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Yesterday, making no calls on my iPhone 6S+, at 5pm, it was at 43%. I did a reset (hold power + home/touch button), the phone came back up and was at... 72% battery.

By 10pm, it was down to 60%. Again, no calls. I had no apps open. Just normal Bluetooth/WiFi active. Max capacity still at 91%.

Peak Performance Capacity always shows "This iPhone has experienced an unexpected shutdown because the battery was unable to deliver the necessary peak power.
The first question I would ask is, how old is the battery? I have the previous model, the 6 Plus. Just this past December, I had a sudden marked decrease in my charging capacity and battery power, though it never died, though it did do weird things like register 38% when I turned the phone off, only to drop immediately to 33% when I turned it back on. At no time did Peak Performance Capability ever display anything other than "Your battery is currently supporting normal peak performance."

Apple nonetheless diagnosed the battery as having failed and promptly replaced it. Problem solved.

With your combination of symptoms, your battery seems like a prime candidate for replacement. I really don't think any settings change you can make is likely to fix what you're experiencing.
 


The phone went dead and would not restart until I got back to the hotel and plugged it in...Why can’t LP mode be normal and the High Drain, Crash your Phone mode be chosen by the user?
Here, too, I would wonder about the age and/or condition of your battery, despite anything Apple's Battery Health metrics might say. The "high drain" mode shouldn't crash your phone in the absence of a worn out or otherwise malfunctioning battery.
 


Here, too, I would wonder about the age and/or condition of your battery, despite anything Apple's Battery Health metrics might say. The "high drain" mode shouldn't crash your phone in the absence of a worn out or otherwise malfunctioning battery.
Interesting thought, but, it is on its second battery - the first was replaced under the recall, and when I was first having problems (December), I took it in, and Apple refused to do anything with it, saying it was behaving normally.
 


Yesterday, making no calls on my iPhone 6S+, at 5pm, it was at 43%. I did a reset (hold power + home/touch button), the phone came back up and was at... 72% battery.
By 10pm, it was down to 60%. Again, no calls. I had no apps open. Just normal Bluetooth/WiFi active. Max capacity still at 91%.
Peak Performance Capacity always shows "This iPhone has experienced an unexpected shutdown because the battery was unable to deliver the necessary peak power. Performance management has been applied to help prevent this from happening again. Disable..."
Clicking the Disable link has a pop-up, "Disabling May Lead to Unexpected Shutdowns. Disable or Leave on"
I am setting it to Low Power Mode until 5pm to see if it makes any difference.
An iPhone 5S behaved the same way. A battery change-out fixed the problem. I am not sure that the battery capacity percent value is sufficient to indicate total battery performance under load.
 


Not entirely related, but similar: I have a 2017 10-inch iPad Pro. Lovely thing - used it all the time. About 6 weeks ago the battery started draining quickly (doing nothing, discharging in 6 hours or so).

I ran CoconutBattery, which said 78% capacity (orange). I took it into an Apple Store in Bluewater and got someone to take a look. She ran their diagnostics and said the battery was fine - according to them, 91% capacity, And what I should do is a wipe and reinstall. I told her I had done that, showed her my tests, and she said she'd be back in 5 minutes. Came back in 5 minutes with a new identical iPad Pro. I wiped the old one, thanked her very much and took the new one.

Did an install using the backup I'd made that morning. But for the past 2 weeks I've seen the same behaviour.... Thought it might be Clash of Clans, so removed that. Still a problem. Siri was using a lot of battery the first week but now seems to have finished its jiggery pockery, and still discharging quickly. On airplane mode, the battery doesn't run down, but if connected by wifi, or 4G, or both, it does. Bluetooth off, still draining quickly. Any ideas?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This may be obvious, and it doesn't solve the problems being discussed, but for what it's worth, I'll just note how helpful it can be to give an iPhone a little extra charge during the day, which can be facilitated by two things in my experience:
  • using a power supply with ample current, e.g. an iPad charger or high-powered outlet, dock port, or car adapter
  • a long Lightning-USB cable that allows more convenient use of the iPhone while it's plugged in (e.g. Amazon Basics cords, which have been working fine for me and come in multiple colors)
 


This may be obvious, and doesn't solve the problems being discussed, but for what it's worth, I'll just note how helpful it can be to give an iPhone a little extra charge during the day, which can be facilitated by two things in my experience:
  • using a power supply with ample current, e.g. an iPad charger or high-powered outlet, dock port, or car adapter
  • a long Lightning-USB cable that allows more convenient use of the iPhone while it's plugged in (e.g. Amazon Basics cords, which have been working fine for me and come in multiple colors)
I have a 10-foot charging cord for traveling. It is handy, especially in older motels and hotels that do no have enough receptacles for the 'age of devices' (and what receptacles they do have are often in very inconvenient locations).
 


I have a 10-foot charging cord for traveling. It is handy, especially in older motels and hotels that do no have enough receptacles...
I usually travel with a 12-outlet power strip. Between myself and my wife, we often use most of them (two laptops, iPad, three phones, iPod, iPod touch, camera, Kindle, Apple Watch).
 


... I have a 2017 10-inch iPad Pro. ... About 6 weeks ago the battery started draining quickly (doing nothing, discharging in 6 hours or so). ...I took it into an Apple Store in Bluewater and got someone to take a look. ... Came back in 5 minutes with a new identical iPad Pro. I wiped the old one ...
Did an install using the backup I'd made that morning. But for the past 2 weeks I've seen the same behaviour.... Thought it might be Clash of Clans, so removed that. Still a problem. Siri was using a lot of battery the first week but now seems to have finished its jiggery pockery, and still discharging quickly. On airplane mode, the battery doesn't run down, but if connected by wifi, or 4G, or both, it does. Bluetooth off, still draining quickly. Any ideas?
If you are using iCloud, check which apps are using iCloud and try turning some off. Also, do you use iCloud Backup? If it is "on" try turning it "off" and see if that helps.
 


This may be obvious, and it doesn't solve the problems being discussed, but for what it's worth, I'll just note how helpful it can be to give an iPhone a little extra charge during the day, which can be facilitated by two things in my experience:
  • using a power supply with ample current, e.g. an iPad charger or high-powered outlet, dock port, or car adapter
  • a long Lightning-USB cable that allows more convenient use of the iPhone while it's plugged in (e.g. Amazon Basics cords, which have been working fine for me and come in multiple colors)
Within 2 months of getting my iPad Air (circa 2013), I bought a 10-foot Lightning-USB cable. I generally use the iPad Air charger to charge my iPhone. Thanks, Ric, as your post reminds me that I need to buy a long USB-C to USB-C cable for my iPad Pro 11".
 


If you are using iCloud, check which apps are using iCloud and try turning some off. Also, do you use iCloud Backup? If it is "on" try turning it "off" and see if that helps.
Thanks for the advice, but no, that's not it.... I think it’s something related to being on the internet, because airplane mode was on overnight and the battery hardly discharged at all. If it is not on airplane mode, it goes from 100 to 0 percent overnight.
 


I usually travel with a 12-outlet power strip. Between myself and my wife, we often use most of them (two laptops, iPad, three phones, iPod, iPod touch, camera, Kindle, Apple Watch).
The most important accessory in my travel kit is a 4.5" x 4.75" rectangular pad that converts a standard 2-outlet a/c receptacle into a 3-outlet receptacle that also contains a row of 4 standard USB type A receptacles that will deliver a maximum of 4.2A (shared). I can charge my cordless Beats X in-ear headphones, my iPhone, my iPad, one other device, and my Netgear Nighthawk cellular router simultaneously and still have the same two vacant a/c receptacles I started with. Here's the link:

 


I usually travel with a 12-outlet power strip. Between myself and my wife, we often use most of them (two laptops, iPad, three phones, iPod, iPod touch, camera, Kindle, Apple Watch).
I have a Griffin block plug-in that on the other end is USB. I can charge my iPhone easily. As as I have said before, I also use Unu portable chargers. They charge up the iPhone in the same way as when it is plugged in. The only downside is it take longer to recharge, but I have two of them and think that will resolve the problem when I fly.
 


... no, that's not it.... I think it’s something related to being on the internet, because airplane mode was on overnight and the battery hardly discharged at all. If it is not on airplane mode, it goes from 100 to 0 percent overnight.
Based on your description, when your device is in "airplane mode" your device cannot access the Internet via WiFi or cellular. That's why it does not drain the battery.

When a user turns Airplane Mode "On" it turns "Off" the device's (iPhone/iPad) connection to all wireless networks, including cellular and Wi-Fi. In addition, Bluetooth, GPS, and other related services are "Off". That means that apps or services that require Internet or related services will not work. iCloud, its apps, iCloud Drive and other apps such as Safari require an active Internet connection. See iCloud system requirements.

If you have not been following this thread, consider reading the posts by Bernard H (#79 starting February 6, 2019) with a similar "perplexing problem" with his iPhone and responses by other forum members.
 


... I have a 2017 10-inch iPad Pro. ... About 6 weeks ago the battery started draining quickly (doing nothing, discharging in 6 hours or so).
... Apple Store in Bluewater and got someone to take a look. She ran their diagnostics and said the battery was fine - ... And what I should do is a wipe and reinstall. I told her I had done that, showed her my tests, and she said she'd be back in 5 minutes ... with a new identical iPad Pro. I wiped the old one...
... Did an install using the backup I'd made that morning. But for the past 2 weeks I've seen the same behaviour.... Thought it might be Clash of Clans, so removed that. Still a problem. ... and still discharging quickly. On airplane mode, the battery doesn't run down, but if connected by wifi, or 4G, or both, it does. Bluetooth off, still draining quickly. Any ideas?
Did you use a backup when you performed the "wipe and reinstall" before going to the Apple Store? If yes, then it seems that the culprit is in your backup, since you used a backup in setting up the new iPad.

If checking for rogue apps you use that have iCloud access and any apps that back up to iCloud Drive (as I suggested before) is not something you want to investigate, then you might consider erasing your iPad and setting up as new (to avoid the culprit that is in your backup).
 


Based on your description, when your device is in "airplane mode" your device cannot access the Internet via WiFi or cellular. That's why it does not drain the battery.

When a.....See iCloud system requirements.

If ...forum members.
Thanks for taking the time to reply, but it's not quite what I'm asking. The question is, 'why does the battery in a new iPad drain very fast except when airplane mode is on?'

It's not inherent to the machine as it retains battery when airplane mode is on. But when connected to the internet it does. (I haven't done the experiment yet with bluetooth off but 4G and wireless on to be honest though, so it could possible be bluetooth)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Thanks for taking the time to reply, but it's not quite what I'm asking. The question is, 'why does the battery in a new iPad drain very fast except when airplane mode is on?'...
As LilLC mentioned, there's a lot of good information in the postings above, but to answer your specific question, wireless Internet access requires a radio in the iPhone that includes a transmitter, and that draws power, draining your battery at variable rates, depending on things such as signal strength.

As one example, you may find that your iPhone battery level drops quite rapidly while on a hike in an area with poor cellphone coverage, as the iPhone maximizes transmitter power in its straining attempts to connect to a cell tower. Enabling airplane mode can turn off the radio and thus save power and battery drain.
 


As LilLC mentioned, ... thus save power and battery drain.
Thanks.

Continuing to experiment. Wiped the new (from Apple 2 weeks ago) 2017 iPad Pro 10" A1709, 4G.

Wiped the machine and reinstalled iOS 12.2 fresh. Didn't install anything else, removed a few Apple apps. iCloud Drive is off, iCloud Backup is off, any kind of Photo sharing is off, it is using iCloud for Mail, Contacts, Calendar, Messages, Safari, Game Center, Keychain and Find My iPad but as far as I know nothing else. It isn't listening for Hey Siri or Press Home for Siri. The only use of Siri is 'Suggestions in Search' and each app has 'Show App' but not 'Siri and Suggestions'. I can't think what else to turn off and still be able to reasonably use it.

Overnight it went from 74% to 0% in 6 hours with me not touching it (screen off). Wifi was on but 4G and bluetooth were off.

For comparison I also have a newer (2018, A1934) 4G iPad Pro 10" with iCloud Drive on, listening for hey Siri, all Photo sharing stuff off, and various apps. It was used yesterday for 1.5 hours for some games, reading a newspaper, email, and a tv episode and left overnight with Wifi, Bluetooth, 4G all on. Went from 76% to 48% in 22 hours.

The 2017 iPad doesn't drain the battery if airplane mode is on, but that rather takes away the point of the device. I'm at a loss....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... Overnight it went from 74% to 0% in 6 hours with me not touching it (screen off). Wifi was on but 4G and bluetooth were off....
For comparison, I have a 16GB iPad Air (recently updated to iOS 12.2) that goes for days with WiFi and Bluetooth turned on and the battery not draining. iCloud is turned off. (An Apple ID is signed in.)
 


If you are using iCloud, check which apps are using iCloud and try turning some off. Also, do you use iCloud Backup? If it is "on" try turning it "off" and see if that helps.
I've been whining here about the battery drain on my iPhone XS Max since I bought the device. Used to go from a 100% charge to about 70% overnight with nothing on. Sometimes it would drop to less than a 70% charge, still with nothing on.

I updated to iOS 12.2 and, voila, overnight - and with the same settings - it goes from a 100% charge to between 92-98%! Happy!
 



For comparison, I have a 16GB iPad Air (recently updated to iOS 12.2) that goes for days with WiFi and Bluetooth turned on and the battery not draining.
An update:
Wiped the machine (new, 5 weeks ago from Apple, 2017 iPad Pro 10.5") and did a fresh install of iOS 12.2. Made a new, fresh, empty iCloud account and logged onto that. Left all settings on the defaults, with Bluetooth, Wifi and 4G all on. Unused, screen off, it runs down 1% per hour over a 48-hour period.

Logged out of the new, fresh iCloud account and logged into my own iCloud account. My iCloud account has 3 photos, 50 Pages documents, various Calendar, Safari, Contacts bits and pieces and 8 GB of mail. Left it on, plugged in and charging for about 48 hours to let it 'settle down'. Not charging, it runs down about 16% per hour (i.e. completely in about 6 hours) unused with the screen off.

I've taken it in to an Apple Store, who advised me to phone Apple support. So far, I've had three half-hour or so sessions with them on the phone, during the last of which they turned on (I think it is called) Extended Logging for 24 hours. I've sent them the log, and it's now in Apple's hands.
 


I had my iPhone 6 Plus battery replaced in December. Just last night, I noticed the new battery's maximum capacity has already dropped to 99 percent. I know it's not a huge drop (in fact, it's the smallest possible drop), but it still seems quick, considering how careful I have been to avoid stressing the battery, unplugging it as soon as I notice it has reached 100 percent, for example.

I guess it could fall under OCD, but I've been checking it more often since upgrading to iOS 12.2, and it still said 100% two days ago.

Or is it not unheard of for a change in capacity to happen this early on?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I had my iPhone 6 Plus battery replaced in December. Just last night, I noticed the new battery's maximum capacity has already dropped to 99 percent.
For comparison, a refurb iPhone 7 purchased in Nov. 2018 currently shows 100% battery capacity. Ditto for an iPhone SE refurb bought in Jan. 2019.
 


For comparison, a refurb iPhone 7 purchased in Nov. 2018 currently shows 100% battery capacity. Ditto for an iPhone SE refurb bought in Jan. 2019.
Thanks, Ric. Hmm. Despite having been careful, there have been a couple occasions on which I've let the battery get very near empty before recharging, which isn't great for the battery either, now that I think of it... I suppose that's what I get.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For comparison, a refurb iPhone 7 purchased in Nov. 2018 currently shows 100% battery capacity. Ditto for an iPhone SE refurb bought in Jan. 2019.
Despite having been careful, there have been a couple occasions on which I've let the battery get very near empty before recharging, which isn't great for the battery either, now that I think of it... I suppose that's what I get.
For what it's worth, the iPhone 7 and iPhone SE are typically kept over 50% charged and recharged to 100% nightly, virtually never run down all the way.

An iPhone SE bought in 2016 and treated in a similar way was down to 88% a few months ago.
 


I had my iPhone 6 Plus battery replaced in December. Just last night, I noticed the new battery's maximum capacity has already dropped to 99 percent. I know it's not a huge drop (in fact, it's the smallest possible drop), but it still seems quick, considering how careful I have been to avoid stressing the battery, unplugging it as soon as I notice it has reached 100 percent, for example.
If you do not want for your battery life to go down, have the phone plugged all the time. Why unplug it at 100%? The battery charging circuits will go to trickle charge to maintain the 100%. They will not overcharge the battery.
 


I had my iPhone 6 Plus battery replaced in December. Just last night, I noticed the new battery's maximum capacity has already dropped to 99 percent. I know it's not a huge drop (in fact, it's the smallest possible drop), but it still seems quick, considering how careful I have been to avoid stressing the battery, unplugging it as soon as I notice it has reached 100 percent, for example.
As Pedro G said...

We've discussed this before in MacInTouch. Li-ion batteries are not like NiCd and NiMH. What uses up Li-ion battery life is running on battery. There is no penalty for frequent charging. The Apple charging circuitry will prevent overcharging.

I just sold an iPad Air 2 that still had 99% battery capacity, after over four years of use. I kept it on the charger whenever I wasn't using it. I never ran any "maintenance" full discharges.
 


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