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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For the past few days the battery indicator on my iPhone 6s always displays 100%, even after hours of use. There are a number of suggestions on-line as to how to fix this...
What a timely and interesting coincidence...
I had a strange Apple Watch Series 4 problem last week. The battery indicator was stuck at 100% even after more than a day's use. EventuallyI found the watch in low power mode showing only the time when the crown is pressed. Obviously, the battery was extremely low, but still it recently showed 100%. I tried restarting the watch and iPhone, restoring the watch from backup and restoring as a new watch. Still stuck on 100% battery.
 


What a timely and interesting coincidence...
Yeah. When I saw Thomas's post, I figured it was a good time to post my problem.

I have some additional info: I've discovered that if I turn my phone off (not reboot) and leave it off for a while, when I turn it back on, the battery indicator is (probably) correct. But, when I then charge the phone, it reaches 100% and then sticks there.

Also, if I look at my phone with Coconut Battery, it shows both Current charge and Full Charge Capacity at 3639 mAh, but the Design capacity is 1715. If I turn the phone off for a while and then on again, Coconut Battery shows both Current charge and Full Charge Capacity at 1777 mAh.
 


For the past few days the battery indicator on my iPhone 6s always displays 100%, even after hours of use. There are a number of suggestions on-line as to how to fix this, and I have tried them all, including changing the date settings, force-rebooting the phone, etc. Coconut Battery also indicates that the battery is fully charged.

(I should note here that this phone is on its third battery. The battery that came with the phone lasted less than two years. The second, from Apple's battery replacement program, lasted less than a year. The current battery is from a third party and has been working well for about a year. It generally lasts all day. But I am not a heavy user.)

Last night the phone suddenly showed the battery discharged display. I connected it to a charger but soon after, it went through a cycle of crash, reboot, log in, repeat. I force-rebooted it again, and when it rebooted, it seemed stable and showed 79% – the first time in a couple of days that it has showed less than 100%.

But then I glanced at my Apple Watch, which had that clock-like progress indicator. Back to the phone, which says that my new Apple Watch is almost finished syncing. (Bummer, because I was baking bread and had set a timer on the watch. Now I had no idea when the bread would be done.) When the syncing finished (about 30 minutes), my phone said, "Welcome to Apple Watch", and the watch said "Timer Done" (too late; I'd already removed the bread from the oven).

I left the phone off the charger all night, and this morning it shows 100%, which can't be right.

Is this likely a hardware problem and, if so, is it worth fixing or do I need a new phone?
I had a smilar problem with an iPhone 6s. After a lot of polite complaining, Apple very graciously offered to provide a third battery at no charge. I attributed the problem to installation of iOS beta software, rightly or not, as I had the same situation described above occurring. Elected to trade it in for a new iPhone 11.
 


After seeing me struggle with, and be unable to use, my iPhone 6s for a few days, my wife came home with a brand new iPhone for me. Lucky guy. Anyway, that freed up the iPhone 6s for more testing.

I did a factory reset and iOS reinstall. That seems to have fixed things. The battery percentage indicator performs as expected and seems to match what Coconut Battery measures.

I guess only time will tell whether or not the fix is permanent.

(Please don't tell my wife, she might take the new phone back.)
 


Hoping the experts on MacInTouch can give me an answer:

I have an iPhone SE I use only for emergency and travel. I've shut down most functions, including any use of Siri (or so I thought.) When my phone battery drained completely overnight, I checked the Battery app activity in Settings and Siri use was 100%. Does anyone know why Siri, after being shut off everywhere I can find in Settings, could still be active and drain my battery? Is there any way to shut Siri down completely? Thanks in advance for any info and/or suggestions.
 


Hoping the experts on MacInTouch can give me an answer:
I have an iPhone SE I use only for emergency and travel. I've shut down most functions, including any use of Siri (or so I thought.) When my phone battery drained completely overnight, I checked the Battery app activity in Settings and Siri use was 100%. Does anyone know why Siri, after being shut off everywhere I can find in Settings, could still be active and drain my battery? Is there any way to shut Siri down completely? Thanks in advance for any info and/or suggestions.
if Siri is the only application running, it is 100% no matter if it is the culprit. But there might be background activities which are not shown. Under macOS 10.15, the phone mounts on the desktop, and I have seen activities in Console (took screen shots but they are on my home computer).
 


I have an iPhone SE I use only for emergency and travel. I've shut down most functions, including any use of Siri (or so I thought.) When my phone battery drained completely overnight, I checked the Battery app activity in Settings and Siri use was 100%. … Is there any way to shut Siri down completely?
Try the Settings > Siri & Search, scroll down and check each app to be sure "Siri & Suggestions" is Off.

Note: Over time, I've added apps and those defaulted to Siri & Suggestions "On".
 


Try the Settings > Siri & Search, scroll down and check each app to be sure "Siri & Suggestions" is Off.

Note: Over time, I've added apps and those defaulted to Siri & Suggestions "On".
Thank you for the suggestion. All apps are Off. I tried to shut off Siri everywhere and am not sure where it's sneaking by me.
 


Thank you for the suggestion. All apps are Off. I tried to shut off Siri everywhere and am not sure where it's sneaking by me.
An update: Siri is turned Off everywhere I can find. After sitting overnight unused, my iPhone battery this morning was down to 35%. Battery setting showed Siri using 75%, lock screen the remaining 25%. I'm still on iOS 12.4.1. All apps are closed, I have auto download off. Very frustrating to find Siri/Apple communicating somehow/somewhere without my knowledge or permission.
 




Thank you! This has to be the issue, it's the only thing I haven't checked, I'll definitely know tomorrow. Thank you again.
In the recent past I had a similar problem with Siri running the battery down overnight with nothing else running on my iPhone 8. I often use dictation (speech-to-text) with Messages. I found a work-around (but no explanation) on-line that suggested playing any song in your Music app as the last thing before you stop using your phone for the night. Apparently Siri stops listening when you play Music. Siri never ran the battery down overnight when I followed this process. On those nights when I didn't, Siri might or might not cause a problem. However, I haven't had this problem in months and I'm now running 13.3.1. I don't know if it was fixed by an iOS update or not, but it's not a problem for me now.
 


Thank you! This has to be the issue, it's the only thing I haven't checked, I'll definitely know tomorrow. Thank you again.
I spoke too soon. iPhone was down to 23% this morning, with Siri using over 50% of battery usage. Next step is to try M. Stallcup's suggestion ("...playing any song in your Music app...").
 


I spoke too soon. iPhone was down to 23% this morning, with Siri using over 50% of battery usage. Next step is to try M. Stallcup's suggestion ("...playing any song in your Music app...").
In addition, if you have not already done so, reboot your iPhone, as that should clear cache memory.
 


In addition, if you have not already done so, reboot your iPhone, as that should clear cache memory.
Finally! This was the final piece of the puzzle, no more rapid battery drain. To recap, I turned off Siri for every app; I turned off Dictation; last but not least, I rebooted the phone. Battery drain was 7% over the last 24 hrs, contrasting with ~75% drain the previous 24-hour periods.

Thanks to all of you for your suggestions, the MacInTouch community is the best!
 


Finally! This was the final piece of the puzzle, no more rapid battery drain. To recap, I turned off Siri for every app; I turned off Dictation; last but not least, I rebooted the phone. Battery drain was 7% over the last 24 hrs, contrasting with ~75% drain the previous 24-hour periods.
Thanks to all of you for your suggestions, the MacInTouch community is the best!
A note on iPhone rebooting: My wife's iPhone 5s battery was graphing a 45-degree straight descent from the moment it came off the charger with no usage whatsoever for weeks. We tried everything, including rebooting - no luck. After worrying at it for a few more hours last night, I unplugged it, did an f'-it reboot and went to bed. It was still 100% this morning, and going strong.

What my wife noticed was that this time the reboot created an entry in Settings > Privacy > Analytics & Improvements > Analytics Data. The prior reboot did not. Perhaps it is worth checking for that log entry after any reboot, and trying again if it's not present?
 


I don't know if you can restore an iMazing backup wirelessly to a new iPhone without first connecting it via Lightning/USB, but the extensive iMazing documentation suggests that USB/Lightning "pairing" is a prerequisite (which may be a function of the Apple software libraries – I don't know).
Ric, thanks for your response. My previous iPhone 6s Plus lost the Lightning connection, and it was repaired by the one dealer still open doing repairs. I then bought an iPhone 8 Plus from the Amazon (Renewed) site, and it works beautifully, is in pristine condition, but the Lightning port has failed on this, so Amazon have agreed to a return and refund. I have ordered another, which says "New" on their website, and it should arrive tomorrow or Friday.

Meanwhile, of course, I can charge it with my Nanami QI charger. These ports seem to be a bit of an Achilles heel on iPhones – not easy to clean. Moral do not put them in your pocket. I have a soft case, which has a charger (folding-prong type) and a cable. Should keep the port away from fluff.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... These ports seem to be a bit of an Achilles heel on iPhones...
That hasn't been my experience at all, nor have I seen it become an issue for many other people. I've kept iPhones in pockets constantly for many years, since before the first Lightning port was introduced, and never had a problem with a Lightning port (knock on wood!). Nor have I had seen Lightning problems with any of the iPhones or iPads owned by people I support.

One family had problems with Home buttons on older iPhones, which led to some creative workarounds, but the hardware has generally been quite reliable (with the iPhone SE currently prominent among people I support).
 


I've had multiple failures with lightning port connections... all traced back to bad contacts on the lightning cable. The second through fourth contacts seem subject to corrosion issues - I don't know if those contacts are the ones that pass power for charging, but it's always the same contacts. I have 'solved' the issue sometimes by inverting the connector, but that's temporary at best. I always end up replacing the cable and forgetting about it for a few months. The source of the cable doesn't seem to matter: Apple's cables fail as often as third-party cables.

To throw some perspective, I'm talking about 6 months plus for a cable used daily across multiple iDevices. And I live in a relatively humid environment, which may contribute to arcing when plugging/unplugging the cables.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I've had multiple failures with lightning port connections... all traced back to bad contacts on the lightning cable. ... The source of the cable doesn't seem to matter: Apple's cables fail as often as third-party cables. ... I live in a relatively humid environment, which may contribute to arcing when plugging/unplugging the cables.
As mentioned, I haven't seen this problem using at least three Lightning-USB cables constantly, although I did see an issue with one person's Lightning cable in a kitchen with cats - it wasn't clear what the source of the problem was, and I just discarded the cable and got a new one, which has been fine (iPhone SE and iPad Mini with A/C wall adapter that has USB power ports).

I don't use Apple cables, though (as Apple accessories have shown awful quality) but rather the nicer Amazon Basics Lightning-USB cables in various lengths and colors, and I don't abuse them.

The power source might also be a factor. I generally use Apple iPad power adapters along with A/C power strips that have USB power ports built in. (I almost never use Apple cables or iPhone power adapters.)

(FWIW, I live where the weather varies a great deal, in terms of temperature, humidity, precipitation, etc.)
 


I don't use Apple cables ... but rather the nicer Amazon Basics Lightning-USB cables in various lengths and colors,
I've been very happy with Anker cables (also sold through Amazon), especially the ones with braided nylon insulation, but even they fail eventually.

I don't know what the deal is with Lightening (maybe the ID chip?) but none of them are as reliable as the old 30-pin dock cables. I've got some truly ancient USB-dock cables that still work great for both data and charging, including audio playback to car stereos.
 



Today the replacement iPhone 8 Plus came from Mobile Reborne, and it is 100% like new. They even enclosed a check-sheet showing all the features tested – at least 24 tests on the various parts of the iPhone The test sheet was called Mobicode Worksheet from Mobicode Ltd. Battery 95%. I dropped the returning iPhone in to our post office, and this afternoon Amazon confirmed my refund. (Note I am in the UK). Oh, and the lightning port works fine!
 


I've been very happy with Anker cables (also sold through Amazon), especially the ones with braided nylon insulation, but even they fail eventually.
How are these failing, exactly?
For the most part, they work great. But after a year or so, especially in the car, the connection will fail intermittently. When it happens, the symptoms include one or more of:
  • No response when connected (not even a charging indication)
  • Apple's "this device is unsupported" indicator on the screen
  • Normal operation, but with occasional momentary disconnects. Depending on the car, this may briefly interrupt music playback or may cause the car stereo to switch to another input source. In either case, music on the iPod/iPhone doesn't actually pause (as it would if I unplugged the cable).
And sometimes the problem will just go away on its own with no hint that there ever was a problem.

These are not unique to Anker. I've seen them with cables from Apple, Amazon Basics and generic no-name brands.

I've assumed that either there has been damage to conductors from heat and flexing, or that something (maybe a power surge from starting the car while the cable is attached) has partially damaged the Lightning ID chip.
 


I had a lightning cable / connector issue with my former iPhone 5S where I noticed that wiggling the cable or unplugging and replugging would then allow the phone to charge.

Later on I noticed the culprit: a dark spot on one of the connectors on the cable end. Since I had replaced that with an iPhone 8, I kept the original Apple cable for charging it. I try to maintain a given iPad or iPhone with its cable, so as not to migrate a problem to another device. So far so good.

I also learned (perhaps here?) that the Gum brand of dental brushes works very well for cleaning out the lint that builds up inside the phone or iPad.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For the most part, they work great. But after a year or so, especially in the car, the connection will fail intermittently...
Keeping the cables in the car (if that's what you do) certainly puts them under much more extreme stress than using them in homes and offices, and I wonder which of these issues may be contributing to the problems you've seen:
  • extreme thermal stresses
  • moisture/humidity
  • UV/light exposure
  • corrosion (e.g. related to salting roads in the winter)
  • exhaust emissions (i.e. from other vehicles)
  • electrical issues
And, unrelated to cars per se, whether there may be mechanical strain on the cable from the way things are positioned/routed in your use.
 


Keeping the cables in the car (if that's what you do) certainly puts them under much more extreme stress than using them in homes and offices...
Absolutely true. I don't think corrosion and exhaust matters much, since the cables are inside the cabin, not in the engine compartment, but everything else is definitely a possibility.

I also know that some car stereo systems have critical bugs in their iPod/iPhone integration software. For instance, if I use my iPod Classic in my 2012 Honda Civic, the iPod will freeze up (forcing a hard reset) after 30-90 minutes of playback via USB audio but has no such problem when playing via the headphone jack (and powered from the car's power plug) or when playing via USB audio on my wife's Kia Sedona minivan (neither the current 2018 model nor our previous 2012 model). Sending bug reports to Honda and Apple (even when they were still making iPod Classics) was an act of futility.

My iPod Touch and iPhones don't crash when playing USB audio, but it wouldn't surprise me if there are other more subtle bugs that are affecting them. After all, a car manufacturer only cares about selling cars, not about supporting Apple's equipment, except to the extent that doing so will pull through additional car sales. Once you've bought the car, they have very little motivation to fix anything in the radio, especially when the bug involves an obsolete device made by somebody else.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's a comment from an anonymous email re Lightning port/cable failures:
"someone" said:
Just wanted to forward a tip on something Ric mentioned in a discussion on Lightning cables / ports, regarding cable shorting out.

ATP Podcast discussed this a while back, but I don’t know if it made the recorded release - John Siracusa (if I recall correctly) mentioned that he had seen cases of a kind of contagious damage that occurs with Lightning cables and ports - where a device with a malfunctioning port will short a cable’s contacts, and that cable will now cause the same damage to lightning ports, that then damage cables, which damage ports etc....
 


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