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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I should add that the waking problem only arises after the Mac Mini (or monitor?) has been asleep for an extended period of time, such as overnight.
I routinely log out at the end of the day, and occasionally, I’d say about 10 to 15% of the time, the monitors do not come to life the next morning. Well, they do in a way, because they power up and you can hear the beeps but remain dark. Normally, after several tries, I would have to force the Mini to shut down and reboot, at which time I do get a normal startup. ... I’m wondering if the problem lies with the built-in Intel 630 graphics...
macOS has a "deep sleep" mode that is likely involved here (across multiple macOS versions and system configurations). This is documented and controllable in Disk Sensei (Tools > Optimize > Sleep Image):
Cindori said:
Sleep Image (Default: On)
During deep sleep (hibernation), your Mac stores the RAM data onto an image file on disk. By disabling this feature, you will prevent your Mac from being able to go into deep sleep mode, but at the same time free several gigabytes of disk space.
So, one issue is that a Mac waking from deep sleep may be loading large amounts of data from storage back into RAM (as big as your RAM configuration), as well as storing that data onto storage when going back into deep sleep. My sense from trying to sort out various problems is that there may be bugs (software/hardware) in this area (as well as delays).

Of course, there may be other display bugs unrelated to deep sleep per se, and the theory of them being related to Intel integrated graphics is interesting, as those are the types of Mac systems where I've encountered them.

For what they're worth, a few Apple notes:
Apple Support said:
If your Mac doesn't sleep or wake when expected
Your Mac might pause a few seconds before it wakes up. If it doesn't seem to wake at all, check for these possibilities...
Apple Support said:
Get help with video issues on external displays connected to your Mac
Try these steps if you don't see an image on your display. These steps can also help if the image on your screen repeatedly turns on and off (flickers), if horizontal lines appear (snow), or if the image is distorted (torn or scrambled).
I don't know if Apple's tricky Power Nap feature is involved:
Apple Support said:
These problems are widespread, though:
DuckDuckGo said:
 


I don't know if Apple's tricky Power Nap feature is involved here:
My new iMac had a problem waking from sleep. The symptom was that when I tried to wake it, nothing would happen. Pressing the power button would reboot the computer.

This would happen periodically, and once it started, then every sleep would fail until I rebooted the computer. After the reboot, it would be OK for days to weeks, but then the problem would return.

I turned off Power Nap and have not seen the problem since.
 


I've just purchased a 2018 Mac Mini (i3 model, macOS 10.14.5), and I have the 'wake from sleep' display problem with an HP 2211x monitor attached via HDMI with an Apple HDMI-DVI adapter. Rebooting via a hard reset doesn't fix the issue, but unplugging/plugging the HDMI adapter does after rebooting (which is not an acceptable solution). An SMC reset didn't fix it. Interestingly, my monitor reports 'no signal' on the DVI line when attempting to awake. If I power-cycle the monitor with the computer awake, I'm met with static on the screen, which doesn't resolve itself unless the HDMI adapter is reconnected. So, it seems like an HDMI handshaking problem to my inexpert eye. I've ordered a USB-C/DVI cable to see if this will provide an acceptable workaround. But still, this is disappointing from Apple.
This bug bit me right out of the box today as I started to set up a new 2018 Mac Mini. Plugged it into a 24-inch Samsung screen via an HDMI to DVI adapter, turned it on, and nothing happened on the screen, although the tiny little light on the Mini turned on and - after a few minutes - the Mini started asking me if I wanted to set it up with voice controls. Turned that off, tried setting it up on a 27-inch Asus screen via HDMI to HDMI connection, and the same thing. I began to suspect a Dead on Arrival computer, so I called Apple Support.

We tried disconnecting everything and reconnecting to the Asus. No joy. Then we tried the HDMI to DVI connection to the Samsung (which lacks an HDMI input), and after a bit of wiggling and a gray screen, I was surprised to see the first Setup Screen. It's now taking its time importing the contents of my Time Machine backup of my 2010 Mini.

The Samsung monitor tends to black out when it times out, and has to be switched on and off and wiggled to get first to gray screen and then to display the status of the information transfer. I am taking care to avoid mucking up the transfer, but once it finishes I will fiddle around a bit more.

It looks to me like there are fiddly connections somewhere in the video circuits, because wiggling the connectors tends to change what happens, as if there is not a good tight fit between the plug and socket on all the pins in the connector. That can be a tricky problem to fix. I wonder if the connectors don't meet the specified tolerances, or the tolerances are so tight that they can't be made. It's a really annoying problem, but it's not surprising, given how small some of the connectors are, especially for iPhone and iPods.

Is there any consensus on what types of connections and monitors work best? My experience makes me think a DVI connection on the monitor works best. I wish Apple would open up about the problem; it might make it easier for Mac users to deal with it.
 




It looks to me like there are fiddly connections somewhere in the video circuits, because wiggling the connectors tends to change what happens, as if there is not a good tight fit between the plug and socket on all the pins in the connector. That can be a tricky problem to fix. I wonder if the connectors don't meet the specified tolerances, or the tolerances are so tight that they can't be made. It's a really annoying problem, but it's not surprising, given how small some of the connectors are, especially for iPhone and iPods.
I suspect that by wiggling the plug around you're temporarily disrupting the HDMI connection, which fixes the issue on the reconnecting handshake. I wonder if this has something to do with the (HDCP) DRM standard baked into HDMI (I've had issues before with iTunes refusing to display HD content on a MacBook Pro if the device is put to sleep when content is playing). Anyway, this is speculative on my part.

I'm hoping that by switching to USB-C/DVI I'll fix the problem. I've also disabled Power Nap in the meantime, as discussed here. Apple needs to work on its Mac Mini marketing - "Bring your own keyboard, mouse and display, and cross your fingers that it works".
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The 2018 Mac Mini does not have a DisplayPort. Are you suggesting getting a Thunderbolt to DisplayPort adapter or cord?
The 2018 Mac Mini, and the 2015 MacBook Pro, and the 2018 MacBook Pro, and all of Apple's other recent Macs, from the MacBook Air to the Mac Pro, do have DisplayPort support — and Mac Thunderbolt 1 and 2 ports are actually, in and of themselves, (Mini) DisplayPort — but, yes, you need an adapter cable in this case (i.e. an inexpensive USB-C to DisplayPort cable).

Here are some cables/adapters I've purchased and used myself for various MacBook Pros, MacBook Airs, 2018 Mac Mini, etc. with DisplayPort and HDMI and DVI monitors:
 



I had set up a few Mac Minis for clients (and one for myself) with HP's 34" 1440p display from a few years ago (don't remember the HP model number; the Minis were from around 2014, if I recall correctly). In all cases, the HDMI-HDMI connection didn't work consistently; often, the screens wouldn't "see" the video signal from the Minis at boot. Luckily, these displays also had DisplayPort, so a cheap Mini DisplayPort-to-DisplayPort cable (from Monoprice, if I recall correctly) fixed things 100%.
The 2014 Mac Mini HDMI ports are good for headless dongles, to fool the GPU into working over Screen Sharing, so you don't have to waste a Thunderbolt port.
 


I wonder, though, if some problems you're experiencing might be due to using older cables that aren't up to snuff with current standards.
I bought the two cables that gave me trouble this afternoon this morning before I started setting up the new Mac Mini.

The new HDMI to DVI-D cable is connecting the new Mac Mini to the Asus monitor as I write this and has not given me a bit of trouble since I installed it while moving the computers around. The old cable from the 2010 Mac Mini to the DVI-D port on the Samsung monitor also works fine.

I haven't tried the new HDMI-HDMI cable again on the new Mac Mini to the Asus, but at some point I will, to see if it's defective, or I just had a bit of cable wonkiness.
 


I bought the two cables that gave me trouble this afternoon this morning before I started setting up the new Mac Mini. The new HDMI to DVI-D cable is connecting the new Mac Mini to the Asus monitor as I write this and has not given me a bit of trouble since I installed it while moving the computers around. The old cable from the 2010 Mac Mini to the DVI-D port on the Samsung monitor also works fine. I haven't tried the new HDMI-HDMI cable again on the new Mac Mini to the Asus, but at some point I will, to see if it's defective, or I just had a bit of cable wonkiness.
My issue is the monitor (TV, in my case) losing the connection during startup. Turning the monitor off and back on solves the problem until the next startup. In my case, I think the problem is with the HDMI connection on the Mini introduced in macOS 10.14.5.

matsuda0707 describes the problem I have in 2018 Mac Mini - monitor problems then the analysis:
Apple Community said:
Jun 11, 2019 1:34 AM in response to Jez2007
I have the same problem on my macmini 2018 with Mojave 10.14.5 using HDMI connection.

Today I tested the followings;

Test 10.14.5 using USB-C->HDMI converterResult: worked OK
Test 10.14.4 (newly installed) using HDMI cableResult: worked OK
Test 10.14.5 (updated from above 10.14.4) using HDMI cableResult: this problem re-created!
Test 10.14.6 beta1 using HDMI cableResult: OK
Test using 10.15 beta using HDMI cableResult:OK

From my tests, this problem seems to occure only on Mojave 10.14.5 with HDMI cable connection!

At moment, I use Mojave 10.14.5 using USB-C->HDMI converter and wait for nets Mojave update to 10.14.6.
When I switch back to macOS 10.14.4, the described problem goes away. It is also not present when I use a DisplayPort (active) adapter from my OWC 4M2 to the HDMI port on my Samsung 27" TV and my LG 24" TV, which I use as monitors.
 


I used an old Samsung VGA monitor with an HDMI-to-VGA adapter on my 2011 Mac Mini. On my 2018 Mac Mini, that setup showed a black screen until I connected an additional USB cable to the adapter to provide a power boost. Clearly, Apple changed the specs of the HDMI port sometime since 2011.
 


The internal drive in my 2010 Mac Mini that I converted into a server failed yesterday after 9 years. I have external drives that are 20 years old that are still running in great shape. This is disappointing. I ordered a 2TB internal drive to replace it. How many of these original drives fail?
 


The internal drive in my 2010 Mac Mini that I converted into a server failed yesterday after 9 years. I have external drives that are 20 years old that are still running in great shape. This is disappointing. I ordered a 2TB internal drive to replace it. How many of these original drives fail?
Are the external drives the same make as the internal drive? Are they 2.5-inch mechanisms, or 3.5-inch ones? Remember that 2.5-inch drives with 500-GByte capacity were brand new at the time the 2010 Mac Mini was released.

The 2.5-inch drive probably came with a 5-year warranty (at most), so I don't really think you have a great deal to complain about. As for your > 20 year old external drives, without knowing how often and how intensely they're accessed, it's hard to predict their remaining lifetimes — they probably don't even support S.M.A.R.T. diagnostics, do they?
 


I've been using the same two monitors on a succession of Mac Minis (and a NUC), including the 2018 with no video problems: an ancient Dell 2001 20" and a slightly less ancient Dell 2408 24".

2018 i5 Mini: HDMI-DVI cable to Dell 2001, USB-C-DisplayPort cable to Dell 2408

2017 i7 NUCintosh: same cables as above

2012 i7 Mini: HDMI-DVI cable to Dell 2001, mDP-DP cable to Dell 2408

2011 i5 Mini: same cables as above

Zero video problems with any of these, but I agree that old or out of spec cables could be a problem.

This thread is the first I've heard about 2018 Mini display problems. We've deployed about a half dozen 2018 i5s in the org here and haven't heard any complaints.
 


I've been using the same two monitors on a succession of Mac Minis (and a NUC), including the 2018 with no video problems: an ancient Dell 2001 20" and a slightly less ancient Dell 2408 24"....
My cables were HDMI to HDMI. I wonder if the issue is an HDMI handshake problem.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
My cables were HDMI to HDMI. I wonder if the issue is an HDMI handshake problem.
I wonder if HDCP might be involved here.
Wikipedia said:
High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection
... The technology sometimes causes handshaking problems where devices cannot establish a connection, especially with older high-definition displays.

... There is also the problem that all Apple laptop products, presumably in order to reduce switching time, when confronted with an HDCP-compliant sink device, automatically enable HDCP encryption from the HDMI / Mini DisplayPort / USB-C connector port.
 


The internal drive in my 2010 Mac Mini that I converted into a server failed yesterday after 9 years. I have external drives that are 20 years old that are still running in great shape. This is disappointing. I ordered a 2TB internal drive to replace it. How many of these original drives fail?
All drives fail - especially hard disk drives (with their mechanical moving parts), it is just a matter of time. Internal or external has no difference on the drive mechanism failing - externals do have a slightly increased chance of failure, if the USB controller itself fails, and possible risk of it being knocked over/dropped.

9 years is honestly pretty good. Keep good backups!
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
All drives fail - especially hard disk drives (with their mechanical moving parts), it is just a matter of time. Internal or external has no difference on the drive mechanism failing - externals do have a slightly increased chance of failure, if the USB controller itself fails, and possible risk of it being knocked over/dropped.
Certainly, physical knocks/drops are a major concern, but there are a lot of factors involved, such as temperature, power cycles, etc., which may favor either internal or external drives, depending on the details.
Wikipedia said:
Hard disk drive failure
A 2007 study published by Google suggested very little correlation between failure rates and either high temperature or activity level. Indeed, the Google study indicated that "one of our key findings has been the lack of a consistent pattern of higher failure rates for higher temperature drives or for those drives at higher utilization levels.".[15] Hard drives with S.M.A.R.T.-reported average temperatures below 27 °C (81 °F) had higher failure rates than hard drives with the highest reported average temperature of 50 °C (122 °F), failure rates at least twice as high as the optimum S.M.A.R.T.-reported temperature range of 36 °C (97 °F) to 47 °C (117 °F).[14] The correlation between manufacturers, models and the failure rate was relatively strong. Statistics in this matter are kept highly secret by most entities; Google did not relate manufacturers' names with failure rates,[14] though it has been revealed that Google uses Hitachi Deskstar drives in some of its servers.[16]
My own Mac Mini (PowerPC G4) with original hard drive, used as a 24x7x365 server, lasted an astonishingly long time (more than a decade, I think) with no problems.

I've had other drives succumb to extreme errors, both in external enclosures and inside an iMac. Apple sealing shut of all its computers except for the high-end Mac Pro is likely to contribute to earlier-than-necessary internal drive failures, due to dust accumulation (aggravated by a lack of filters), heat, etc.
 


The internal drive in my 2010 Mac Mini that I converted into a server failed yesterday after 9 years. I have external drives that are 20 years old that are still running in great shape. This is disappointing. I ordered a 2TB internal drive to replace it. How many of these original drives fail?
How many of these original drives fail? Almost all, in time.

It has been a few years since I was astonished that the backup of a boot volume contained more than a million files. Our terabytes of media files number only in the thousands.

External drives used for data storage are accessed infrequently as compared to boot drives. There are myriads of small files which macOS touches frequently. In spinning drives, that poor mechanical arm gets a workout. Corruption of a frequently accessed file is not unknown.

Calvin Carson (MacGroup Detroit) said, "There are only two kinds of people, those who have lost data and those who will."
 


Calvin Carson (MacGroup Detroit) said, "There are only two kinds of people, those who have lost data and those who will."
Or, as countless other people have put it: There are only two kinds of people when it comes to regular backups: those who do so and those who haven't lost any critical data... yet.
 


I received a new built-to-order Mac Mini (18,1) 3.2-GHz Core i7 computer with 8 GB RAM (will be installing 64 GB myself after a bit of a shakedown) and 1TB storage. I also have the new LG 23.7" Thunderbolt display, which is very nice.

However, in order to get Creative Suite 6 running, I need to create the faux Java 6 folders. In order to turn off SIP, I need to invoke the recovery mode with Command R. This has always worked in the past in El Capitan and Sierra, but, alas, no joy. Nothing but a black screen. In speaking with Apple support, they suggested several different ways of invoking Recovery Mode and always the same result.

Does anyone think it might be the new LG Thunderbolt display? I am going try a previous iteration of the LG display running with HDMI input before taking this back to the Geniuses at the Apple Store to investigate.
 


I received a new built-to-order Mac Mini (18,1) 3.2-GHz Core i7 computer with 8 GB RAM (will be installing 64 GB myself after a bit of a shakedown) and 1TB storage. I also have the new LG 23.7" Thunderbolt display, which is very nice.
However, in order to get Creative Suite 6 running, I need to create the faux Java 6 folders. In order to turn off SIP, I need to invoke the recovery mode with Command R. This has always worked in the past in El Capitan and Sierra, but, alas, no joy. Nothing but a black screen. In speaking with Apple support, they suggested several different ways of invoking Recovery Mode and always the same result.
Does anyone think it might be the new LG Thunderbolt display? I am going try a previous iteration of the LG display running with HDMI input before taking this back to the Geniuses at the Apple Store to investigate.
Your Mini has the Apple T2 security chip with Secure Enclave. Have you tried holding down the Option key during boot to get to the Recovery menu? And/or lowering the security setting with that tool?
 


I received a new built-to-order Mac Mini (18,1) 3.2-GHz Core i7 computer with 8 GB RAM (will be installing 64 GB myself after a bit of a shakedown) and 1TB storage. I also have the new LG 23.7" Thunderbolt display, which is very nice.
However, in order to get Creative Suite 6 running, I need to create the faux Java 6 folders. In order to turn off SIP, I need to invoke the recovery mode with Command R. This has always worked in the past in El Capitan and Sierra, but, alas, no joy. Nothing but a black screen. In speaking with Apple support, they suggested several different ways of invoking Recovery Mode and always the same result.
Does anyone think it might be the new LG Thunderbolt display? I am going try a previous iteration of the LG display running with HDMI input before taking this back to the Geniuses at the Apple Store to investigate.
I have the same Mac Mini; I've had it almost 2 weeks. I installed 32 GB of RAM (from OWC), and I use it with the old Apple Thunderbolt Display. I restored everything from my 2012 15" MacBook Pro Retina via Time Machine, which went a lot faster than I expected. I got a Thunderbolt 2-to-Thunderbolt 3 adapter to use the display and all the Thunderbolt 1 drives I have hanging off it.

I am also using Creative Suite 6; Photoshop just worked, and when Illustrator balked, I just went ahead and installed the latest Java Runtime for Mac; it seems to be Java 8. I have Java disabled in my browsers.

It's all working fine on this end. However, I keep telling myself that I'm going to switch to Affinity's suite, which I own, but haven't taken the time to learn....
 


Your Mini has the Apple T2 security chip with Secure Enclave. Have you tried holding down the Option key during boot to get to the Recovery menu? And/or lowering the security setting with that tool?
Yes. Restarting with Command Option R goes to a black screen. Option alone gives me a choice of drives to start from but no recovery partition (volume?) or to choose a network boot. Network boot only lists wireless networks which I cannot access. Ethernet is not an option in that menu.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I am going try a previous iteration of the LG display running with HDMI input before taking this back to the Geniuses at the Apple Store to investigate.
Restarting with Command Option R goes to a black screen. Option alone gives me a choice of drives to start from but no recovery partition...
Have you tried the HDMI display yet?

FYI, if you haven't already reviewed these:
Apple Support said:
Start up from macOS Recovery

To start up from macOS Recovery, turn on your Mac and immediately press and hold one of the following combinations on your keyboard. Command-R is generally recommended, especially if you never installed macOS Sierra 10.12.4 or later.

Command (⌘)-R
Install the latest macOS that was installed on your Mac.​
Option-⌘-R
Upgrade to the latest macOS compatible with your Mac.​
Shift-Option-⌘-R
Install the macOS that came with your Mac, or the closest version still available.​

Release the keys when you see the Apple logo, a spinning globe, or a prompt for a firmware password. When you see the Utilities window, you've started up from macOS Recovery.
Apple Support said:
About Startup Security Utility

To open Startup Security Utility:
  1. Turn on your Mac, then press and hold Command (⌘)-R immediately after you see the Apple logo. Your Mac starts up from macOS Recovery.
  2. When you see the macOS Utilities window, choose Utilities > Startup Security Utility from the menu bar.
  3. When you're asked to authenticate, click Enter macOS Password, then choose an administrator account and enter its password.
 


Have you tried the HDMI display yet?
Yes. The older LG 27UD68 works perfectly, and the computer goes into recovery mode and displays the appropriate menu, whereas the newer Thunderbolt display, LG 24MD4KL, blacks out and does not display. I will be speaking with Apple later this morning.
 




My new iMac had a problem waking from sleep. The symptom was that when I tried to wake it, nothing would happen. Pressing the power button would reboot the computer.

This would happen periodically, and once it started, then every sleep would fail until I rebooted the computer. After the reboot, it would be OK for days to weeks, but then the problem would return.

I turned off Power Nap and have not seen the problem since.
I had another sleep/wake failure yesterday, with Power Nap off.
 


I had another sleep/wake failure yesterday, with Power Nap off.
This may not directly respond to your problem (and for that I apologize), but issues like these are among the reasons I prefer to sleep my display while the rest of the system remains awake; Keyboard Maestro allows me to accomplish this with a single keystroke. It also eliminates having to wait for hard drives to spin up.

I'm still a little bitter towards Apple for removing the "breathing" sleep indicator. I hate having to press a key to determine whether my system is on or off. One little light doesn't "ruin" aesthetics as much as Apple wants you to believe.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This may not directly respond to your problem (and for that I apologize), but issues like these are among the reasons I prefer to sleep my display while the rest of the system remains awake; Keyboard Maestro allows me to accomplish this with a single keystroke. It also eliminates having to wait for hard drives to spin up.
Even easier (as I learned on MacInTouch!):

System Preferences > Desktop & Screen Saver > Hot Corners > Put Display to Sleep

I hold down the Command key when choosing the pop-up menu, which helps avoid accidentally triggering sleep. (You can use other modifier keys instead of Command.)
 


I hold down the Command key when choosing the pop-up menu, which helps avoid accidentally triggering sleep. (You can user other modifier keys instead.)
Thanks, Ric. I didn't know about the modifier key trick, which does solve the problem that caused me to stop using hot corners for this.

The only thing that makes me continue to prefer a keyboard macro is that it is still a one-handed operation, while hot corner + modifier requires two hands (unless, of course, I'm missing something!)
 


Hot corner doesn't require a modifier – Ric uses a corner for sleep that he visits for other reasons; using a modifier key means that just visiting that corner with the mouse doesn't put his computer to sleep.

[In System Preferences] if one doesn't hold down a modifier key when choosing the pop-up menu, simply putting the mouse in the chosen corner puts the display to sleep. I use the lower left corner for sleep, and have no modifier key. I very rarely need to push my mouse to that corner, so it is very rare that my computer goes to sleep accidentally.
 


Hot corner doesn't require a modifier – Ric uses a corner for sleep that he visits for other reasons; using a modifier key means that just visiting that corner with the mouse doesn't put his computer to sleep.
This is true, but accidentally putting my computer to sleep is precisely why I sought a keyboard-centric solution. While it may seem like an uncommon mistake to make, glitchy software and sometimes even placement or other mouse issues resulted in unintentional sleep.
 


recovery mode with Command R. This has always worked in the past in El Capitan and Sierra, but, alas, no joy. Nothing but a black screen.
My 2018 Mac Mini display also goes black in certain reboot phases.

When the 2018 Mac Mini boots into Command-R Recovery mode, or the macOS installer reboots in Option-Command-R Internet Recovery mode, the display suddenly goes black. Disconnecting and reconnecting the USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 or HDMI cable reveals what is on the display and what user input is needed to continue. Also (Shift) Safe Boot boots into a black screen.

Via Thunderbolt 3 to the LG UltraFine 4K 23.7" (24MD4KL-B) display, that error can be reproduced almost always.

Via HDMI to the LG 55" 4K UHD OLED Smart TV OLED55B6V, that error does not happen so often. More often if the Mac Mini is shut down, HDMI cable disconnected and reconnected and then Command-R startup, for example. Occasionally, even a normal reboot boots into a black screen via HDMI.

Resetting PRAM via Option-Command-P-R, resetting SMC, or installing LG Screen Manager 2.32 (LG UltraFine 4K has the latest 3.00, 5249,4.13,0.3 software) do not fix the error.
 


My 2018 Mac Mini display also goes black in certain reboot phases. When the 2018 Mac Mini boots into Command-R Recovery mode, or the macOS installer reboots in Option-Command-R Internet Recovery mode, the display suddenly goes black. Disconnecting and reconnecting the USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 or HDMI cable reveals what is on the display and what user input is needed to continue. Also (Shift) Safe Boot boots into a black screen. Via Thunderbolt 3 to the LG UltraFine 4K 23.7" (24MD4KL-B) display, that error can be reproduced almost always. Via HDMI to the LG 55" 4K UHD OLED Smart TV OLED55B6V, that error does not happen so often. More often if the Mac Mini is shut down, HDMI cable disconnected and reconnected and then Command-R startup, for example. Occasionally, even a normal reboot boots into a black screen via HDMI. Resetting PRAM via Option-Command-P-R, resetting SMC, or installing LG Screen Manager 2.32 (LG UltraFine 4K has the latest 3.00, 5249,4.13,0.3 software) do not fix the error.
I have a similar problem with the same machine, though it occurs with simply Restart (not initial boot). After running my periodic SuperDuper backup, I restart the computer. Since around June 1, when I do this, the screen goes black, nothing happens for several minutes. The lack of visual or audio feedback (thanks, Apple) prevents me from knowing whether the machine has shut down or not. After several minutes I do a manual reboot.

Using a Samsung 23" LED monitor bought in 2010, I suspect the problem may lie in the way the Mini is dealing with the monitor, only because when I turn the monitor off and back on, it appears that Restart has been completed (it's at the account login screen), though I have no way of knowing when that actually happened.

The problem only appeared after the most recent OS update (or two) and did not occur between January (when I got the 2018 Mini) and late May. Any insight would be appreciated.
 


I have a similar problem with the same machine, though it occurs with simply Restart (not initial boot). After running my periodic SuperDuper backup, I restart the computer. Since around June 1, when I do this the screen goes black, nothing happens for several minutes. The lack of visual or audio feedback (thanks, Apple) prevents me from knowing whether the machine has shut down or not. After several minutes I do a manual reboot....
Waiting a few minutes may not be enough. Try waiting longer, like half an hour or more, and occasionally hit Shift to see if anything has shown up.

One of the key OS differences used to be that while Windows would leave you blank for long periods with no visible signs of life—Apple would never do so. Now they do, too. Sad. And of course it's exacerbated by the fact that Macs (intentionally) have no disk LED or other activity indicator other than the screen itself.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For what it's worth, I heard from one MacInTouch reader about a voodoo fix for a Mac Mini display problem. According to him, connecting an ancient USB-HDMI adapter somehow reset things, such that the problem went away. (Maybe there's some low-level persistent data that got reset somehow.) He theorized that there's some compatibility issue with HDMI 1.4 monitors, as opposed to displays with HDMI 2.0 support (and I'm still wondering if HDCP is involved, somehow).

As far as I know, there is no problem with DisplayPort, only with HDMI or Thunderbolt display connections.
 


Waiting a few minutes may not be enough. Try waiting longer, like half an hour or more, and occasionally hit Shift to see if anything has shown up. One of the key OS differences used to be that while Windows would leave you blank for long periods with no visible signs of life—Apple would never do so. Now they do, too. Sad. And of course it's exacerbated by the fact that Macs (intentionally) have no disk LED or other activity indicator other than the screen itself.
Maybe that's what Apple meant by "dark mode." ;-)
 


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