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Do current versions of macOS allow "Find My Mac" to work when the computer is asleep? If so, that may be the explanation. If so, turning it off should let it sleep without periodically waking up and maybe also working around the "sleep with light off" bug.
I'm not signed into iCloud on this Mini, so I doubt that is what's causing the ominous sounding "DarkWake". This is a Media Centre Mac, so I'm deliberately not signed into iCloud to keep it simple and not have the Mini constantly pinging whatever iCloud pings these days.
 


I woke Sunday morning and nothing had changed. I decided to do a Safe mode restart, but I had forgotten what you hold down to do it. So I called Apple Support. It is the Shift key. Well, it did not go into Safe mode, it finished the migration. That surprised both of us. Somehow, our restart interrupted the migration. There still might have been something going on, but we could not see it. Now everything is up and running. So this is one person's experience.
My experience with the Mac Mini 8,1 in Mojave is... it won't do a safe boot. At least, I haven't been able to get it going. Recovery, yes; verbose, sometimes; but never safe. Maybe it's the third party keyboard?
 


My experience with the Mac Mini 8,1 in Mojave is... it won't do a safe boot. At least, I haven't been able to get it going. Recovery, yes; verbose, sometimes; but never safe. Maybe it's the third party keyboard?
I am using an Apple keyboard, so I guess Safe mode has gone the way of the dodo bird.
 


I am using an Apple keyboard, so I guess Safe mode has gone the way of the dodo bird.
I am unable to turn up anything online that says Apple has deprecated safe mode. (Unfortunately all that proves is I can't find it, not that it hasn't happened.) This Apple Support article, published 8/17/2017, seems current. The first computer with the T2 chip is the iMac Pro released 12/14/17. Mojave released 9/14/18.
Apple said:
Use safe mode to isolate issues with your Mac
What is safe mode?
Safe mode (sometimes called safe boot) is a way to start up your Mac so that it performs certain checks and prevents some software from automatically loading or opening. Starting your Mac in safe mode does the following:
  • Verifies your startup disk and attempts to repair directory issues, if needed
  • Loads only required kernel extensions
  • Prevents startup items and login items from opening automatically
  • Disables user-installed fonts
  • Deletes font caches, kernel cache, and other system cache files
Given the list of what Safe Mode does, I can envision incompatibilities with how the T2 "security chip" works and manages the boot drive, and with APFS.

The Apple Support article linked above provides instructions on how to invoke Safe Mode at the next boot through Terminal commands to facilitate diagnosing headless Macs. I'd only try that if I really needed to use Safe Mode, as invoking it on a T2 Mac, or even a pre-T2 with APFS, might result in unfortunate consequences, such as a fatal boot loop?

It is possible the man pages for macOS Mojave might have something. I don't have Mojave, and don't have Xcode, which may be necessary to access the deepest levels....
Apple said:
Reading UNIX Manual Pages
The UNIX online manual, known as the man pages, documents low-level UNIX command-line tools, APIs, and file formats.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
It is possible the man pages for MacOS Mojave might have something.
The easiest way I've found to read man pages is with the help of this neat utility, which renders in much more flexible browser windows, where you can do a Find, scroll, etc.
Bruji said:
Bwana
Download Bwana and drop it into your applications folder. Then, without even running it, you can start viewing Unix manual pages using your browser. Just type "man:" followed by the man page you're looking for into your browser's URL field. Hit enter and let Bwana do the rest.
 


Given the list of what Safe Mode does, I can envision incompatibilities with how the T2 "security chip" works and manages the boot drive, and with APFS.
I've booted my iMac Pro into safe mode, so it's not an APFS/T2 thing. That doesn't mean the Mini isn't different though.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Given the list of what Safe Mode does, I can envision incompatibilities with how the T2 "security chip" works and manages the boot drive, and with APFS.
I just booted a 2018 MacBook Pro in Safe Mode. I entered the FileVault password and hit the Shift key immediately after. When it reached the login dialog, Safe Boot appeared in the menubar in red.
 


I just received the new Mac Mini and have been loading my stuff back onto it with fresh installs. I have two monitors using USB-C to DVI adapters. Does anyone else have a problem with, after startups or restarts, the system not remembering display settings? A bit frustrating.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
While you can lease Windows and Linux computing resources from many cloud providers on many platforms, macOS cloud resources require the provider to buy Mac hardware from Apple:
MacWeb said:
[PR] Mac mini Open Compute Cloud (OC2)
MacWeb.com introduces Mac mini Open Compute Cloud (OC2), an Internet cloud service renting on-demand compute capacity using dedicated 2018 Apple Mac mini computers. MacWeb.com’s Open Compute Cloud combines the hardware and software advantages of a dedicated Mac mini server with the low cost and instant deployment of cloud computing. With provisioning of a new 2018 Apple Mac mini on demand iOS, macOS, web, and database developers now have a dedicated solution for cloud computing that does NOT share hardware resources or use virtualization.

All Mac mini OC2 instances feature Intel eighth-generation i5 or i7 6-core processors, fast 2666MHz DDR4 memory, and blazing-fast all-flash storage starting at only $100 per month. The new, re-engineered 2018 Mac mini is a fast, reliable, and cost effective little powerhouse. Compile iOS or macOS apps remotely with Xcode, run web applications, publish databases, or share files easily. With a Mac mini OC2 instance there is no hardware to purchase, no hardware to ship, no lead time, and no commitment. Replace an aging Mac mini Internet server today with a new Mac mini OC2 instance from MacWeb.com.
 





Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple could design a cooling system for the 2018 Mini which allows all six i7 or i5 cores to run at their full Turbo speeds at, say, 80°C. That's a simple engineering task, but of course that would result in a much larger case to house the much larger cooling unit. Apple is under no obligation to do that, much like Dell is under no obligation to do the same in their tiny Optiplex 7060 USFF units.
...
In my opinion, the takeaway here is that recent Intel design changes have enabled significantly higher maximum clock speeds when in Turbo mode and also allow more power usage than the CPU is rated for. While you will see those benefits in shorter-term jobs, you will not see nearly as much with longer jobs in the typical smaller chassis computers, which are in vogue nowadays. Performance running at stock non-turbo speeds is unaffected by this and continues to work as advertised.
A related note from Apple:
Apple Support said:
If kernel_task is using a large percentage of your Mac CPU
Activity Monitor might show that a system process named kernel_task is using a large percentage of your CPU, and during this time you might notice more fan activity.

One of the functions of kernel_task is to help manage CPU temperature by making the CPU less available to processes that are using it intensely. In other words, kernel_task responds to conditions that cause your CPU to become too hot, even if your Mac doesn't feel hot to you. It does not itself cause those conditions. When the CPU temperature decreases, kernel_task automatically reduces its activity.
 



As an SSD optimization, I have disabled Sleep Image using Disk Sensei's Tools options, not so much to save space on the SSD but to reduce wear and wake time:
I don't have Disk Sensei. Is there a way to disable this Sleep Image using the Terminal? My new (2018) Mini also has the 30-second wake-from-sleep issue. I wonder if that might help?
 



I don't have Disk Sensei. Is there a way to disable this Sleep Image using the Terminal? My new (2018) Mini also has the 30-second wake-from-sleep issue. I wonder if that might help?
Under Sierra or later, you need to disable SIP, then do a:
Code:
sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0
and finally reenable SIP (unless you like walking on the wild side)....
 


What do I lose by not having a discrete graphics card, compared to the ATI Radeon HD 2600 xt 256MB that I have in my tower?
 


What do I lose by not having a discrete graphics card, compared to the ATI Radeon HD 2600 xt 256 MB that I have in my tower?
While it would be better if you could compare some test applications, it's worth looking at the results at the TechPowerUp site for the Radeon HD 2600 xt and the Intel UHD Graphics 630. All in all, the specs for everything except the GPU clock are better for the UHD, and the power draw is a third of what the Radeon draws. Probably not too surprising that integrated graphics could be a bit better than a nice discrete card from 12 years ago.
 


Speaking of startup delays...

2018 Mac Minis have been having issues, especially if FileVault is on, when booting — they don’t wake up certain monitors, particularly 4K monitors. Doesn’t matter what connection you have, what cable you use — you have to reboot into Recovery mode, clear PRAM, etc. What's more, some people have found that the machines will “lose” their monitors during sleep.

Remember, these are computers that can run into the thousands of dollars, connected to mildly-to-wildly expensive monitors... and that we paid hundreds of dollars extra for “Apple reliability and support,” neither of which is in evidence. To get problems and to get ignored by Apple like this, I could have set up a hackintosh at much lower cost...

My final proposed solutions were removed from the Apple discussion site.


Apparently they don’t care when we have problems, but they do care when we mention lawyers!

I believe the only fix is for all of us to file bug reports / product feedback with Apple and hope they go back to caring about their buyers (fat chance). I would also suggest that we have the start of a class action suit, really... these computers are not performing their function as advertised. What's more, I understand from discussions elsewhere that they don't work consistently with the eGPU.

In short, if you want a problem solved, you can file as many feedback forms as you like and talk yourself hoarse in the Apple Communities, and Apple won’t hear you. Mention the word “class action” and you’re immediately nabbed. I'm just glad it's not a permanent ban.
 


2018 Mac Minis have been having issues, especially if FileVault is on, when booting — they don’t wake up certain monitors, particularly 4K monitors. Doesn’t matter what connection you have, what cable you use — you have to reboot into Recovery mode, clear PRAM, etc. What's more, some people have found that the machines will “lose” their monitors during sleep.
I notice most monitors mentioned on the Apple forum are from LG. Are other monitors working for other people? Is it just 4K or are people also having problems with 2K monitors? It sounds like the blank screens may happen only in certain cases with certain types of cables, which can be a hard thing to troubleshoot.
 


I notice most monitors mentioned on the Apple forum are from LG. Are other monitors working for other people? Is it just 4K or are people also having problems with 2K monitors? It sounds like the blank screens may happen only in certain cases with certain types of cables, which can be a hard thing to troubleshoot.
I've used three HDMI cables, two DisplayPort cables/adapters (though apparently DisplayPort is a “known issue”), and a couple of USB-C-to-HDMI adapters.

Pretty sure this is not cables. It also only happens to me, at least, in the FileVault unlock screen. The way around that is to boot into recovery mode, which, unfortunately, seems to void the 32-bit-warning database file, so I get warned about every freakin’ program I use again.

Reminds me of the time I tried to update my Mac Pro 5,1 to Mojave, and was then told that it won't support FileVault. Thanks, Apple.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I notice most monitors mentioned on the Apple forum are from LG. Are other monitors working for other people? Is it just 4K or are people also having problems with 2K monitors?
I had to stop using my 27" LG 4K monitor in retina mode with my 2015 MacBook Pro 15" running macOS Sierra, because it was causing memory/drive corruption. Not cool.

I switched to a Viewsonic 27" VP2770 at 1440p and it's running fine. (It also ran fine with a 23" Viewsonic at 1080p.)

I haven't had a chance to do further testing to isolate the LG problem, but I did do some experiments removing SwitchResX, which didn't seem to be implicated in the problem. Sleep/wake did seem to be a factor, however, making me wonder about issues with saving/restoring the Sleep Image file used for deep sleep (hibernation), which I had disabled via DIsk Sensei.

Yet to be tested:
  • LG 4K with 2018 MacBook Pro/macOS 10.14
  • LG 4K with 2015 MacBook Pro (test boot drive!) / Sierra vs. Sleep Image
  • LG 4K at 1440p with 2015 MacBook Pro (test boot drive!) / Sierra
 


I don't know if this is relevant: I'm still using an ancient Samsung SyncMaster 712n VGA monitor. I use an HDMI-to-VGA adapter, which has an optional USB cable to supply additional power. The adapter worked on my 2011 Mac Mini without the added power. On my 2018 Mac Mini, the USB power boost is required.
 


Re Mac Mini 2018, FileVault and display issues: before you login to FileVault, it's mostly firmware running things - should be fixable through a firmware update.

I was surprised reading about display issues, because I'd used the new Minis with a wide variety of screens from 22" through 65", sub-1080p to 4k, and a couple of projectors. The only time I'd seen any issues was with three screens connected, where sometimes on reboot one of the displays wasn't recognized - something I was going to further investigate with some different displays within the next couple of days. Sleep/wake cycles didn't seem to have any issues.

One difference is that I run these without FileVault, although I do access boot options fairly often during setup, which is also is entirely firmware-based, and hadn't seen any issues. It's possible that boot options don't even try to do resolutions higher than 1080p.
 



Re Mac Mini 2018, ... The only time I'd seen any issues was with three screens connected, where sometimes on reboot one of the displays wasn't recognized - something I was going to further investigate with some different displays within the next couple of days. ...
Thank you for the information. I had this problem and thought it was the monitor, since it was always the same monitor affected, and changing connection type (VGA, DisplayPort, HDMI) made no difference. FileVault is not in use. I look forward to your investigatory results.
 


I don't have Disk Sensei. Is there a way to disable this Sleep Image using the Terminal? My new (2018) Mini also has the 30-second wake-from-sleep issue. I wonder if that might help?
So did disabling the sleep image fix the 30-sec. wake from sleep issue? I had that issue with a 2018 Mini and an LG 34WK95U-W, which I later returned.
 


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