apps running at all.
  • The iPhone SE is in Low Power Mode.
  • The iPhone SE was new this year and has 100% battery capacity.
  • Settings > Battery is unhelpful for identifying the issue. It shows no activity on the activity graph and the highest battery usage (24 hours) is shown as "App Store, Background Activity" at 23%.
  • An iPhone X has has no problem with excess battery drain using the same iOS versions.
As another test, I tried to switch SIM cards and carriers yesterday but ran into a problem where the iPhone SE could make calls but not receive calls after the switch, so I had to switch back.

I have a few more things I can try (all, yet again, quite time-consuming).
Since updating, both my wife and daughter using iPhone 6s's have experienced a very rapid drain in usual day to day activities (texting, talking), during which the screen and back get very hot. I have encouraged them, when they feel it getting that warm, to shut their phones off. I have an even older iPhone 6 that cannot be updated to iOS 13 and has had none of the aforementioned issues.
 


FWIW, I seem to be getting around the same amount of battery time from my iPhone 6s after updating to iOS 13.2 as before. However, once it reaches 20%, it very rapidly drops off to 10% and below, and the Battery Health setting now indicates "Service." To be fair, it is an older phone nearing 1,200 battery charging cycles.
 


Saturday evening I updated my iPhone SE to iOS 13.2. I'd read the troubles posted on this thread, but my iPad update (to 13.1.3) a week or so ago went OK, and I have some time right now to deal with problems, so I took a chance on being one of the lucky ones. Not feeling so lucky now. However, after a couple of restarts the phone is usable, even if battery life isn't what it was.
I note that the firmware update Ric found was part of the installation, so that isn't the issue. Also, the idea that battery drain isn't being reported accurately seems possible, in that recharging goes faster now. The sudden drops are puzzling. The battery indicator doesn't seem to drop at all while I'm looking at the screen, but if I put the phone in my pocket for a few minutes, it's dropped when I take it out again. It also dropped about 10% overnight while shut down.

But here's what makes me wish I hadn't done this 'upgrade': I remembered that the phone has a few pictures I never uploaded to my iMac, and I don't use iCloud for photos. When I plugged the phone into the iMac, the Photos app launched as usual, but a dialog box came up. It says: "A software update is required to connect to Harold's iPhone. Would you like to download and install this update now?" The options: Install; Not Now; Learn More. But Learn More just says your iPhone has an OS your Mac doesn't support; it doesn't say what the update is. Catalina happens to be the only pending update for my 6-month old iMac running Mojave 10.14.6. I'm not prepared for Catalina, so now my phone is divorced from any connection to the Mac. This is a trap I hadn't thought of. Until 6 months ago I had an iMac stuck on El Capitan. More recent iOS updates never mattered to that connection. While I've been getting all sorts of warnings from Apple (ever since I got the new iMac) about loss of 32-bit apps, I don't recall any warning about loss of ability to connect with iOS devices.
As it happens, I set Dropbox to back up my photos, and it scooped up the ones from the iPhone. But retrieving photos from Dropbox seems like an unnecessary step.
Others have seen this. It wants to update an iTunes library (package). See this posting: #21670
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I think I hit this bug but didn't understand at the time what was causing the problem...
ZDNet said:
iOS 13 has a huge bug that makes me want to dump my iPhone and iPad
... So, what's the problem? Well, put simply, you fire up an app, do some work in it -- perhaps load a page, or a document, or whatever function the app is supposed to do -- and then switch to another app to do something. OK, so far, everything is fine. But now try switching to the first app and see what happens.

If you're lucky, the first app fires up, and you're back where you started. However, with iOS 13, more than likely the app will reload, and you've lost whatever you were doing. iOS was never really that good at multitasking between apps -- it always had a tendency to forget what apps in the background were doing -- but iOS 13 and iOS 13.2 has taken this and elevated it to new heights of awfulness.
#applequality
 


... On the other hand, I'm still experiencing odd, brief dropouts in phone conversations, which I have also been trying unsuccessfully for weeks and weeks to isolate and resolve.
I have had issues with my phone communicating, with two bars, with me hearing the other phone just fine and the other phone hearing my every third word. Nearly always the other phone is a Samsung on a different carrier. (I have read that there are issues in voice quality when communicating from one carrier to another.)
 


Can anyone comment on updating an iPad Pro 9.7” to iPadOS 13.2? The new multitasking features are attractive, but with so many new versions in the last couple of weeks, I'm more than a bit apprehensive.
Since iPadOS 13.2 had gone almost a week without a bug fix, I decided to install it on my iPad Pro 1 – no battery issues at all, and only a couple of unexplained app crashes.

However, the mystery meat menu fairy has obviously been hard at work. Features have disappeared (or maybe just moved and I've yet to find them). The most afflicted so far is Mail; without saving any real estate, some of the handy buttons at the top have absconded to a menu at the bottom that hides under an Undo (?!) icon. Dumb, for no reason.

Does no one at Apple understand the concept of muscle memory, one reason why it's good not to fix things that aren't broken? I had to download the stupid User Guide to find how to reply to an email. Ditto to discover how to apply app updates, another case of "exit through the gift shop."

Text selection verges on hopeless. My finger always hides the cursor; grabbing a blue selection handle is impossible, I keep pasting stuff by accident, and the useful magnifier is gone. It's often easier to delete a whole paragraph and start over, rather than attempt to fix a typo. I guess they want me to buy another keyboard... tell me again why I bought an iPad instead of a laptop?

I could not care less about new (or old) emojis. I understand the in-your-face promotion of every Apple profit center, but why is each release clumsier to use than the last? Did the company burn the last copy of their Human Interface Guidelines bible?

At least I didn't make the mistake of buying an iPhone...

#appleui
 


Text selection verges on hopeless. My finger always hides the cursor; grabbing a blue selection handle is impossible, I keep pasting stuff by accident, and the useful magnifier is gone. It's often easier to delete a whole paragraph and start over, rather than attempt to fix a typo. I guess they want me to buy another keyboard... tell me again why I bought an iPad instead of a laptop?
[I think that] iOS/iPadOS 13 has the best text cursor control Apple's handheld devices have ever had: press and hold the space bar until the keyboard becomes a bunch of blank, grey rectangles, then, without lifting your finger, simply move the cursor about. I was really pleasantly surprised to learn about that.

I haven't yet gotten as conversant with the other one finger- and multi-touch gestures (e.g. to select a single word, simply press on it for a second or so; you can then use the same finger to move the limits of the text selection), including ones for undo and redo.
 


Does no one at Apple understand the concept of muscle memory, one reason why it's good not to fix things that aren't broken? I had to download the stupid User Guide to find how to reply to an email. Ditto to discover how to apply app updates, another case of "exit through the gift shop."
The truly shortsighted thing about Apple seemingly arbitrarily changing UI elements in defiance of "muscle memory" and Apple's own Human Interface Guidelines is that it actually makes it easier to switch to other platforms. After all, if every update invalidates some important bit of your long-standing knowledge of how a tool works, maybe it's not such a big deal to try something else, especially if something else has a reputation for being relatively consistent.

I'm a member/moderator of a couple of traditional mailing lists/listservs, and iOS 13 has been driving me bananas on my iPhone by putting a "This message is from a mailing list - Unsubscribe" button directly under the button to take you back from viewing an individual message to viewing a list of messages. Consequently, I accidentally press "unsubscribe" several times a day from groups that personally are very important to me. At least the geniuses in Apple's UX design department were kind enough to provide a visible "Are you sure?" prompt before going through with the unsubscription, though it's probably only a matter of time before I accidentally press "Yes" there, too.

#appleui
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
In iOS 13.2, I just discovered a new feature of Settings > Battery, which led to some disturbing results....

If you lightly touch the Battery Level graph, you can select an hour's worth of data, which is highlighted in the graph with the rest of the graph fading to light gray.

For example, I can select 17:00-18:00 today and see what was using the battery. Hmmm, App Store 100%. That's really interesting, because App Store wasn't running. Well, I couldn't see it running, and it wasn't visible in the app switcher. I haven't used the App Store for days, either. There were no apps running, according to the app switcher. None.

Same "App Store 100%" at 12:00-13:00.

(This is on the iPhone SE. The iPhone X didn't show App Store activity in a similar check.)

Also, yesterday, I found Game Center and Nearby Players turned on. Again. I think I may have mentioned that I've turned those off before... Over. And. Over. And. Over. And. Over. And... never f****** turned them on. Ever.

Today, iOS 13.2 harassed me yet again to "Create Your Memoji". I don't want f****** memoji, but Apple won't let you say "no!"

(I've got a few other things I am saying to Apple, though....)

#appleabuse
 



Since iPadOS 13.2 had gone almost a week without a bug fix, I decided to install it on my iPad Pro 1 – no battery issues at all, and only a couple of unexplained app crashes.
However, the mystery meat menu fairy has obviously been hard at work. Features have disappeared (or maybe just moved and I've yet to find them). The most afflicted so far is Mail; without saving any real estate, some of the handy buttons at the top have absconded to a menu at the bottom that hides under an Undo (?!) icon. Dumb, for no reason.
Does no one at Apple understand the concept of muscle memory, one reason why it's good not to fix things that aren't broken? I had to download the stupid User Guide to find how to reply to an email. Ditto to discover how to apply app updates, another case of "exit through the gift shop."

Text selection verges on hopeless. My finger always hides the cursor; grabbing a blue selection handle is impossible, I keep pasting stuff by accident, and the useful magnifier is gone. It's often easier to delete a whole paragraph and start over, rather than attempt to fix a typo. I guess they want me to buy another keyboard... tell me again why I bought an iPad instead of a laptop?

I could not care less about new (or old) emojis. I understand the in-your-face promotion of every Apple profit center, but why is each release clumsier to use than the last? Did the company burn the last copy of their Human Interface Guidelines bible? ...
I absolutely agree with muscle memory and with the fact that text selection now seems near-impossible. And forget about "select all" or "paste." For the former to work, I need to attempt to tap on a blank area, or the option won't come up, and to paste, I need to add a couple of dummy characters and tap on them to get the paste option.
 


In iOS 13.2, I just discovered a new feature of Settings > Battery...
If you lightly touch the Battery Level graph, you can select an hour's worth of data, which is highlighted in the graph with the rest of the graph fading to light gray.
For example, I can select 17:00-18:00 today and see what was using the battery...
Wow! This is a really useful new iOS feature! Thank you for calling it to our attention!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Wow! This is a really useful new iOS feature! Thank you for calling it to our attention!
It would be even more useful if it showed what is draining the battery during the times when no apps are active and the graph shows no activity, just battery drain for things that are hidden and not accounted for.
 


In iOS 13.2, I just discovered a new feature of Settings > Battery, which led to some disturbing results.... If you lightly touch the Battery Level graph, you can select an hour's worth of data, which is highlighted in the graph with the rest of the graph fading to light gray....
I don't know when this feature was added, but I'm sure I was using it in iOS 12.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
If you lightly touch the Battery Level graph, you can select an hour's worth of data, which is highlighted in the graph with the rest of the graph fading to light gray.
For example, I can select 17:00-18:00 today and see what was using the battery. Hmmm, App Store 100%. That's really interesting, because App Store wasn't running. Well, I couldn't see it running, and it wasn't visible in the app switcher. I haven't used the App Store for days, either. There were no apps running, according to the app switcher. None.
Same "App Store 100%" at 12:00-13:00.
It would be even more useful if it showed what is draining the battery during the times when no apps are active and the graph shows no activity, just battery drain for something hidden.
OK, just in case we thought I might have missed something... no, I didn't. Today the radically reset and rebuilt (over many hours) 2019 iPhone SE is yet again draining battery rather rapidly, all while being in Low Power Mode with the screen off and no apps running. Double and triple checked and verified. None. Period.

Let's just take a look at that hour-by-hour Battery chart again. It, yet again, shows virtually no activity, yet certain periods show "App Store 100%", all while the battery is draining to fuel some unknown/unexplained process(es). [expletives deleted]
 


Let's just take a look at that hour-by-hour Battery chart again. It, yet again, shows virtually no activity, yet certain periods show "App Store 100%", all while the battery is draining to fuel some unknown/unexplained process(es).
Looking at the hour-by-hour battery display it appears that the percentage of all apps displayed for the interval add to 100%. If no apps are running and App Store takes a peek for an update check, then it would be the only app running in that interval. Therefore 100%. It doesn't mean that App Store is running 100% of the time.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Looking at the hour-by-hour battery display it appears that the percentage of all apps displayed for the interval add to 100%. If no apps are running and App Store takes a peek for an update check, then it would be the only app running in that interval. Therefore 100%. It doesn't mean that App Store is running 100% of the time.
Yes, I think you're right (although that doesn't explain what App Store is doing while it's not supposed to be running and doesn't appear to be running).

On further reflection, I think the battery drain may be due mostly to cellular signals that aren't strong enough, even though Apple is not showing any data about "low cellular signal" in Battery information, as it sometimes does (e.g. in rural areas), and even though there hasn't been a change in locations.

But Apple has clearly changed modem firmware, since that's documented in obscure version number changes, and I wonder if that's part of the battery drain problems I've seen with iOS 13.
 


[I think that] iOS/iPadOS 13 has the best text cursor control Apple's handheld devices have ever had: press and hold the space bar until the keyboard becomes a bunch of blank, grey rectangles, then, without lifting your finger, simply move the cursor about. ...
Thank you for pointing this out! This solves a big headache for me, which has been landing the cursor in the proper place with my fingertip to edit misspellings.
 


For example, I can select 17:00-18:00 today and see what was using the battery. Hmmm, App Store 100%.
We've simply not powered up the three iPads we use at work because of the many issues that have been reported about iOS 13.

Your posts about the SE sent me looking on the 'net. There's any number of sites talking about changes in iOS 13. The one below may be pertinent, but there's a possibility, since it is dated in July, that it isn't applicable to the released versions.
MacWorld said:
How the App Store is changing in iOS 13
The biggest change to the App Store in iOS 13 is the replacement of the Updates tab at the bottom with Apple Arcade.
... You’ll now see your Apple ID profile picture in the upper right of every App Store tab. Tap on that to be taken to your Account page.
This is your one-stop shop for managing all your App Store... stuff. There’s banner at the top to manage Apple ID settings, followed by links to all your Purchased content and Subscriptions. You can redeem or send gift cards or add funds to your Apple ID, and manage the settings for your personalized recommendations.
To me, that sounds like Apple has designed the "App Store" to be continually ready to take your money - and to do that, it has to be ready lag-free.

Does the battery performance change if you have all three radios on the device off? Do you have access to software like Pi-Hole that would enable blocking Apple URLs (presuming LTE is off) to see if the battery drain is from telemetry?
 


The iPadOS keyboard is beyond buggy. The keyboard has different features in Mail, depending on what field you're in. Some keyboard functions are hit-or-miss: auto-capitalization is random, cut/copy/paste may be hiding under a new mystery icon, the Undo key actually replaces some text with a clipboard paste (and is not recoverable), Select All is MIA, spelling hints may be absent or apply to something you typed in the previous paragraph, actions that used to be one tap are now buried in a complex pop-up menu, etc. etc.

The spacebar-slide-finger cursor trick jumps to the top, and only works if the text is short enough that none of it is hidden under the keyboard. Text selection is still a nightmare.

This is just nuts. Apple wants the world to believe the iPad is ready to replace the laptop, but how does crippling the keyboard and frustrating users help achieve that? What happened to UI consistency? Does some psychopathic programmer think it's clever to be hyper-context-sensitive, even when the choices are broken or inappropriate? It's taken me over twice as long to type this post as it would have in iOS 12. Feh.
 


I'm sure all these problems will be fixed in IOS 19.84
Well, it appears that the first 13.3 beta offers an option to disable Memoji, which could make us crusty oldsters incrementally happier, but the same article notes that progress in the current beta toward fixing the too-aggressive forgetting during multi-tasking is limited. (Specifically, the tester was able to switch successfully among several open apps, but as soon as he locked his phone for a few moments and then reopened it, apps had been killed and reloaded.) Sounds like getting multitasking back where it was is a work in progress.
 




On further reflection, I think the battery drain may be due mostly to cellular signals that aren't strong enough, even though Apple is not showing any data about "low cellular signal" in Battery information, as it sometimes does (e.g. in rural areas), and even though there hasn't been a change in locations.
But Apple has clearly changed modem firmware, since that's documented in obscure version number changes, and I wonder if that's part of the battery drain problems I've seen with iOS 13.
Hi, Ric. I have an iPhone SE as a secondary mobile, so it doesn't get used much at all - it's mainly to receive incoming messages on the original number that it has. It sits on my desk and only physically moves when I go for a swim - then it gets put in a safe while I'm out.

I was able to do this and charge it just once a week, and it was fine. However, sometime with a late iOS 12.x update, whenever I put it in the safe, the battery drained faster. The safe is metal, and I guess it had issues with the cellular signal, but something changed in the way it handled that - for worse. It still occurred with iOS 13.0. Then I started to put it into flight safe [Airplane] mode while it was in the safe, and that helped. Then all the zillion iOS 13.x updates came out, and battery life was all over the place, even when it just sits on the desk. iOS 13.2 has been the best so far, but something is not the same.

What I'm trying to say is that I concur with you that battery drain on an iPhone SE might be related to cellular signal and how it handles changes, seeking, low signal, edge signals, swapping towers, etc. Of course, that's going to be a b*tch to diagnose.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple has posted iOS and iPadOS 13.2.2 updates today....
Thanks — here are more details:
Apple Support said:
iOS 13.2.2
iOS 13.2.2 includes bug fixes and improvements for your iPhone. This update:
  • Fixes an issue that could cause apps to quit unexpectedly when running in the background
  • Resolves an issue where iPhone may temporarily lose cellular service after a call
  • Addresses an issue where cellular data may temporarily not be available
  • Fixes an issue that caused replies to S/MIME encrypted email messages between Exchange accounts to be unreadable
  • Addresses an issue where using Kerberos single sign-on service in Safari may present an authentication prompt
  • Resolves an issue where charging may be interrupted on Yubikey Lightning-powered accessories
For information on the security content of Apple software updates, please visit this website: https://support.apple.com/kb/HT201222
#applesecurity #applequality
 


The iOS 13.2.2 update for my iPhone weighs in at 3.42GB, according to iTunes. Made me wonder how much data I have downloaded just in iOS updates starting with iOS 13, since I had not been tracking such information. Seemed like every other week I am downloading 3 GB or more of data. Turns out this now is the seventh such download of iOS 13 content, including the initial release, since its release only eight weeks ago. At least I am doing it over the home network.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Battery drain has been really bad today, so I'm taking drastic action and resetting the iPhone SE completely....
I needed to reset an iPhone 7 for someone else to use...
  1. Settings > Find My > Find My iPhone: Turn it Off (provide Apple ID password)
  2. Settings > Apple ID > scroll to bottom: Sign Out
  3. Settings > General > Reset: Reset All Content and Settings (acknowledge scary warnings, etc., etc.)
  4. iPhone goes black, shows progress bar, etc. and eventually reaches "Hello" screen.
  5. Connect iPhone to Mac and run iMazing.
  6. The iPhone has not been updated to the latest iOS, despite resetting "all content and settings" — it's still back-level on iOS 13.1.2.
  7. Tell iMazing to update the iPhone to 13.2.2...
  8. iMazing has many interesting status updates during installation (in stark contrast to Apple's total absence of information), including notes about firmware updates, "updating baseband", "fixing up /var", and more.
  9. iMazing says "successfully installed", and iPhone looks to be rebooting with, yet again, the apple logo and progress line (and no other information).
  10. The iPhone eventually gets back to "Hello", with an obnoxiously dim screen, but it's in a dimly lit environment, and shining a bright light on it (because no brightness controls are available at this point) brightens up the screen.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
iOS 13.2.2 didn't change Modem Firmware from iOS 13.2 on either of two iPhones I checked before and after the update.

(It looks like iOS 13.2.1 was never released publicly.) [See below]
 



This may just show my lack of experience as iOS has evolved.

Her battery dying, I persuaded friend to set aside her iPhone 5 and buy new. She chose an iPhone 11.

She also has Windows 7, which is going EOL soon. Before showing her Linux Mint as an alternative to Windows 10, we connected her new iPhone to the computer, which does have iTunes installed. To my surprise, she was able to use Windows Explorer to access the DCIM "folder" on her new iPhone. Even with only 56 photos on the new phone, it crashed several times while importing, but did work. I sorta' presumed that was because she had iTunes installed on her PC.

But, to my greater surprise, I plugged the iPhone 11 into my Linux Mint desktop, a much faster system than her Windows Dell, and was able to access the iPhone DCIM "folder" and smoothly drag all the photos onto my system.

Is that new?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
But, to my greater surprise, I plugged the iPhone 11 into my Linux Mint desktop, a much faster system than her Windows Dell, and was able to access the iPhone DCIM "folder" and smoothly drag all the photos onto my system.
Wow! I had no idea, either, but I just booted Mint 19.2 on a MacBook Air, connected an iPhone X (iOS 13.2.2) via USB-Lightning cable, OK'd access (“Trust this computer?”) on the iPhone, and, bingo, there were photos!
 



iOS and iPadOS 13.2.3 is now out.
So far, so good. The 13.2.3 update seems to have fixed some very annoying problems I've been having with Mail on my iPhone 6s since iOS 13 was released, particularly issues with background message updating and display issues.

It's amazing that iOS 13 was released almost exactly two months ago, and we're already on version 13.2.3. My initial impression is that in a world less driven by Apple's seemingly arbitrary and aggressive marketing deadlines, iOS 13.2.3 would have been the proper initial release of iOS 13, or perhaps it would have been the first incremental bug fix release, i.e. 13.0.1 in that alternate universe.
 


Well, maybe this update will finally restore my battery to good health.

A little background: This is a 2017 iPhone SE with 128 GB. I bought it in February 2019, when AT&T had finally cleared out their warehouse of SEs that had been sitting in storage since heaven knows when (my serial number indicates it was built in the first half of 2017).

When I received the iPhone, I promptly plugged it in. 0% Battery. It took a minute or so for the iPhone to actually start charging. Who knows how long that iPhone had been languishing in a cold warehouse in Somewheresville USA? How long had it been in a state of 0% charge? Months? Years?

So I finally put the newer iPhone to use after my original iPhone SE's battery was pretty much worthless (thanks to upgrading to iOS 13.1.1).

I may have one 15-minute call a day. Maybe one or two brief text messages. That's it. I don't use the iPhone for much anything else. I use my 2014 MacBook Pro for email, writing, work, internet surfing, etc.

Yet at the end of the day (15 hours), I can guarantee you with minimal usage, my battery level is at 30%. Of course the Battery Health indicator shows that it is operating at 100%, peak performance. But I would think that a battery stored in a warehouse for 2 years at 0% charge would certainly have some effect on the battery's lifespan.

I did buy AppleCare Plus, but I know if I take it into the Apple Store, the Genius will run magical tests on it to show me that there is nothing wrong with my battery. And there's no point in bringing up the notorious battery draining issue introduced in iOS 13. They'll just deny it.

Eventually I will have to have a new battery installed. I doubt AppleCare would cover it (good until February 2021). I'm willing to accept that; what I'm not willing to accept is Apple's pointless weekly updates where this-and-that is promised, but the battery life still sucks.
 


It seemed worth a try on my iPhone, also with poor battery life on iOS 13 (and all its updates).

I installed it and took a look at my top battery usage apps yet again. Hmmm...

Settings > Battery > Last 5 Days

App Store
Background Activity
33%
Phone
Low Signal
33%
Mail
Background Activity
14%

Interestingly, "Low Signal" first appeared only after the iOS update today... It was not listed previously (and I've checked frequently over the last 5 days).

And App Store activity is the top battery drain at 33% over 5 days, when I hardly ever use the App Store and always quit out of it? What's with that? (iOS updates? But Auto Update is turned Off.)
I see Apple Music as active in Background Activity. How do I turn it off? I don't use Music on my phone (iphone SE).
 


And App Store activity is the top battery drain at 33% over 5 days, when I hardly ever use the App Store and always quit out of it? What's with that? (iOS updates? But Auto Update is turned Off.)
Auto Update may be turned off, but that doesn't mean that iOS is not checking for updates and that it will not download the update if it is available. I have deleted the iOS 13 update from my iPhone 7 (iOS 12.4.1) even though I have Auto Update turned off. As such, I would expect some activity from the App Store, but your amount does seem excessive.
 


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