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I have iTunes 12.9.2 with Mojave 10.14.2.
I, too, have that version with Mojave 14.2. Note that Apple no longer offers anything later than iTunes 12.8 as a separate download - the website at itunes.apple.com now says, "The latest version of iTunes now comes installed with macOS Mojave", and only offers a link to either V12.8 of iTunes or to download Mojave.
 



I, too, have that version with Mojave 14.2. Note that Apple no longer offers anything later than iTunes 12.8 as a separate download - the website at itunes.apple.com now says, "The latest version of iTunes now comes installed with macOS Mojave", and only offers a link to either V12.8 of iTunes or to download Mojave.
There used to be a time when Apple allowed the latest iTunes to be installed on older systems than the three supported macOS versions at the time. Guess things have changed. And yet, you can get the latest version of iTunes on "Windows 7 or later." While I am not inconvenienced by this fact, I am very disappointed in Apple as it continues to dismantle bridges to the past.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There used to be a time when Apple allowed the latest iTunes to be installed on older systems than the three supported macOS versions at the time.
At the moment macOS 10.12.6 Sierra isn't getting the latest version of iTunes, yet macOS Sierra is supposedly still supported. (I'm not sure what version Apple's distributing for macOS 10.13.)
 


At the moment macOS 10.12.6 Sierra isn't getting the latest version of iTunes, yet macOS Sierra is supposedly still supported. (I'm not sure what version Apple's distributing for macOS 10.13.)
I believe we have seen something similar to this previously, where the iWork apps (Pages, Numbers, and Keynote) were only getting updates for the latest macOS release at the time. Not sure if that still holds.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I believe we have seen something similar to this previously, where the iWork apps (Pages, Numbers, and Keynote) were only getting updates for the latest macOS release at the time.
Excellent example! In addition to the latest iTunes mismatch, the following Apple apps were updated in November 2018 and will not run on macOS 10.12.6 (there may be others I'm missing):
  • Configurator 2.8.2
  • Pages 7.3
  • Numbers 5.3
  • Keynote 8.3
  • iMovie 10.1.10
 


iTunes 12.8.1, specifically 12.8.1.2, also broke iPhoto in Yosemite.

The iTunes update that fixes the Safari error is listed in the App Store as 12.8.1, but it installs 12.8.1.3.

As of now, If you have iTunes 12.8.0.150 installed, the App Store does not offer an update to 12.8.1 or 12.9. This is true for all OS from 10.10 through 10.13.
 


I did the Mojave upgrade, and iTunes is version 12.9.2.5. Upgraded from macOS 10.13.6 to 10.14.2. I miss the iTunes version 12.6.5.
 


I see no sign of that in macOS Sierra's App Store updates, where iTunes is version 12.8.0.150.
The iTunes 12.9.x track is (currently) for macOS 10.14.x and Windows only. It also (currently) only comes with the operating system - there are no separate downloads available!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The iTunes 12.9.x track is (currently) for macOS 10.14.x and Windows only. It also (currently) only comes with the operating system - there are no separate downloads available!
So, the obvious question is: what's different between the macOS 10.14/Windows-only version and the version for previous macOS systems? (And is that documented anywhere by Apple?)
 


So, the obvious question is: what's different between the macOS 10.14/Windows-only version and the version for previous macOS systems? (And is that documented anywhere by Apple?)
It is indeed an obvious question and I have it too. Unfortunately, this is 2018 Apple and we can no longer expect useful/helpful documentation from them :-(
Perhaps in 2019 things will change…

Apple's (dysfunctional) download site shows iTunes 12.9 clearly available for Windows but only iTunes 12.8 available for macOS:

Apple's iTunes download site now states:
The latest version of iTunes now comes installed with macOS Mojave. Upgrade today to get your favorite music, movies, TV shows, and podcasts. iTunes is also where you can join Apple Music and stream — or download and play offline — over 50 million songs, ad‑free.

Download macOS Mojave

You can always download iTunes 12.8 for previous versions of macOS, as well as the application for Windows.
 


iTunes 12.8.1, specifically 12.8.1.2, also broke iPhoto in Yosemite.
The iTunes update that fixes the Safari error is listed in the App Store as 12.8.1, but it installs 12.8.1.3.
As of now, If you have iTunes 12.8.0.150 installed, the App Store does not offer an update to 12.8.1 or 12.9. This is true for all OS from 10.10 through 10.13.
The iTunes 12.8.2 update is now available for OS X 10.11 through macOS 10.13 but not OS X 10.10 Yosemite.
 


Anyone having issues with AirTunes and speaker volume? I'm on High Sierra on a MacBook Air and an iMac Retina, but otherwise all the latest updates and using the latest iTunes. I have four Airport Expresses around the house. If I start iTunes and don't explicitly go in and change the selected output speakers, iTunes often seems to ignore the overall volume changes and stays with a fixed volume no matter whether I go up or down. Only if I go in the drop-down AirTunes selection menu and either change the volume on the individual speakers or change the speaker selection does it then realize what the new adjusted volume should be.

It's definitely more buggy than it used to be before Apple went to AirPlay 2 (I think that's what changed).

Of course i don't have this problem if i play the music from my iPhone. At least there AirTunes 2 has given me the benefit of being able to choose multiple output speakers.

Another change is how it handles playing when you switch users. Previously if you were playing from iTunes to AirTunes speakers, if you switched users it would keep playing. You could use the Remote app to control the music on iTunes that was in the non-active user account. The computer (non-AirTunes) speakers would stop playing, but that made sense, since there was a different user in control of the computer. Now if you switch users it just stops playing altogether no matter what the selected outputs.

I will say that iTunes/AirTunes is way more reliable than it was in years past. It rarely ever drops out anymore, and when it does it usually resumes pretty quickly. So there's that.
 


Anyone having issues with AirTunes and speaker volume?...
I was having similar AirPlay problems. I thought they were caused by upgrading to Mojave, but it turned out they were caused by updating my AirPort Express firmware to version 7.8, which I had done around the same time as the Mojave upgrade. When I reverted to the previous AirPort firmware (7.6.9), the problems were solved.

One weird and bothersome problem you didn't mention was that iTunes Equalizer settings were inoperable when an AirPlay speaker was in use. That was also fixed when I reverted to 7.6.9 firmware.

In case you don't know the trick to reverting to a previous firmware version (I didn't), it's easy but well hidden. In AirPort Utility, you first click the Aiport Express device, which displays info about it, including the firmware version. You then Option-click the firmware number, and you get a whole list of firmware versions to choose from.
 


In case you don't know the trick to reverting to a previous firmware version (I didn't), it's easy but well hidden. In AirPort Utility, you first click the Aiport Express device, which displays info about it, including the firmware version. You then Option-click the firmware number, and you get a whole list of firmware versions to choose from.
A very old trick that even I had forgotten. However, in just checking it (on a Time Capsule) one must option-click on the heading "Version:" for this to appear, not on the actual version number. (current firmware v. 7.7.9)
 


Anyone having issues with AirTunes and speaker volume?
Yes, same here. I am currently using Airfoil from Rogue Amoeba to control iTunes on my Mac. It all seems to be working, even with the latest firmware. One nice thing is that you can use Airfoil Remote on your iOS devices just like the Apple Remote app -- and the volume controls actually work!
 


Here's another short story. This has happened every time in Sierra and now High Sierra. I redeem an iTunes Gift card then hit Done. Within a minute, the added amount disappears, showing the amount before redemption.

The solution is to sign out and sign in to your account. After that, the full amount is available.
 


In case you don't know the trick to reverting to a previous firmware version (I didn't), it's easy but well hidden. In AirPort Utility, you first click the Aiport Express device, which displays info about it, including the firmware version. You then Option-click the firmware number, and you get a whole list of firmware versions to choose from.
Reverting back to firmware 7.6.9 definitely fixes the issue/change of stopping play when you switch users. The volume controls seem to be working correctly again, but i'll need a bit more time to verify that.

Thanks!
 


Apps are failing to update properly under iTunes 12.6.5.3 with error code 8288. This only happened after iOS was updated to 12.1.4, which is odd, as I'd have thought this should only happen with a macOS update. Any workarounds for this? Re-installing iTunes 12.6.5.3 didn't help.
 


Apps are failing to update properly under iTunes 12.6.5.3 with error code 8288. This only happened after iOS was updated to 12.1.4, which is odd, as I'd have thought this should only happen with a macOS update. Any workarounds for this? Re-installing iTunes 12.6.5.3 didn't help.
I've been having trouble with iTunes 12.6.5.3 since Saturday, 9 February. Appears be an issue on iTunes for Windows, too. There are a couple of threads at Apple Support Discussions:
One of the posts in the above threads mentioned that there are many reports of this issue on Reddit.
 


Apps are failing to update properly under iTunes 12.6.5.3 with error code 8288. This only happened after iOS was updated to 12.1.4, which is odd, as I'd have thought this should only happen with a macOS update. Any workarounds for this? Re-installing iTunes 12.6.5.3 didn't help.
I upgraded an iPhone SE to iOS 12.1.4 a few days ago (Feb. 8). I updated nine apps on Feb. 9 with no difficulties or errors. After seeing this post, I tried today and again had no difficulty downloading one updated app.

I'm running iTunes v12.6.5.3 and macOS Sierra 10.12.6.
 



I've been having trouble with iTunes 12.6.5.3 since Saturday, 9 February. Appears be an issue on iTunes for Windows, too. There are a couple of threads at Apple Support Discussions:
One of the posts in the above threads mentioned that there are many reports of this issue on Reddit.
I went to the second thread, and reports are that all is back to normal, and as I speak, all my updates are ongoing!
 



Reverting back to firmware 7.6.9 definitely fixes the issue/change of stopping play when you switch users. The volume controls seem to be working correctly again, but i'll need a bit more time to verify that.
Well, volume is working again. But on iOS, I can only select one set of speakers for output.

Summary in my experience:

Airport firmware 7.7.9
- enables multiple output speakers on iOS​
- causes iTunes to have odd volume quirks​
- stops music playing to AirTunes speakers when fast user switching is done​
Airport firmware 7.6.9
- only one output speaker on iOS​
- iTunes volume works ok​
- AirTunes speakers keep working from non-foreground user when using fast user switching​
 


Setting up a new iPhone SE:

... requires updating to iOS 12.1.3 in order to restore my backup (via iMazing), something I did not want to do but can't see how to avoid ...
And... after all that, I checked the phone this morning and it had 42 updates pending. So all those downloads yesterday were out of date? I don't get it.
An FYI on iMazing: not sure if it is backing up exactly the same way that iTunes would, so the encrypted backup and restore through iMazing may not work entirely the same.

I have iMazing, as well, and use it for backing up and easily interacting with my iPhone and iPad but ran across an issue that may illustrate my backup and restore comment. Bear with me here....

I have a contact that I wanted to set up with a custom ring tone, one I made and then used iMazing to move to the iPhone and iPad. Very handy and very easy to transfer the ring tone to both.

Now for the interesting part. I could not get the contact to sync that ring tone on both devices. Set one, and the other reverted to "opening ringtone". Change the other, and the first reverted. Figured that for some reason it was just not going to work.

Then my iPad and iPhone were in the same room, and another contact I had a custom ring tone for played on both devices. Now I know it can be done, so went back and tried again. Still no go.

Removed the ring tone with iMazing then used iTunes to move the same file to both the iPad and the iPhone. Set the ring tone on the iPhone and then went to the iPad, and the custom ring tone was already set.
 


I know folks have had mixed experiences with iTunes Match over the years, but I'm wondering about the current state of the platform.

I have more than 30,000 songs in my iTunes library now, many of which were imported from CD at relatively low quality in the early days of iTunes as a product, as well as quite a few DRM-encoded 128 kbps songs from the early days of the store. I'm thinking of turning on iTunes Match as a way to upgrade as many of these songs as possible to better quality, DRM-free versions.

Does anyone have recent experience with a similar task? Of course, I'll make an archival backup of my current library before I start mucking around and deleting/downloading things, I know that not everything that once was available in the iTunes Store is still available, and I know that not all songs can be "matched," but are there any specific glitches and gotchas I should be looking for?
 


I could be wrong but iTunes Match only worked with the low quality songs purchased from the iTunes Store.

Please tell me otherwise.
 


I know folks have had mixed experiences with iTunes Match over the years, but I'm wondering about the current state of the platform.

I have more than 30,000 songs in my iTunes library now, many of which were imported from CD at relatively low quality in the early days of iTunes as a product, as well as quite a few DRM-encoded 128 kbps songs from the early days of the store. I'm thinking of turning on iTunes Match as a way to upgrade as many of these songs as possible to better quality, DRM-free versions.

Does anyone have recent experience with a similar task? Of course, I'll make an archival backup of my current library before I start mucking around and deleting/downloading things, I know that not everything that once was available in the iTunes Store is still available, and I know that not all songs can be "matched," but are there any specific glitches and gotchas I should be looking for?
It's not recent experience, sorry, but here's my iTunes Match Frequently Asked Questions article. To answer some of your specific questions and point out some gotchas:

• 30,000 tracks is below the 100,000 track limit so you are good to go on that
• If you have low quality DRM-encoded 128 kbps tracks that are matched they will only be replaced with iTunes 256Kbps AAC versions
• If you have low quality DRM-encoded 128 kbps tracks that are not matched they will not be uploaded
• Low quality MP3s ripped from CD that are matched will only be replaced with iTunes 256Kbps AAC versions (you don't get ALAC/lossless versions which you can get by re-ripping your CDs - I know that's a pain if you have lots of CDs but I just wanted to point it out)
• Low quality MP3s equal to or below 96Kbps will not be matched
• High quality tracks that are not matched will be replaced with lower quality 256Kbps AAC files in the cloud

Most of the original problems with iTunes Match was when the service mismatched tracks and mismatched artwork - from the track mismatching point of view I recommend making a text/spreadsheet file of your library which you can easily refer back to before switching iTunes Match on so that it is easier to identify mismatches when they occur: in your iTunes Library > on the left at the top of the Sidebar (View menu > View Sidebar) click on Library > Songs (if Songs is not listed hover your pointer to the right of Library and click "Edit" and tick "Songs") > go to View menu > Column Browser > Show Column Browser > then go to View menu > Show View Options > add all the columns of information that you want > move the columns by dragging the column headings into the order you want > tag all your tracks as you want > go to Edit menu > Select All (so all your tracks are highlighted) > go to Edit menu > Copy. Open your text editor/spreadsheet software and paste the information (the copy took a while but this works for me with 75000+ tracks and Excel)
 


It's not recent experience, sorry, but here's my iTunes Match Frequently Asked Questions article.
...
Most of the original problems with iTunes Match was when the service mismatched tracks and mismatched artwork {snip}
Graham, thanks for the detailed reply and the tips! Your article is one of the resources I've been consulting as I've been thinking about using iTunes Match.

I agree with the comment about mismatched tracks and mismatched artwork. Even in the basic iTunes app, the accuracy of data delivered by the "Get Album Artwork" and "Get Track Names" can be shockingly poor. I wish those commands could be used selectively, i.e. for one or a few songs, rather than for an entire library. After some hard lessons, I now treat those commands as being downright harmful. For example, I buy a lot of my CDs through Amazon, which imports songs and artwork accurately into iTunes if the CD purchase includes Amazon's "Autorip" feature. After choosing "Get Album Artwork" in iTunes, quite a few correct album images from Amazon were replaced with wildly inaccurate images. Fortunately, I did have a backup of my library handy.

P.S. I should note that I've long found Graham's MacStrategy articles to be very useful. I have no connection to Graham aside from being a grateful reader, and I hit Graham's "Donate" button today. In addition to supporting MacInTouch, please consider supporting MacStrategy, too.
 


I know folks have had mixed experiences with iTunes Match over the years, but I'm wondering about the current state of the platform. I have more than 30,000 songs in my iTunes library now, many of which were imported from CD at relatively low quality in the early days of iTunes as a product, as well as quite a few DRM-encoded 128 kbps songs from the early days of the store. I'm thinking of turning on iTunes Match as a way to upgrade as many of these songs as possible to better quality, DRM-free versions.
Does anyone have recent experience with a similar task? Of course, I'll make an archival backup of my current library before I start mucking around and deleting/downloading things, I know that not everything that once was available in the iTunes Store is still available, and I know that not all songs can be "matched," but are there any specific glitches and gotchas I should be looking for?
iTunes Match is very sketchy and has been for years. That said, I still use and pay for it. It used to work perfectly. Every CD I ripped with iTunes was matched. Then some years ago something changed and some tracks would be matched, others uploaded (not matched). Sometimes almost all would be uploaded and only a few tracks matched. And these were always with CDs that were actually in the iTunes store. It continues that way, although more now seem to be matched. But it has never equaled the perfection of the early days.
 


It's not recent experience, sorry, but here's my iTunes Match Frequently Asked Questions article. To answer some of your specific questions and point out some gotchas...
Good summary. I have used Match since it became available, primarily to upgrade lower-quality MP3 and AAC tracks to 256 Kbps. I also have multiple Apple devices, and it was a way to synchronize their libraries.

My question is, now that I have signed up for Apple Music/iCloud Music, am I really gaining anything from keeping Match? I still have multiple devices (all of which can access Apple Music), but I certainly don't need to upgrade bit rates anymore.
 


Good summary. I have used Match since it became available, primarily to upgrade lower-quality MP3 and AAC tracks to 256 Kbps. I also have multiple Apple devices, and it was a way to synchronize their libraries. My question is, now that I have signed up for Apple Music/iCloud Music, am I really gaining anything from keeping Match? I still have multiple devices (all of which can access Apple Music), but I certainly don't need to upgrade bit rates anymore.
Yes, one subtle, but very big, difference:
• iTunes Match is your music to keep.​
• Apple Music is a subscription - you don't, and never will, own the music. When you stop paying, you will lose access to all the music you don't already own.​

If you're happy to pay Apple for the rest of your music listening life, you probably don't need Match.

In addition, Apple Music only gives you access to what's in Apple's music library - for most people, that's fine but, for example, in my own personal (but probably unusual) case, around 30% of the music I own isn't in the Apple Music library. When you consider my collection is currently 75,000+ tracks and 7,500+ CDs (not all ripped yet), that's a lot of music that Apple doesn't have and that Apple Music will never give me access to.
 


Graham, thanks for the detailed reply and the tips! Your article is one of the resources I've been consulting as I've been thinking about using iTunes Match. I agree with the comment about mismatched tracks and mismatched artwork. Even in the basic iTunes app, the accuracy of data delivered by the "Get Album Artwork" and "Get Track Names" can be shockingly poor. I wish those commands could be used selectively, i.e. for one or a few songs, rather than for an entire library. After some hard lessons, I now treat those commands as being downright harmful. For example, I buy a lot of my CDs through Amazon, which imports songs and artwork accurately into iTunes if the CD purchase includes Amazon's "Autorip" feature. After choosing "Get Album Artwork" in iTunes, quite a few correct album images from Amazon were replaced with wildly inaccurate images. Fortunately, I did have a backup of my library handy.
Thanks for the support. :-) I don't use Apple's "Get Album Artwork" and "Get Track Names", either, as I had exactly the same problems with mismatches and I'm very fussy with the cataloguing of my music.

It's a lot of hard work to manually keep my iTunes metadata and artwork correct, but I'm a bit OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder) with my library. I manually remove and add artwork as required, and I manually edit the metadata - it takes time, but, in my case, it is worth it. Documenting the steps I took meant I could keep the consistency across the library, and it helped me write my tagging articles on MacStrategy. As for artwork, I prefer hi-quality artwork, as it looks amazing when playing back via an Apple TV on a 1080p HD television. This requires sourcing at least 1000x1000-pixel artwork, which is not easy. Fortunately, I have found a way to grab hi-res artwork from Apple's iTunes online library, which I can't post here, as I don't want Apple to shut that route down. There's also my own... web site, The World Wide Release DataBase (WWRDB).

The Amazon Auto-rip service is quite good, but do note that you are only getting lossy MP3s, even if you buy a CD - these are lower quality than the CD itself.

With the advent of cheap, large-volume storage, I'm now slowly (re-)ripping my music to Apple Lossless (ALAC), and the quality is quite a lot different/better than MP3/AAC. Obviously, with a collection of 7500+ CDs, it's taking a while. ;-)

For help with metadata editing, I highly recommend Doug's Scripts For iTunes and, in the case of re-ripping, this process has been working really well for me:
  1. Download and install Doug's Copy Tag Info Tracks to Tracks script, if you don't already have it (donate to/make a purchase from Doug, of course, if you haven't already).
  2. In your iTunes library. select all the older, lower quality tracks in the whole album.
  3. Get Info and change the metadata/tags for Grouping to include something that won't be used anywhere else e.g. "TODELETE" and append " OLD" to the album field.
  4. Create a Smart Playlist to "Match Music" with the Grouping tag/field "Contains" to what you set in the previous step, e.g. "TODELETE", and tick "Live updating".
  5. Re-rip the CD to ALAC/(re)import the original hi-res files (this won't flag up as duplicate/replace the older files, as you added OLD to the original files in step 3).
  6. You now have an "OLD" set of files with your original/correct hard-worked metadata/tags/artwork plus a new set of files with incorrect/poor quality CDDB data and no artwork.
  7. Use Doug's Copy Tag Info Tracks to Tracks script to copy all tag info except the Grouping field from the old files (album) to the new files (album).
  8. You will now have both the old and new files with identical tagging except the Grouping field - so now you can go to the "TODELETE" Grouping Smart Playlist you created in step 4, which will only show the old files, :-) select all the tracks and right/Control-click on them and select "Delete from Library" from the contextual menu - at the prompt, click to move the files to the Trash.
  9. You are now left with only the new hi-resolution/re-ripped files in your library but with all your metadata/artwork hard work intact - all you have to do now is edit the new files to remove the appended " OLD" from the end of the Album field.
One final note: if you have original files in FLAC (or other lossless formats), you can use the excellent (donationware) X Lossless Decoder (XLD) to convert these to Apple's ALAC, ready to import into iTunes.
 


• iTunes Match is your music to keep.​
• Apple Music is a subscription - you don't, and never will, own the music. When you stop paying, you will lose access to all the music you don't already own.​
... In addition, Apple Music only gives you access to what's in Apple's music library - for most people, that's fine but, for example, in my own personal (but probably unusual) case, around 30% of the music I own isn't in the Apple Music library.
That's a great point, especially because songs available through the iTunes Store and through Apple Music (including otherwise unique songs or performances) can be removed from the Store/Music platforms without notice.

For example, I'm glad that I downloaded and kept copies of several "iTunes Originals" albums that I had purchased, as they no longer are available. Many of the Originals albums included truly interesting live performances and commentary by artists, and their disappearance is a real loss for fans.
 


That's a great point, especially because songs available through the iTunes Store and through Apple Music (including otherwise unique songs or performances) can be removed from the Store/Music platforms without notice. For example, I'm glad that I downloaded and kept copies of several "iTunes Originals" albums that I had purchased, as they no longer are available. Many of the Originals albums included truly interesting live performances and commentary by artists, and their disappearance is a real loss for fans.
Indeed, yes! Not just some "iTunes Originals" have disappeared. There's also iTunes Festival recordings e.g. Dave Gahan (of Depeche Mode fame) Live From Soho + digital box sets e.g. Depeche Mode's The Complete Depeche Mode! Both of these digital releases contain unique content not available anywhere else and are now gone!
 


For help with metadata editing, I highly recommend Doug's Scripts For iTunes and, in the case of re-ripping, this process has been working really well for me ...
That's similar to my somewhat simpler process I used to re-rip all my CDs as Apple Lossless:
  1. Append an "X" to the current album name in iTunes.
  2. Use XLD to rip the CD to Apple Lossless, with "Add encoded files to iTunes" selected.
  3. Obsess over whether XLD achieved a perfect rip. (This step is optional.)
  4. Use Doug's Copy Tag Info Tracks to Tracks to copy from albumX to the new album, except for the album name.
  5. Delete albumX.
  6. Delete the extra copy of the ripped tracks that XLD made in its output directory. ("Add encoded files to iTunes" means it copies the tracks to iTunes, not move.)

By changing the album name, you don't get the old and newly ripped tracks all mixed together in iTunes. And that means there's no need to use a temporary playlist as a holding area.

Step 3 is the tricky one. For some CDs, I couldn't get a clean rip, and had to resort to Exact Audio Copy on Windows, along with CUETools which can actually repair rips from damaged CDs.
 


It’s been a long time since I did this, but I experienced that if all the metadata for the CD matches that of the lossy tracks you previously ripped, iTunes offers to replace the files with new, freshly ripped files using the import settings currently in place.

I did this years ago for hundreds of CDs I ripped before I took iTunes seriously enough to rely on it. This technique maintains the playcount, last played, album cover art, and other metadata previously collected. It’s also an opportunity to review and correct the title and artist data.

... Hmmm, thinking about it again, I may be wrong about the artwork being retained.
 


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