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The battery on my iPhone 6 was becoming very problematic. Unexpected shutdowns, slowness, sudden draining. Though it qualified for the $29 battery replacement, thanks to symptoms, the Battery Health beta and Coconut Battery, the nearest Apple store is about five hours away. The word is that shipping a phone off to Apple takes five business days. Untenable.

There's a local tech shop here with a pretty good rep. So, after a preliminary phone backup, I dropped in with no appointment and an hour later walked out with a freshly installed battery. Cost: $54.

After having lived with a phone in Geriatric Mode, spending a lot of time on the Low Power setting, my device is now downright frisky. I can go two or three days without even charging!

Sometimes it's just not worth holding out for the super special price.
 
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I'm in a similar boat, with nearest Apple store 2 hours away. And, of course, although you can get an "appointment" at the Apple store, that appointment does not guarantee that your battery replacement will actually be available/held for you when you appear there (after a multi-hour drive). So I agree, Apple should modernize its battery replacement/appointment procedure to take into account many of us who don't live near a store.
 


So I agree, Apple should modernize its battery replacement/appointment procedure to take into account many of us who don't live near a store.
Apple would say they've already done that. Like I said, you can do it through the mail. Be without your phone for at least a week.
 


If Coconut Battery Plus says an iPhone 5S battery has 92.8% of Design Capacity and 128 Cycle Count, is this a certifiably good battery, something else is wrong?

My wife's 5s tanked dramatically after updating to 11.3.1. It would seem coincidental, but we can’t find any likely culprits. Coconut says it's a good battery.

Thanks.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
If Coconut Battery Plus says an iPhone 5S battery has 92.8% of Design Capacity and 128 Cycle Count, is this a certifiably good battery, something else is wrong?

My wife's 5s tanked dramatically after updating to 11.3.1. It would seem coincidental, but we can’t find any likely culprits. Coconut says it's a good battery.
Sounds like a software, not hardware, problem, but I suggest checking Apple's own tools:
  • Settings > Battery > Battery Health (beta)
  • Settings > Battery > Battery Usage
It's often the case that the battery drains quickly after an update, as iOS does mysterious things sillently behind the scenes that use a lot of power. This should diminish with time.
 


My experience is that Coconut Battery gives a worse result than either the battery health (beta) or the app Battery Life. Both of those agree. Right now they say my capacity is 1800/1821 or 99% and battery is at 94%. Coconut Battery says 1790/1821 or 98.3% with 90.1% charge. Not sure why there is this discrepancy.
 


iOS's new battery health features do not work on the 5s and earlier.

The Coconut author discusses the discrepancy on his page. As I recall, it was just a different approach to interpreting the raw readings. Didn't really seem significant either way.

We went through settings repeatedly, looking for culprits (even though nothing had been changed). I've read that after updates the iOS needs to rebuild caches and indexes, but no one in the household has run into this before. Nonetheless, we gave it almost a week to settle down. Also, did a factory reset - no difference. It was too late to try backing the update out.

With a vacation looming, my wife didn't want to mess with it, and had Batteries Plus swap it out. Seems to have solved the problem.

Thanks, though.
 


It's often the case that the battery drains quickly after an update ... This should diminish with time.
That's what I thought, too. Three days after upping to iOS 11.3.1 my iPhone 6s battery was down to half a usable day, so I ran an iTunes backup, downloaded iOS 11.3.1, reinstalled, and restored my stuff. A day later the battery was back to 24-ish hrs.
 


That's what I thought, too. Three days after upping to iOS 11.3.1 my iPhone 6s battery was down to half a usable day, so I ran an iTunes backup, downloaded iOS 11.3.1, reinstalled, and restored my stuff. A day later the battery was back to 24-ish hrs.
I always do a hard reset after updating an iOS, as well as reset my network settings.
 


My ancient Griffin charge block that I received when I had purchased a used iPhone 4s years ago finally broke and I'm looking for a replacement wall charger for my current iPhone 7 Plus. I have read that many "Apple OEM" chargers sold on Amazon and eBay are fake; perhaps this is true.

It's my understanding that older charge blocks with the green dot are preferred over older ones without the green dot. I have no idea if current Apple charge blocks have a green dot.

I purchased one off of eBay which showed a green dot in the photos, but unfortunately the one I received did not have the green dot. I requested a green dot charge block from the seller, and he simply gave me a refund and a return shipping mailing label. I accepted.

So, other than purchasing for full price a charging block from an Apple Store, what options are there for a good, safe charger? Third-party is fine and more powerful than the Apple cube is also fine. Any tips on how to tell if an ad for an Apple charge block is selling a real one or not?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... I'm looking for a replacement wall charger for my current iPhone 7 Plus. I have read that many "Apple OEM" chargers sold on Amazon and eBay are fake; perhaps this is true...
I'm curious about where you heard this "green dot" story. It's something I don't recall ever hearing before.

I think, in your situation, I'd just buy an iPad charger directly from Apple (iPad vs. iPhone because it has more power). That's what I use.

But, aren't we just talking about a USB power supply? They're virtually universal now in various convenient forms, e.g. surge protector/outlet strips with USB charging ports built-in.
 


I'm curious about where you heard this "green dot" story. It's something I don't recall ever hearing before.
I believe this will solve the "green dot" mystery - Apple used it as a visual mark during the iPhone 3G ultracompact recall a decade (!) ago. The green adaptors are the (green=good) replacements supplied by Apple.
Apple said:
Apple Ultracompact USB Power Adapter Exchange Program

Important Safety Notice

On September 20, 2008, Apple announced the Apple Ultracompact USB Power Adapter Exchange program.

Apple has determined that under certain conditions the new ultracompact Apple USB power adapter's metal prongs can break off and remain in a power outlet, creating a risk of electric shock. We have received reports of detached blades involving a very small percentage of the adapters sold, but no injuries have been reported.

The ultracompact USB power adapters were supplied with every iPhone 3G sold in the following countries, and may also have been purchased separately as an accessory.

... If you have an ultracompact adapter with a green dot on the bottom, you already have a new, redesigned adapter and do not need to participate in this exchange program.
 


The reason for not using any ol’ USB connector is that Apple has a good deal of built in “anti-fry” circuitry. Not only are they unlikely to hurt your phone, but they shouldn’t burn your house down, either. I’m not saying dead phones or house fires are common due to third-party USB adapters, but people who have opened up both have found that Apple is cautious and puts in safeguards that generic manufacturers (even those selling under good company names) don’t.

I would pay extra for the Apple connector. There are a small number of other trustworthy companies as well.
 


eBay has numerous new Apple iPad 12W chargers, part number MD836LL/A, complete with appropriate stickers, box and instruction pamphlet for sale for $8 to $10. Any way I can tell if these are actual Apple OEM chargers?
 



I think the green dot is now gone.
My iPhone SE came without a green dot charger and a different model number (A1385) made by Artesyn, while my old stash of green dot chargers are A1265 by Flextronics. Macsales often has discounted NOS and used Apple USB chargers, all of mine appear genuine.

The nice article I read about Apple charger safety has extensive analysis and tips on identifying genuine units from Ken Shiriff's Blog, who also has posts on several other Apple and clone chargers:
 


This is a good article on why there are compelling safety reasons to spend the money on a genuine Apple charger:

Tiny, cheap, and dangerous: Inside a (fake) iPhone charger

Personally, I take a risk management perspective when thinking about decisions like this. Sure, I might be able to save a few dollars by buying a no-name charger or by taking a chance with a third-party seller... but the costs of the damage a faulty charger might cause, even if the probability is small, far outweigh the minimal benefit of paying, say, US$7.99 versus US$19. To me, making a bricked device or a fire or a shock injury as unlikely as possible is worth 11 bucks.
 


The reason for not using any ol’ USB connector is that Apple has a good deal of built in “anti-fry” circuitry. Not only are they unlikely to hurt your phone, but they shouldn’t burn your house down, either. I’m not saying dead phones or house fires are common due to third-party USB adapters, but people who have opened up both have found that Apple is cautious and puts in safeguards that generic manufacturers (even those selling under good company names) don’t. I would pay extra for the Apple connector. There are a small number of other trustworthy companies as well.
I use iClever chargers and cords. A double charger allows you to potentially use a taken receptacle at an airport. I have a 10-foot charging cord for motels that have the receptacle some distance from the flat space that you need for the phone . Here is one example on Amazon.
 


eBay has numerous new Apple iPad 12W chargers, part number MD836LL/A, complete with appropriate stickers, box and instruction pamphlet for sale for $8 to $10. Any way I can tell if these are actual Apple OEM chargers?
Given how rampant counterfeit power bricks (and other Apple accessories) are these days, I wouldn't trust any such product from an eBay reseller at any price. The seller himself might not even know if they are genuine or fake.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I had a niece who fried her iPhone by plugging into a charger she got from the grocery store.
A friend's iPhone SE died suddenly and totally - Apple said it was unrepairable - which seemed very strange to me. He had not been using a third-party charger, but it turned out he had been using a generic (probably Chinese) external battery pack for more runtime, which seems like the most likely culprit to me. It was out of warranty, so that was a very expensive problem (having to replace it).
 


The reason for not using any ol’ USB connector is that Apple has a good deal of built in “anti-fry” circuitry. Not only are they unlikely to hurt your phone, but they shouldn’t burn your house down, either. I’m not saying dead phones or house fires are common due to third-party USB adapters, but people who have opened up both have found that Apple is cautious and puts in safeguards that generic manufacturers (even those selling under good company names) don’t.

I would pay extra for the Apple connector. There are a small number of other trustworthy companies as well.
I have use Griffin for charging my iPhone 6. I ordered another to carry on trips, just the part that plugs into an outlet. I can also charge my iPod. I had no problem for years.
 


Everyone please note that the real problem being described here is that of buying no-name knockoffs versus from reputable manufacturers. Designing and making a USB charger that protects the downstream devices from power fault conditions isn't magic and doesn't require Apple to accomplish it. If, however, getting the lowest possible price is your goal, then you may very well wind up with a design that is missing certain (usually "cheap") components that would help protect your devices.

Just remember that the USB power spec is fairly straightforward, and well known to engineers who design these chargers, so go with a good team. For my own part, I buy various 6-channel USB power supplies, which means that I don't wind up buying Apple chargers, but I do seek out known manufacturers. (And, yes, I buy them on the right Amazon channel these days.)
 



Please don't ignore the other very real problem of counterfeit products (e.g. fake Apple products that are shoddy and dangerous). It's for that reason that I recommended buying an Apple charger directly from Apple.
On the other hand, there's probably a lower probability of someone making a counterfeit of a quality aftermarket brand like Belkin or Macally.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
On the other hand, there's probably a lower probability of someone making a counterfeit of a quality aftermarket brand like Belkin or Macally.
Or, then again, perhaps not...
Belkin said:
Counterfeit Belkin Products & How to Avoid Them

When you buy a genuine Belkin product, you're also buying the peace of mind that comes with knowing that your purchase is backed by warranties. These warranties “guarantee product quality and protect you if your product needs to be replaced,” while counterfeit and knock-off products do not.

But perhaps most importantly, phony products can function poorly and can even damage your device. Repairs can be costly and time-consuming, and quickly offset any savings you thought you were making by buying a cheaper version.

Belkin products are made of the highest quality materials and put through rigorous quality assurance testing to meet the standards our customers deserve. To avoid the potential hazards of counterfeit products, here are some key things to look out for:
  • If it seems like too good of a deal, it probably is. Be suspicious of massive markdowns on “Belkin” products.
  • If the packaging has spelling errors, is damaged, or seems incomplete in any way, it is probably a fake.
  • Amazon.com is one of our trusted and reputable retailers, but be sure to look out for “Ships from and sold by Amazon.com” or “Ships from and sold by Belkin” on the product page. Purchase from any other reseller and you could be getting a counterfeit.
 


I recently bought an iPhone case on eBay that was the same one my son had gotten. I really liked his. First I noticed the case seemed a bit slipperier. Then I realized none of the buttons actually worked. I took it off and put back on, but then noticed the side of the case had cracked in 3 places. Of course, I had only paid $13 for a $45 case.

My point is, I got a refund and no harm was done to my iPhone. Had this been an equivalently-made charger, my phone would be gone and I have no idea how well I'd be feeling at this point after having 110V AC applied to my skull.

I have a great 25-watt charger from Anker and an Apple 12W charger. I consider any money over the cost of a counterfeit to be money well spent.
 


As a former retailer, I'd say that any brand that has established a positive reputation is at risk of fakes and knockoffs. Products that are black boxes to end users are especially attractive to counterfeiters.
 


I think the green dot is now gone.
My iPhone SE came without a green dot charger and a different model number (A1385) made by Artesyn, while my old stash of green dot chargers are A1265 by Flextronics. Macsales often has discounted NOS and used Apple USB chargers, all of mine appear genuine.
My experience is the same as G Louie's. I'm still using the green dot charger (A1265) with my iPhone SE. MacSales lists new Apple 5W iPhone charger - the photo shows the green dot, but that probably is an old photo.
 


Could this "green dot" on chargers be specific for the U.S.? I live in the Netherlands. The original Apple chargers that came with my iPad and iPhone do not have a green dot.
 


Could this "green dot" on chargers be specific for the U.S.? I live in the Netherlands. The original Apple chargers that came with my iPad and iPhone do not have a green dot.
Ye Olde Internet Search Results via Reddit/r/iphone:
Why do the apple charging blocks have a green dot?
Apple Support said:
Apple Ultracompact USB Power Adapter Exchange Program
Important Safety Notice ...
Apple has determined that under certain conditions the new ultracompact Apple USB power adapter's metal prongs can break off and remain in a power outlet, creating a risk of electric shock. We have received reports of detached blades involving a very small percentage of the adapters sold, but no injuries have been reported.

The ultracompact USB power adapters were supplied with every iPhone 3G sold in the following countries, and may also have been purchased separately as an accessory:
  • US
  • Japan
  • Canada
  • Mexico
  • Several Latin American countries (click here for a detailed list of countries)
... If you have purchased this ultracompact adapter as a standalone accessory, you may also exchange it for a new one. Replacement adapters have a single green dot on the bottom…
 


I'm looking to have the battery in my iPhone SE replaced with the Apple $29 replacement program. I'm on iOS 10.3 by choice.

Does anyone know if Apple will update the iOS as part of the replacement?
 


I'm looking to have the battery in my iPhone SE replaced with the Apple $29 replacement program. I'm on iOS 10.3 by choice. Does anyone know if Apple will update the iOS as part of the replacement?
I had my SE battery replaced for $29 by the Apple Store last week, and in their check-in diagnostics, they noted I was on iOS 10.x but said that was OK. No problem, it came back exactly like I left it, iOS 10.x.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's Apple's latest battery replacement pricing info:
Apple Support said:
iPhone Battery & Power Repair

Phone battery replacement pricing

iPhone model

In-warranty or with AppleCare+

Out of warranty

iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, iPhone XR

$0

$69

iPhone SE, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, iPhone X

$0

$29*

All other eligible models

$0

$79
*Through December 31, 2018, the out-of-warranty battery service fee is $29 for all eligible iPhone 6 or later models. Battery service at $29 may be limited to one repair per iPhone. After December 31, 2018, the fee will change to $49 for all these products except iPhone X, which will change to $69.
 


The other day, my iPad Pro 10.5" (running iOS 11.4.1) stopped recognizing the lightning cable when I plugged it in. Well, almost - the iPad sometimes recognized it after I manipulated it for a few minutes. Even when I got it to do that, it sometimes disconnected itself when left untouched on a table. I tried a total of three different charger/cable combinations, all with the same result.

I took it to the Apple Store, and the Genius checked to make sure it wasn't dirt in the port, and then said it must be a bad pin or connector. Sadly, it was one year and 48 days old, so I had to pay the service charge of $449 plus tax to exchange it for a new one.

I do all my backups on iTunes, but my most recent one was August 15. I never keep any data on the iPad that is not also in iCloud and/or on my iMac, so I wasn't worried about losing data. I had to upgrade the new iPad to iOS 12 first, then do the restore. After a long process of having me practice entering my Apple ID password many times, the restore completed.

Since I'm using iTunes 12.8, the apps had to be redownloaded from iCloud. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this was done automatically, and that my icon arrangement had been fully restored. What I didn't expect, but makes sense, is that the apps were downloaded using the version that had been on the iPad on August 15. I could tell this from the fact that after the process finished, I had 80+ apps to update, and the app with the oldest available update happened to be a few days after August 15. I decided this was the right thing to do, since maybe I didn't want to update some of my apps beyond where I had them.

Other than having to spend an unexpected sum of money, the whole process went pretty smoothly, if a bit tediously.
 


The other day, my iPad Pro 10.5" (running iOS 11.4.1) stopped recognizing the lightning cable when I plugged it in. Well, almost - the iPad sometimes recognized it after I manipulated it for a few minutes. Even when I got it to do that, it sometimes disconnected itself when left untouched on a table. I tried a total of three different charger/cable combinations, all with the same result.
I took it to the Apple Store, and the Genius checked to make sure it wasn't dirt in the port, and then said it must be a bad pin or connector. Sadly, it was one year and 48 days old, so I had to pay the service charge of $449 plus tax to exchange it for a new one....
I've had AppleCare pay off twice. First, my 2006 MacBook needed a new fan toward the end of the second-year AppleCare extended warranty. New fan, no charge. Second, my iPad Pro 10.5" developed a display flaw just into the second-year AppleCare extended warranty term. The local Apple Store Genius glanced at the flaw and gave me a new iPad. No fuss, no hassle. I'm sold on AppleCare.
 


Sadly, it was one year and 48 days old, so I had to pay the service charge of $449 plus tax to exchange it for a new one.
How did you pay for the original purchase of your iPad? If you used a credit card to pay for it in full, most credit cards come with extended warranty service, which will pay for repairs on purchases for 1-2 years additional beyond the expiration of the original manufacturer's warranty (or, sometimes, beyond the expiration of extended warranty services too, like AppleCare).

Check the benefits guide for your card or call your issuing bank. If your purchase is covered, then they'll reimburse you in full for the repair/replacement cost. You'll usually have to submit a copy of the original sales receipt, a copy of your credit card statement showing the purchase on your card, a copy of the manufacturer's warranty (can be found on Apple's website), and a copy of the repair order/invoice.
 



Ouch, I guess this issue isn't over yet...
Journalists (and many users, apparently) believe that the better approach is what Apple did in the good old days of iOS 6. Like my iPod Touch which runs at full speed, but with a battery indicator that drops from full to empty in 10 minutes, causing the whole device to power off afterward.

When you've got an old battery, there are only two choices. Either slow down the software to extend run-time or don't, and reduce the run-time to mere minutes.

I can guarantee you that if Apple didn't implement the slow-down approach, then those very same journalists would start criticizing Apple for selling a device that can't remain charged long enough to make a phone call.

Apple is in a no-win situation here and will remain there until somebody invents a battery that never wears out. I suppose they could start making user-replaceable batteries, but it appears that nobody in the industry is willing to do that anymore.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I can guarantee you that if Apple didn't implement the slow-down approach, then those very same journalists would start criticizing Apple for selling a device that can't remain charged long enough to make a phone call.
I think you misunderstand the issue, which is not that Apple has implemented mechanisms for solving a technical issue with battery power but rather that Apple did this in secret without telling its customers, so they become confused about what was really happening and the false implication that their iPhones (not batteries) were just too old and needed to be replaced, pushing them into expensive new iPhone purchases they didn't actually need. That's the issue here. (And, of course, making the batteries customer-replaceable would go a long way to solving all these issues, but that's apparently impossible for Apple to do now, as it constantly and blatently pushes its customers into spending time and money at Apple Stores.)
 


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