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When ripping CDs, be sure to make all your edits to the CD's metadata before you rip the disc. Then, after it all looks good, perform the rip. The imported tracks will have whatever you entered on the CD and (most importantly) the iTunes CD database will also have the data. So the next time you insert that disc, it will have what you entered.
If you are adding universally useful data, like the original release years of each track in an artist’s retrospective or other collection, please share your work with the rest of us and update GraceNote!
 


When ripping CDs, be sure to make all your edits to the CD's metadata before you rip the disc. Then, after it all looks good, perform the rip. The imported tracks will have whatever you entered on the CD and (most importantly) the iTunes CD database will also have the data. So the next time you insert that disc, it will have what you entered.
You can use another of Doug's AppleScripts — Copy Track Info to CD Tracks — to copy metadata to the CD data, which means you can:
  1. Rip CD using whatever garbled data Gracenote provides.
  2. Obsess over correcting the iTunes imported track data to be just right.
  3. Use the script to copy the track data back to the CD, so it will be there the next time you insert the disc.
It may be a while before these scripts work in Catalina.
 



Apple has turned iTunes into a huge interactive advertisement for Apple Music. They have made it useless for anyone who doesn't like or doesn't want Apple Music. ... The first thing I noticed was that streaming radio stations have been eliminated.
You can get rid of almost all of the annoying "Apple Music" junk in pre-Catalina iTunes and in Catalina's Music.app (including the newer "Apple Radio" functions) by going to

iTunes/Music.app > Preferences > Restrictions > Disable > Apple Music​

Unfortunately, iTunes' under-appreciated, curated list of "Internet Radio" streaming stations (as distinct from Apple's newer, completely unrelated "Radio" function) has been deprecated.

If you are using iTunes 12 or earlier, the list of Internet Radio streaming stations is still accessible in iTunes, though Apple appears to have stopped updating the list. Consequently, it is likely that station links will break or disappear as time marches on.

(Note: If you're using iTunes but don't see "Internet Radio" in the sidebar, it may be on the Music pulldown menu, or you may need to find the sidebar's hidden "Edit" button by hovering in the top right of the sidebar and clicking the "Internet Radio" check box.)

If you're using the Catalina Music.app, the curated list is gone completely, but you still can play traditional streaming radio stations if you know the URL for the radio station's streaming feed (File > Open Stream URL ...). Unfortunately, the resulting interface is clunky, at best.

P.S. Thanks to Michael Schmidt, who shared a tip a while back about hiding Apple Music features through iTunes' General Preferences that eventually led me to find the Restrictions Preference setting that addresses both Apple Music and Apple Radio.
 


Speaking of iTunes.....

I don't know if anyone else has had this experience but this is new(s) to me. Up until recently we needed to authorize a computer to play streaming music in iTunes via Apple Music (the $9.99/month subscription). One was also limited to 5 total computers for Apple Music streaming (and 10 total devices).

I've noticed recently that the 5-computer limit seems to have gone away. I had 5 devices authorized to play Apple Music but, just for sh**s and grins, I tried playing some music on my recently purchased HP Spectre x360, and it worked just fine. To verify, I used another non-authorized computer in an attempt to play music, and that worked as well.

Is this something new? Is the 5-computer limit gone now? (Spotify, conversely, never had that limit. The only limit Spotify imposes is on how many computers can download music for offline listening.)
 


Unfortunately, iTunes' under-appreciated, curated list of "Internet Radio" streaming stations (as distinct from Apple's newer, completely unrelated "Radio" function) has been deprecated.
Wikipedia has a curated list of radio stations available on the Internet at this link:

You may find, as I did, that not every link is fresh. For example, the links to my hometown NPR stations are no longer current. Were I a Wikipedia editor, I'd fix that....

Using Firefox, I randomly clicked one station and had no trouble accessing its live feed within Firefox. After finding the new URLs of my local university's stations, I was able to launch the classical station's feed within Firefox.

Since I'm running Little Snitch, it did require clicking a good number of "Allow" buttons to complete the connection. It was much faster on my Linux desktop, which doesn't benefit (or suffer?) from Little Snitch.
 


You may find, as I did, that not every link is fresh. For example, the links to my hometown NPR stations are no longer current. Were I a Wikipedia editor, I'd fix that....
I use the NPR app in iOS/iPadOS to listen to a local NPR station (and you can add many more). Naturally, there's nothing from NPR for macOS (yet), but a quick look at the Mac App Store showed at least two English-language FM radio apps (myTuner and OneRadio).
 


There are several standalone radio apps available via the Mac App Store, as well as third-party radio apps discoverable on macupdate.com. I grabbed a few free apps and have found they offer a variety of features and interfaces.
 



You may find, as I did, that not every link is fresh. For example, the links to my hometown NPR stations are no longer current. Were I a Wikipedia editor, I'd fix that....
Go for it. You don't need to be blessed as an editor on Wikipedia (except for certain high-profile pages that attract extensive vandalism). If you know the correct link, please change it.
 


Rearranging apps in iOS 13 is a mess. All I wanted to do was add a couple of apps to the dock on an iPad Pro 10.5. No luck, even after installing the iPadOS 13.2 Public Beta. Apple Configurator 2.11 fails to apply changes.

iTunes 12.6.3.6 running in an El Capitan VMware Fusion virtual machine does the job. It does not show the list of installed apps, but it does show all home screens, folders, and the dock. Apps can be moved between screens folders, and the dock. When iTunes asks to Sync and Replace, just Cancel, or it will replace the library on the iPad with the one from the virtual machine. There is a brief pause after hitting Apply before changes show up on the iPad.

This does not seem to interfere with Finder's iPad backup and sync operations in Catalina.
 


You can use another of Doug's AppleScripts — Copy Track Info to CD Tracks — to copy metadata to the CD data, which means you can:
  1. Rip CD using whatever garbled data Gracenote provides.
  2. Obsess over correcting the iTunes imported track data to be just right.
  3. Use the script to copy the track data back to the CD, so it will be there the next time you insert the disc.
It may be a while before these scripts work in Catalina.
I just downloaded, tested and paid for this script. As Michael says, I can insert the CD, select my original cleaned-up mp3 import, and copy the track data to the CD, so that the AAC import comes in clean.
 


There are several standalone radio apps available via the Mac App Store, as well as third-party radio apps discoverable on macupdate.com. I grabbed a few free apps and have found they offer a variety of features and interfaces.
Just to remind folks, macupdate.com at one point went over to the dark side and started bundling adware into downloads.


I don't know if that is still true, as once their reputation was tarnished, I refuse to visit their site, but exercise caution in what you do. If you're just browsing to discover apps, you'll probably be fine, but it's always a good idea to get apps directly from a developer, or better yet, from the Mac App Store.
 


Just to remind folks, macupdate.com at one point went over to the dark side and started bundling adware into downloads.
I don't know if that is still true, as once their reputation was tarnished, I refuse to visit their site, but exercise caution in what you do. If you're just browsing to discover apps, you'll probably be fine, but it's always a good idea to get apps directly from a developer, or better yet, from the Mac App Store.
Not still true — they received serious backlash and stopped the ridiculous adware bundling. And their $40/year subscription option allows for use of their app, which streamlines third-party app updates in a big way. The app can be configured to not run in the background, thus no resource drain after quitting it. I have been a satisfied customer for many years.
 



I just finished importing most of my 1,200 CDs except my classical collection using Doug's AppleScripts — Copy Track Info to CD Tracks. This included many box sets and around 90 CDs I picked up in Asia around the turn of the century that have Chinese, Japanese or Korean album and song names. I found one bug: sometimes the disc number is set to garbage and shows up as 65,535 in iTunes, so I need to go back to the box to figure out where the songs are supposed to go. Not a big deal, but just know that it's there.

Something that wasn't available 20 years ago is Google Translate and I went back through all my Asian CDs and translated the album and song names to something that I actually could read and remember. That was especially useful for my Anime box sets so now I have some idea what the songs are about.
 


I rely on a couple of Doug’s AppleScripts to take the pain out of cleaning up my iTunes music library, which is probably about 95% ripped from CDs. If only there were a "Fix all the inconsistent, incomplete, misspelled or generally FUBAR info in CDDB/Gracenotes" script. It would be a lifesaver for classical music in particular.
 


I rely on a couple of Doug’s AppleScripts to take the pain out of cleaning up my iTunes music library, which is probably about 95% ripped from CDs. If only there were a "Fix all the inconsistent, incomplete, misspelled or generally FUBAR info in CDDB/Gracenote" script. It would be a lifesaver for classical music in particular.
Kathryn speaks the truth. There needs to be a "This Gracenote entry is wrong" button. I have no clue who is entering or cleaning up Gracenote data but I've seen songs and artists reversed in maybe 5% of what I have used, artist or song names misspelled, and "various artists" listed as an artist. Seriously, if you're going to be that lazy, why bother submitting to Gracenote in the first place. I would pay money for a managed version of Gracenote where the entries are guaranteed to be correct. If Apple Music has the right info, I know it's out there.
 


There are conventions in naming as well as language differences that make the lazy habit of assigning initial caps to every word of a track title just plain pernicious. In this regard, far too many database track names are entered inappropriately, or contain outright spelling errors. In German, for example, nouns and substantives are capitalized, as is, of course, the first word of a title: so Bach's "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" is rendered incorrect by using initial caps on every word. In opera and other vocal recordings. the track title is often simply the first line of an aria or other vocal part, and shouldn't be treated as a title in terms of capitalization.

Just copying what is on the CD shouldn't be too difficult for people to do when they are submitting track info. And yet…
 


There are conventions in naming as well as language differences that make the lazy habit of assigning initial caps to every word of a track title just plain pernicious. In this regard, far too many database track names are entered inappropriately, or contain outright spelling errors. In German, for example, nouns and substantives are capitalized, as is, of course, the first word of a title: so Bach's "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" is rendered incorrect by using initial caps on every word. In opera and other vocal recordings. the track title is often simply the first line of an aria or other vocal part, and shouldn't be treated as a title in terms of capitalization.
Just copying what is on the CD shouldn't be too difficult for people to do when they are submitting track info. And yet…
Unfortunately, Gracenote's own Guidelines For Submitting a CD specifically state, "Gracenote's standard is to capitalize the first letter of each word", so you're never going to get away from what you consider lazy with their data. Personally, I prefer to capitalize the first letter of each word, but I understand I'm quite different to most and that it is not for everyone, and it also goes against title conventions elsewhere. It's just me :-)

But I do totally agree with you on the more general fact that most of Gracenote's data is utterly awful. People nowadays don't even read stuff, especially what they are typing, far too often relying on autocorrect rather than their own brain. Doug's AppleScripts are a godsend, regardless of what you prefer in iTunes.
 


Unfortunately, Gracenote's own Guidelines For Submitting a CD specifically state, "Gracenote's standard is to capitalize the first letter of each word", so you're never going to get away from what you consider lazy with their data. Personally, I prefer to capitalize the first letter of each word, but I understand I'm quite different to most and that it is not for everyone, and it also goes against title conventions elsewhere. It's just me :-)
But I do totally agree with you on the more general fact that most of Gracenote's data is utterly awful. People nowadays don't even read stuff, especially what they are typing, far too often relying on autocorrect rather than their own brain. Doug's AppleScripts are a godsend, regardless of what you prefer in iTunes.
Gracenote's recommendation seems to assume that titles will only be in English and probably won't be titles of classical tracks. It's ridiculous. A better one would be: enter the information exactly as it appears on the source. I do occasionally see correctly spelled information, so correct entry of titles is not something that Gracenote inevitably ruins.

Now I am adding the person at Gracenote who made that dumb decision to the growing list of people I [really don't appreciate].
 


Good news for Internet radio listeners: I downloaded Triode from the App Store, and in "Find a Station", I typed in "baroque" and immediately had a list of stations (including one I listened to years ago).
The Iconfactory said:
Introducing Triode
Today we’re happy to introduce Triode, our new multi-device app that’s the best way to enjoy all of your favorite Internet radio stations, wherever you go.
... And unlike many web-based apps and streaming services, Triode was designed with your privacy in mind. We don’t collect any information from or about you.
 


There are conventions in naming as well as language differences that make the lazy habit of assigning initial caps to every word of a track title just plain pernicious. In this regard, far too many database track names are entered inappropriately, or contain outright spelling errors. In German, for example, nouns and substantives are capitalized, as is, of course, the first word of a title: so Bach's "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" is rendered incorrect by using initial caps on every word. In opera and other vocal recordings. the track title is often simply the first line of an aria or other vocal part, and shouldn't be treated as a title in terms of capitalization.
Kathryn, on a non-iTunes but related topic, are you aware of the Idagio classical music streaming service? Just something I stumbled across. Would be curious to hear what others might have to say on Apple Music's classical library and the ability to find what you are interested in listening to?
John Darko said:
 


I solved my mp4 movie playback problem! I hope the information and experiences help someone else....
macOS 10.13.6 is working on a 'Mac OS Extended (journaled)' SSD now. I found one other Perian component I removed to avoid problems:
~/Library/QuickTime/AC3MovieImport.component

iTunes with app support was the next project. I tried running the iTunes 12.6.5.3 installer that I just downloaded, but it said it was incompatible with my system. So, I booted from another volume and used Path Finder to delete iTunes 12.74, then used Pacifist to extract iTunes 12.6.5.3 from the package. There were two copies of the application listed in Pacifist, and I chose the first one.

I think this is the right name... Apple listed a "Mobile Device Support" update, which I applied. Then I launched iTunes, connected my iOS 13 phone, and it download another update for iOS 13 support. iTunes 12.6.5.3 syncs fine with my iOS 13 device. I tried using the AppStoreExtract script to archive those two installers, but it didn't work. Does anyone have a direct download link or method to archive those?

Comparing all the installed iTunes components I could find, which may not be complete, the only remnant of 12.74 I could find was "iTunesLibrary.framework" and "iTunesAccess.framework". They appear to run fine with iTunes 12.6.5.3, so I haven't replaced them with that older 12.65 version. CoreTypes.bundle had an older date with bigger filesize, so I'm not sure if that should be replaced. Should any of those be replaced with 12.6.5 versions?

The other iTunes components seemed to be the same version, or newer version. I didn't worry about the "com.apple.mobiledeviceupdater.plist" in LaunchAgents, or the "com.apple.usbmuxd.plist" in LaunchDaemons. I don't know if this method of installation was the smartest, but it works. If someone has a better method, please share.

Comparing the versions of my active macOS iTunes components to the iTunes 12.6.5.3 installer components (listed in parenthesis), I see:

System / Library / PrivateFrameworks:
AirTrafficHost.framework - 4017.101.6 (4016.100.901)​
CoreADI.framework - 4.14.0 (3.40.0)​
CoreFP.framework - 2.13.22 (2.12.8)​
DeviceLink.framework - 5.0 (5.0)​
iTunesAccess.framework -12.7.4 (12.6.5)​
MobileDevice.framework - 1190.9.2 (988.200.77.100.1)​
System / Library / Extensions:
AppleMobileDevice.kext - 4.0 (3.5.0)​
AppleUSBEthernetHost.kext - 8.1.1 (7.0)​

System / Library / CoreServices:
CoreTypes.bundle - 468.7 dated Oct 6, 2017, 272.9MB (no version, dated Aug 23, 2018, 101.5MB)​

Library / Frameworks:
iTunesLibrary.framework - 12.7.4 (12.6.5)​
 


Thanks for the reference to Idagio. I'm listening to Baroque on the free version on their Mac app. It'll take me a few days to decide if it's worth a paid subscription to not hear ads. My only negative comment is that their web page pushed the subscriptions in my face and made it difficult to find the app download without subscribing.
 


Thanks for the reference to Idagio....
Had remembered seeing the issues previously discussed here on the handling of classical music within iTunes and just happen to have seen that video in my feed this morning on YouTube. It is not a product for me – not really into streaming music, preferring to listen to selections from my own collection, and the depth of my knowledge of classical music is limited to only what I remember from a music appreciation class I took to fulfill liberal arts requirements during my engineering studies decades ago.

I do, however, know those who might benefit from any knowledge and feedback that might be available on the platform. When you think about the amount of time it would take to curate a properly documented collection from existing sources of vinyl or CD, a few commercials might be a worthwhile compromise to consider. It did sound like they were putting in the appropriate work this format needs.
App Store said:
 


I did some due diligence on my own, unsuccessfully, so it's time to ask the crew...

I want to transfer a photo album from my iPhone XR running iOS 13.2.2 to a Mac running macOS 10.14.6. iTunes is, of course ... useless now, and iPhoto only knows or cares about its own albums on the Mac. Various "guides" suggest using different methods to transfer/import all photos, then manually putting them in a Mac album. Yeah, right. Some want you to sync everything to iCloud first! Uh, no. I stay within my free 5 GB.

I've downloaded and tried several "recommended" apps, only to discover they don't even show the iPhone, or they do but claim my album with 111 photos is empty (with a note that iOS restrictions prevented looking), or they want me to buy a helper app for my iPhone.

I am sure this frustration has played out several times recently with the latest moves to sandboxes. Leaving aside the asinine "feature" that allows you to create photo albums on your phone yet leaves no way to copy and preserve them on your computer, can someone suggest a good app or method to accomplish this?

Thanks!
 


Kathryn, on a non-iTunes but related topic, are you aware of the Idagio classical music streaming service? Just something I stumbled across. Would be curious to hear what others might have to say on Apple Music's classical library and the ability to find what you are interested in listening to?
I hadn’t heard of it, but it might be worth a look. I have not even peeked at Apple Music. I have a ton of ripped music and am more inclined to tune in to that, given how laborious and annoying it has been to rip all those CDs and clean up the info.

We are down to just one classical station in NYC. At one time, there were two all-classical stations and one public station that played a fair amount of music. The best of these stations was taken over by a company that shortly thereafter fired all the wonderful, knowledgeable personnel and then changed the focus to pop.

The surviving station is not great. It seems to be aping the lowest-common-denominator cable TV Music Choice approach, and plays mostly little snippets rather than entire pieces for much of the day. Some areas are ignored almost completely. Does Idagio take this approach, or do they play a reasonable number of pieces in their entirety?
 


I want to transfer a photo album from my iPhone XR running iOS 13.2.2 to a Mac running macOS 10.14.6. iTunes is, of course ... useless now, and iPhoto only knows or cares about its own albums on the Mac. Various "guides" suggest using different methods to transfer/import all photos, then manually putting them in a Mac album. Yeah, right. Some want you to sync everything to iCloud first! Uh, no. I stay within my free 5 GB.
I've downloaded and tried several "recommended" apps, only to discover they don't even show the iPhone, or they do but claim my album with 111 photos is empty (with a note that iOS restrictions prevented looking), or they want me to buy a helper app for my iPhone.
I am sure this frustration has played out several times recently with the latest moves to sandboxes. Leaving aside the asinine "feature" that allows you to create photo albums on your phone yet leaves no way to copy and preserve them on your computer, can someone suggest a good app or method to accomplish this?
Thanks!
If you want to transfer the photos to your Mac why not use Share > AirDrop? The imported photos will be added to the Downloads folder. You can then import them into an album in iPhoto. I don't see a way to have it create a folder with the album name you have made on your phone.

Alternatively, switch to using Photos.app, which will sync with your phone and later transfer any photos to iPhoto if you need a specific function that only iPhoto has. I do this when I make a slideshow that includes the title of each photo, since Photos.app isn't capable of this trick.
 


I am sure this frustration has played out several times recently with the latest moves to sandboxes. Leaving aside the asinine "feature" that allows you to create photo albums on your phone yet leaves no way to copy and preserve them on your computer, can someone suggest a good app or method to accomplish this?
Have you tried Photos (not iPhoto)? That allows you to transfer photos but not in the [albums themselves]. However, you can be selective when you pull them in and create albums that way.

Alternatively, you could take a look at iMazing. It has a trial version, but that has a limited number of transfers. iMazing is a multi-purpose tool for dealing with iOS devices and has been endorsed by several of my friends. The price for the for the app at iMazing.com is $44.99, but it is showing up on MacHeist for $14.99. I'm not familiar with MacHeist, but have gotten ads from them before. It is worth a look.

[This iMazing page may be helpful: Easily Transfer Documents, Photos and Music to iPhone or iPad —MacInTouch]
 


I want to transfer a photo album from my iPhone XR running iOS 13.2.2 to a Mac running macOS 10.14.6.
Here's a shot in the dark:

On your iPhone,
  1. Select the album.
  2. Tap Select in the upper-right corner.
  3. Tap Select All in the upper-left.
  4. Tap the square-with-arrow icon in the lower-left.
  5. Send to the Mac with AirDrop.
 


It's hard to beat free: my local public library provides all library card holders with access to Kanopy and Hoopla. Both services host and stream full albums, including works that are out of print on vinyl or CD. Last week, for example, I listened to Fearful Symmetries (John Adams, Orchestra of St. Lukes, 1989) on Hoopla for "The Nice Price" (yes, there's an old-school vinyl head reference there).
 


I hadn’t heard of it, but it might be worth a look. I have not even peeked at Apple Music. I have a ton of ripped music and am more inclined to tune in to that, given how laborious and annoying it has been to rip all those CDs and clean up the info.
I subscribe to JazzRadio.com, but it's part of a family of services that include ClassicalRadio.com and a number of others, all accessible via the same $70 annual subscription. I'm only a casual fan of classical music, so I can't say how satisfying the service would be to an aficionado, but the streaming is available in Web players, dedicated iOS apps, and Sonos speakers, up to 320-kbit quality. I think you can try it without a subscription at limited bandwidths. Might be worth a look.
 


We are down to just one classical station in NYC. At one time, there were two all-classical stations and one public station that played a fair amount of music. The best of these stations was taken over by a company that shortly thereafter fired all the wonderful, knowledgeable personnel and then changed the focus to pop.
BBC Radio 3, which is available worldwide, is a classical music station (interspersed occasionally with jazz and drama). There's usually a live concert or two each day. Worth a listen if you were previously unaware of it.
 


BBC Radio 3, which is available worldwide, is a classical music station (interspersed occasionally with jazz and drama). There's usually a live concert or two each day.
Yesterday afternoon, I spent a couple of hours at the BBC's Maida Vale Studios for one of their 'live' concerts – the BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Brad Lubman, with a British premiere of modern American music. It will be broadcast in the new year. It's quite an experience attending these. (We have been to quite a few but never heard the broadcasts!)
 



We are down to just one classical station in NYC. At one time, there were two all-classical stations and one public station that played a fair amount of music. The best of these stations was taken over by a company that shortly thereafter fired all the wonderful, knowledgeable personnel and then changed the focus to pop.
We have The New Classical FM here in Toronto, and they stream onto the internet.

And JAZZ.FM9 is also here in Toronto, and they also stream.
 


ClassicFM is also available for free worldwide, and has regular “full concert” shows.
We have The New Classical FM here in Toronto, and they stream onto the internet.
And JAZZ.FM9 is also here in Toronto, and they also stream.
No static at all?

While these types of streaming sources may be nice as a radio replacement, they do not provide the ability to listen to the content of our choice in a lossless manner – why many of us still desire and retain a curated music collection, no matter what roadblocks Apple throws in our path.
 


BBC Radio 3, which is available worldwide, is a classical music station (interspersed occasionally with jazz and drama). There's usually a live concert or two each day. Worth a listen if you were previously unaware of it.
Austin (TX) has KMFA, a subscriber-supported classical radio station. They stream also; go to their website or try iHeartRadio. KMFA is ad-free, so they're happy to play long pieces all the way through. If you like 'em, consider paying some small amount per month for support.

France Musique also has an on-line presence; I don't use that in France (FM radio works fine) because my ISP is capacity-limited. Check 'em out and select one of their "web radios."
 



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